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A chilling, thrilling collection of Edgar Allan Poe's poetry, introduced by best-selling author Philip Pullman The Raven . . . Annabel Lee . . . Ulalume . . . these are some of the spookiest, most macabre poems ever written, now collected in this chilling, affordable volume. Dreams The Lake Sonnet — To Science [Alone] Introduction To Helen Israfel The Valley of Unrest The City in th A chilling, thrilling collection of Edgar Allan Poe's poetry, introduced by best-selling author Philip Pullman The Raven . . . Annabel Lee . . . Ulalume . . . these are some of the spookiest, most macabre poems ever written, now collected in this chilling, affordable volume. Dreams The Lake Sonnet — To Science [Alone] Introduction To Helen Israfel The Valley of Unrest The City in the Sea To One in Paradise The Coliseum The Haunted Palace The Conqueror Worm Dream-Land Eulalie The Raven ["Deep in Earth"] To M.L.S___ Ulalume — A Ballad The Bells To Helen [Whitman] A Dream Within a Dream For Annie Eldorado To My Mother Annabel Lee


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A chilling, thrilling collection of Edgar Allan Poe's poetry, introduced by best-selling author Philip Pullman The Raven . . . Annabel Lee . . . Ulalume . . . these are some of the spookiest, most macabre poems ever written, now collected in this chilling, affordable volume. Dreams The Lake Sonnet — To Science [Alone] Introduction To Helen Israfel The Valley of Unrest The City in th A chilling, thrilling collection of Edgar Allan Poe's poetry, introduced by best-selling author Philip Pullman The Raven . . . Annabel Lee . . . Ulalume . . . these are some of the spookiest, most macabre poems ever written, now collected in this chilling, affordable volume. Dreams The Lake Sonnet — To Science [Alone] Introduction To Helen Israfel The Valley of Unrest The City in the Sea To One in Paradise The Coliseum The Haunted Palace The Conqueror Worm Dream-Land Eulalie The Raven ["Deep in Earth"] To M.L.S___ Ulalume — A Ballad The Bells To Helen [Whitman] A Dream Within a Dream For Annie Eldorado To My Mother Annabel Lee

30 review for The Raven and Other Poems

  1. 4 out of 5

    Brina

    The Raven and Other Poems by Edgar Allen Poe is the short story selection in the group catching up on classics in November 2017. A gloomy, gothic selection of poetry that deems suitable for longer fall evenings ahead, I decided to read along with the group. After being exposed to much modern poetry this year, I was markedly underwhelmed by Poe's work. The fact that The Raven has endured as an American classic intrigued me to read it over a few times to see if I could evoke scarier images, which The Raven and Other Poems by Edgar Allen Poe is the short story selection in the group catching up on classics in November 2017. A gloomy, gothic selection of poetry that deems suitable for longer fall evenings ahead, I decided to read along with the group. After being exposed to much modern poetry this year, I was markedly underwhelmed by Poe's work. The fact that The Raven has endured as an American classic intrigued me to read it over a few times to see if I could evoke scarier images, which I feel is what Poe may have been after all along. Checking my yearly reading log, I noted that The Raven is the nineteenth poetry collection that I have read this year; however, the other eighteen anthologies were all written in the 20th or 21st centuries and contain modern imagery and sentence structure. I have been moved by the last few Pulitzer winners which contain sharp images of both the writers' lives and events in the late 20th or 21st century which I am familiar with. Poe's poetry is gloomy and filled with countless images of death and depression, and it rhymes. While this structure makes the Raven easier to study in the classroom, especially by teachers who would like for their students to write their own poems, it does not make the poems satisfying for me. I remember studying Annabel Lee in school, and my adolescent self enjoyed the poem especially because the first few stanzas rhymed and appeared upbeat. Of course, the study followed with my classmates and I attempting our own rhyming poetry, and to this day my children tell me that I can create rhymes with the drop of a hat. Yet, with a closer study even Annabel Lee tells the story of two adolescent lovers separated by distance, with the girl eventually dying. This is not the happy poem I remember from my youth. The Raven itself is a part of Americana, the poem or bird enjoying appearances in the Simpsons television show, the National Football League, and everywhere in between. Perhaps, I remember the humor in the Simpsons version of the poem because it featured Homer Simpson as Poe, and, of course, something had to go wrong in his telling of it. I also note positive imagery in the football team uniform of purple and gold which stand out in a league of reds, blues, and whites. Poe's original work was not meant to be happy or humorous. Beginning with the famous words, "once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary" already evokes gloom and doom. The entire poem features rhyming stanzas that translate well to the classroom, but, between my modern mind and thirst for quality literary fiction, I was not as moved by it as I might have been had I lived years ago. The appearance of the Raven scattered throughout American vernacular dulls the spookiness of Poe's original work, allowing me to read quickly through his rhyming words that initially were meant to scare people when they were first written. I think the fact that a classics group chose to read a poetry collection allows for much discussion. Poems are personal and run the gamut of human emotions, which each reader having an distinct view on the meaning of the words. In the group discussion there is a link to a video with James Earl Jones reading the Raven, but, alas, my mind evoked Darth Vader coming to scare the narrator rather than a bird. I do like that in its original intention that the poems are meant to be scary and evoke countless images of death. That they rhyme also allow for much creativity in the classroom. Yet, for myself who reads many modern collections to relax, the Raven did feel spooky or full of quality literary prose to move my emotions. With images of ghosts and scary birds, however, the poem has endured and remained an American classic and one that is often studied and enjoyed by many. 3 stars

