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The kids in Upside-Down Magic know their magic is a little out of control. But that doesn't make them weird--it only makes them human. Strange things are happening at Dunwiddle Magic School-and the Upside-Down Magic class is getting blamed! Yes, Marigold did shrink Lacey Clench to the size of a gerbil. But that was an accident. And, yes, most people weren't prepared for Nory The kids in Upside-Down Magic know their magic is a little out of control. But that doesn't make them weird--it only makes them human. Strange things are happening at Dunwiddle Magic School-and the Upside-Down Magic class is getting blamed! Yes, Marigold did shrink Lacey Clench to the size of a gerbil. But that was an accident. And, yes, most people weren't prepared for Nory to transform into a squippy (that's half squid, half puppy)-but it's not like Nory meant to mix up paws and tentacles. And while Bax does have the unfortunate magical condition of turning into a stone, he swears he has nothing to do with the rocky magic that's been happening in Dunwiddle's halls. When things get messy, it's easy to point your finger at the kids with the messiest magic. But the Upside-Down Magic students aren't going to let themselves get in trouble. Instead, they're going to find out what's really going on-and get their school back on track before something really wacky happens.


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The kids in Upside-Down Magic know their magic is a little out of control. But that doesn't make them weird--it only makes them human. Strange things are happening at Dunwiddle Magic School-and the Upside-Down Magic class is getting blamed! Yes, Marigold did shrink Lacey Clench to the size of a gerbil. But that was an accident. And, yes, most people weren't prepared for Nory The kids in Upside-Down Magic know their magic is a little out of control. But that doesn't make them weird--it only makes them human. Strange things are happening at Dunwiddle Magic School-and the Upside-Down Magic class is getting blamed! Yes, Marigold did shrink Lacey Clench to the size of a gerbil. But that was an accident. And, yes, most people weren't prepared for Nory to transform into a squippy (that's half squid, half puppy)-but it's not like Nory meant to mix up paws and tentacles. And while Bax does have the unfortunate magical condition of turning into a stone, he swears he has nothing to do with the rocky magic that's been happening in Dunwiddle's halls. When things get messy, it's easy to point your finger at the kids with the messiest magic. But the Upside-Down Magic students aren't going to let themselves get in trouble. Instead, they're going to find out what's really going on-and get their school back on track before something really wacky happens.

30 review for Sticks & Stones

  1. 5 out of 5

    Prabhjot Kaur

    Nory has upside-down magic and she has been attending a special class at Dunwiddle school for upside-down magic with seven other kids. Normally there are five categories of magic talents - Flares have fire talents. Fuzzies have animal talents. Flickers have power to be invisible or make things invisible. Flyers can fly. Fluxers can turn into animals. But there are people whose magic doesn't fit into these categories and they are known as wonky or different or people with upside-down magic. Nory i Nory has upside-down magic and she has been attending a special class at Dunwiddle school for upside-down magic with seven other kids. Normally there are five categories of magic talents - Flares have fire talents. Fuzzies have animal talents. Flickers have power to be invisible or make things invisible. Flyers can fly. Fluxers can turn into animals. But there are people whose magic doesn't fit into these categories and they are known as wonky or different or people with upside-down magic. Nory is an upside-down fluxer. Nory's classmate, Bax is also an upside-down fluxer but he can only flux into a rock and he cannot turn himself back to his human form. It is done using a special potion. One day, they find that pennies collected for charity have turned into rocks and everyone blames kids from UDM class but they all swear that it wasn't them. But Lacey decided to start a petition and remove the special UDM class from the school after she was shrunk by Marigold accidently. The whole UDM class has become good friends with each other and they heard Lacey say that she is out to get them. Bax's parents got divorced just before he was about to get his magic and since then he only turns into a rock and cannot keep his human mind active whilst he's rock. Bax and Nory get a special coach assigned to them to help with their fluxing. At first, the coach only pays attention to Nory and Bax feels left out but then the coach genuinely starts helping Bax and Bax starts doing better. Nory also signs up to be in the kittenball game as the coach thinks that Nory could do great. Lacey is still out to get them and at a kittenball game, she ends up annoying the UDM kids and the arena starts to turn to stone. It turns out that Bax was doing it all along but he didn't realize it. His parents divorce took a toll on him and his emotions are messing with his magic. This book was mainly focused on UDM kids being friends and how it is affecting Bax's magic and how he is getting better. There were couple other revelations but other than that not much happened but still I found it to be an improvement on the first book. I was hoping for more world building but that also didn't happen. I want to know if everyone in the world gets some kind of magic talent or is it some specific people and how does the magic work, why it works the way it works and how is the magic used in the daily lives. Yes, kids are studying magic at school but what will it be used for. None of these questions were even acknowledged. I will read the next just to find some answers. 2.75-3 stars

