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Me Too: Experience the God Who Understands

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Your life is filled with pressure and pain and heartache and disappointment. So was His. If you've ever tried to pick up the shattered pieces of your life and put them back together again without help, you know it's an impossible task. When you lose your job, when divorce divides your family, when a loved one commits suicide, or when cancer claims a friend, it's easy to los Your life is filled with pressure and pain and heartache and disappointment. So was His. If you've ever tried to pick up the shattered pieces of your life and put them back together again without help, you know it's an impossible task. When you lose your job, when divorce divides your family, when a loved one commits suicide, or when cancer claims a friend, it's easy to lose perspective and abandon hope. According to Jon Weece, Christianity does not require you to smile through your pain, much less praise God for tormenting you. God doesn't enjoy your suffering. But he does understand it--and he knows exactly how to fix it. That's what Me Too is all about: A God who turned the ugliness of the cross into a spectacle of eternal beauty. An all-powerful Lord who will do the same with the pain of this world. An eternal Father who specializes in wiping away tears and putting you back together again. If you'll allow him.


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Your life is filled with pressure and pain and heartache and disappointment. So was His. If you've ever tried to pick up the shattered pieces of your life and put them back together again without help, you know it's an impossible task. When you lose your job, when divorce divides your family, when a loved one commits suicide, or when cancer claims a friend, it's easy to los Your life is filled with pressure and pain and heartache and disappointment. So was His. If you've ever tried to pick up the shattered pieces of your life and put them back together again without help, you know it's an impossible task. When you lose your job, when divorce divides your family, when a loved one commits suicide, or when cancer claims a friend, it's easy to lose perspective and abandon hope. According to Jon Weece, Christianity does not require you to smile through your pain, much less praise God for tormenting you. God doesn't enjoy your suffering. But he does understand it--and he knows exactly how to fix it. That's what Me Too is all about: A God who turned the ugliness of the cross into a spectacle of eternal beauty. An all-powerful Lord who will do the same with the pain of this world. An eternal Father who specializes in wiping away tears and putting you back together again. If you'll allow him.

30 review for Me Too: Experience the God Who Understands

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Albright

    [Note: This book was provided free of charge by BookLook/Thomas Nelson Publishers in exchange for an honest review.] In reviewing a book like this, there is a tension between two contradictory pulls. On the one hand, this book has a lot to celebrate, and its warm and personal and confessional touch seeks to disarm criticism. On the other hand, though, people reading the book with more biblical knowledge than the author, specifically regarding God's laws, will find a lot to criticize, including th [Note: This book was provided free of charge by BookLook/Thomas Nelson Publishers in exchange for an honest review.] In reviewing a book like this, there is a tension between two contradictory pulls. On the one hand, this book has a lot to celebrate, and its warm and personal and confessional touch seeks to disarm criticism. On the other hand, though, people reading the book with more biblical knowledge than the author, specifically regarding God's laws, will find a lot to criticize, including the author's praise of the conversion of Muslims to Christianity so that they can eat bacon, something I hope is a joke because it reminds readers of one of the more objectionable jokes in Shakespeare's A Merchant Of Venice about the conversion of Jews raising the price of hogs, and the author's continual discussion about heaven as an escape from the problems of earth. If the reader can overlook these and other shortcomings, and see the heart of love the author has for outcasts and people who are loved by God but feel unlovable, and see his concern for abandoned women and unwanted babies and people who have survived abuse and broken families and traumas, the reader will likely find the book to have its heart in the right place even where its knowledge is not accurate. The book itself has a skillful organization that seems somewhat random when looked at it on the chapter by chapter level, or when one considers the almost impossibly diverse set of awkward and embarrassing personal stories told by the author, including an experience of flying a plane with a backpack that smelled strongly of eau d'skunk and a traumatic experience of seeing a naked middle-aged to elderly neighbor after a wind-induced wardrobe malfunction. These uncomfortable personal stories are mixed with poignant tales about comforting women who have struggled with a history of past abortions or promiscuity or dealing with comforting the survivors of suicide victims, or encouraging people to give church a second chance after problems with overzealous legalists. Despite the somewhat drastic shifts in tone from chapter to chapter, and many of the chapters are only around ten pages apiece, the materials of the book are logically organized into three parts, the first dealing with the historical work of Jesus Christ on the cross in the past, the second dealing with the work of Jesus Christ through the Church in the present, and the third looking at the future New Jerusalem in the world to come. At times this book will make you laugh, at times it will make you cry, and at times it will make you cringe, yet despite the drastic changes in tone, the book has a point and makes it effectively well--that God cares about people, and that this present world is not all there is, and that we as Christians really do need to be a lot more loving. All of this is true and needs to be said, even if it has already been said often and often well [1]. The title of this book is unusually reflective of the contents of the book. When the author refers to God and Jesus Christ as being able to say "Me Too" to the sufferings of others, he is alluding to, without specifically referencing, parts of the Bible like Hebrews 4 with their discussion of the way that Jesus Christ can relate to our sufferings and burdens, and to the need for Christians to develop a strong sense of empathy and compassion for the suffering of their brethren and for those in the world in the grip of Satan's rule. In looking at the book, this sense of empathy is all-encompassing, running the gamut from the author's oversharing of uncomfortable stories as a way of drawing compassion from the reader, and also poignantly looking at how a lost and broken world [2] needs God's love and our own. This point is not made subtly, it is made continually and passionately and deeply personally. Whether or not the reader appreciates that will greatly determine how the reader appreciates this book as a whole. [1] See, for example: https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress... https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress... https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress... https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress... https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress... https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress... https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress... https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress... https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress... https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress... [2] See, for example: https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress... https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress... https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress... https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress... https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress... https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress... https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress... https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress... https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress... https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress... https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