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mischenko

    Who doesn't love Poe? This one contains some of our favorite poems and I purchased it for my oldest daughter to read from our book club. It contains some of the spookiest poems by Poe including our favorite for this time of year, The Raven, as well as others like The Haunted Palace, Annabel Lee, The Bells, and A Dream Within a Dream. It's a small paperback with a nice collection of Poe's works.  Who doesn't love Poe? This one contains some of our favorite poems and I purchased it for my oldest daughter to read from our book club. It contains some of the spookiest poems by Poe including our favorite for this time of year, The Raven, as well as others like The Haunted Palace, Annabel Lee, The Bells, and A Dream Within a Dream. It's a small paperback with a nice collection of Poe's works. 

  3. 4 out of 5

    Paul O'Neill

    Be nothing which thou art not. Overview 4/5 stars I don't read much of any poetry. Apart from poems I've read for school (way back when), this is my first book of poetry I've ever read. I will be reading more poetry from now on as I thoroughly enjoyed this. Poe is well known for the Raven, which everyone has heard at some point. Even the Simpsons recited it during a tree house of horror episode. His other works are also brilliant. There are, of course, a few misses but for the most part everything Be nothing which thou art not. Overview 4/5 stars I don't read much of any poetry. Apart from poems I've read for school (way back when), this is my first book of poetry I've ever read. I will be reading more poetry from now on as I thoroughly enjoyed this. Poe is well known for the Raven, which everyone has heard at some point. Even the Simpsons recited it during a tree house of horror episode. His other works are also brilliant. There are, of course, a few misses but for the most part everything is great. The raven This is now my favourite poem ever. I'm currently looking on amazon to see if I can get the poem in a frame to put on a wall in my house, it's that good. If you don't check out any of the other poems, you must read the raven. I’ve read this every night before bed since starting this collection. Very few writers can command language like Poe. Here are some of my favourite lines. But the Raven, sitting lonely on that placid bust, spoke only That one word, as if his soul in that one word he did outpour. But the Raven still beguiling all my sad soul into smiling, Straight I wheeled a cushioned seat in front of bird and bust and door Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door! I could copy the whole thing as every word is placed brilliantly. Other favourites Amongst my favourites were Tamerlane, Alone, Elizabeth, Lenore, The City in the Sea, The Sleeper, The Valley of Unrest and Dreamland. Most of the poems are gothic in nature and are rather haunting, though beautiful. Here are just some of my favourite bits. First up is a beaut from Dreamland: By the lakes that thus outspread Their lone waters, lone and dead,—Their sad waters, sad and chilly With the snows of the lolling lily,—By the mountains—near the river Murmuring lowly, murmuring ever,—By the gray woods,—by the swamp Where the toad and the newt encamp,—By the dismal tarns and pools Where dwell the Ghouls,—By each spot the most unholy—In each nook most melancholy,—There the traveller meets aghast Sheeted Memories of the past—Shrouded forms that start and sigh As they pass the wanderer by—White-robed forms of friends long given, In agony, to the Earth—and Heaven. Would to God I could awaken For I dream I know not how, And my soul is sorely shaken Lest an evil step be taken,—Lest the dead who is forsaken May not be happy now. My love, she sleeps! Oh, may her sleep, As it is lasting, so be deep; Soft may the worms about her creep! For no ripples curl, alas! Along that wilderness of glass—No swellings tell that winds may be Upon some far-off happier sea—No heavings hint that winds have been On seas less hideously serene. “Wretches! ye loved her for her wealth and hated her for her pride, And when she fell in feeble health, ye blessed her—that she died! How shall the ritual, then, be read?—the requiem how be sung By you—by yours, the evil eye,—by yours, the slanderous tongue That did to death the innocence that died, and died so young?” Read nothing, written less –in short’s a fool And all I loved—I loved alone And boyhood is a summer sun Whose waning is the dreariest one—For all we live to know is known, And all we seek to keep hath flown Darkness there and nothing more…

