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Fox Talk: How Some Very Special Animals Helped Scientists Understand Communication

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When you talk to a dog, does the dog talk back? Many people think so. But for a long time, scientists didn't know how our furry friends learned to communicate with people. Luckily, Russian scientist Dmitri Belyaev had a plan. If he could tame wild red foxes, he could learn how dogs first came from wolves. By studying the way these foxes changed during domestication, the mys When you talk to a dog, does the dog talk back? Many people think so. But for a long time, scientists didn't know how our furry friends learned to communicate with people. Luckily, Russian scientist Dmitri Belyaev had a plan. If he could tame wild red foxes, he could learn how dogs first came from wolves. By studying the way these foxes changed during domestication, the mystery of communication would be solved at a last. More than 50 years after the experiment began, Belyaev's foxes have become so tame, you can have one as a pet! Packed with eye-popping photos and first-hand research, FOX TALK reveals the story of these amazing animals... and everything they've taught us about wolves, dogs, and communication. Silver Medalist, 2014 Benjamin Franklin Awards "The book is full of information, all told in a child-friendly way... highly recommended as an excellent introduction to communication, inheritance, and the power of DNA." -- Helen Mason, Resource Links "Fox Talk is a great introduction of recent discoveries in domesticated behavior of canids." -- Anna Kukekova, fox researcher and PhD "For kids who love animals, and want to know more about what makes wild animals wild, and pets pets - and about people's relationships with both - this book is a winner!" -- Mr. Fox (AKA Helaine Becker - award-winning author of Zoobots, The Big Green Book of the Big Blue Sea, and What's the Big Idea?) "This is exactly the kind of book I love to read. It will appeal to anyone who wants to understand how and why." -- Joan Marie Galat - author of the Dot to Dot in the Sky astronomy/mythology series


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When you talk to a dog, does the dog talk back? Many people think so. But for a long time, scientists didn't know how our furry friends learned to communicate with people. Luckily, Russian scientist Dmitri Belyaev had a plan. If he could tame wild red foxes, he could learn how dogs first came from wolves. By studying the way these foxes changed during domestication, the mys When you talk to a dog, does the dog talk back? Many people think so. But for a long time, scientists didn't know how our furry friends learned to communicate with people. Luckily, Russian scientist Dmitri Belyaev had a plan. If he could tame wild red foxes, he could learn how dogs first came from wolves. By studying the way these foxes changed during domestication, the mystery of communication would be solved at a last. More than 50 years after the experiment began, Belyaev's foxes have become so tame, you can have one as a pet! Packed with eye-popping photos and first-hand research, FOX TALK reveals the story of these amazing animals... and everything they've taught us about wolves, dogs, and communication. Silver Medalist, 2014 Benjamin Franklin Awards "The book is full of information, all told in a child-friendly way... highly recommended as an excellent introduction to communication, inheritance, and the power of DNA." -- Helen Mason, Resource Links "Fox Talk is a great introduction of recent discoveries in domesticated behavior of canids." -- Anna Kukekova, fox researcher and PhD "For kids who love animals, and want to know more about what makes wild animals wild, and pets pets - and about people's relationships with both - this book is a winner!" -- Mr. Fox (AKA Helaine Becker - award-winning author of Zoobots, The Big Green Book of the Big Blue Sea, and What's the Big Idea?) "This is exactly the kind of book I love to read. It will appeal to anyone who wants to understand how and why." -- Joan Marie Galat - author of the Dot to Dot in the Sky astronomy/mythology series

30 review for Fox Talk: How Some Very Special Animals Helped Scientists Understand Communication

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Wow. Domestic foxes, bred for tameness, for "niceness," became better at communicating with humans, *not* because they were trained, but because their DNA actually changed. I need to investigate the books of the bibliography for something directed at adults... I had no idea of this research and want to learn more. Meanwhile, this book explains the experiments carefully, reinforces the Scientific Method and Statistical Analysis, and points out the problems with research on wolves and dogs. All in Wow. Domestic foxes, bred for tameness, for "niceness," became better at communicating with humans, *not* because they were trained, but because their DNA actually changed. I need to investigate the books of the bibliography for something directed at adults... I had no idea of this research and want to learn more. Meanwhile, this book explains the experiments carefully, reinforces the Scientific Method and Statistical Analysis, and points out the problems with research on wolves and dogs. All in a short book accessible to early readers with lots of photos and illustrations. Teachers, whether you have a class of second-graders or a high-school biology lab, buy this for your classroom now!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Renee