    This book is relatable because everyone goes through a hard time or a dip in their life; and though it might feel like we're alone at times, God is always with us. Edit (12/01/2019): It was interesting reading this book again from a different perspective as well as a different mindset. I was able to get more from it this time around - this was more of a relaxing read the second time around. This book is relatable because everyone goes through a hard time or a dip in their life; and though it might feel like we're alone at times, God is always with us. Edit (12/01/2019): It was interesting reading this book again from a different perspective as well as a different mindset. I was able to get more from it this time around - this was more of a relaxing read the second time around.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Julie Hicks

    This book is a great read for those of us who need to know we don't all alone. Others can say "Me Too" to our thoughts and livings. Weece opens up his home, his life and his heart in this no holding back book. I laughed, I cried, I sympathized. Yes it's a good real life read that shows we are not only ones trying break free of this stronghold in our lives. This book is a great read for those of us who need to know we don't all alone. Others can say "Me Too" to our thoughts and livings. Weece opens up his home, his life and his heart in this no holding back book. I laughed, I cried, I sympathized. Yes it's a good real life read that shows we are not only ones trying break free of this stronghold in our lives.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Joel Eynon

    This Christmas gift was my companion on a flight to Denver. My goal was to complete it in one day and I did. Jon's writing fuses storytelling with his deep love of Christ. It was a joy to read and virtually just what I expected after reading his first book Jesus Prom. This Christmas gift was my companion on a flight to Denver. My goal was to complete it in one day and I did. Jon's writing fuses storytelling with his deep love of Christ. It was a joy to read and virtually just what I expected after reading his first book Jesus Prom.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    An easy and encouraging read. Good to reread when feeling down.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chuck

    Great book! I like this guy!!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Gretchen