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sue K H

    Not wild about poetry, not wild about horror but I love, love love these poems. I'm becoming a big Edgar Allan Poe fan completely by accident. Not wild about poetry, not wild about horror but I love, love love these poems. I'm becoming a big Edgar Allan Poe fan completely by accident.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Andd Becker

    Challenge yourself to memorize one poem by Poe. Use this book as a selection tool. Follow the advice in the introduction and read "The Raven" aloud. Challenge yourself to memorize one poem by Poe. Use this book as a selection tool. Follow the advice in the introduction and read "The Raven" aloud.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Naia Pard

    it is my first but not my last complete read of this dramatic bulbous compilation. Please, there is a dreamland, some godly empowered water and a wickedly sarcastic raven

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    This present volume, in which the poems are reprinted from standard older editions, generally presents the final versions, which are usually distinct improvements To — ("I saw thee on thy bridal day") - 3.5 Stars This is the first line of a poem later titled Song The speaker tells of a former love he saw from afar on her wedding day. A blush on her cheek, despite all the happiness around her, displays a hidden shame for having lost the speaker's love. Dreams - 3 Stars Poem where poet wishes he co This present volume, in which the poems are reprinted from standard older editions, generally presents the final versions, which are usually distinct improvements To — ("I saw thee on thy bridal day") - 3.5 Stars This is the first line of a poem later titled Song The speaker tells of a former love he saw from afar on her wedding day. A blush on her cheek, despite all the happiness around her, displays a hidden shame for having lost the speaker's love. Dreams - 3 Stars Poem where poet wishes he could always stay in the dreamscape of the young. Spirits of the Dead - 4 Stars Was initially titled Visits of the Dead. Evening star - 4 Stars A Dream Within a Dream - 5 Stars Stanzas - 3 Stars A Dream - 3 Stars The Happiest Day, The Happiest Hour - 3 Stars The Lake: To - 3 Stars Sonnet: to Science - 4.5 Stars Romance - 4 Stars In this poem Poe uses allusions in nature to capture the essence of romance. To — ("The bowers whereat, in dreams, I see") - 3 Stars Killis Campbell author of The Mind of Poe and Other Studies thought that these lines refer to Elmira Royster Shelton and that lines 11 and 12 may refer to the wealth of her successful suitor and husband, Alexander Barret Shelton, who later left her fifty thousand dollars. https://www.eapoe.org/works/mabbott/t... To the River - 3 Stars A beautiful poem that compares the elegance of a young woman to a crystal clear flowing river. To — ("I heed not") 1829 - 3.5 Stars (8 line version in this book) Called Alone in the earliest version, To M— in the 1829 volume, and To — in a late manuscript, the poem is extremely personal — and, in the final version, worthy of the term “perfect.” The allusions will be patent to anyone acquainted with the early life of Poe. The 20 line version is a solid 4 Stars. https://www.eapoe.org/works/mabbott/t... Fairy-land - 4 Stars To Helen ("Helen, thy beauty is to me") - 4 Stars Israfel - 3.5 Stars The City in the Sea - 5 Stars The Sleeper - 5 Stars Lenore - 4.5 Stars The Valley of Unrest - 4.5 Stars The Coliseum - 4 Stars To One in Paradise - 4.5 Stars To F — 4 Stars Sonnet: to Zante - 3.5 Stars The Haunted Palace - 5 Stars Sonnet: Silence - 4.5 Stars The Conqueror Worm - 4 Stars This poem was later incorporated into the text of Poe's short story "Ligeia" Dream-Land - 4.5 Stars The Raven - 5 Stars Eulalie : a song - 4 Stars To M. L. S. 1847 - 5 Stars (Marie Louise Shew ) Poe’s friend and Virginia’s nurse. Ulalume - 4 Stars To — ("Not long ago, the writer of these lines") 1848 - 3.5 Stars Another poem that was to (Marie Louise Shew) Poe’s friend and Virginia’s nurse. To Helen — ("I saw thee once, once only, years ago") - 4 Stars Eldorado - 5 Stars For Annie - 4 Stars To My Mother - 3.5 Stars Poem was for his "Muddy" his mother-in-law/paternal aunt Annabel Lee - 5 Stars The Bells - 5 Stars Alone - 4 Stars [Boy you really can feel Poe's depth of sadness in the lines of this poem]. This 22-line poem was composed in 1829 and left untitled and unpublished during Poe’s lifetime. The original manuscript was signed "E. A. Poe" and dated March 17, 1829. In February of that year, Poe's foster mother Francis Allan had died.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jerecho