    Fox Talk is an educational, research-based book that explores the domestication of dogs from the wolf species by examining the behavior and communication of foxes. Turns out they don’t say “Hatee-hatee-hatee-ho” either! Using stunning photography of dogs, foxes, and wolves, author L.E. Carmichael (who has a PhD in wildlife population genetics) describes how, with increased contact with humans, wolves slowly evolved over time to become a new species – dogs! What is absolutely fascinating is that Fox Talk is an educational, research-based book that explores the domestication of dogs from the wolf species by examining the behavior and communication of foxes. Turns out they don’t say “Hatee-hatee-hatee-ho” either! Using stunning photography of dogs, foxes, and wolves, author L.E. Carmichael (who has a PhD in wildlife population genetics) describes how, with increased contact with humans, wolves slowly evolved over time to become a new species – dogs! What is absolutely fascinating is that domestication resulted in not only behavioural change but actual DNA changes. In order to better understand how dog domestication took place, Carmichael presents the research findings of Russian scientist, Dmitri Belyaev who conducted a series of studies with foxes in the 1950′s. I am a PhD researcher in Psychology so I could really appreciate Carmichael’s descriptions of the research methods, findings, and conclusions. While there are many findings about fox behaviour and communication cited, what was most interesting to me is that it only took 3 to 4 rounds of breeding with plenty of human contact and interaction for foxes to become domesticated. While the information is presented with a combination of photos, diagrams, “fact boxes”, and text, I did feel that there is a lot of information and much of it is quite complex. My 7 year-old son was interested in the book, but his attention did waver on occasion. This is definitely a book that a child would pick up and peek into from time to time rather than read cover-to-cover in one sitting. Another interesting section of the book is near the back where there is information about owning foxes. When my children saw this section, they immediately wanted to adopt a fox and were sad to learn that this is not allowed in Canada. Apparently you cannot own a domestic fox in Canada, but you can in the United States (although this may vary state-to-state). Also, in the back of the book is a glossary of some of the more complex terms used in the book such as “breeding”, “DNA”, “domestication”, “evolution”, and more. I also thought it was a great idea to include an index at the back. The book itself is beautifully designed and absolutely chock-full of great information. My Bottom Line: Fox Talk is an educational non-fiction title exploring the domestication of dogs by studying fox behaviour and communication. The information is presented with beautiful photographs, illustrations, bubbles/boxes of brief information, and descriptions of the research findings using age-appropriate language. I think this would be an excellent resource in elementary schools or for homeschoolers in particular and I highly recommend it. Ages 8+ * I was given this book free-of-charge by the author in exchange for my honest opinion. All opinions expressed are my own.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bettie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. (view spoiler)[ Bettie's Books (hide spoiler)] (view spoiler)[ Bettie's Books (hide spoiler)]

