web site hit counter Operation Whisper: The Capture of Soviet Spies Morris and Lona Cohen - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Operation Whisper: The Capture of Soviet Spies Morris and Lona Cohen

Availability: Ready to download

Meet Morris and Lona Cohen, an ordinary-seeming couple living on a teacher's salary in a nondescript building on the East Side of New York City. On a hot afternoon in the autumn of 1950, a trusted colleague knocked at their door, held up a finger for silence, then began scribbling a note: Go now. Leave the lights on, walk out, don't look back. Born and raised in the Bronx Meet Morris and Lona Cohen, an ordinary-seeming couple living on a teacher's salary in a nondescript building on the East Side of New York City. On a hot afternoon in the autumn of 1950, a trusted colleague knocked at their door, held up a finger for silence, then began scribbling a note: Go now. Leave the lights on, walk out, don't look back. Born and raised in the Bronx and recruited to play football at Mississippi State, Morris Cohen fought for the Loyalists in the Spanish Civil War and with the U.S. Army in World War II. He and his wife, Lona, were as American as football and fried chicken, but for one detail: they'd spent their entire adult lives stealing American military secrets for the Soviet Union. And not just any military secrets, but a complete working plan of the first atomic bomb, smuggled direct from Los Alamos to their Soviet handler in New York. Their associates Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, who accomplished far less, had just been arrested, and the prosecutor wanted the death penalty. Did the Cohens wish to face the same fate? Federal agents were in the neighborhood, knocking on doors, getting close. So get out. Take nothing. Tell no one. In Operation Whisper, Barnes Carr tells the full, true story of the most effective Soviet spy couple in America, a pair who vanished under the FBI's nose only to turn up posing as rare book dealers in London, where they continued their atomic spying. The Cohens were talented, dedicated, worldly spies-an urbane, jet-set couple loyal to their service and their friends, and very good at their work. Most people they met seemed to think they represented the best of America. The Soviets certainly thought so.


Compare

Meet Morris and Lona Cohen, an ordinary-seeming couple living on a teacher's salary in a nondescript building on the East Side of New York City. On a hot afternoon in the autumn of 1950, a trusted colleague knocked at their door, held up a finger for silence, then began scribbling a note: Go now. Leave the lights on, walk out, don't look back. Born and raised in the Bronx Meet Morris and Lona Cohen, an ordinary-seeming couple living on a teacher's salary in a nondescript building on the East Side of New York City. On a hot afternoon in the autumn of 1950, a trusted colleague knocked at their door, held up a finger for silence, then began scribbling a note: Go now. Leave the lights on, walk out, don't look back. Born and raised in the Bronx and recruited to play football at Mississippi State, Morris Cohen fought for the Loyalists in the Spanish Civil War and with the U.S. Army in World War II. He and his wife, Lona, were as American as football and fried chicken, but for one detail: they'd spent their entire adult lives stealing American military secrets for the Soviet Union. And not just any military secrets, but a complete working plan of the first atomic bomb, smuggled direct from Los Alamos to their Soviet handler in New York. Their associates Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, who accomplished far less, had just been arrested, and the prosecutor wanted the death penalty. Did the Cohens wish to face the same fate? Federal agents were in the neighborhood, knocking on doors, getting close. So get out. Take nothing. Tell no one. In Operation Whisper, Barnes Carr tells the full, true story of the most effective Soviet spy couple in America, a pair who vanished under the FBI's nose only to turn up posing as rare book dealers in London, where they continued their atomic spying. The Cohens were talented, dedicated, worldly spies-an urbane, jet-set couple loyal to their service and their friends, and very good at their work. Most people they met seemed to think they represented the best of America. The Soviets certainly thought so.

