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Annabelle Doll is 8 years old--and has been for over 100 years. Nothing much has changed in the dollhouse during that time, except for the fact that 45 years ago, Annabelle's Auntie Sarah disappeared from the dollhouse without a trace. After all this time, restless Annabelle is becoming more and more curious about her aunt's fate. And when she discovers Auntie Sarah's old Annabelle Doll is 8 years old--and has been for over 100 years. Nothing much has changed in the dollhouse during that time, except for the fact that 45 years ago, Annabelle's Auntie Sarah disappeared from the dollhouse without a trace. After all this time, restless Annabelle is becoming more and more curious about her aunt's fate. And when she discovers Auntie Sarah's old diary, she becomes positively driven. Her cautious family tries to discourage her, but Annabelle won't be stopped, even though she risks Permanent Doll State, in which she could turn into a regular, nonliving doll. And when the "Real Pink Plastic" Funcraft family moves in next door, the Doll family's world is turned upside down--in more ways than one! Fans of The Borrowers and Stuart Little will love this exciting story of adventure and mystery. The relationship between the two doll families, one antique, one modern, is hilariously, wonderfully drawn. The Funcrafts are reckless and raucous, with fearlessness born of their unbreakable plastic parts. The Doll family is reserved and somewhat prim, even though they occasionally break into '60s tunes like "Respect" in their sing-alongs. Annabelle is a heroine with integrity and gumption. Ann Martin (The Babysitters Club series) and Laura Godwin create a witty, intriguing tale, illustrated with humor and a clever eye for detail by Brian Selznick. (Ages 7 to 11) --Emilie Coulter


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Annabelle Doll is 8 years old--and has been for over 100 years. Nothing much has changed in the dollhouse during that time, except for the fact that 45 years ago, Annabelle's Auntie Sarah disappeared from the dollhouse without a trace. After all this time, restless Annabelle is becoming more and more curious about her aunt's fate. And when she discovers Auntie Sarah's old Annabelle Doll is 8 years old--and has been for over 100 years. Nothing much has changed in the dollhouse during that time, except for the fact that 45 years ago, Annabelle's Auntie Sarah disappeared from the dollhouse without a trace. After all this time, restless Annabelle is becoming more and more curious about her aunt's fate. And when she discovers Auntie Sarah's old diary, she becomes positively driven. Her cautious family tries to discourage her, but Annabelle won't be stopped, even though she risks Permanent Doll State, in which she could turn into a regular, nonliving doll. And when the "Real Pink Plastic" Funcraft family moves in next door, the Doll family's world is turned upside down--in more ways than one! Fans of The Borrowers and Stuart Little will love this exciting story of adventure and mystery. The relationship between the two doll families, one antique, one modern, is hilariously, wonderfully drawn. The Funcrafts are reckless and raucous, with fearlessness born of their unbreakable plastic parts. The Doll family is reserved and somewhat prim, even though they occasionally break into '60s tunes like "Respect" in their sing-alongs. Annabelle is a heroine with integrity and gumption. Ann Martin (The Babysitters Club series) and Laura Godwin create a witty, intriguing tale, illustrated with humor and a clever eye for detail by Brian Selznick. (Ages 7 to 11) --Emilie Coulter