  2. 5 out of 5

    Schizanthus Nerd

    Nory has now been living with her Aunt Margo and attending Dunwiddle Magic School for a month. She’s one of eight students in the Upside-Down Magic class, a class for kids whose magic is unusual. When the pennies the school was collecting for charity turn into rocks and Marigold accidentally shrinks Lacey, one of the bully Sparkies, the Upside-Down Magic class are in the spotlight. It’s easy for the other kids to place blame on the kids who are different and pretty soon Lacey has started a petiti Nory has now been living with her Aunt Margo and attending Dunwiddle Magic School for a month. She’s one of eight students in the Upside-Down Magic class, a class for kids whose magic is unusual. When the pennies the school was collecting for charity turn into rocks and Marigold accidentally shrinks Lacey, one of the bully Sparkies, the Upside-Down Magic class are in the spotlight. It’s easy for the other kids to place blame on the kids who are different and pretty soon Lacey has started a petition to remove the Upside-Down Magic class and its members from Dunwiddle Magic School. While the rumour mill is working overtime at Dunwiddle Nory is hoping to join the school’s beginner kittenball club, Elliott is keeping a secret from Nory and Bax is trying to learn how to keep his human mind when he turns into a rock. I liked that this book alternated between Nory and Bax’s perspectives, and enjoyed learning about Bax’s family, including his father who is an (view spoiler)[Upside-Down Fuzzy, with animals reflecting his emotions (hide spoiler)] . I definitely want to see more of Squippy-Nory, when she fluxes into a puppy with tentacles. This was a reread for me but I haven’t read any more of the series so I’m looking forward to seeing what Ms. Starr’s class gets up to next.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Krissy

    ***Rated by my daughter***

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Marquart

    In this adorable sequel, Nory and Bax are continuing to deal with their upside down magic, this time facing a petition to get rid of the UDM program after some mysterious things start happening at school. Can the UDM students prove it wasn’t them, or will they be banished for being too dangerous? Readers of Upside Down Magic will love the second book in this series. Our favorite characters return, and as we get to know them better they become even more lovable. With great lessons of empathy and In this adorable sequel, Nory and Bax are continuing to deal with their upside down magic, this time facing a petition to get rid of the UDM program after some mysterious things start happening at school. Can the UDM students prove it wasn’t them, or will they be banished for being too dangerous? Readers of Upside Down Magic will love the second book in this series. Our favorite characters return, and as we get to know them better they become even more lovable. With great lessons of empathy and teamwork, and an exciting plot, young readers are sure to love this series. Highly recommend for grades 3-5.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Koby Z. (KZ Reads)

    4.8 Stars This book was just as good as the first, which I was very pleased about! With tons of exciting adventures, this book was like the first, with a new adventure every few chapters, and with tons of fun. Sorry for the short review- I need to write my Tyrant's Tomb review. **Make sure to like this review, and of course, follow or friend me if you haven't yet.** **My blog link is www.kzreads.blogspot.com. I would greatly appreciate it if you take a moment to look at it, and if you like it, subs 4.8 Stars This book was just as good as the first, which I was very pleased about! With tons of exciting adventures, this book was like the first, with a new adventure every few chapters, and with tons of fun. Sorry for the short review- I need to write my Tyrant's Tomb review. **Make sure to like this review, and of course, follow or friend me if you haven't yet.** **My blog link is www.kzreads.blogspot.com. I would greatly appreciate it if you take a moment to look at it, and if you like it, subscribe!**