30 review for Operation Whisper: The Capture of Soviet Spies Morris and Lona Cohen

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Morris and Lona Cohen should have taken the place of the Rosenbergs. The Cohens' spy ring was responsible for passing key atomic secrets to the USSR. I found this book interesting for its description of key espionage taking place in New Mexico where I live. The book is an easy read and the author takes a bit of literary license to add details that he couldn't possible know. But it makes for a smoother read. Really stunning to see the lax security and Keystone Cop failures of the ABC (American, B Morris and Lona Cohen should have taken the place of the Rosenbergs. The Cohens' spy ring was responsible for passing key atomic secrets to the USSR. I found this book interesting for its description of key espionage taking place in New Mexico where I live. The book is an easy read and the author takes a bit of literary license to add details that he couldn't possible know. But it makes for a smoother read. Really stunning to see the lax security and Keystone Cop failures of the ABC (American, British and Canadian organizations) and others as we lose key secrets. Had a hard time understanding how many of the spies found the Soviet system so worthy of praise and taking risks. 3 Stars

  2. 4 out of 5

    Cold War Conversations Podcast

    A fascinating and well written true story of Cold War espionage. Morris and Lona Cohen, an ordinary-seeming couple living in New York City in the 1950s, however they are a key part of a Soviet plan to steal the secrets of the atomic bomb. Betrayed by a defector they disappear from view only to re-appear as Peter and Helen Kroger antiquarian booksellers in London. I’ve always been fascinated by the Cohens and have long awaited a book that details their story, especially their activities in England A fascinating and well written true story of Cold War espionage. Morris and Lona Cohen, an ordinary-seeming couple living in New York City in the 1950s, however they are a key part of a Soviet plan to steal the secrets of the atomic bomb. Betrayed by a defector they disappear from view only to re-appear as Peter and Helen Kroger antiquarian booksellers in London. I’ve always been fascinated by the Cohens and have long awaited a book that details their story, especially their activities in England in what became known as the Portland Spy Case. Operation Whisper is the first to study in detail their "two lives" as Morris and Lona Cohen in America and Peter and Helen Kroger in England. Barnes Carr doesn’t disappoint telling an exciting story of espionage sweeping from the East Coast of the US to the leafy confines of London’s suburbia. With details of the actual spycraft used (and misused) this is a must read for any cold war espionage fans. Literary fans will be fascinated by the connection between the Cohens/Krogers and Frank Doel of fame. Whilst the writer is obviously not familiar with some of the UK place names he writes in a style that is easy to read and pacey making the book read more like a novel than fact. Recommended. I received this book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sam Schelfhout

    After watching a couple seasons of the television show The Americans on FX, I became obsessed with Cold War espionage and wanted to explore this topic further through literature and historical events. I found this book through BookBub, which had a sale on this title at the time I purchased it. I was really disappointed with how this book turned out given the enthralling topic. The book covers the lives of Morris and Lona Cohen, who were instrumental in introducing the secrets of the atomic bomb After watching a couple seasons of the television show The Americans on FX, I became obsessed with Cold War espionage and wanted to explore this topic further through literature and historical events. I found this book through BookBub, which had a sale on this title at the time I purchased it. I was really disappointed with how this book turned out given the enthralling topic. The book covers the lives of Morris and Lona Cohen, who were instrumental in introducing the secrets of the atomic bomb to the Soviets quickly following World War II. The book shines in its depth of characters and settings throughout each stage of Soviet involvement in war and espionage. In fact, one of my major gripes with this book was that it got way too in-depth for the casual reader. For a book that reads like a novel, the author takes too much time and effort individually introducing each person. Whenever a new character was introduced, no matter how major or minor, the author delved into his/her childhood, silly quirks, and job background to the point where it was unnecessary. When I originally picked this book up, I thought it would be a story about the titular characters, the Cohens. However, I feel as if less than 30% of the entire book focuses on these two. The rest of the book is a lot of fluff about the people connected to the Cohens and the situations that these outside characters become entangled in. In addition, the lack of context and background information is absent in key parts of the story. At times, reading the book felt more like a chore! I applaud the author in his commitment to research and effort in telling a rich story, but the story did not flow and was bogged down by extraneous detail. My recommendation is that if you want to learn more about the Cohens, just go straight to Wikipedia and learn about them there. Unfortunately, I would not recommend this title unless you are an expert in Cold War espionage and want a poorly organized wish-wash of information to supplement your knowledge.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dr.J.G.