30 review for The Doll People

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    Aww, I wish my kids liked this more than they did. I mean they did like it, definitely, but they didn’t like like it, you know? And this review is going to have to reflect their reaction to it, not mine, because personally I think this book is cute. But evidently they have different tastes than I do, and who am I to judge? (Just for the record, though, those little jerks wouldn’t know a good book if it bit ’em in the ass.) The Doll People is the story of a bunch of anthropomorphic dolls who’ve li Aww, I wish my kids liked this more than they did. I mean they did like it, definitely, but they didn’t like like it, you know? And this review is going to have to reflect their reaction to it, not mine, because personally I think this book is cute. But evidently they have different tastes than I do, and who am I to judge? (Just for the record, though, those little jerks wouldn’t know a good book if it bit ’em in the ass.) The Doll People is the story of a bunch of anthropomorphic dolls who’ve lived with the same real-people family for several generations. The premise of this is adorable—for freaking real, if it were my house those dolls would have been put to curbside the minute my kids had outgrown them. Who the hell keeps dolls around that long?? So the dolls have taken a sort of oath to keep secret the fact that they are alive, and if they fail in that endeavor then they enter a frozen state of lifelessness called, appropriately, Doll State. The main doll character Annabelle has to solve the mystery of her aunt’s disappearance without getting caught in Doll State, or without being discovered and carried off by the household cat. I think what ruined it for my kids, though, was my boring monotonous voice. If I could have put a little life into the reading it might have been improved for them, but I don’t enjoy reading aloud and I couldn’t always muster the vocal enthusiasm. I’m sorry kids but it’s all about me. This has been a miserably hot summer and Daddy is a little bitch when he overheats. Anyway, they can read it again when they get older if they want to. They are 5 and 7 now, and this book is probably targeted at a 7 to 9 year-old reading level. It is 250 pages intermittently dispersed with small black-and-white sketches, so most of the page is text, but it is of a large enough font that it should not be too intimidating for this age group. Personally, I wouldn’t take the advice of my kids. See what yours think.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tina

