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The Dead Men's Song: Being the Story of a Poem and a Reminiscent Sketch of Its Author Young Ewing Allison Together with a Browse Through Other Gems of His and Recollections of Older Days

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A book to be treasured not only for association's sake, but remarkable for beauty of workmanship and depth of expression in sentiment that only newspaper men who have been through the fire together can really appreciate, is a copy of "The Dead Men's Song," edited by C. I. Hitchcock of Louisville, published privately and now in the hands of a few highly favored friends. The A book to be treasured not only for association's sake, but remarkable for beauty of workmanship and depth of expression in sentiment that only newspaper men who have been through the fire together can really appreciate, is a copy of "The Dead Men's Song," edited by C. I. Hitchcock of Louisville, published privately and now in the hands of a few highly favored friends. The famous poem by Young E. Allison, editor of the Insurance Field, and President Hitchcock's long-time associate and friend, is the main theme of the book, which is really a most delightful biography of Mr. Allison and his labors in insurance literature, daily journalism, as a librettist and as a poet. The clever intimate and caressing touch of Mr. Hitchcock's master pen upon a topic so closely connected with his own life's work gives the volume a literary value outside of its intrinsic interest, and the gem, "Fifteen Men on the Dead Man's Chest," suitably illustrated, is enshrined for posterity in a way to refute controversy and delight the soul. It is a splendid compliment from one big fellow to another. -The Weekly Underwriter, Volume 92 [1915]


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A book to be treasured not only for association's sake, but remarkable for beauty of workmanship and depth of expression in sentiment that only newspaper men who have been through the fire together can really appreciate, is a copy of "The Dead Men's Song," edited by C. I. Hitchcock of Louisville, published privately and now in the hands of a few highly favored friends. The A book to be treasured not only for association's sake, but remarkable for beauty of workmanship and depth of expression in sentiment that only newspaper men who have been through the fire together can really appreciate, is a copy of "The Dead Men's Song," edited by C. I. Hitchcock of Louisville, published privately and now in the hands of a few highly favored friends. The famous poem by Young E. Allison, editor of the Insurance Field, and President Hitchcock's long-time associate and friend, is the main theme of the book, which is really a most delightful biography of Mr. Allison and his labors in insurance literature, daily journalism, as a librettist and as a poet. The clever intimate and caressing touch of Mr. Hitchcock's master pen upon a topic so closely connected with his own life's work gives the volume a literary value outside of its intrinsic interest, and the gem, "Fifteen Men on the Dead Man's Chest," suitably illustrated, is enshrined for posterity in a way to refute controversy and delight the soul. It is a splendid compliment from one big fellow to another. -The Weekly Underwriter, Volume 92 [1915]

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