  6. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    Everyone is gifted with some sort of magic ability. There are the Fluxers (shape-shifters), Flares (make fire), Flyers (can fly), Flickers (invisibility powers), and Fuzzies (communicate with animals). And then are those whose magic is not quite, well, normal. Their magic is called Upside-Down Magic (UDM). Flares with the ability to freeze things or make it rain. A Fuzzy who repeals animals or a Flyer who cannot seem to stay on the ground on his own. And a Flicker who sees sound waves. Then ther Everyone is gifted with some sort of magic ability. There are the Fluxers (shape-shifters), Flares (make fire), Flyers (can fly), Flickers (invisibility powers), and Fuzzies (communicate with animals). And then are those whose magic is not quite, well, normal. Their magic is called Upside-Down Magic (UDM). Flares with the ability to freeze things or make it rain. A Fuzzy who repeals animals or a Flyer who cannot seem to stay on the ground on his own. And a Flicker who sees sound waves. Then there are Fluxers like Nory and Bax--Bax can only flux into a rock. Nory's fluxes seem to be inconsistent--she often changes into two creatures at once. The UDM students are in a class, separate from their classmates who have "normal" magic abilities. They are often the butt of jokes and looked down on by their peers for being different. Mouse and I broke the cardinal rule of not starting with the first book in the series, and so Sticks & Stones was our introduction to the wonderful UDM kids. Mouse and I enjoyed reading this book together. There were quite a few laugh out loud moments as well as more serious moments, taking on difficult issues school-aged children often face. Like dealing with divorce and a parent's job loss, bullying, overcoming obstacles, self-doubt, learning that it is okay to make mistakes (and that everyone makes them), and how to embrace our differences. The three authors handled each of these subjects with sensitivity and in a knowledgeable way, capturing the feelings of the characters and making them even more relatable. My 9-year-old was struck by how these great kids were treated so poorly by their peers. "They are normal, Mom. They are unique and may have different talents, but they are just like everyone else." She is unable to pick a favorite character among the UDM students, but she did say that her favorite part was when Marigold accidentally shrunk Lacey Clench, the school bully ringleader. Both Mouse and I would like to go back and read the first book in the series and continue on with it after. We love the cast characters. I have not told Mouse yet there is a Disney television series coming out this summer based on the books. She is going to be over the moon when she hears that bit of news. Review originally published on Musings of a Bookish Kitty: https://www.literaryfeline.com/2020/0...

  7. 4 out of 5

    James

    More summer reading with the kid. I love the inclusive message and particularly the depression metaphor in this book. My daughter loves the series and gets really upset whenever the bullies are scheming.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shel

    I've been reading this series with my 7-year-old son. He loves the story, and I love the positive messages hidden in it. There is so much in here that he can relate to, and it's helped me initiate so many important discussions! I've been reading this series with my 7-year-old son. He loves the story, and I love the positive messages hidden in it. There is so much in here that he can relate to, and it's helped me initiate so many important discussions!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kylee Wheeler

    This girl named Nory, she has the weirdest/ coolest magic ever. Even though she's a fluxer, she has really cool magic. She ends up turning to Dritten Nory, (Dragon Kitten) She has a friend named Bax, He has weird magic. He's a fluxer but he turns to a rock or leash. They have a tutor for their magic and their learning to keep their magic from showing too much. Bax learns to hear and keep his human mind when he fluxed into a rock. At the end the sparkies were chasing after them but they stayed sa This girl named Nory, she has the weirdest/ coolest magic ever. Even though she's a fluxer, she has really cool magic. She ends up turning to Dritten Nory, (Dragon Kitten) She has a friend named Bax, He has weird magic. He's a fluxer but he turns to a rock or leash. They have a tutor for their magic and their learning to keep their magic from showing too much. Bax learns to hear and keep his human mind when he fluxed into a rock. At the end the sparkies were chasing after them but they stayed safe somehow.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jude (NovelReader13)

    This book was just as wonderful, fun and heartfelt as the first one. I'm really loving this series so far! This book was just as wonderful, fun and heartfelt as the first one. I'm really loving this series so far!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