    This is a middle grade book with a little mystery. This story is told by Annabelle Doll who is a young doll girl who is part of a 100 year old doll set. Annabelle wants to find her Auntie Sarah who disappeared from the dollhouse without a trace over 40 year ago. I love all the characters, and they where so fun and developed. I love this storyline was very fun to read, and I enjoyed reading this book. The small mystery parts was fun. This book made me think of the movie "Toy Story" a little bit. This is a middle grade book with a little mystery. This story is told by Annabelle Doll who is a young doll girl who is part of a 100 year old doll set. Annabelle wants to find her Auntie Sarah who disappeared from the dollhouse without a trace over 40 year ago. I love all the characters, and they where so fun and developed. I love this storyline was very fun to read, and I enjoyed reading this book. The small mystery parts was fun. This book made me think of the movie "Toy Story" a little bit. (*)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    If you are looking for a story that you can share with your chapter reader that doesn't include first loves, cliques or mean girls than this is the story for you. This was a sweet, delightful and clever story about adventure, friendship and mystery. Annabelle is part of a doll set that is over one hundred years old. The set has been passed down from grandmother to daughter to granddaughter. Annabelle is curious about what happened to her Auntie Sarah who disappeared from the doll set over 50 yea If you are looking for a story that you can share with your chapter reader that doesn't include first loves, cliques or mean girls than this is the story for you. This was a sweet, delightful and clever story about adventure, friendship and mystery. Annabelle is part of a doll set that is over one hundred years old. The set has been passed down from grandmother to daughter to granddaughter. Annabelle is curious about what happened to her Auntie Sarah who disappeared from the doll set over 50 years ago. No one in her family seems to remember what happened or is willing to talk about it. When a new doll family moves into the humans house (to appease the human's younger sister who's always playing her older sister's doll set), Annabelle is excited learn the new dolls have a young daughter, too, named Tiffany. Annabelle and Tiffany both team up to solve the mystery of what happened to Auntie Sarah. [WARNING SPOILERS]. I loved the premise of bringing in a new doll family to keep the sisters from fighting over the current doll set. I liked that the new doll set was plastic, which enabled Tiffany to do more dangerous tasks on their adventure than Annabelle, who is made out of china and may break. I loved that Auntie Sarah was a Jane Goodall type character who disappearance happened because she was chronicling the wonders of the outside world: spiders, dust bunnies, etc. I loved that once Sarah was found safe and sound the dolls had to figure out how to let her be discovered by the family, so her reappearance wouldn't raise any suspicion. I loved the ever-present danger of The Captain, the humans cat, who would abscond with a doll at a moments notice, taking them to who knows where. Ann Martin and Laura Godwin weave all these elements together seamlessly to create a fantastic tale. Brian Selznicks drawings bring visual interest to the story and life to the characters. Very deserving of every single star.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    This is the first book in the Doll People series, but I unknowingly read them out of order, starting with the third book which is the only one my library had on audiobook. I loved it so much that I asked for the first one for my birthday ;-) I loved it, too. Here is the story of Annabelle Doll and her family. Created over 100 years ago in England, the Doll family came to live with a little girl in America and has been passed down from mother to daughter over the years. Annabelle and her family no This is the first book in the Doll People series, but I unknowingly read them out of order, starting with the third book which is the only one my library had on audiobook. I loved it so much that I asked for the first one for my birthday ;-) I loved it, too. Here is the story of Annabelle Doll and her family. Created over 100 years ago in England, the Doll family came to live with a little girl in America and has been passed down from mother to daughter over the years. Annabelle and her family now belong to eight-year-old Kate, whom Annabelle loves. They are also occasionally played with by little sister Nora, who has a special fondness for playing Rancher Family and bringing all sorts of dirty farm animals into the Doll's lovely home. Oh, the horror! ;-> Fortunately, Nora gets a new doll family for her birthday (the non-breakable, plastic, ultra-modern FunCraft family). This alleviates some of the Nora-stress for the Doll family and also provides them with some new doll acquaintances (I chuckled so much over the proper Doll family visiting the 21st century FunCrafts in their plastic overwhelmingly pink home!) Still, all is not quite well in doll land as Auntie Sarah, Annabelle's aunt, has been missing for 45 years!!!! When Annabelle discovers Auntie Sarah's diary, she gains a new appreciation for the brave, adventuresome woman Auntie Sarah was (always sneaking off to explore new parts of the human's home, or to find a new species of spider to study) and a profound desire to set out to find her, much to the chagrin of her family who would much prefer to stay safely ensconced in the doll house, and for Annabelle to do the same. Here, the story takes on an unexpected complexity as the family argues and tries to come to terms with what to do about the Auntie Sarah situation. Mama and Papa Doll want to protect Annabelle. Uncle Doll is confronted with his own feelings of cowardice as he was too afraid to look for his wife before. It's the first time Annabelle has ever seen adults disagree, and the first time she has felt truly compelled to do something independent of her family's wishes. Their fears are compounded by the looming threat not only of The Captain (the human's cat) but of *Permanent Doll State* if they break too many rules of dollkind. Annabelle has been in Doll State before--slipping into an immobile condition for a day if one of the humans sees her move--but PDS is much more serious, causing the doll to lose her freewill forever! This raises lots of great conversation points if parents read this with their children. What obligation do we have to rescue others if it puts our own lives in danger? What if the person left willingly, knowing the danger, versus was lost in an accident? To what extent should adults protect their children versus allowing their children the freedom to explore? Etc. Etc. Despite the occasionally weightier issues, the story is quite breezy and fun on the whole with a wonderful sense of adventure and excitement, as well as cozier moments. The audiobook narration by Lynne Redgrave is absolutely wonderful--like ones very own (British and immensely talented) grandma reading you a bedtime story. I highly recommend these stories to children who enjoy dolls and cherish the possibility that their dolls might be real, as well as to adults who have never quite outgrown their love of dollhouses and the wonderful world of make-believe.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Katie Carson

    Although this book is a favorite on my bookshelves, many of my eighth grade girls seems reluctant to pick it up (by fourteen, you apparently should be over dolls, in the eyes of my students) and enthralled within the first few pages. The story about is about an old porcelain doll family who is bombarded with the arrival of a new plastic doll family, who do not respect their "dated" ways of life and The Doll Code of Honor. This brought to my mind memories of my mom forcing her old Chrissy doll (I Although this book is a favorite on my bookshelves, many of my eighth grade girls seems reluctant to pick it up (by fourteen, you apparently should be over dolls, in the eyes of my students) and enthralled within the first few pages. The story about is about an old porcelain doll family who is bombarded with the arrival of a new plastic doll family, who do not respect their "dated" ways of life and The Doll Code of Honor. This brought to my mind memories of my mom forcing her old Chrissy doll (I think her name was) on me. I hated the way her eyes were painted on and the funny yarn-looking hair she had. I found myself sidetracked often thinking about my doll days and how much imaginative energy goes into playing with these toys. Like so many other personified toy stories, I feel that one of the reasons this book appealed to me so much was my constant connection back to creating interactions with my own dolls. Our textbook relates this idea to the concept that if we are making our toys talk like people, as readers, we are interested in seeing these toys talk on their own (without our direction). I compare it to the curiosity we all have about what our toys our doing when we are not around; a theme also present in books like Corduroy and Toy Story. I also frequently found myself lost in Brian Selznick's illustrations. The creative perspectives of the dolls in action keep the reader moving throughout the story and are very appealing to interested eyes. I must say that the illustrations make the text far less intimidating to struggling readers, without compromising the quality of the story in the book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kacy