    If one has read The Illegals, one is generally familiar with the Cohen couple and their story, but even reading a sample of this book makes it clear this would be a worth read, telling far more than about just Cohen couple. For example, having seen the very thrilling teleseries about Sidney Reilly it's a disappointment reading the book about him by Lockhart - and here one realises why! ............ "Morris and Lona Cohen were forced to flee the United States in 1950 as the Rosenberg spy ring was be If one has read The Illegals, one is generally familiar with the Cohen couple and their story, but even reading a sample of this book makes it clear this would be a worth read, telling far more than about just Cohen couple. For example, having seen the very thrilling teleseries about Sidney Reilly it's a disappointment reading the book about him by Lockhart - and here one realises why! ............ "Morris and Lona Cohen were forced to flee the United States in 1950 as the Rosenberg spy ring was being rolled up by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The Cohens were a New York couple who ran a North American spy network that in 1945 was the first to deliver a complete diagram and description of the Allied atomic bomb to the Russians. That made them members of a select society of spies, the crème de la crème of espionage. They continued spying for the Soviets into the sixties, through some of the most turbulent decades in espionage history. "The Soviets gave the Rosenbergs money and ordered them to leave the United States just before they were formally charged. They took the money and refused to go. With that, the Soviets wrote them off and moved on to save the Cohens. The Rosenbergs were assigned to the scientific/industrial—not the atomic—line of Soviet spying in North America. Ethel did recruit her brother David Greenglass to steal product from the Manhattan Project, the Allied atomic bomb program, but he delivered only pieces of the puzzle. The Cohens ran the only Soviet network dedicated to atomic spying, and the product they turned in completed the puzzle, allowing the Russians to save years in the development of their own A-bomb. That made the Cohens eminently more valuable." "The Cohens maintained that they did not spy on the Manhattan Project in order to harm their homeland but rather to assist a wartime ally, Russia, in attaining nuclear parity so that a balance of power could be assured and another world war prevented. The atomic bomb was the most fearsome weapon ever devised. Stealing its secrets was the holy grail of espionage. "But the spy war between East and West did not end with the theft of the Bomb, or the capture of the Cohens or Blake or dozens of other spies, or with the implosion of Soviet Communism in 1991. This quiet war of lies, denials, and murder is still going on. The United States, Canada, Britain, Australia, and New Zealand operate a worldwide satellite surveillance system called Echelon that vacuums in data from phone calls and Internet traffic. Paris uses a similar program, Frenchelon, and Germany has Project 6, coordinated with the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency. Russia relies on its SORM (System of Operative Investigative Measures), and China conducts spying and hacking through Unit 61398 of the People’s Liberation Army. "“Nothing has changed,” cautioned Sergei Tretyakov, who defected in 2000 after running Russian intelligence operations out of New York. “The SVR [Russian foreign intelligence] rezidenturas in the U.S. are not less but in some respects even more active.” Rezidenturas are spy stations in countries outside Russia. The one in New York has traditionally been called Station One. "Tretyakov’s warning means billions of dollars are being spent by each of those countries, every year, on spying. And each new year brings ever larger budgets, with no end in sight." ............ "The Russian Revolution of February 1917 (March in the Western calendar) saw Imperial Army generals forcing the abdication of Nicholas II and a provisional government being formed to rule Russia until a constituent assembly could meet to decide the nation’s future. The new premier was Alexander Fyodorovich Kerensky, a moderate socialist revolutionary. Kerensky called the new government the Russian Revolutionary Republic and kept the country in the war on the side of the Allies. "Lenin had other plans. He had secretly financed his Bolshevik Party with German money as far back as 1915, and he had cut a deal with Berlin to take Russia out of the war if he could seize power. Lenin was not in Russia for the February