    Jon Weece is a pastor in Lexington, Kentucky, and it's clear from his writing that the Holy Spirit is on fire in his heart. Though I have never heard him preach, I would imagine he is quite entertaining, as his latest book, "Me Too: Experience the God Who Understands" is chock full of stories about how God works in the here and now through average people in every day situations, healing, comforting and giving hope, even when hope seems impossible. The book is divided into three parts: The Cross, Jon Weece is a pastor in Lexington, Kentucky, and it's clear from his writing that the Holy Spirit is on fire in his heart. Though I have never heard him preach, I would imagine he is quite entertaining, as his latest book, "Me Too: Experience the God Who Understands" is chock full of stories about how God works in the here and now through average people in every day situations, healing, comforting and giving hope, even when hope seems impossible. The book is divided into three parts: The Cross, The Church, and The City, which are then broken down into chapters meant to illustrate what Jesus did for us through his death and resurrection. Together, it shows what Jesus does today through His Advocate - the Holy Spirit, and expresses Jesus's vision for us, which is a very intimate, personal relationship with him which continually develops until we reach eternal rest with Him. I was excited to read this book because any apologetic for Jesus grabs my attention, and one which aims to connect His suffering with ours seems especially important. We are all trying to make sense of our hurts, tragedies, and setbacks, however, I expected more layers of depth in Pastor Weece's treatment of these subjects. Throughout each section, I felt adrift as he moved from one anecdote to the next, using rather thin transitions. That said, there were two chapters which I thought were the best overall: Chapters 9 and 11, which deal so tenderly with the heartbreaking subjects of suicide and abortion. In Chapter 9, Weece makes the crucial statement that Jesus can save us from all sin, including suicide. As he points outs, "Jesus experienced an emotional low in his life and reached the conclusion in the Garden of Gethsemane that dying would be better than living, saying, 'My soul is overwhelmed with sorrow to the point of death' (Matt. 26:38 NIV)." (p.90) Though Jesus did not choose suicide, he certainly understood the despair that can drive a person to that point. Of abortion, Weece writes that our society forces us to pick a side between the child and the mother. And yet, "Jesus was born to a scandalous, teenage mom.... It seems to have shaped Jesus' ministry because Jesus publicly, demonstratively loved children and women and elevated their value in first-century society." The reality, Weece points out, is that Jesus is both pro-child and pro-woman. Further, he argues, "There are so many women suffering in silence each weekend in churches across America because they don't know what to do with the shame they're carrying...It is the responsibility of the church to surround those who have been blistered and burned by their sexual choices. The church was never meant to be a pristine showroom. It was meant to be a messy living room filled with people who have messed up. So we have a faucet that we never turn off, and what flows out isn't finger pointing and rock throwing. What flows out of the church is what flows out of Jesus - help, hope, and healing." (p. 105-6) Amen to that. I am especially grateful to Weece for raising these points in Chapters 9 and 11, as he does a good job of clarifying in simple language a few misconceptions about the Christian faith. For someone who is looking for short, modern stories about myriad ways God expresses His love for us, this might be the right book. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlyn Bouchillon

    The idea behind Me Too is good. When you pick up the book, it sounds like you'll be reading about how God understands, how through the personhood of Jesus Christ He experienced many of the feelings we have and a lot of life that we walk through. The back cover copy and description listed here on Amazon seem to say that as well. However, the book touches on this idea a time or two and then rambles about stories that don't connect to the point of the book. I re-read the back cover and don't at all The idea behind Me Too is good. When you pick up the book, it sounds like you'll be reading about how God understands, how through the personhood of Jesus Christ He experienced many of the feelings we have and a lot of life that we walk through. The back cover copy and description listed here on Amazon seem to say that as well. However, the book touches on this idea a time or two and then rambles about stories that don't connect to the point of the book. I re-read the back cover and don't at all see how the book matches that wording. I'll be honest up front and say that I stopped reading at page 93. By page 40 I wanted to be done - I was annoyed by the choppy writing style, the book formatting (more on that in a minute), the sentences I assume are jokes but come across as rude statements, grammar and punctuation typos, and the lack of any transitions between stories. It is very rare that I do not finish a book, though, so I pressed on. By the time I made it halfway through the book and a few chapters into the next section, my feelings from the 40-page-point had only grown stronger. You can take or leave this review for what it is, as I didn't finish the book. But quite simply, it was not compelling. About the formatting: The font used is hard to read. But beyond that, there is a double space between every single paragraph in the book. This definitely doesn't help with flow, and if I had to guess, I would say they were desperately trying to make the book appear much longer. With normal spacing, it would have been a good deal shorter (probably about 150 pages). An an example of sentences that are likely jokes but are never once clarified as such: "If you love bacon, Jesus loves you!" (pg 38) "If you haven't eaten Golden Oreos, you are sinning." (pg 42) Granted, if this were spoken in a conversation it may be funny. But when you write something down in print, you cannot hear the author's tone of voice. The author should make it clear what the style is. If you're reading a book by a comedian, of course you could assume. But this is a book written by a pastor, so jokes like this may not come across very well for many readers. For example, the second sentence listed here is immediately followed by this (which does not transition well, nor does it show that statement about sin is actually a joke): "We live in a performance-based culture. For many in our culture there is the unspoken mantra, "What you do defines who you are." I received a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mark Evans