    OMG BEST BOOK IN THE WORLD !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! OMG BEST BOOK IN THE WORLD !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Linda Lipko

    If you are looking for something in depth and intellectual, this isn't the book for you, but if you are weary, tired and simply wanting something smooth, delightfully creative, imaginative and unique, then by all means, take a journey through doll land where magic occurs. A porcelain family of dolls have inhabited an antique doll house for four generations. They come alive during the day when the house is empty and at night when the house is quiet. There are funny adventures, both inside the doll If you are looking for something in depth and intellectual, this isn't the book for you, but if you are weary, tired and simply wanting something smooth, delightfully creative, imaginative and unique, then by all means, take a journey through doll land where magic occurs. A porcelain family of dolls have inhabited an antique doll house for four generations. They come alive during the day when the house is empty and at night when the house is quiet. There are funny adventures, both inside the doll house where the 100 year old family bangs away at a old fashioned wooden piano singing Aretha Franklin's Respect sockittome. sockitome, sockitome and outside the doll house where they hesitantly wander down the dark halls, sneaking under the sofa, hiding from the family cat who is ever lurking to catch them. The book is uniquely illustrated by Brian Selznick and would not be as wondrous without the stunning creative art work. When the young daughter of the real life people family receives a gift, the 100 year old doll family meet a brand new, modern, adventurous plastic bunch of characters who are not as rigid, up tight or breakable. The author delightfully intertwines the personalities and the cultural differences of the older and modern doll family members. I liked this book for many reasons, primarily for the imaginative wonderment of it all.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rachel :)

    Love, love, loved this book when I was a bit younger. Would quickly recommend it to anyone asking. :)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cadence

    "What surprised me was when Kate said, "Do you ever think dolls are alive?"" -Cadee, age 7 "What surprised me was when Kate said, "Do you ever think dolls are alive?"" -Cadee, age 7

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brittney Griffith

    This book is one of my favorites from when I was younger. I love the mystery of trying to find Auntie Sarah and all of the adventures that Annabell goes on to find her aunt and get around the house. Annabell is a doll, who has been passed down in the same family for generations. Fifty years ago, Auntie Sarah disappeared and Annabell's doll family has never found out where she disappeared to. When another doll family moves in, Annabell befriends the daughter and they decide that Annabell needs to This book is one of my favorites from when I was younger. I love the mystery of trying to find Auntie Sarah and all of the adventures that Annabell goes on to find her aunt and get around the house. Annabell is a doll, who has been passed down in the same family for generations. Fifty years ago, Auntie Sarah disappeared and Annabell's doll family has never found out where she disappeared to. When another doll family moves in, Annabell befriends the daughter and they decide that Annabell needs to solve the mystery of her aunt's disappearance. This book is great for grades 3-5. It has a lot of different elements to it, which is why I would recommend it to an older grade level. The illustrations on the cover, inside the cover and inside the book are fun. The cover is the only colored illustration but it really captures the historic value of Annabell and her family as well as the modern doll family. Inside the cover there are ads from the early 1900's of the doll house and family members of Annabell's doll family, in the back is the same for the modern family. This really adds value to the book as an introduction and something fun for the reader to have in addition to the story.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Claire S

    We really liked this, but were sort of weirded out by it. Plus, an ongoing weird thing would happen where, toys that make music would go on mysteriously in the middle of the night. Throughout my daughter's childhood... it would happen now and then. This one ball with knob-like things sticking out that was really loud, and this one horse with a purple mane.. So, given that, we were perhaps a little bit sensitive. Anyway, great book, the sequel as well. A bit dark, but still.. We really liked this, but were sort of weirded out by it. Plus, an ongoing weird thing would happen where, toys that make music would go on mysteriously in the middle of the night. Throughout my daughter's childhood... it would happen now and then. This one ball with knob-like things sticking out that was really loud, and this one horse with a purple mane.. So, given that, we were perhaps a little bit sensitive. Anyway, great book, the sequel as well. A bit dark, but still..