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn Jacoby

    I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own and unbiased. I would highly recommend this book not only to elementary aged children, but also to older, middle grade students, especially low readers, as well. The non-fiction account of a Russian scientist’s dedication to the study of communication of domesticated canines is clearly written, interspersed with terrific photographs of both wild and domestic animals. The amount of writing per page is ju I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own and unbiased. I would highly recommend this book not only to elementary aged children, but also to older, middle grade students, especially low readers, as well. The non-fiction account of a Russian scientist’s dedication to the study of communication of domesticated canines is clearly written, interspersed with terrific photographs of both wild and domestic animals. The amount of writing per page is just enough to communicate the story without having the young or literary-challenged reader feel bogged down, as with many text books. The writing itself is given in digestible bites and is flows over each page with movement and color to add interest. The author begins by discussing the definition of domestication and comparing foxes, wolves and dogs, giving differences and similarities. The problem of communication between humans and canines is introduced and then Belyaev’s experiments are discussed. As a science teacher who is introducing the scientific method to sixth graders, I enjoyed reading the methods used in Belyaev’s and Gogoleva’s experiments. This would be an excellent supplement to a science lesson in which controls, variables and settings would be discussed. The content of the book would be much more interesting to a group of young scientists than reading about plants grown in different soils or lighting. There is just enough science jargon to balance the more interesting behavioral outcomes with domestic vs wild foxes or other canines. Other fox studies are also included in this book, American and Hungarian. Results seemed to match up with Balyaev’s experiments, which reinforces the concept of replication in the scientific method. The author includes personal bits about some of the foxes to make them even more endearing to children (and science teachers) by including short video clips showing the foxes interacting with humans. She lays out an experiment that children can do with their dogs using food bowls. This, to me, brings all of this back home for kids to relate what they have learned about foxes to their own domestic canines. I believe children will look at their dogs with different eyes after reading this book. And, if this book has left you interested in adopting a domestic fox of your own, the author can assist you in that as well. Online information sites are provided to pursue this further. As much as I love to read, I rarely have the time during a school year to write a review of a book. Fox Talk was definitely an exception to this. Maybe it was my strong feelings for the plight of endangered wolves that drew me to the book’s cover. Once, I ventured inside, however, I was hooked. The photographs are passionate as well as beautiful and the author’s knowledge of the subject is obvious. I would highly recommend this book to any elementary or middle school librarian or student. Five stars.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lynda Dickson

    "Fox Talk" is a nonfiction book describing the links between foxes, wolves, and domesticated dogs. It documents Russian scientist Belyaev's experiments to try and domesticate wild foxes in order to better understand how humans and dogs communicate. The book explains the distinction between trained animals whose DNA is not altered, and domesticated animals whose DNA has changed and are thus able to pass these changes on to their offspring. We also learn about Svetlana Gogoleva's experiments to try "Fox Talk" is a nonfiction book describing the links between foxes, wolves, and domesticated dogs. It documents Russian scientist Belyaev's experiments to try and domesticate wild foxes in order to better understand how humans and dogs communicate. The book explains the distinction between trained animals whose DNA is not altered, and domesticated animals whose DNA has changed and are thus able to pass these changes on to their offspring. We also learn about Svetlana Gogoleva's experiments to try to determine if foxes use different sounds to mean different things. Does domestication affect animal sounds and how do the animals' feelings affect the sounds they make? And, what does the fox say? Check out page 30 to find out. You can also visit the Bioacoustic Group website and scroll down to "Red Fox" to hear actual fox sounds. The book provides an easy experiment you can try with your own dog. You can even find out how to get a domestic fox of your own as a pet (be warned, after reading this, you may very well want to!). Also included are handy links and a book list to find out more about domestic foxes, as well as a glossary of terms used in the book. "Fox Talk" is a colorful book and is brightly illustrated throughout with magnificent photos. The Kindle version contains pop-up boxes with discussion questions. Words found in the glossary are also highlighted in the text and can be clicked on directly to find out their meanings. Embedded videos also make the book literally come alive. Unfortunately the text is a bit too small, and I was struggling to read it on my 7-inch tablet. "Fox Talk" is a very well-researched book and contains a wealth of information. It is interesting enough for adults as well as simple enough for children to understand. This book would make a great addition to any home library. I received this book for the purpose of providing an honest review.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Fox

    I got this book through Netgalley for reviewing, and boy am I happy I did. Fox Talk is a fantastic children's book that delves into the topic of domestication in a way that is easy for anyone to understand. They actually talk about the Russian Fox Experiment, how domestication affects not only behavior but actual genetics, and how you can assess these facts and animal intelligence for yourself. The topic, while complex, is laid out very well and further resources are also offered throughout the bo I got this book through Netgalley for reviewing, and boy am I happy I did. Fox Talk is a fantastic children's book that delves into the topic of domestication in a way that is easy for anyone to understand. They actually talk about the Russian Fox Experiment, how domestication affects not only behavior but actual genetics, and how you can assess these facts and animal intelligence for yourself. The topic, while complex, is laid out very well and further resources are also offered throughout the book. The nature of exotic pet ownership is examined in a respectful way that acknowledges both the pros and cons and explains just why legality can come into question. This is a book that I look forward to using someday for my own educational outreach, and is definitely one that I'll refer many people to while I work in the exotic animal field. Five stars, no question. I'm so glad that this book came my way. :)