    Zamboozle!!!! What a fun sequel and great addition to the Upside Down Magic series. My seven year old and I really loved reading the first book together and jumped right into this one. We enjoyed catching up with our favorite characters and meeting a few new ones. In this story, the UDM students are still enjoying lessons with Ms. Starr and they’ve starting receiving special tutoring in hopes that it will help them have less uncontrollable moments. Nory and Bax get paired together with the very Zamboozle!!!! What a fun sequel and great addition to the Upside Down Magic series. My seven year old and I really loved reading the first book together and jumped right into this one. We enjoyed catching up with our favorite characters and meeting a few new ones. In this story, the UDM students are still enjoying lessons with Ms. Starr and they’ve starting receiving special tutoring in hopes that it will help them have less uncontrollable moments. Nory and Bax get paired together with the very health conscious Coach. Bax and his ability to flux into a rock has entertained us from the very beginning. We liked getting to know him better and we loved learning about Kittenball. We also enjoyed the gentle mystery of figuring out who was responsible for all of the rocks appearing randomly around campus. Another entertaining read and wonderful introduction into the fantasy genre. The cast and their mishaps definitely provide plenty of laugh out loud moments. However, there are lots of great lessons about feeling like an outcast, not being too quick to point the blame at someone and sticking up for your friends no matter how different they may seem to others. It also touches on bullying and depression. We had a blast discussing this one and definitely look forward to continuing with book three, Showing Off.

  12. 4 out of 5

    H

    Another one I listened to with my daughter, which I think is what made me love it so much. Not only seeing how she enjoyed it, but the messages of inclusion and accepting yourself and others despite differences or “wonky” things, felt stronger because I was thinking of it through her experiences and the good, loyal friends she has. My favorite parts were every scene with Coach Vitamin; I didn’t like him at first and thought he was silly, but then he really came through and proved what a stellar Another one I listened to with my daughter, which I think is what made me love it so much. Not only seeing how she enjoyed it, but the messages of inclusion and accepting yourself and others despite differences or “wonky” things, felt stronger because I was thinking of it through her experiences and the good, loyal friends she has. My favorite parts were every scene with Coach Vitamin; I didn’t like him at first and thought he was silly, but then he really came through and proved what a stellar guy and mentor he was. Some of the things he said to Bax and Nori got me legitimately teary eyed. He said he was on their side and that they were a team, and then he proved it again and again, telling them he was proud of them, helping them think outside the box insofar as controlling their magic, and celebrating their accomplishments. It was really heart-warming and so nice that the kids have so many good adult role models, which isn’t often the case in MG/YA fiction. I loved the concept of being a team and supporting each other, both the kids among themselves as well as with the kids and adults working together. Lots of warm fuzzies, hopefulness, love, and acceptance. Great book. I’m glad my daughter found this series.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kay

    As sweet and as kind as book 1: Upside-Down Magic. While reading this, I just kept thinking about how important this book is for children with learning disabilities. Being differently abled (especially in a dangerous magical school!) can be just as tough for a non-magical real kid in a real school... & I love seeing these kids being different in some way they had no control over (born different) represented in this series. Also, I like Nory, but I loved Bax! I liked his chapters and thought his As sweet and as kind as book 1: Upside-Down Magic. While reading this, I just kept thinking about how important this book is for children with learning disabilities. Being differently abled (especially in a dangerous magical school!) can be just as tough for a non-magical real kid in a real school... & I love seeing these kids being different in some way they had no control over (born different) represented in this series. Also, I like Nory, but I loved Bax! I liked his chapters and thought his story rocked! Looking forward to reading more of Upside-Down Magic!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Joy

    In the second book of Sarah Mlynowski's series Upside-Down Magic. The UDM kids struggle to stay at school (and in there human minds). After Marigold shrinks the leader of the Sparkies, Lacey, the UDM kids have to fight to stay at Dunville. I would recommend this book to ages 9-15. In the second book of Sarah Mlynowski's series Upside-Down Magic. The UDM kids struggle to stay at school (and in there human minds). After Marigold shrinks the leader of the Sparkies, Lacey, the UDM kids have to fight to stay at Dunville. I would recommend this book to ages 9-15.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    One of my favorite series of children’s books. So many great messages for teaching how to treat others that may be different that us and teaching how to look at our struggles/challenges in a new light. Highly recommend for everyone to read!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lizzy