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Read this aloud with my 9 year old and we loved it! It is full of adventure and mysteries that keep you guessing what will happen next. The characters are easy to relate to and add to the stories charm. I would recommend reading the book over doing an audio because Brian Selnick's illustrations are great! Read this aloud with my 9 year old and we loved it! It is full of adventure and mysteries that keep you guessing what will happen next. The characters are easy to relate to and add to the stories charm. I would recommend reading the book over doing an audio because Brian Selnick's illustrations are great!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Emery

    I've read this book five times! I love it!👍❤️ I've read this book five times! I love it!👍❤️

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tara Kendall

    I remember loving this book as a child. I just finished reading it to my first graders and they were hanging on every word 💛

  15. 4 out of 5

    Leonard Kim

    My 8yo daughter loves these books and insisted I read this, so I really can't rate it any lower, right? My 8yo daughter loves these books and insisted I read this, so I really can't rate it any lower, right?

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lizzy Knowles

    SPOILER ALERT Written by Ann M. Martin & Laura Godwin Pictures by Brian Selznick There is a house of dolls, but not just any kind of dolls they are alive. Humans don’t know this but when they are away they can talk, walk, read and do just about anything that you could think of. There is one doll who has a secret that no one else knows, and her name is Annabelle. She has 7 people in her family, one is a nanny. Her aunt and uncle live with her and her family. Auntie Sarah has been missing for man SPOILER ALERT Written by Ann M. Martin & Laura Godwin Pictures by Brian Selznick There is a house of dolls, but not just any kind of dolls they are alive. Humans don’t know this but when they are away they can talk, walk, read and do just about anything that you could think of. There is one doll who has a secret that no one else knows, and her name is Annabelle. She has 7 people in her family, one is a nanny. Her aunt and uncle live with her and her family. Auntie Sarah has been missing for many years and Annabelle has always wanted to find out what happened to her. One day when they had time to wonder about their doll house Annabelle found that there was a hidden book in the book shelf. It was Auntie Sarah’s journal. This could lead to where Auntie Sarah disappeared to Annabelle thought. She didn’t tell anyone in her family that she had found her journal. when Annabelle was alone she would read it. Annabelle asked Uncle doll to come with her to find Auntie Sarah. So one night they sent out to find her. They came upon a box of other dolls and they were the Funcrafts. They became friends with them. They tried again to find Auntie Sarah but they had no success. Annabelle kept reading through the journal and she found out that Auntie Sarah went on an adventure to the attic and never returned. They went searching there, but the first time they could not find her but the second time they did. Their family was finally back together again after so many years of being apart. This book was interesting and you just wanted to find out if they found Auntie Sarah. I would recommend this book to about 9 or 10 year olds. It was an interesting book I have never really read anything like it. i think that the genera of this book was suspense. This book tried to get you to believe that dolls were really alive you just didn’t know. I didn’t think that the author left anything hanging in the book that I noticed. It was a fast read I finished it in about two and a half hours This was a good book and I would recommend to read it if you are interested in fiction/suspense books.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mordy :•)

    This was one of my favorite books as a child, even my mother loved it when she read it to me. I am now in my mid-twenties and still adore this story. Its so interesting and fun. I hope to read the 3rd and 4th book in the series on day too.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mariana