    I'm not a fan of poetry but since I'm to exhausted to read fantasy now a days I tried to read this one. In this book it's too hard to read unless otherwise you sit and reread the phrases in order to understand what you are reading. Anyway, life is too hard to contemplate. There will always be sorrow and lost. Things will always mystify us in the future. Poems are mysteries of life that sometimes are hard to phantom. I'm not a fan of poetry but since I'm to exhausted to read fantasy now a days I tried to read this one. In this book it's too hard to read unless otherwise you sit and reread the phrases in order to understand what you are reading. Anyway, life is too hard to contemplate. There will always be sorrow and lost. Things will always mystify us in the future. Poems are mysteries of life that sometimes are hard to phantom.

  9. 4 out of 5

    mayy

    "Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door! Quoth the raven, 'Nevermore.' " These poems...where something else. I really really loved 'The Raven', which is the first poem in this collection. It was incredibly weird and abstract and I really enjoyed making notes on it and studying the writing of it. One other poem I found really creative and interesting was 'Epigram For Wall Street. Something about it just spoke to me and made me laugh, so loved that one also. But unfortunate "Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door! Quoth the raven, 'Nevermore.' " These poems...where something else. I really really loved 'The Raven', which is the first poem in this collection. It was incredibly weird and abstract and I really enjoyed making notes on it and studying the writing of it. One other poem I found really creative and interesting was 'Epigram For Wall Street. Something about it just spoke to me and made me laugh, so loved that one also. But unfortunately the others fell a little flat for me. I am, without a doubt, certain that they are great poems and I am sure if I really sit down and focus and study them, I will be able to appreciate them alot more. I found myself just skipping some of the poems and kind of drifting away while reading them. So maybe I'll re-vist this collection at some point, but not any time soon.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    I haven’t read many collections of poetry, or single poems for that matter. It is not something I gravitate to in my normal course of reading. I just don’t know how to embrace poetry. Maybe it was a poor high school education that contributed to my utter lack of understanding things like meter, rhythm, iambic pentameter, and all that goes into creating a poem. For me enjoying a poem has always been an impulse or gut reaction, either the poem is instantly OK or it’s not. The memorability of a poe I haven’t read many collections of poetry, or single poems for that matter. It is not something I gravitate to in my normal course of reading. I just don’t know how to embrace poetry. Maybe it was a poor high school education that contributed to my utter lack of understanding things like meter, rhythm, iambic pentameter, and all that goes into creating a poem. For me enjoying a poem has always been an impulse or gut reaction, either the poem is instantly OK or it’s not. The memorability of a poem is even more difficult for me. Granted I have read very little poetry and a lot of it has been enjoyable, but until this books “Annabel Lee” I can only call up two poems that are locked in my memory. While the poem was memorable, I had to look up the titles for this post. Both were written by Robert Frost, one called “Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening.” The other is called “The Road not Taken.” I won’t pretend that I remember these poems word for word but parts of them have and will stick with me forever. The woods are lovely, dark and deep, But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep, Two roads diverged in a wood, and I— I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference. The angels, not half so happy in heaven, Went envying her and me-- Yes!--that was the reason (as all men know, In this kingdom by the sea) That the wind came out of the cloud by night, Chilling and killing my Annabel Lee. I have read all the poems of "The Raven and Other Poems" at least once, and a few poems I have read several times. I have also looked up and listened to audio versions of all the poems. I read this book because it is a group read and discussion next month, at that time I plan to read them all again.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dimitrije Srebric