    ABOUT JON: Jon Weece is married to Allison, and they have two children, Ava and Silas. For the past fourteen years he has been the Lead Follower at Southland Christian Church—a community of fourteen thousand Jesus followers in Central Kentucky who love people in extravagant ways. Prior to moving to Lexington, Jon lived in Haiti for four years. The information above has been copied from Jon’s personal website. John writes, “and thats what this book is about: an eternal Father who specializes in wipi ABOUT JON: Jon Weece is married to Allison, and they have two children, Ava and Silas. For the past fourteen years he has been the Lead Follower at Southland Christian Church—a community of fourteen thousand Jesus followers in Central Kentucky who love people in extravagant ways. Prior to moving to Lexington, Jon lived in Haiti for four years. The information above has been copied from Jon’s personal website. John writes, “and thats what this book is about: an eternal Father who specializes in wiping away tears, and the people he uses to help him.” (p. xvii) Great quotes: “I was so happy I cried. Have you ever been so happy you cried?” p. 95 “The church was never meant to be a pristine showroom. It was meant to be a messy living room filled with people who have messed up. So we have a faucet that we never turn off, and what flows out isn’t finger pointing and rock throwing. What flows out of the churches is what flows out of Jesus-help, hope, and healing.” p. 106 “Every command God gives us is an invitation into a better life, not a requirement for love.” p. 134 John proposes that people often feel relief as they hear the words “me too.” In the book he strays form the point a little. In fact he does not really elaborate on it. The book has minimal bible references. One would think that there would be more, considering that Johns a pastor. The formatting was choppy and strange. I am not sure why John chose such a method. It wasn’t terrible, just different. Despite the last few comments I found the book to be very comforting and I enjoyed it. Me Too is filled with stories about John, his family, and friends. It seems as though John started with the stories and tried to develop a biblical and practical application within the story. I suppose, John is trying to tell others “me too.” The book is just the right length. Since the book was a little incoherent and he strayed a little from the original proposal a longer book would have made it awkward. As it is, the book is the proper length and I would recommend it. Although I would probably recommend many others first. I do enjoy reading personal testimonies, which is why I liked the book as much as I did. In exchange for an honest review I have received a copy of this book from BookLook bloggers. I have given an honest review.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    In Me Too, Jon Weece shared the importance of connecting with others and God. We all have fallen short and sinned and this is why God sent His Son to die for our sins. We all experience emotions, such as fear, anger, sadness, and pain. Many people suffer alone through difficult circumstances and they are needing a help from a friend. He strongly believes in listening to others and there is power in having a friend say, “me too”. Jon Weece shared the story about four men trying to get a paralyzed In Me Too, Jon Weece shared the importance of connecting with others and God. We all have fallen short and sinned and this is why God sent His Son to die for our sins. We all experience emotions, such as fear, anger, sadness, and pain. Many people suffer alone through difficult circumstances and they are needing a help from a friend. He strongly believes in listening to others and there is power in having a friend say, “me too”. Jon Weece shared the story about four men trying to get a paralyzed man to Jesus. They had to dig a hole through the roof in order to get the paralyzed man to Jesus’. Everyone needs friends who are willing to be there in the hard times. And the most important friend we can rely on is Jesus. I would recommend this life changing book to anyone who is longing to experience a closer relationship with God. This book has shown me that God does truly care about whatever challenges we are facing. I related with Jon when he opened up about his fears and struggles with getting close to others and opening up to them. I also struggle with trusting people and I can honestly say “me too”. This book helped me realize that I’m not alone and others have the same issues that I do. It helped me see that I need to face my fears head on and not let satan try and scare me into backing down. I also liked how Jon wasn’t afraid to talk about suicide and how it affects a large number of people. It’s heartbreaking to read it’s the “second leading cause of death for ages 10-24”. I especially liked how he shared how losing hope in life can lead to the dark tunnels of depression. He explained how satan knows how to convince people that suicide is the only answer. Jon shared how God understands our pain and He is willingly to help us. I also liked how he explored the question most people are wondering and that is, if someone commits suicide will they go to Heaven. He related the scripture of Romans 8:38-39 and this talks about how nothing can separate us from the love of God and this includes satan and his demons, our past, our future, height or depth. If you’re looking for an excellent book on ways to connect with God on a greater level, then read this book! "I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers book review bloggers program."