    Rating: I give this book 5 stars because it is a-ma-zing. It tells me that dolls are people too, st the beginnig when Mr. Judd gave me this book, I thought it was for babies! But no way, it is amazing! It is a gorgeous story. Summary: At Kate's room lied a 100 year old doll house which loved a very curous little girl, Annabelle. She and her family were very scared of humans because they did not want to enter Permanent Doll State, which is when a doll shows herself to a human and then the doll dies Rating: I give this book 5 stars because it is a-ma-zing. It tells me that dolls are people too, st the beginnig when Mr. Judd gave me this book, I thought it was for babies! But no way, it is amazing! It is a gorgeous story. Summary: At Kate's room lied a 100 year old doll house which loved a very curous little girl, Annabelle. She and her family were very scared of humans because they did not want to enter Permanent Doll State, which is when a doll shows herself to a human and then the doll dies and have no life. The family was Papa, Mama, Uncle Doll, Nanny, Baby Betsy, Bobby, Auntie Sarah, and Anabelle. But, a long time ago a misfortune happened. Auntie Sarah disappeared, and no one ever looked for her. That is when, one day Anabelle was looking through the shelves, and sehe found a very dusty and old journal, and it was her aunt's! Anabelle wanted it to make it secret, whnes she read it she learned a bunch of stuff from her aunt that no one knew, at least, she thought no one knew. One day, when Anabelle thgought she had read enough, she decided to explore the Human's house to see if they find Auntie Sarah, but they did not find her, they found some other dolls! She met a girl doll called Tiffany, she by the time became Anabelle's BFF and they created a detective group called SELMP. They looked and looked, will this treacherous mission will be accomplished? Well it is up to you to know!

  19. 4 out of 5

    (NS) Becca

    Doll people is a fantastic book that explores the adventures of Annabelle the doll and her secret life. Annabelle keeps us in suspense as she dabbles in some dangerous business and threatens her own "permanent doll state." I literally could not put this put down as I read it. I have always been a huge fan of Ann Martin, but this collaboratively written novel is an excellent new tale. It enlightened me to a new style of writing that I had never read from Ann Martin before (I read the whole babysi Doll people is a fantastic book that explores the adventures of Annabelle the doll and her secret life. Annabelle keeps us in suspense as she dabbles in some dangerous business and threatens her own "permanent doll state." I literally could not put this put down as I read it. I have always been a huge fan of Ann Martin, but this collaboratively written novel is an excellent new tale. It enlightened me to a new style of writing that I had never read from Ann Martin before (I read the whole babysitters series). I loved the clever use of personified toys and feel like so many of my girls would really enjoy reading it. After the movie Toy Story, I think children's imaginations were heightened even more than before to the idea of toys leading a secret life. I always loved dolls as a child and feel like this book. would have really intrigued me. ages 7-10