    "And neither the angels in Heaven above Nor the demons down under the sea Can ever dissever my soul from the soul Of the beautiful Annabel Lee." When it comes to poetry, I haven't read anything so profound, filled with raw emotions and macabre, bizarre imagery in a long time. At his peak creative genius, Edgar Allan Poe, using poetry, managed to convey a vast array of human emotions, starting with love, despair, depression, etc. marked with a deep sense of beauty. Probably his most famous pieces o "And neither the angels in Heaven above Nor the demons down under the sea Can ever dissever my soul from the soul Of the beautiful Annabel Lee." When it comes to poetry, I haven't read anything so profound, filled with raw emotions and macabre, bizarre imagery in a long time. At his peak creative genius, Edgar Allan Poe, using poetry, managed to convey a vast array of human emotions, starting with love, despair, depression, etc. marked with a deep sense of beauty. Probably his most famous pieces of poetry, "Annabel Lee" and "The Raven" are prime examples of aforementioned feelings. His love poems are always about lost love, that died, passed away, and by Fate wasn't meant to be. Anyone who knows what he had went through in his personal life would understand where all those feelings came from. All in all, Poe's poetry will always stand as a monument to his genius.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Evelyn (devours and digests words)

    Some poems are really hard for me to understand unless I sit down, reread the lines twice and think hard. Though there are some that are beautifully haunting and sad. My favourite poems by him are the ones about his lost loves, those are the ones I delved into and got lost in. For one thing, Poe sure had an uncanny ability to depict pain and suffering. Hell, it seem to seep through the pages. It's obvious this man wrote with passion and feeling. Some poems are really hard for me to understand unless I sit down, reread the lines twice and think hard. Though there are some that are beautifully haunting and sad. My favourite poems by him are the ones about his lost loves, those are the ones I delved into and got lost in. For one thing, Poe sure had an uncanny ability to depict pain and suffering. Hell, it seem to seep through the pages. It's obvious this man wrote with passion and feeling.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Munroe

    I didn't like this book one because I don't like poems and second the plot lines for the poems were all mixed up and confusing. I didn't like this book one because I don't like poems and second the plot lines for the poems were all mixed up and confusing.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Our Library Mornington

    First published in the New York Evening Mirror in 1845, The Raven, is perhaps one of Poe’s most well-known poems. A talking raven visits a man tormented by the loss of his love, “the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels named Lenore”. The Raven perches upon the man’s chamber door and foretells he will “nevermore” be reunited with his love, not even in death. With each refrain of “nevermore” the protagonist becomes more and more agitated until he finally succumbs to madness. “And the raven, neve First published in the New York Evening Mirror in 1845, The Raven, is perhaps one of Poe’s most well-known poems. A talking raven visits a man tormented by the loss of his love, “the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels named Lenore”. The Raven perches upon the man’s chamber door and foretells he will “nevermore” be reunited with his love, not even in death. With each refrain of “nevermore” the protagonist becomes more and more agitated until he finally succumbs to madness. “And the raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door; And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon's that is dreaming, And the lamp-light o'er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor; And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor Shall be lifted - nevermore!" While the language is old fashioned the poem is easy to read with its nursery rhyme rhythm, and the familiar hark of "nevermore" - but this simplicity is deceptive. Seeded in the tradition of the allegoric (and the epic) The Raven is ambiguous in the telling. Was the man in fact visited by a talking bird, or had he already begun a slow decent into madness, the bird merely being a manifestation caused by his deep-seated grief? I do have a secret though, one of my favorite adaptations of this poem was in The Simpsons first Halloween special Treehouse of Horror I, narrated by James Earl Jones. Homer portrays the grief-stricken lead, Marge as Lenore and Bart the antagonistic Raven. Nice to see popular culture references to this classic.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sarah W.