Revolution; nor was Trotsky or Stalin. In April 1917 the Germans delivered Lenin back to his homeland in a so-called sealed train, and in July he attempted a Bolshevik coup d’état with a street mob. But Lenin, like Kerensky, was a great talker who possessed few realistic skills in military strategy. Lenin’s “July Days” operation failed miserably, and he was forced to flee the country disguised as a woman wearing a poorly fitting wig after the provisional government publicized his ties with Germany. "Lenin sneaked back into Russia for a second act, in October 1917. This time he was successful. Millions of Russian soldiers were deserting the eastern front and killing their officers, and the Russian Provisional Government was on the brink of collapse. Kerensky dropped the ball and Lenin scooped it up. He called it the Great October Socialist Revolution, though it was not a general uprising of the Russian people but simply a coup staged by a few hundred street fighters. In Petrograd, the capital, some Red Guards landed two artillery shells on the Winter Palace, defended in part by Colonel Maria Leontievna Botchkareva and her First Russian Women’s Battalion of Death. "After that “bombardment,” the provisional government ministers and the women soldiers surrendered, and a mob looted the palace, leaving feces in the bathtubs as calling cards. Russia was then in the hands of the Bolsheviks. There was little loss of life in Petrograd; eight Bolsheviks were killed, six of them by bullets fired by their own comrades. Lenin later admitted that his Red Guards mostly argued the opposition out of business. The Red Guards were replaced by the Red Army, later called the Soviet Army. "Lenin kept his bargain with Berlin by signing a separate peace with the Central Powers at Brest-Litovsk (now in Belarus) on March 3, 1918. That shut down the eastern front, taking Russia and eight million of her soldiers out of the war. Germany and Austria-Hungary were then free to start shifting divisions over to France. The result was the Russian Civil War, with Lenin and the Bolsheviks defending their shaky new government against a mélange of Socialist Revolutionaries, anarchists, Czechs, Poles, tsarist White armies, Allied and German agents, and roaming gangs of highwaymen." ............ "The Allied Intervention in the Russian Civil War, as it is popularly known, was actually a two-pronged operation. The second part was to kidnap Lenin, ferry him off to England to stand trial for treason, and install a pro-Allied government in Moscow. London’s top conspirators in the plot were Robert Bruce Lockhart, British consul in Moscow and a special agent for the intelligence section of the British Foreign Office, and Sidney Reilly, an agent for MI1C, the British Secret Intelligence Service, also known as MI6. Washington was represented by Xenophon Dmitrevich deBlumenthal Kalamatiano, an American agent for the Bureau of Secret Intelligence of the Diplomatic Service of the U.S. State Department." "The British would later call their Moscow coup attempt the Lockhart Conspiracy. The Russians saw it as the Envoys’ Plot. Then there are those who say it was the Reilly Plot because Sidney might have been secretly planning his own coup in Moscow, which would allow him to do some browsing in the captured Soviet treasury. Taking all that into consideration, a more equitable term would be simply the Lenin Plot." "The Lenin Plot was a colossal embarrassment to Washington, Paris, and London. They had gone to war against a former ally and tried to murder her leader. Worse yet, their sophisticated, modern invasion force was defeated by Trotsky’s ragged Red Army at the battle of Shenkursk in January 1919 and driven out of Russia in shame. "Lockhart was praised and promoted in London, and later knighted. Kalamatiano was dismissed by Washington as a failure, a relic from another time. His controllers paid him off and put him on a train for Illinois. Two years later, his health broken, he died in obscurity. "But during his incarceration, Kalamatiano had continued to collect information about the Communists, the name the Bolsheviks had adopted in 1918, and when he was debriefed in Washington he warned that America had replaced Britain as the main adversary of Soviet Russia. It was both a prediction and a warning. And it turned out to be accurate. "Western intelligence agencies dismissed the Lenin Plot as just a sideshow that had gone bad. They tied it off and moved on. But the Russians saw it as proof that the West was out to destroy the Soviet state. Dzerzhinsky made the case a part of the curriculum at his spy school in Moscow. Succeeding generations of Soviet bosses used it to justify whatever mischief they could cook up against the West. "If the term “Cold War” can be defined as an attempt to defeat another nation politically, economically, or militarily without a formal declaration of war, then the Lenin Plot was the true beginning of what President John F. Kennedy would call the “long twilight struggle.”" ............ "THE COHENS AND THEIR SPY RING were rounded up in London in 1961 and convicted of conspiring to violate the British Official Secrets Act. It was one of the high-profile spy cases of the sixties, a decade that would bring George Blake, Kim Philby, John Vassall, Robert Soblen, the Christine Keeler affair, and the U-2 incident into living rooms everywhere. And those were only the cases that intelligence agencies allowed the public to know about. "Morris and Lona had finally been tracked down by the British Security Service (MI5), assisted by Scotland Yard’s Special Branch, the CIA, the FBI, and the counterintelligence agencies of several other nations. The Cohens had once again been plying the trade they knew best—stealing atomic secrets for Russia, this time by operating a spy network inside a North Atlantic Treaty Organization base in Britain. The media dubbed it the “Portland Spy Ring” and the “Naval Secrets Case.” The roll-up of the Cohens’ organization was called Operation Whisper first by Scotland Yard, then by the other agencies involved in the investigation." ............ "GOVERNMENTAL SUSPICION of Soviet intentions in the United States dates back at least to January 1919, the same month that Allied forces were defeated at Shenkursk in North Russia. On the twenty-first of that month, a New York City police inspector and former military intelligence officer named Thomas J. Tunney told a U.S. Senate subcommittee a revealing story about Leon Trotsky. Trotsky had lived in New York for a while in 1917, editing a Russian newspaper and giving lectures on revolutionary socialism before going back to Russia to convert to Bolshevism and raise the Red Army. As Trotsky was leaving New York, Tunney said, he left instructions to his American followers: “I want you people here to organize and keep on organizing until you are able to overthrow the damned, rotten capitalistic government of this country.” "Two months after Tunney’s testimony, the Communist International (Comintern) was founded in Moscow. This was during the time when the defeated Allied force in North Russia was waiting for a fresh troop surge from Britain and while Kalamatiano was being tortured in prison in Moscow. The Comintern was a Soviet-sponsored association of international Communist parties set up to stoke violent revolution throughout the world. “Setting off Red fireworks” was the expression used. The preferred method was to stage a propagande par le fait, a propaganda by the deed, against an established government. This involved committing a high-profile political crime in order to provoke an even harsher response from the state. Theoretically, it in turn would radicalize the population and catalyze a revolution, counterrevolution, civil war, or coup." "In June, bombs were detonated in eight more cities. Again the targets were government officials who had opposed anarchism and supported deportation of radicals. This time Palmer’s house was hit. He was not injured, but the bomber, an anarchist newspaper editor named Carlo Valdinoli, was killed in the blast. Apparently the overweight Valdinoli had tripped on Palmer’s doorstep with the bomb in his hands. One of his body parts landed across the street in the yard of Assistant Navy Secretary Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Two more inept bombers, along with a night watchman, were killed that night in New York in the bombing of a judge’s home. Anarchists openly claimed responsibility for those attacks, but because of a lack of evidence, no arrests were ever made." "Two months after the second round of bombings, Palmer established a new Radical Division within the Justice Department. It was closely aligned with the Justice Department’s Bureau of Investigation, forerunner to the FBI. The Bureau of Investigation had been created in 1908 by Charles Joseph Bonaparte, secretary of the navy and attorney general in President Theodore Roosevelt’s cabinet. Known variously as the Imperial Peacock and Souphouse Charlie, Bonaparte was a grandson of Jerome, younger brother of Napoléon I, making him probably the only member of royalty to ever reach high office in the U.S. government." ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............