  7. 4 out of 5

    dust

    I received a copy of this book from NetGalley for review purposes. I feel the need to start this review with a disclaimer that I have a deep love for foxes. One of my prized possessions, to this day, remains a stuffed fox (named Todd, unsurprisingly) that my grandmother gave to me the better part of twenty years ago. I absolutely want a pet fox, if I ever live in a place where it is legal. They're extremely dear to my heart sometimes for reasons I can't even explain. Secondly, I want to link to th I received a copy of this book from NetGalley for review purposes. I feel the need to start this review with a disclaimer that I have a deep love for foxes. One of my prized possessions, to this day, remains a stuffed fox (named Todd, unsurprisingly) that my grandmother gave to me the better part of twenty years ago. I absolutely want a pet fox, if I ever live in a place where it is legal. They're extremely dear to my heart sometimes for reasons I can't even explain. Secondly, I want to link to this important blog post including important information about myths and realities regarding domestic foxes. The blog, made by a fox owner, also includes a list of state laws regarding the ownership of pet foxes. Sadly, keeping foxes as pets (domesticated or otherwise) remains universally illegal in Canada, save for the potential to receive a special permit if you already owned the fox before moving into the country. Now, onto the book. This was a very charming and insightful book on animal communication and domesticated foxes! It includes some very interesting information about the domestication process, and the history of it with dogs and foxes, and the ways in which it affects how animals communicate with humans. There are a few small graphs noting communication differences between aggressive and domestic foxes, and details of experiments on testing the ability of foxes and dogs alike on their ability to understand human gestures. There is some great information here and it's a fun introduction to the subject of domestic foxes and animal communication. The photography, too, is charming. I have to say that, for me, one of the best parts of the books is the photos of foxes to illustrate both points regarding communication and behaviour, as well as simply to showcase a couple of examples of domestic foxes in the United States. It was good quality, and a great touch. (There was also an adorable photograph of a pug puppy.) The only real flaw I find in the book is how much information is missing from the book. Or, more importantly, the fact that I feel like there is some (unintentional) misinformation wherein too strong of a connection is drawn between fox behaviour and dog behaviour. It gives off the impression that a domestic fox is rather similar to a pet dog, which is not the case. There is also information missing in that area. However, as the purpose of the book was actually more about the behavioural science of communication in canines, I find this to be a minor flaw at worst. And I might just be biased.