    This book kept me on the edge of my seat.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Salamah

    Sticks and Stones is a sweet story about a group of students who need help with their magic. So they attend this special school in order to learn how to handle their magic. I love how this story mirrors special education students and how everyone can learn!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Hudson

    Nory has trouble controlling her magic. She can transform into a kitten, but she can’t hold the shape, so she ends up with the head of a goat, which makes her a koat. What she has is called upside down magic, and along with a few other kids who are struggling to control their own powers, she’s in a special class at Dunwiddle Magic School. But when strange things start happening in the halls, the other kids want to blame the students in her class and get them kicked out of the school forever. If Nory has trouble controlling her magic. She can transform into a kitten, but she can’t hold the shape, so she ends up with the head of a goat, which makes her a koat. What she has is called upside down magic, and along with a few other kids who are struggling to control their own powers, she’s in a special class at Dunwiddle Magic School. But when strange things start happening in the halls, the other kids want to blame the students in her class and get them kicked out of the school forever. If Nory could find out what’s really causing the strange occurrences, she might find a way to help her group fit in. Upside Down Magic: Sticks & Stones is the second in the series by Sarah Mlynowski, Lauren Myracle, and Emily Jenkins. The action is fun and funny, but it also addresses some serious issues that can help young readers get insight into what it’s like to be different from your peers. With the advice of her teacher/tutor, Nory signs up for a sport. And even though she’s not great at it, she meets other kids outside of class. They all benefit when they get to know each other and can see each other as people instead of stereotypes. Anyone who has ever felt the awkwardness of being different (pretty much anyone at one time or another) is sure to enjoy Upside Down Magic. I recommend it for readers aged 9 to 12 (and their moms). The publisher provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nicholai Vidanes

    This book deserves to be 5 star rating because it is delightful. The words used in the book are unique. The book is remarkable because it is relatable and it has adorable sequel. Nory and Bax are continuing to deal with their upside down magic, this time facing a petition to get rid of the UDM program after some mysterious things start happening at school. It also speaks about bullying and children can use their disabilities to their advantage. This book relates to me because I am still trying t This book deserves to be 5 star rating because it is delightful. The words used in the book are unique. The book is remarkable because it is relatable and it has adorable sequel. Nory and Bax are continuing to deal with their upside down magic, this time facing a petition to get rid of the UDM program after some mysterious things start happening at school. It also speaks about bullying and children can use their disabilities to their advantage. This book relates to me because I am still trying to make more friends. Since this book is a series, I will continue reading it because I want to see the adventures of Nory and her friends throughout the school year. I would recommend this book because this book is totally adorable.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Hazel Rainfall

    The science in this book is completely inaccurate (yes there is real science even in sci-fi magical novels). For example a squid does not have tentacles - yet the author refers to the squid version of the main character having tentacles that suctioned her firmly onto objects. Squid have no such ability. That aside, the story is clever and most children would love to read it. I found several of the adult characters to be shallow and stereotyped though. I also found there to be a very strong polit The science in this book is completely inaccurate (yes there is real science even in sci-fi magical novels). For example a squid does not have tentacles - yet the author refers to the squid version of the main character having tentacles that suctioned her firmly onto objects. Squid have no such ability. That aside, the story is clever and most children would love to read it. I found several of the adult characters to be shallow and stereotyped though. I also found there to be a very strong political agenda within the pages of this book, especially within respect to specific characters. I dislike when politics enter books for children.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Madeline (The Bookish Mutant)

    Even though this was a pretty short read (For me, at least), it was great! I liked it as much as the first one. Cute, funny, quirky, and then there’s kittenball. How I truly wish kittenball were real! KIIIIIITTTTTTTTTEEEENNNNNNNNNSSSS /Users/Madeline/Desktop/Randomness/Gifs and gifs and gifs/Bowling cat!.gif