  5. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Mr Carr's book about the Cohens (or Krugers) starts off with a history of the Russian revolution so bad I didn't know whether to laugh or cry. Once past that, it is an interesting story of a couple whose espionage career should have ended a decade before they were finally caught. Mr Carr's book about the Cohens (or Krugers) starts off with a history of the Russian revolution so bad I didn't know whether to laugh or cry. Once past that, it is an interesting story of a couple whose espionage career should have ended a decade before they were finally caught.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Quentin Stewart

    I received an ARC of this book for an honest review. In the annals of the Cold War only a few are familiar with the Cohens. In the United States if you have lived through or studied the beginning of the arms race and the Cold War the name Rosenberg is well known as the American spies who gave the nuclear secrets to the Soviets. But Mr. Carr's book informs us of another couple who should be given the real credit for stealing the secrets and getting them into Soviet hands. Morris and Lona Cohen are I received an ARC of this book for an honest review. In the annals of the Cold War only a few are familiar with the Cohens. In the United States if you have lived through or studied the beginning of the arms race and the Cold War the name Rosenberg is well known as the American spies who gave the nuclear secrets to the Soviets. But Mr. Carr's book informs us of another couple who should be given the real credit for stealing the secrets and getting them into Soviet hands. Morris and Lona Cohen are children of immigrants who in their early lives latch onto the liberal philosophies of socialism and communism. Morris even joins up and fights in Spain's Civil War on the Soviet side, where he is wounded and is brought into the circle of spies for the Soviet Union. Both Morris and Lona accept the propaganda that comes out of the Soviet Union and are determined to help this less fortunate ally. It is during World War II that the Cohens, working as a team begin to turn over weapon information to the Soviets. Morris is serving in the army, first in Alaska and then in Europe, and Lona is traveling the east coast getting information that might be helpful to the Soviets in the development of new weapons. They see no problem in this because the Soviets are fighting the same enemy as the United States and should have the same weapons to use in the war. But then the first atomic explosion occurs and the Soviets want to get all of the information that they can get on this new weapon. It is Lona who finds a way to get the information, As the Rosenberg ring is being rolled up the the FBI the Cohen's handler tells them to walk away and in a round a bout way they end up in England again spying for the Soviets against the British bases of NATO. The British MI5 and MI6 get wind of them and with dogged determination they move in and arrest them and their handler. They were tried and convicted and eventually exchanged for some British citizens who had been arrested in the Soviet Union. The Cohens lived a life as Soviet heroes in their adopted country and would die peacefully there and be buried with honors. Why are they not that well known in America? The American anti spy network missed them and allowed them to slip through their fingers to continuing their spying for the Soviets. They were never put on trial in the United States thus that embarrassing fact was never exposed except in the inner circles of the FBI. Were they traitors? That is a question that is left up to the reader to decide for themselves.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    I received a free copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This spy couple did more damage than the Rosenbergs, but you've probably never heard of them. I picked this up because I hoped to learn more about how these spies collected top secret atomic secrets and forwarded them to the Soviets. This book presents you with a great deal of information, but I think it still lacked some of the details I had hoped for. I found the book crowded with tons of details that did I received a free copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This spy couple did more damage than the Rosenbergs, but you've probably never heard of them. I picked this up because I hoped to learn more about how these spies collected top secret atomic secrets and forwarded them to the Soviets. This book presents you with a great deal of information, but I think it still lacked some of the details I had hoped for. I found the book crowded with tons of details that didn't seem relevant to the story (to me). So many people are introduced aside from the Cohens that I quickly lost track of who was who. Several reviewers have said this reads like a novel, but I have to disagree. It took me forever to get through this; probably because it felt more like a catalog of Soviet spies than the story of the Cohens. Not a bad choice if you love Cold War spy stories, but probably a bit too dense for the casual reader.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ralphz