  8. 5 out of 5

    M.M. Hudson

    I had the opportunity to review the e-book Fox Talk by L.E. Carmichael and was somewhat facinated. This is a non-fiction science book based upon the domestication of foxes. Several years ago a group of scientist were attempting to figure out communication of dogs with humans and other species. As dogs, wolves and foxes are all related they chose to study the different foxes over a course in time. They bread them and watched them to see if over time their DNA would change to become domesticated. T I had the opportunity to review the e-book Fox Talk by L.E. Carmichael and was somewhat facinated. This is a non-fiction science book based upon the domestication of foxes. Several years ago a group of scientist were attempting to figure out communication of dogs with humans and other species. As dogs, wolves and foxes are all related they chose to study the different foxes over a course in time. They bread them and watched them to see if over time their DNA would change to become domesticated. Through experimentation the scientist were able to learn communication and how that relates to other animals in their same species, in this case, dogs. They were also able to domesticate a group of foxes so well that now they can be pets. The scientist were careful as to not 'train' the animals but allow natural evolution to occur over time. --------------------------- There are only two issues I did have with the book that I must mention. The first is the print was really small and that made it a bit difficult to read. It is possible that was due to it being an e-book. The second issue I had was some editing issues which could easily be corrected and may again be because it was an e-book. However, overall, I really liked this book and could see a middle-elementary school child even up to young teens liking this book. This is the kind of book that animal lovers would dream about and want to know more just based on the book alone. A great feature for Fox Talk was words highlighted in orange that when hovered over gave the reader a full definition. Also, blue dots on some pages when clicked on gave the reader a question to further enhance reading or let the reader ponder a particular point. This book gets 4 stars. ~Naila Moon Disclosure: I received a free e-book copy for my open and honest opinion. The opinions expressed her are 100% my own.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    (4.5 stars) When I first saw the title for this book, I started singing "What does the fox say?" Go ahead, admit it. You did, too. If your child wasn't obsessed with that song and you don't know what I'm talking about, consider yourself very lucky! (I will admit that I liked it the first couple of times I heard it but it got old when I heard it over and over and over.) I did realize that I didn't know that much about foxes so I was interested to learn more, and so were my kids. Dr. Carmichael sta (4.5 stars) When I first saw the title for this book, I started singing "What does the fox say?" Go ahead, admit it. You did, too. If your child wasn't obsessed with that song and you don't know what I'm talking about, consider yourself very lucky! (I will admit that I liked it the first couple of times I heard it but it got old when I heard it over and over and over.) I did realize that I didn't know that much about foxes so I was interested to learn more, and so were my kids. Dr. Carmichael starts with the domestication of dogs. Then she explains Russian scientist Dmitri Belyaev's experiment to try to turn wild red foxes into tame ones. We all enjoyed reading about this experiment and learning the results. She also discusses their body talk and sounds. Then, in the chapter titled "Meet the Foxes," there are pictures of them playing tag, dancing and chasing each other through a tunnel. We also learned the noises they make when they play. This is a book that we all enjoyed! It's easy to understand, and it's packed with information and pictures to help illustrate the points she's making. This is a great resource for any home library and one we will definitely read again and again! Mel's Shelves

  10. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    I have 3 dogs and I know they can communicate with me, things like "Get me a Milkbone." "I don't want to take a bath!" or "I love it when you rub my belly." So I was very interested in what scientists had learned when studying foxes and how they communicate. I had not heard of this experiment with domesticating foxes in order to study them and try to see how dogs learned to understand and be understood by people. Can you believe that they have been studying generation after generation of foxes f I have 3 dogs and I know they can communicate with me, things like "Get me a Milkbone." "I don't want to take a bath!" or "I love it when you rub my belly." So I was very interested in what scientists had learned when studying foxes and how they communicate. I had not heard of this experiment with domesticating foxes in order to study them and try to see how dogs learned to understand and be understood by people. Can you believe that they have been studying generation after generation of foxes for 50 years? They have observed and discovered many things about the differences between wild and domesticated foxes and their behavior, body language and vocal sounds. The photos of the foxes playing, smiling, and chasing through tunnels were funny. There is plenty of extra information in the back of the book, such as an index, a glossary, facts about the author and photographer, places to look for further information, and even what to do if you would like to have a domesticated fox as a pet. Animal lovers will enjoy the research results and photos shared in this book. Readers who have considered getting a pet, but wanted something out of the ordinary, might take this information and offer a home to a fox. I read an e-book provided by the publisher through NetGalley.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    This ebook offers an intriguing look at the domestication of foxes. Over the course of 50 years by breeding foxes with milder personalities that weren't afraid of humans, Russian scientist Dmitri Belyaev has been studying and experimenting with how animals communicate with each other and humans. The book is 5 chapters with adorable pictures of wolves, foxes and dogs. It covers the reasons to start trying to domesticate red foxes and what was learned about ways in which foxes and dogs communicate This ebook offers an intriguing look at the domestication of foxes. Over the course of 50 years by breeding foxes with milder personalities that weren't afraid of humans, Russian scientist Dmitri Belyaev has been studying and experimenting with how animals communicate with each other and humans. The book is 5 chapters with adorable pictures of wolves, foxes and dogs. It covers the reasons to start trying to domesticate red foxes and what was learned about ways in which foxes and dogs communicate. Finally, there is contact information if you wanted to consider having a fox as a pet. Being an ebook, this offered some nice features. Scientific terms are linked in the story to an index with definitions. The pictures can be tapped to enlarge. However, I will say that it is easiest to read with the color setting to "white." I initially had it on "sepia" and the text color and background color on some of the pages were nearly impossible to distinguish making it very hard to read. The book is probably targeting 2nd - 5th graders but younger children would likely enjoy it for the pictures. I obtained a copy of the book courtesy of Netgalley.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    What a fascinating book about foxes! Even though this a nonfiction book for children, I learned a great deal about foxes and dogs. It was fascinating to read the experiments that the scientists did to learn about wild versus tame. The experiments were clearly explained as well as the results. There are excellent pictures showing the experiments. There is an experiment that kids can do with their dog. This book will be enjoyable for children to read and learn from. A "warning" though you or your What a fascinating book about foxes! Even though this a nonfiction book for children, I learned a great deal about foxes and dogs. It was fascinating to read the experiments that the scientists did to learn about wild versus tame. The experiments were clearly explained as well as the results. There are excellent pictures showing the experiments. There is an experiment that kids can do with their dog. This book will be enjoyable for children to read and learn from. A "warning" though you or your children may want a fox for a pet! The author does explain that foxes as pets do have special needs. The book also tells you where to get one. Disclaimer: I received a digital galley of this book free from the publisher from NetGalley. I was not obliged to write a favourable review, or even any review at all. The opinions expressed are strictly my own.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    What a great book! A little book that packs a lot of information, Fox Talk is a wonderful resource for kids who love learning about animals. But it's not only a great resource for children, it's a great resource for adults as well. I learned so much about foxes by reading this book. This book is more than just general information about foxes; it is a book about domesticated foxes and how they communicate. Fox Talk shows you how the researchers developed domesticated foxes and learned about the de What a great book! A little book that packs a lot of information, Fox Talk is a wonderful resource for kids who love learning about animals. But it's not only a great resource for children, it's a great resource for adults as well. I learned so much about foxes by reading this book. This book is more than just general information about foxes; it is a book about domesticated foxes and how they communicate. Fox Talk shows you how the researchers developed domesticated foxes and learned about the development of their own special language. It's filled with bright pictures and summaries to help you organize the information. Fox Talk also contains pages with books and sites where you can go to find out more. In just this one book, you have a whole world of new information just waiting for you! I am sure your upper elementary/middle school child will love it!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