  11. 4 out of 5

    Monica

    You know that you have found a special friend when you share some of your life's stories and they respond with, "Yeah, me too." Author Jon Weece tells us in his new book, Me Too, that God is a God who understands our difficulties and our pain, our thoughts and feelings. Weece says that He is the God of Me too. Me Too is divided into three sections. Part 1:The Cross--What Jesus Did, Part 2: The Church--What Jesus is doing, and Part 3: The City--What Jesus will do. In each section of the book, Jon You know that you have found a special friend when you share some of your life's stories and they respond with, "Yeah, me too." Author Jon Weece tells us in his new book, Me Too, that God is a God who understands our difficulties and our pain, our thoughts and feelings. Weece says that He is the God of Me too. Me Too is divided into three sections. Part 1:The Cross--What Jesus Did, Part 2: The Church--What Jesus is doing, and Part 3: The City--What Jesus will do. In each section of the book, Jon shares stories from his church and his life, relates them to the God of the Bible and ends with teaching you can relate to your life. In the first section we read about the Jesus who lived, walked among us and died for us--and how that can change our life if we will let it. The second section shares how God lives in His people and they are the church wherever they go. In the last section, Weece tells us how we have a heavenly city to look forward to even in the midst of suffering and pain now. Weece had me from the introduction when he shared this: "Too many people suffer alone. And most people who suffer alone aren't looking for answers. Most people who suffer alone are looking for a friend--a friend who understands. Me too friends don't need to talk. There is power in presence. There is power in just being there." Weece goes on to share how listening may be the greatest form of love and how people need us to notice them and love them. Wow. It sounds so simple and yet I totally agree. Everyone wants to feel loved and understood. I need to ask myself how I can do this for the people I come in contact with daily. I realize then that I am one ordinary person who can make a difference to someone else. I found Me Too to be easy to relate to. I also enjoyed Weece's stories. I especially appreciate that this book is not a book of pat answers and trite Christian sayings that don't really seem to touch your heart and leave you feeling emotionally untouched. Instead, Weece had me smiling, laughing and shedding a few tears. I would recommend it to anyone searching to find the God who says, "me too." I received this book from the publisher, Thomas Nelson. I was not required to write a positive review in exchange for the book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Susan Barton

    We all go through trials and tribulations in our lives. No one said it would be an easy, carefree life. The Bible does not tell us this. In fact, the Bible is filled with passages that detail the struggles of even the most faithful of God’s followers. The key is having faith in a God who is accessible to any of us whenever we need Him. This is what’s at the heart of Me Too. There are plenty of references scattered throughout this book, to show us examples of God’s love for His children. However, We all go through trials and tribulations in our lives. No one said it would be an easy, carefree life. The Bible does not tell us this. In fact, the Bible is filled with passages that detail the struggles of even the most faithful of God’s followers. The key is having faith in a God who is accessible to any of us whenever we need Him. This is what’s at the heart of Me Too. There are plenty of references scattered throughout this book, to show us examples of God’s love for His children. However, many, many of them are the author’s personal references. There are numerous personal stories about the author, and the author’s daughter, family and friends. This is fine to a certain degree of course, but I found that they overpowered the book. To me, it began to read more like a personal memoir than a reference book on spiritual growth. I found Me Too to be a very basic book about turning to God in times of sorrow – something most Christians are quite familiar with. Maybe it would appeal more to someone who is currently doubting God’s love. I already know God loves me no matter what negative and even awful things that might be going on in my life. I know He’s ready to listen to me when I’m ready to talk about things. I didn’t like the print book’s formatting. There’s a space after every single paragraph throughout the book – for what reason, I’m not sure. In my opinion, this made the book choppy and it disrupted the flow of the author’s narration. It’s a short book to begin with. Without all the extra space, it probably would have been half the length that it is now. 3 of 5 Stars, Review by Susan Barton http://ebookreviewgal.com received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Julius