    I thought this book was okay. It was a good, short book to read. This book is definitely not my favorite poetry book that I have read before, but it was an okay book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jude (NovelReader13)

    I think I would've enjoyed this a bit more if I had read it instead of listened to it, or if the narrator had been a different one. Still beautifully dark and atmospheric though. I think I would've enjoyed this a bit more if I had read it instead of listened to it, or if the narrator had been a different one. Still beautifully dark and atmospheric though.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    What a joy to revisit the poems of Edgar Allan Poe with a group of readers who brought to them thoughts and ideas that enhanced the reading. I love Poe's grasp of mythology, his use of rhyme and rhythm, alliteration, and, yes, even his morose musings. He seems to me to lay a tortured soul in front of us and ask, "What would you do with this? What could you do with it, but mourn?" I have written individual reviews for The Raven, The Bells and Annabel Lee. I will not revisit them here, but I would What a joy to revisit the poems of Edgar Allan Poe with a group of readers who brought to them thoughts and ideas that enhanced the reading. I love Poe's grasp of mythology, his use of rhyme and rhythm, alliteration, and, yes, even his morose musings. He seems to me to lay a tortured soul in front of us and ask, "What would you do with this? What could you do with it, but mourn?" I have written individual reviews for The Raven, The Bells and Annabel Lee. I will not revisit them here, but I would like to speak to some of the lesser known poems that touched a chord with me. To Annie: And the fever called "Living" Is conquered at last. Poe sees life as so much torture and death as a release. And, death is portrayed as an illusion. The onlookers think he is "dead", but he is really in the arms of the woman he loved and lost. And... And ah! let it never Be foolishly said That my room it is gloomy And narrow my bed; For man never slept In a different bed— And, to sleep, you must slumber In just such a bed. So, death is inevitable and there is no rest in life...to slumber you must die. It will come to all of us, and he seems to say that while it might look gloomy or confining or sad, it is not. It is simply a release from this world's toil and it is not just his lot, but that of every man. Alone: And all I lov'd--I lov'd alone. I thought this one of the most moving of the poems. There is a real sense of angst in his recognition that he sees the world differently than others and that they cannot understand what is beneath his surface, in his mind. Even his loves cannot be shared or understood by others. They see fluffy clouds, he sees demons in the sky. He cannot explain why the world is darker to him, but he knows that his view separates him from humanity at large. To Science: I took this to be more about reality vs. creativity (imagination) than science literally. He cannot help reality imposing itself upon him, and truth destroys the comfort of myth. With science, he must face death as a reality; with myth, he can imagine that he is still able to hold and share the world of his beloved. I thought about Eden--after all, we humans lost Eden because Adam and Eve ate from the Tree of Knowledge. And finally, Dream Within a Dream Yet if hope has flown away In a night, or in a day, In a vision, or in none, Is it therefore the less gone? All that we see or seem Is but a dream within a dream. The ultimate question (especially for Poe), "what is reality?" If hope has flown in a dream or vision is it less gone? Good question. If we feel something deeply, is it not real for us? How do we distinguish between what is and what was and what might be? If we wake on the morning after the loss of someone we love and believe we feel the weight of their body in the bed, can they have been there for that moment? Are there two worlds, ours and theirs, and can we bridge the two? And if there are two worlds, which of them is real...are they the dream, or are we? There were several of the poems that just left me flat and did not speak to me at all, but for the most part I love his ability to tap into his sorrow and isolation and see his poems as an attempt to connect and reveal himself. He challenges our intellect, makes us ask questions, and what more can a poem do than that? I hope in death he was indeed folded into the arms of his Virginia or granted the gentle sleep that eluded him in life. There is no writer ever whose life and work were more intertwined.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Madison M.