    I received a free copy of this book for an honest review. Fox Talk is a children’s book but I learned a lot about domesticated animals. I had no idea that the DNA of domestic animals is different than that of wild animals. This book has the results of the results of over 50 years of research on domestication and communication of animals. It lists the results of several experiments and has great photos of foxes, wolves, and dogs. It even has an experiment that can be done at home. At the end of the I received a free copy of this book for an honest review. Fox Talk is a children’s book but I learned a lot about domesticated animals. I had no idea that the DNA of domestic animals is different than that of wild animals. This book has the results of the results of over 50 years of research on domestication and communication of animals. It lists the results of several experiments and has great photos of foxes, wolves, and dogs. It even has an experiment that can be done at home. At the end of the book there is information on buying foxes. I liked that there was a caution that foxes have special needs. I definitely recommend this book for children. Parents will learn a lot from it, too.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Emily (Heinlen) Davis

    Formatting: This book was formatted correctly, except that it didn't have any front matter (title page, copyright page, etc.). Content: While I knew, basically, how dogs became domesticated, I didn't know that you could do the same thing to foxes. I found the information on domesticating foxes fascinating, especially in regard to how anger toward humans seems to be nature, not nurture. I also liked how the author compared dogs and foxes throughout the book so that the reader had a frame of refere Formatting: This book was formatted correctly, except that it didn't have any front matter (title page, copyright page, etc.). Content: While I knew, basically, how dogs became domesticated, I didn't know that you could do the same thing to foxes. I found the information on domesticating foxes fascinating, especially in regard to how anger toward humans seems to be nature, not nurture. I also liked how the author compared dogs and foxes throughout the book so that the reader had a frame of reference from which to start about what was being talked about. I also found the reference and glossary sections to be very helpful.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Stacie