    You've heard of the Rosenbergs, but you've probably never heard of the Cohens, Morris and Lona, who pulled off a spectacular bit of Cold War espionage ... then disappeared. The story starts out with young, idealistic communists in the 1930s and comes to its first climax with the theft of blueprints for the atomic bomb. As the Rosenbergs were rounded up for their spying (for a much smaller secret), the Cohens ran. Soon, in England, Peter and Helen Kroger mysteriously showed up and start selling boo You've heard of the Rosenbergs, but you've probably never heard of the Cohens, Morris and Lona, who pulled off a spectacular bit of Cold War espionage ... then disappeared. The story starts out with young, idealistic communists in the 1930s and comes to its first climax with the theft of blueprints for the atomic bomb. As the Rosenbergs were rounded up for their spying (for a much smaller secret), the Cohens ran. Soon, in England, Peter and Helen Kroger mysteriously showed up and start selling books. And stealing secrets. Eventually they are caught, and thus ends the first great round of East vs. West. This is a Cold War tale that's riveting in it's scope and detail. Carr weaves his tale with the everyday ins and outs of being a spy. I received this book for review. Read more of my reviews at Ralphsbooks.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jack Barsky

    This book is filling in a gap in the annals of Soviet espionage. Clearly, the Cohens contributed much more to the theft of the atomic secret than the Rosenbergs who were executed. This book was of special interest to me because I got to know Morris and Lona personally while I was in Moscow, being prepared for undercover work in the United States by the KGB. They were absolutely lovely people who most have been great friends and neighbors. Goes to show you that the old saying "don't judge a book This book is filling in a gap in the annals of Soviet espionage. Clearly, the Cohens contributed much more to the theft of the atomic secret than the Rosenbergs who were executed. This book was of special interest to me because I got to know Morris and Lona personally while I was in Moscow, being prepared for undercover work in the United States by the KGB. They were absolutely lovely people who most have been great friends and neighbors. Goes to show you that the old saying "don't judge a book by his cover" is VERY true. Those nice people (honestly) served an evil cause. As much as it might pain one to say: 'consequently, they were evil themselves', it is the hard truth. BTW - it also goes the other way - just because we do not like certain people, that does not imply they are bad.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dayna

    Thorough & well-paced, this book is filled with details I would never have known. You can skim the 1st few pages if you already know the basics of the Cold War; after that, however, you will definitely learn a great deal of information untaught in schools & unknown to the general public, at least in the US. I received this in a Goodreads giveaway, for which I'm very grateful, as I probably would not have heard about this book if not for the site. Thanks! Thorough & well-paced, this book is filled with details I would never have known. You can skim the 1st few pages if you already know the basics of the Cold War; after that, however, you will definitely learn a great deal of information untaught in schools & unknown to the general public, at least in the US. I received this in a Goodreads giveaway, for which I'm very grateful, as I probably would not have heard about this book if not for the site. Thanks!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Good read Interesting history of two spies-traitors. They didn't want to go to the USSR, that paradise they were devoted to, when they were discovered. Hmmm. The book moves, tells a good story. I recommend it for history buffs. Good read Interesting history of two spies-traitors. They didn't want to go to the USSR, that paradise they were devoted to, when they were discovered. Hmmm. The book moves, tells a good story. I recommend it for history buffs.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    This is a reasonably well-written biography of Morris and Lona Cohen, and covers a somewhat interesting period of time - I'd like to learn more about the Spanish Civil War. That said, it was also not exceptional - it seemed like a fairly standard ideological spying story told well. This is a reasonably well-written biography of Morris and Lona Cohen, and covers a somewhat interesting period of time - I'd like to learn more about the Spanish Civil War. That said, it was also not exceptional - it seemed like a fairly standard ideological spying story told well.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    Fascinating look at Cold War era spying. Makes you wonder about todays spies.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    The subject matter was interesting, but it was not presented well. The author couldn’t seem to stop bringing up irrelevant little details that interrupted the main story. The story didn’t effectively weave in the other characters from the Cohen story, but instead stopped to focus on each person for a few chapters and then would just mention their name in a chapter about the Cohens. It didn’t really ever integrate the various characters into one coherent story. Another problem with the book was t The subject matter was interesting, but it was not presented well. The author couldn’t seem to stop bringing up irrelevant little details that interrupted the main story. The story didn’t effectively weave in the other characters from the Cohen story, but instead stopped to focus on each person for a few chapters and then would just mention their name in a chapter about the Cohens. It didn’t really ever integrate the various characters into one coherent story. Another problem with the book was that it tried to be too matter-of-fact about the spying parts of the story and didn’t really present them in an interesting way. Instead of creating some mystery or suspense, or letting the reader figure out some of the connections, the author would just begin with the conclusions and then elaborate in an uninteresting way. It was written like a book-length newspaper article, essentially. Probably one of the least interesting spy books I can imagine.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Julie Huskey