  20. 4 out of 5

    Katie Fitzgerald

    This is a review of the entire Doll People series, including The Doll People, The Meanest Doll in the World, The Runaway Dolls, The Doll People Set Sail, and The Doll People's Christmas. When my mom came to visit just before Easter, she brought us paperback copies of all of the Doll People books. I have always wanted to read them, so I decided to just preview them all at once so that I will be ready to hand them to my oldest daughter whenever I think she is ready. The main character of the series This is a review of the entire Doll People series, including The Doll People, The Meanest Doll in the World, The Runaway Dolls, The Doll People Set Sail, and The Doll People's Christmas. When my mom came to visit just before Easter, she brought us paperback copies of all of the Doll People books. I have always wanted to read them, so I decided to just preview them all at once so that I will be ready to hand them to my oldest daughter whenever I think she is ready. The main character of the series is Annabelle Doll. She and her family belong to Kate Palmer, an eight-year-old girl who is the most recent owner of a dollhouse that has been passed down through several generations. The other members of the Doll family include Annabelle's mother and father, her brother Bobby, Nanny, baby Betsy, Uncle Doll, and, though she has been missing for 45 years, Auntie Sarah. The adults have always been very protective of Annabelle, owing in part to their fear of breaking the oath all dolls take if they want to remain living. Part of the oath is to avoid behavior that threatens dollkind, such as being seen moving around by humans, and the penalty for putting other dolls in danger in this way can be as mild as "Doll State," a 24-hour coma-like state in which the doll is only a doll and not a living being, and as severe as "Permanent Doll State," when the doll becomes inanimate forever. When Annabelle finds Auntie Sarah's diary, however, she begins gathering clues as to where her aunt may have gone. Despite the dangers, Annabelle convinces her family that she must venture out into the Palmers' house to find her aunt and bring her back home. On the night she leaves her dollhouse for the first time, Annabelle comes upon a box containing a present for Kate's younger sister Nora to receive on her upcoming fifth birthday. The package contains a Funcraft dollhouse and a family of brand-new, durable, plastic dolls: Mom, Dad, Bailey, Baby Britney, and Tiffany, with whom Annabelle becomes fast friends. With Tiffany by her side, and buoyed by the Funcrafts' less cautious outlook on life, Annabelle is certain she can find her long-lost aunt and bring their family back together again. This quest comprises the plot for book one, The Doll People (2000). The Doll People is really well-done. The story is similar to tales like Hitty: Her First Hundred Years and The Borrowers, but the authors also add new twists to the concept to make it their own. I love all the descriptions of the ridiculous games Nora plays with all the dolls, including the fragile ones that belong to her sister, as well as the fun little details, such as the fact that Baby Betsy was sent to the original owner of the dollhouse by mistake, and that she is actually a much larger doll from a different set. Martin and Godwin understand what appeals to the imaginations of little girls who love dolls, and they tell a great story using those elements. Brian Selzick's illustrations, which I don't always like, are perfect for a book like this. His cinematic changes in perspective, and the immersive quality of his pictures really place the reader in the doll world and keep her there for the duration of the story. He does an especially great job capturing the differences in appearance and personality between the Dolls and the Funcrafts. Book two, The Meanest Doll in the World (2003), sends Annabelle and Tiffany to school in Kate's backpack. When they climb out to explore the school and inadvertently go home in the wrong backpack at the end of the day, they find themselves in a house full of dolls who live in fear of Princess Mimi, a bully who constantly puts them all in danger by intentionally doing things that can't be undone before the humans discover them. Before they return to the Palmers', Annabelle and Tiffany want to save their new friends from Mean Mimi once and for all. In book three, The Runaway Dolls (2008), the Palmers are getting ready to go on vacation when a mysterious package arrives. Annabelle discovers that it contains a baby named Tilly May - the baby doll that was originally supposed to come with the Dolls has finally been delivered after all these years! Annabelle is overjoyed to have another sister, but also very nervous. What if the Palmers don't realize what's in the package and return it unopened? Unwilling to take that chance, she and Tiffany carefully open the package, release Tilly May, and take off into the great outdoors. Unfortunately, they don't have much of a plan, and before they know it, all three girls, along with their brothers, are placed for sale in a department store from which no doll has ever escaped! The conclusion of the series, The Doll People Set Sail (2014), is illustrated by Brett Helquist, and sadly, though he tries to uphold the style established by Selznick, the charm just isn't there. The story, which is about the Dolls and Funcrafts accidentally being donated to charity and shipped overseas, is not as strong as the others to begin with, and the loss of Selznick as the illustrator just contributes to the feeling that maybe this series went on just one book too long. I will have no objection to my kids reading it (I gave it three stars), but it kind of a let-down to end the series on a low note. There is also a picture book companion to the series, The Doll People's Christmas (2016), also illustrated by Helquist. The illustrations are in color, which makes them work a little bit better than Helquist's black and white ones, but the story is bland compared to the plots of the novels. I'll probably bring it out as a novelty at Christmastime sometime after we have read the rest of the series. My oldest daughter who loves dolls and adventure stories is definitely going to love these books. She will not understand some references (the dolls sing "Respect" by Aretha Franklin, which she has never heard, and a couple of the books mention Barbies, which she has played with but has never heard called by their brand name) but the themes of friendship and family will appeal to her, and since there are always consequences for bad behavior, I feel like the series will uphold the values we are currently trying to teach her. I haven't decided yet whether to read the first one aloud to my two older girls or to just hand it over to the oldest for independent reading, but we will definitely be getting to these soon! They are great additions to our shelves, and I'm happy to have them. This review also appears on my blog, Read-at-Home Mom.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Alicea