  22. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    3.5 stars. Super darn cute. Better than the first installment by far and the themes of acceptance and diversity and fabulously and not so subtly interwoven. I loved Bax, he was a sweet character. Enjoyable and I can't wait to pass it off to my students to love magic as much as me. 3.5 stars. Super darn cute. Better than the first installment by far and the themes of acceptance and diversity and fabulously and not so subtly interwoven. I loved Bax, he was a sweet character. Enjoyable and I can't wait to pass it off to my students to love magic as much as me.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte Fairbanks

    This was a great second book! And even good enough that this is my second time reading it!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    Tolerance is the focus of the 2nd book in the Upside-Down Magic series. Nory and her friends that have unusual magic (Don't call it wonky! That's a put down) are attending Dunwiddle, a public magic school. All the kids with UDM are in the same class. But some of the kids with regular magic don't think the UDMs should be in their school. What if they're dangerous? To try to help the UDMs work through their unusual magic, they are assigned tutors. Nory and Bax get signed up with Coach Vitomin (who Tolerance is the focus of the 2nd book in the Upside-Down Magic series. Nory and her friends that have unusual magic (Don't call it wonky! That's a put down) are attending Dunwiddle, a public magic school. All the kids with UDM are in the same class. But some of the kids with regular magic don't think the UDMs should be in their school. What if they're dangerous? To try to help the UDMs work through their unusual magic, they are assigned tutors. Nory and Bax get signed up with Coach Vitomin (who is a little bit nuts about healthy eating.) And slowly, they seem to be making progress. But then, things start to go wrong. It starts with the day they show up to school and there are marbles all over the floor. Kids are falling left and right. Most think it's just an 8th grade prank, but there are some who want to blame the UDMs. Then, when Marigold accidentally shrinks Lacey, that's the last straw. Lacey starts a petition to get the UDMs out of Dunwiddle. If they can get 50 signatures, they are sure the school administration will do what they want. Kids are slow to sign, so Lacey and her cadre try to force the issue by making the UDMs do something wrong at the Kittenball game. It's only a matter of time. A nice fantasy for readers new to chapter books and fantasy, with a positive message.

  25. 4 out of 5

    michelle

    This book alternates the perspective from Nory to Bax, a boy who is a shape shifter, but so far can only turn himself into a rock. Book 2 has a slightly more well developed plot since book 1 needed to set the stage. Here, Nory and Bax have been working with the same tutor to help them gain more control of their powers. Nory still focuses on trying to be normal, truly struggling with accepting her UDM powers. She is encouraged to join the kitten-ball team so the other kids can get to know her ins This book alternates the perspective from Nory to Bax, a boy who is a shape shifter, but so far can only turn himself into a rock. Book 2 has a slightly more well developed plot since book 1 needed to set the stage. Here, Nory and Bax have been working with the same tutor to help them gain more control of their powers. Nory still focuses on trying to be normal, truly struggling with accepting her UDM powers. She is encouraged to join the kitten-ball team so the other kids can get to know her instead of her strange magic. At the same time, some weird things have been happening around school and a group of kids are pointing their fingers at the UDM class. They are evening circulating a petition to have them kicked out of the school. We all know the line that sticks and stones may break your bones...well, words still hurt. Add magic into the mix and bullying takes on a whole new meaning, especially if someone tries to fight back. The idea in this one is that it can be easy to bully and tease, especially when you don't get to know the person. By trying to be a part of the school and participate in various ways, the UDM kids don't need to feel so isolated.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jill Jemmett

    The kids in this story have special magic powers. Nory and her friends have upside-down magic because their powers don’t work the way they are supposed to. Though these kids have special powers, they still have to deal with ordinary school problems in this story. Someone at the school is turning everything into stone. The other kids think it must be the upside-down magic class who is pranking them. Bax seems like the most obvious culprit because he can turn himself into a stone, but he claims he The kids in this story have special magic powers. Nory and her friends have upside-down magic because their powers don’t work the way they are supposed to. Though these kids have special powers, they still have to deal with ordinary school problems in this story. Someone at the school is turning everything into stone. The other kids think it must be the upside-down magic class who is pranking them. Bax seems like the most obvious culprit because he can turn himself into a stone, but he claims he didn’t do it. Nory and her friends have to fight to remain in the school while they investigate the strange pranks. What I love about this series is that it’s a well developed story. I enjoyed it and I was intrigued until the end, even though it’s aimed towards a younger audience. I didn’t guess what was happening, so I was surprised at the end but it also made sense. This is a great series and I’m excited to see what happens next.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Alysha DeShaé

