web site hit counter The Works of George Swinnock, M.A, Vol. 4: Containing the Latter Portion of the Fading of the Flesh; The Pastor's Farewell; The Gods Are Men; The Beauty of Magistracy; Men Are Gods; And the Incomparableness of God - Ebooks PDF Online
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The Works of George Swinnock, M.A, Vol. 4: Containing the Latter Portion of the Fading of the Flesh; The Pastor's Farewell; The Gods Are Men; The Beauty of Magistracy; Men Are Gods; And the Incomparableness of God

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Excerpt from The Works of George Swinnock, M.A, Vol. 4: Containing the Latter Portion of the Fading of the Flesh; The Pastor's Farewell; The Gods Are Men; The Beauty of Magistracy; Men Are Gods; And the Incomparableness of God I proceed now to the second doctrine, from the second part of the text, The saint's comfort: 'But God is the strength of my heart, and my portion fo Excerpt from The Works of George Swinnock, M.A, Vol. 4: Containing the Latter Portion of the Fading of the Flesh; The Pastor's Farewell; The Gods Are Men; The Beauty of Magistracy; Men Are Gods; And the Incomparableness of God I proceed now to the second doctrine, from the second part of the text, The saint's comfort: 'But God is the strength of my heart, and my portion for ever.' That the comfort of a Christian in his saddest condition is this, that God is his portion. The psalmist's condition was very sad; his flesh failed him. Man's spirit often decays with his flesh. The spirits and blood are let out together. His heart fell with his flesh; but what was the strong cordial which kept him from swooning at such a season? Truly this: 'But God is the strength of my heart, and my portion for ever.' Aristotle affirmeth of the tortoise, that it liveth when its heart is taken away. The holy man here liveth when his heart dieth. As the sap in winter retreateth to the root, and there is preserved, so the saint in crosses, in death, retireth to God, the fountain of his life, and so is comforted. David, when his wives were captivated, his wealth plundered, and his very life threatened - for the soldiers talked of stoning him - was doubtless in a very dreadful estate; one would have thought such a heavy burden must needs break his back; but, behold, the joy of the Lord was his strength. 'But David encouraged his heart in the Lord his God, ' 1 Sam. xxx. 6. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.


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Excerpt from The Works of George Swinnock, M.A, Vol. 4: Containing the Latter Portion of the Fading of the Flesh; The Pastor's Farewell; The Gods Are Men; The Beauty of Magistracy; Men Are Gods; And the Incomparableness of God I proceed now to the second doctrine, from the second part of the text, The saint's comfort: 'But God is the strength of my heart, and my portion fo Excerpt from The Works of George Swinnock, M.A, Vol. 4: Containing the Latter Portion of the Fading of the Flesh; The Pastor's Farewell; The Gods Are Men; The Beauty of Magistracy; Men Are Gods; And the Incomparableness of God I proceed now to the second doctrine, from the second part of the text, The saint's comfort: 'But God is the strength of my heart, and my portion for ever.' That the comfort of a Christian in his saddest condition is this, that God is his portion. The psalmist's condition was very sad; his flesh failed him. Man's spirit often decays with his flesh. The spirits and blood are let out together. His heart fell with his flesh; but what was the strong cordial which kept him from swooning at such a season? Truly this: 'But God is the strength of my heart, and my portion for ever.' Aristotle affirmeth of the tortoise, that it liveth when its heart is taken away. The holy man here liveth when his heart dieth. As the sap in winter retreateth to the root, and there is preserved, so the saint in crosses, in death, retireth to God, the fountain of his life, and so is comforted. David, when his wives were captivated, his wealth plundered, and his very life threatened - for the soldiers talked of stoning him - was doubtless in a very dreadful estate; one would have thought such a heavy burden must needs break his back; but, behold, the joy of the Lord was his strength. 'But David encouraged his heart in the Lord his God, ' 1 Sam. xxx. 6. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

15 review for The Works of George Swinnock, M.A, Vol. 4: Containing the Latter Portion of the Fading of the Flesh; The Pastor's Farewell; The Gods Are Men; The Beauty of Magistracy; Men Are Gods; And the Incomparableness of God

  1. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    The work entitled "The Incomparableness of God" is the highlight of this volume and of all Swinnock's works so far. It is a brilliant study on the attributes of God, citing hundreds of Scriptures, and arranged in a very intuitive manner - each point naturally leading to the next. He is clearly a gifted preacher and a warm-hearted pastor, but. like many authors of his era, he suffers greatly from his incessant use of illustrations. Many are from Greek and Roman history, with which the modern read The work entitled "The Incomparableness of God" is the highlight of this volume and of all Swinnock's works so far. It is a brilliant study on the attributes of God, citing hundreds of Scriptures, and arranged in a very intuitive manner - each point naturally leading to the next. He is clearly a gifted preacher and a warm-hearted pastor, but. like many authors of his era, he suffers greatly from his incessant use of illustrations. Many are from Greek and Roman history, with which the modern reader is likely to be completely unfamiliar, thus blunting the force of the illustration. But, the worst part of it is, most of his illustrations are from ancient Greek and Roman natural histories, so they are in fact, not true. It doesn't lend a lot of weight to your arguments (for the modern reader) to have illustrated them by false examples. For instance, he remarks how naturalists say that rubbing garlic on magnet removes its magnetic power. He could've at least tried it and found it to be false before he used to illustrate what was otherwise a good point. Swinnock's works abound with such illustrations, severely hampering the reader's enthusiasm for the truth he is teaching.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Scott

  3. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

  4. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

  5. 5 out of 5

    William

  6. 5 out of 5

    Justin Tamblyn

  7. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Myers

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bernie

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Roat

  10. 5 out of 5

    Josh

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michael Locklear

  12. 4 out of 5

    Blake Harris

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  14. 5 out of 5

    Allen Patterson

  15. 4 out of 5

    Santhosh

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