    This post has taken me far longer to write than I'd like to admit and I think that's largely because I found this book pretty lukewarm. The Doll People by Ann M. Martin (with pictures by Brian Selznick) was another one of those books recommended as a great book for the kids in your life who are trying to stretch their legs as early and eager readers. I didn't realize at the outset of reading it that it was actually the first in a series which follow the lives of the members of the Doll family. T This post has taken me far longer to write than I'd like to admit and I think that's largely because I found this book pretty lukewarm. The Doll People by Ann M. Martin (with pictures by Brian Selznick) was another one of those books recommended as a great book for the kids in your life who are trying to stretch their legs as early and eager readers. I didn't realize at the outset of reading it that it was actually the first in a series which follow the lives of the members of the Doll family. This is like Toy Story but dialed up to 11, ya'll. We follow the adventures of Annabelle Doll who is preoccupied with the mystery of her aunt's disappearance 45 years ago. Like Toy Story, there are certain rules about letting the humans see them moving but they actually have an oath with consequences attached. (We learn about Doll State or Permanent Doll State where they are frozen either temporarily or permanently.) The storyline is slow and rather predictable but suitable for beginner readers who are gaining confidence with chapter books. I guess the most 'interesting' part (if you can call it that) was when a new set of dolls entered the house and the reader can see the difference between the older porcelain toys and the newer plastic ones. 4/10

  22. 4 out of 5

    Abby

    This was a sweet story that I think I would have been obsessed with had I read it when I was ten or eleven. At that time in my life, The Borrowers was a big part of my reading experience, and this book gave me the same vibes as that one. (Also, let's see how many times I can say the word "doll" in this review) We follow Annabelle Doll, a china doll who lives with her family, the Dolls, in a dollhouse in the bedroom of a girl named Kate. Annabelle has been eight for a hundred years, and recently, This was a sweet story that I think I would have been obsessed with had I read it when I was ten or eleven. At that time in my life, The Borrowers was a big part of my reading experience, and this book gave me the same vibes as that one. (Also, let's see how many times I can say the word "doll" in this review) We follow Annabelle Doll, a china doll who lives with her family, the Dolls, in a dollhouse in the bedroom of a girl named Kate. Annabelle has been eight for a hundred years, and recently, when our story begins, she is beginning to feel restless and unsatisfied with the life she is living. Enter the Funcrafts, the family in the dollhouse that is to be given to Kate's sister Nora. Tiffany Funcraft is Annabelle's age, but she is made of plastic, and thus not nearly as fragile as Annabelle. The two hit it off immediately, and throughout the story, we really see their friendship blossom. And the overarching plot is that of Annabelle determining to find her Auntie Sarah, who has been missing for fourty-five years. Her family seems afraid to go out after her, fearing Permanent Doll State. But Annabelle is sure that she must find her missing Auntie, and now she has Tiffany to help. Overall, this story had me grinning the whole time from sheer cuteness. I loved the explanation of Doll State and everything involved with it, I loved the having to get back in the position Kate left them in, and the studies of spiders. It was magical, adorable, and I would definitely give it to my daughter if I had one. 4.5 stars from me!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Heidy Villalvazo

    I recommend this book to a fifth grader. This book was about a doll family that is alive and a doll Annabelle that goes on adventures to find her aunt that went missing forty-five years ago. At the end of the book she does find her and takes her to her family and there house so they live happily ever after.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Kaufman

    This is a cute children's book. Always imagined as a kid, what my dolls did when I wasn't home. Enjoyed this book, and am starting book 2 tonight! This is a cute children's book. Always imagined as a kid, what my dolls did when I wasn't home. Enjoyed this book, and am starting book 2 tonight!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Liv Bowie

    This was one of my all time favorite books when I was a kid and it still follows through! This book is an adorable adventure about dolls that come to life!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    I thought it was good, because I liked the doll's point of view instead of just people. I thought it was good, because I liked the doll's point of view instead of just people.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gwen

    First chapter book read aloud that my 4 year old LOVED. She’s still talking about the Doll People. Just like my love of the Babysitters Club years ago, Ann M. Martin can pace a good friendship story.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I read this as a kid and absolutely loved it!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    An endearing book that would be fun to read with children.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Misslailadean

    i loved the book and i am sad for it to end i cant i wait to read the second book

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