    Fox Talk is an educational book that teaches children about how dogs learned to communicate with humans. The story is laid out with pictures and facts that make learning fun. The author uses simple language which allows children to easily grasp concepts in this interesting non-fiction tale. As a dog owner, and definitely one who talks to her pets with the belief that they know what I am saying, I found Fox Talk fascinating. My dogs, just like the foxes and dogs in Fox Talk, understand pointing, e Fox Talk is an educational book that teaches children about how dogs learned to communicate with humans. The story is laid out with pictures and facts that make learning fun. The author uses simple language which allows children to easily grasp concepts in this interesting non-fiction tale. As a dog owner, and definitely one who talks to her pets with the belief that they know what I am saying, I found Fox Talk fascinating. My dogs, just like the foxes and dogs in Fox Talk, understand pointing, especially when it comes to snack time. Fox Talk is a wonderful story for parents and teachers. I recommend picking up a copy.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    Lots of concepts are described here in an accessible way. The narrative depicts the Russian experiment on foxes that examined the genetic changes that occur in domestication. The structure of experiments is depicted, the changes- how they are selected and how they occur along with the outcomes are well explained. Some canine behaviors and communication tactics are shown. All in all, really well done description of a fascinating study that can be applied to general science literacy as well as int Lots of concepts are described here in an accessible way. The narrative depicts the Russian experiment on foxes that examined the genetic changes that occur in domestication. The structure of experiments is depicted, the changes- how they are selected and how they occur along with the outcomes are well explained. Some canine behaviors and communication tactics are shown. All in all, really well done description of a fascinating study that can be applied to general science literacy as well as interesting for those who are fans of dogs and foxes.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    Fox Talk is about domestic foxes that are legal in some places to have and keep as pets. It is explained about their history and how they need to be taken care of. Numerous photographs are shown throughout giving a better look at these unusual pets. Bonus material at the end includes a glossary, index, and list of websites for further research. A well-done book giving insight into a lesser known species of animal.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ravencrantz

    Excuse me while I go get a pet fox... This children's book goes into how scientists bred and domesticated foxes to learn more about domesticated dogs. The question was, how do dogs communicate with humans? Is it something they learn, or is it something they are born with? Beautiful visuals, and great resources, I think I will add a fox to my list of dream animals to live with when I get a farm. Received from netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Excuse me while I go get a pet fox... This children's book goes into how scientists bred and domesticated foxes to learn more about domesticated dogs. The question was, how do dogs communicate with humans? Is it something they learn, or is it something they are born with? Beautiful visuals, and great resources, I think I will add a fox to my list of dream animals to live with when I get a farm. Received from netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Brave

    Basically, this book explains how researchers used foxes to try and figure out how dogs learned to understand humans. It deals heavily with domestication and communication, which was extra interesting to me because I'm planning to work with Deaf students. I really enjoyed this, and I do plan to find a way to use it in my future classroom. (And not just because I love foxes.) (I received this book for free for an honest review.) Basically, this book explains how researchers used foxes to try and figure out how dogs learned to understand humans. It deals heavily with domestication and communication, which was extra interesting to me because I'm planning to work with Deaf students. I really enjoyed this, and I do plan to find a way to use it in my future classroom. (And not just because I love foxes.) (I received this book for free for an honest review.)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Bynum Black Words-White Pages

    This book was interesting and intriguing story, but I had a bit of trouble reading the words on the dark background. I really did like the video better though. I received an e-ARC copy, for a blog tour, in return for an honest review.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Thank you to netgalley.com and Ashby-BP Publishing for allowing me access to this title. This book was interesting and informative. I now want to add domestic fox to my list of animals that would be fun to have as a pet. 3 1/2 stars

  23. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

    Fox Talk by L.E. Carmichael is a book Looking at the documentation and research of canine language and development. starting with a comparison of Dmitri Belyaeve research on foxes... this is a look at a very interesting NOVA special about the breading of dogs.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nisa

    This was an interesting read and the more I think about it, the more intrigued I become. I did struggle reading the dark red pages with black print, though.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michele

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kayleigh

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kaethe Douglas

  30. 4 out of 5

    Eva Blaskovic

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