    Morris and Lona Cohen are not as well known as their compatriots, Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, but Carr argues that the information the Cohens provided the Soviet Union was far more important. (That the Cohens fled the United States, only to be arrested and tried in Great Britain a decade later, may be the reason for their being less known.) Carr provides a good biography of both Cohens; at the same time, he places them in the context of the Cold War. The cast of characters -- spies, spy handlers, Morris and Lona Cohen are not as well known as their compatriots, Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, but Carr argues that the information the Cohens provided the Soviet Union was far more important. (That the Cohens fled the United States, only to be arrested and tried in Great Britain a decade later, may be the reason for their being less known.) Carr provides a good biography of both Cohens; at the same time, he places them in the context of the Cold War. The cast of characters -- spies, spy handlers, and spy hunters -- is occasionally hard to track, and sometimes the Cohens disappear from the story for longer than the reader would like. Nevertheless, espionage relies on complexity, so narratives of it are going to require some effort to follow. This is a worthwhile read for anyone interested in the Cold War.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    There were points where it became difficult to keep track of which spy was attached to which codename(s), but perhaps that’s the point? I found it fascinating and it provided great insight into the rationalizing of “patriots” who convinced themselves they were helping promote a better world. I wish the author had included more information on how the Cohens felt about the Soviet Union once they were actually living there. Other than one or two quotes at the end, there’s not much to indicate their There were points where it became difficult to keep track of which spy was attached to which codename(s), but perhaps that’s the point? I found it fascinating and it provided great insight into the rationalizing of “patriots” who convinced themselves they were helping promote a better world. I wish the author had included more information on how the Cohens felt about the Soviet Union once they were actually living there. Other than one or two quotes at the end, there’s not much to indicate their state of mind. Overall, though, worth the read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ellie Bell

    The subject matter was interesting, but the author didn't manage to reel back in after going on tangents. Although, I was listening to the audiobook. Maybe the lack of organization was a footnote issue and wouldn't be a problem in print. I did find it interesting that they managed to be Soviet Spies for decades and still considered themselves loyal Americans. The subject matter was interesting, but the author didn't manage to reel back in after going on tangents. Although, I was listening to the audiobook. Maybe the lack of organization was a footnote issue and wouldn't be a problem in print. I did find it interesting that they managed to be Soviet Spies for decades and still considered themselves loyal Americans.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Liz Short

    Enjoyed the book-- but listening to it, I had to rewind a few times. Gets a little slow and some points, and there are many characters. I'm guessing that actually reading it would be more pleasurable and easier to follow-- but that being said, I still very much enjoyed the story. Quite fascinating, and good writing. Enjoyed the book-- but listening to it, I had to rewind a few times. Gets a little slow and some points, and there are many characters. I'm guessing that actually reading it would be more pleasurable and easier to follow-- but that being said, I still very much enjoyed the story. Quite fascinating, and good writing.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

    probably 4.5--great to have this comprehensive history of these 2 infamous spies

  20. 4 out of 5

    Randy Johnson

    A well-researched reminder of just how many American-born spies were working for Stalin during the Cold War, and of how much critical information they were able to steal and relay to his government.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Alexis McAdams

    Pretty good, thoroughly researched, and entertaining despite the slow start and some odd patches of flowery over- description. I want to read more about espionage after finishing this book!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    This is a really interesting story of the life and career of two very normal spies who I had somehow never heard of before. During the Cold War, the Rosenbergs got the fame, but the Cohens pulled off grand acts of espionage against the US while remaining uncaught for much longer. Reading about the schemes they pulled off while maintaining their everyday life was fascinating, and the writing style was easy to read without being too informal. *According to FTC regulations I disclose that I receive This is a really interesting story of the life and career of two very normal spies who I had somehow never heard of before. During the Cold War, the Rosenbergs got the fame, but the Cohens pulled off grand acts of espionage against the US while remaining uncaught for much longer. Reading about the schemes they pulled off while maintaining their everyday life was fascinating, and the writing style was easy to read without being too informal. *According to FTC regulations I disclose that I received this book through the Goodreads First-Reads program.*

  23. 5 out of 5

    Forsyth Muir

  24. 4 out of 5

    Therese Van Arsdale

  25. 4 out of 5

    Charles Hill

  26. 5 out of 5

    unknown

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan A Holland

  28. 5 out of 5

    Serban Vassiliou

  29. 4 out of 5

    marylis

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ron Johnson

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.