    3 stars I needed another poetry book for the forty book challenge, and while this was very good poetry I didn't enjoy reading it as much as some others. This book was very poetic and you have to slow down to really understand. Edgar Allan Poe is very poetic and his poems often have elements of sadness and sorrow. Like I said, though it didn't flow like free-verse I still thought it was ok 3 stars I needed another poetry book for the forty book challenge, and while this was very good poetry I didn't enjoy reading it as much as some others. This book was very poetic and you have to slow down to really understand. Edgar Allan Poe is very poetic and his poems often have elements of sadness and sorrow. Like I said, though it didn't flow like free-verse I still thought it was ok

  19. 4 out of 5

    Smitha Murthy

    Edgar Allan Poe was my faithful companion back in 1990s. How many of his stories I devoured again and again! "The Tell-Tale Heart" still reverberates in my memory! This set of poems in a lovely, illustrated edition by Peter Pauper contains haunting verse - macabre and spooky. 'The Raven' remains one of my favorite poems ever, and there are other classics such as 'A Dream Within A Dream' (Which also is one of my favorite songs) and Annabel Lee. One for the collector in you, this is a delight. Edgar Allan Poe was my faithful companion back in 1990s. How many of his stories I devoured again and again! "The Tell-Tale Heart" still reverberates in my memory! This set of poems in a lovely, illustrated edition by Peter Pauper contains haunting verse - macabre and spooky. 'The Raven' remains one of my favorite poems ever, and there are other classics such as 'A Dream Within A Dream' (Which also is one of my favorite songs) and Annabel Lee. One for the collector in you, this is a delight.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Billierosie Billierosie

    Published in January, 1845,"The Raven", by Edgar Allan Poe, is a poem, a lament, telling of loss, isolation, and loneliness. The opening lines identify the speaker as someone who feels tired and weak but is still awake in the middle of a gloomy night. He passes the time by reading a strange book of ancient knowledge. Poe uses alliteration to convey the effect of unsteadiness. This line also sets the poem's rhythmical pattern and provides the first example of the use of internal rhyme in "dreary" Published in January, 1845,"The Raven", by Edgar Allan Poe, is a poem, a lament, telling of loss, isolation, and loneliness. The opening lines identify the speaker as someone who feels tired and weak but is still awake in the middle of a gloomy night. He passes the time by reading a strange book of ancient knowledge. Poe uses alliteration to convey the effect of unsteadiness. This line also sets the poem's rhythmical pattern and provides the first example of the use of internal rhyme in "dreary" and "weary." The speaker tells of becoming more tired and beginning to doze but being wakened by a sound that he assumes is a quiet knock. Internal rhymes of "napping," "tapping," and "rapping" along with repetition of these last two words, create a musical effect. This effect is also produced by alliteration of n. These sound devices and the steady rhythm of these lines are almost hypnotic. The Raven speaks only one word: “nevermore.” This word punctuates the poem. Each time the speaker asks a question, the strange bird repeats the word “nevermore”. Near the end of this poem, when the fear of the poem's speaker has reached a level of near hysteria, he shouts "Leave my loneliness unbroken!" In one sense, this could just be an emotional outburst, like the lines that lead up to it, but the interesting thing about this particular line is that the speaker, in his terror, is for once reflecting upon himself. This, and the line's location at the climax of the poem, indicates to us that "my loneliness" is not just another expression that he shrieks: it is the key, the secret that he has been trying to guard all along. Throughout the poem, we see the speaker being drawn out of his isolation by the raven and the one word that it speaks. Once the bird enters his chambers, nothing really changes in the scene except the speaker's attitude, which grows increasingly nervous.  It is unknown how long Poe worked on "The Raven"; speculation ranges from a single day to ten years. “In part due to its dual printing, "The Raven" made Edgar Allan Poe a household name almost immediately and turned Poe into a national celebrity. Readers began to identify poem with poet, earning Poe the nickname "The Raven". The poem was soon widely reprinted, imitated, and parodied. Though it made Poe popular in his day, it did not bring him significant financial success. As he later lamented, ‘have made no money. I am as poor now as ever I was in my life – except in hope, which is by no means bankable.’ “The New World said, "Everyone reads the Poem and praises it ... justly, we think, for it seems to us full of originality and power." The Pennsylvania Inquirer reprinted it with the heading "A Beautiful Poem". Elizabeth Barrett wrote to Poe, "Your 'Raven' has produced a sensation, a fit o' horror, here in England. Some of my friends are taken by the fear of it and some by the music. I hear of persons haunted by 'Nevermore'."  “Poe's popularity resulted in invitations to recite "The Raven" and to lecture – in public and at private social gatherings. At one literary salon, a guest noted, "to hear [Poe] repeat the Raven ... is an event in one's life." It was recalled by someone who experienced it, "He would turn down the lamps till the room was almost dark, then standing in the center of the apartment he would recite ... in the most melodious of voices ... So marvelus was his power as a reader that the auditors would be afraid to draw breath lest the enchanted spell be broken. “‘The Raven’ has influenced many modern works, including Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita in 1955, Bernard Malamud's "The Jewbird" in 1963 and Ray Bradbury's "The Parrot Who Knew Papa" in 1976. The poem is additionally referenced throughout popular culture in films, television, music and more.” WIKI