    A bit of anti-bullying is included in this book and it's done very well. Considering that it's a child's book, everything does wrap up fairly neatly, but I'm pleased that the bully doesn't become friends with the people she's picking on. I love realism in my fiction (when done right) and it would not have made sense. (view spoiler)[The bully is praised for her activism (she starts a petition and gets a good number of signatures) and standing up for what she thinks, but then it's explained that s A bit of anti-bullying is included in this book and it's done very well. Considering that it's a child's book, everything does wrap up fairly neatly, but I'm pleased that the bully doesn't become friends with the people she's picking on. I love realism in my fiction (when done right) and it would not have made sense. (view spoiler)[The bully is praised for her activism (she starts a petition and gets a good number of signatures) and standing up for what she thinks, but then it's explained that she's going about it the wrong way (deliberately trying to hurt people) and told that just because she thinks something different doesn't mean she's right or that she will get her way just because other people agree with her. (hide spoiler)] This is definitely something children should be reading in this day and age.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christine Rains

    My seven-year-old son picked out this book based on the cover. He loves cats! It was a terrific choice. This is a children's fantasy book about a group of kids whose magic is wonky. They call it upside-down magic. The kids are part of a new program at Dunwiddle School of Magic, and all they want to do is fit in. It's tough when some stuck up kids don't want them around and try to get them kicked out of the school. There were plenty of funny bits, mystery, and tension. My son loved kittenball as a My seven-year-old son picked out this book based on the cover. He loves cats! It was a terrific choice. This is a children's fantasy book about a group of kids whose magic is wonky. They call it upside-down magic. The kids are part of a new program at Dunwiddle School of Magic, and all they want to do is fit in. It's tough when some stuck up kids don't want them around and try to get them kicked out of the school. There were plenty of funny bits, mystery, and tension. My son loved kittenball as a sport! What I liked was the fact the kids came from all sorts of families with a mixture of backgrounds yet they found friendship together. It was different from other children's books with the various kinds of magic and how the upside-down magic worked or didn't work! We'll definitely be picking up more in this series.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Десислава Сивилова

    I liked the mystery element and the introduction of the "us vs. them" conflict (all heroes need their enemies, right?), and totally enjoyed Bax's POV. And the appearance of even more upside-down magic! But ... some of the overall charm of the previous novel was missing. I particularly didn't like the infodumpy beginning: I don't believe sequels are required to spell out all the details of the world at the start of each new book, even given the target audience. If the authors feel some reminders a I liked the mystery element and the introduction of the "us vs. them" conflict (all heroes need their enemies, right?), and totally enjoyed Bax's POV. And the appearance of even more upside-down magic! But ... some of the overall charm of the previous novel was missing. I particularly didn't like the infodumpy beginning: I don't believe sequels are required to spell out all the details of the world at the start of each new book, even given the target audience. If the authors feel some reminders are needed, they should be mentioned more gradually and naturally, not unloaded in a heap on page 1. Still a great book, a memorable adventure with interesting characters, but the slow start spoiled my first impression.

  30. 5 out of 5

    AMELIA TUTTLE

    Normally I don't read books for this age level, after all I am 48 years old!! But I saw great reviews and wanted to give it a try. The book was great. Wonderful storyline, likeable characters that young readers can relate to. One thing I loved was that the authors were so descriptive of everything, and it did not weigh the story down at all. The book was in constant motion, such as children are as well. The quirky teachers, divorced parents, kids just trying to fit in ... all completely relatabl Normally I don't read books for this age level, after all I am 48 years old!! But I saw great reviews and wanted to give it a try. The book was great. Wonderful storyline, likeable characters that young readers can relate to. One thing I loved was that the authors were so descriptive of everything, and it did not weigh the story down at all. The book was in constant motion, such as children are as well. The quirky teachers, divorced parents, kids just trying to fit in ... all completely relatable to children written about in a story that weaves these subjects in throughout. I highly recommend it to anyone with children who love to read.

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