  21. 4 out of 5

    Indi Martin

    Edgar Allen Poe was my first love as a emo high school goth, thick with black eyeliner and heavy stares, convinced my deep green eyes saw the world deeper and more completely than any of my peers. In other words, High Goth, standard cookie-cut-individualism. I still wear black eyeliner, it's the one habit I've never been able to break. Musically, I highly recommend Alan Parson's "Tales of Mystery and Imagination" as an excellent companion piece. Favorite tales of mine were "Dr. Tarr and Professo Edgar Allen Poe was my first love as a emo high school goth, thick with black eyeliner and heavy stares, convinced my deep green eyes saw the world deeper and more completely than any of my peers. In other words, High Goth, standard cookie-cut-individualism. I still wear black eyeliner, it's the one habit I've never been able to break. Musically, I highly recommend Alan Parson's "Tales of Mystery and Imagination" as an excellent companion piece. Favorite tales of mine were "Dr. Tarr and Professor Feather," "The Raven," and the one about his lost love, "Annabel Lee."

  22. 4 out of 5

    Roy Huff

    "Once upon a midnight dreary." I love Poe. How could anyone not? I loved it so much, I memorized it! I've forgotten most of it since then, but it compelled me to take it to heart. Dark yet enchanting, Poe has a way of drawing the reader it. It lacks the gore of modern horror and suspense but is much more effective and endearing. This is a schoolyard classic, and if you haven't read it you are missing out. Pick this up now and read it! I can still hear the words in my head being spoken in a spook "Once upon a midnight dreary." I love Poe. How could anyone not? I loved it so much, I memorized it! I've forgotten most of it since then, but it compelled me to take it to heart. Dark yet enchanting, Poe has a way of drawing the reader it. It lacks the gore of modern horror and suspense but is much more effective and endearing. This is a schoolyard classic, and if you haven't read it you are missing out. Pick this up now and read it! I can still hear the words in my head being spoken in a spooky manner. This is simply wonderful!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    In my estimation Poe was a nut case. The Ravern illustrates that more than anything else/

  24. 5 out of 5

    Hanguin

    best advice is reading it aloud suitable for rainy days with a cup of hot coffee

  25. 4 out of 5

    Diana ~Daughter of the Books~

    Surprisingly enough, I really liked this. Annabel Lee still is my favorite, too many Lady Midnight feels :))

  26. 4 out of 5

    A.D. Crystal

    EDGAR ALAN POE The RAPPER POET of the 19th century. 'Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter, In there stepped a stately Raven of the saintly days of yore; Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he; But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door— Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door— Perched, and sat, and nothing more.' EDGAR ALAN POE The RAPPER POET of the 19th century. 'Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter, In there stepped a stately Raven of the saintly days of yore; Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he; But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door— Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door— Perched, and sat, and nothing more.'

  27. 4 out of 5

    Milda

    To be honest, I am not a big fan of poetry but I am a huge fan of Edgar Allan Poe. His deep gothic style is so fascinating to read. I bought this book so I would have a paper copy of The Raven which is one of the best poems ever written. As it turns out, I enjoyed the other poems too. The poems are all brilliant. Dark, gothic, creepy, mysterious and beautiful of course.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Hanna de Koning

    I did really enjoy some of the poems and I loved the writing style, hoewever, I found most poems to be really hard to understand (since I'm not a native English speaker). I definitely want to read some more poetry classics! I did really enjoy some of the poems and I loved the writing style, hoewever, I found most poems to be really hard to understand (since I'm not a native English speaker). I definitely want to read some more poetry classics!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Andd Becker

    A SOPORIFIC Wondering how to fall asleep because TV news tends to keep me a- wake and worrying, needlessly, I de- cided to memorize a line each night. Certainly, this de- cision was right.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ronald

    3.5, Amazing, I love Poe but somehow his stories are some slow

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