    John Weece's Me Too: Experience the God Who Understands explores the depths of an incarnational theology -- Jesus' experience of suffering and its connection to our own experiences of suffering and pain. Christian faith doesn't require you to smile through your pain, much less praise God for tormenting you. God doesn't enjoy your suffering. But he does understand it -- and, more importantly, he knows how to heal it. Me Too is a book that focuses on Christian living at precisely those moments when John Weece's Me Too: Experience the God Who Understands explores the depths of an incarnational theology -- Jesus' experience of suffering and its connection to our own experiences of suffering and pain. Christian faith doesn't require you to smile through your pain, much less praise God for tormenting you. God doesn't enjoy your suffering. But he does understand it -- and, more importantly, he knows how to heal it. Me Too is a book that focuses on Christian living at precisely those moments when that living is most difficult, moments of pressure and pain and heartache and disappointment. That's what Me Too is all about: The Gospel God who turned the ugliness of the cross into a spectacle of eternal beauty. An Lord who does the same with the pain of this world. The God and Father of Jesus Christ who specializes in wiping away tears and putting you back together again. Weems covers a wide variety of topics -- vulnerability, praying, fear, loving your enemy, hospitality, grace, forgiveness, suicide, abortion, second chances, and more. And he writes with a pastor's heart. This is a book for all those hurting hearts and wounded lives who really aren't sure where God is in all the mess. __________________ Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Ray

    Sometimes I see a book on the review list, and I go ahead and request it, even though I’m not personally excited by it. I don’t expect much of these books, but usually the cover or the back copy appeals to me, so I request it from the list. I’m telling you this to be transparent, and to let you know that I really wasn’t expecting much when I requested Me Too: Experience the God Who Understands. In this book, Jon Weece discusses how we don’t always have to smile when we have pain in our life. We d Sometimes I see a book on the review list, and I go ahead and request it, even though I’m not personally excited by it. I don’t expect much of these books, but usually the cover or the back copy appeals to me, so I request it from the list. I’m telling you this to be transparent, and to let you know that I really wasn’t expecting much when I requested Me Too: Experience the God Who Understands. In this book, Jon Weece discusses how we don’t always have to smile when we have pain in our life. We don’t always have to feel like praising God when bad things happen. He tells us that one of the reasons we lack connection with other people is because we refuse to be vulnerable. (Can I get an amen here?) He talks about Jesus. He talks about slowing down to see what is broken in ourselves and in others. He discusses depression, abortion, legalism and heaven. The book is loosely organized, but many times reads like a free riff. There’s a mingling of scripture, stories, personal experiences, quotes and lovely discussion. The result is a beautiful book. It’s touching. It’s convicting. When I read the chapters on suicide and abortion, I was in a public setting, trying not to do the ugly cry. Reading about death and the grace with which other Christians responded to it, touched me to the core. I wasn’t expecting much of this book, but found it to be a beautiful book and worthy of spending some time with. Disclaimer: I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  15. 4 out of 5

    W. Whalin

    ME TOO engages the reader from the opening page and holds attention through the end. Weece runs through many of the common life experiences and shows us how God understands. One of the most common experience is pain. In one of the opening pages, Weece writes, "Pain is the common language of human experience. Most people I know are fluent in suffering. They speak it, but they don't understand it. One of the ways people begin to heal is to sit across the table from someone who can say, "Me too." I e ME TOO engages the reader from the opening page and holds attention through the end. Weece runs through many of the common life experiences and shows us how God understands. One of the most common experience is pain. In one of the opening pages, Weece writes, "Pain is the common language of human experience. Most people I know are fluent in suffering. They speak it, but they don't understand it. One of the ways people begin to heal is to sit across the table from someone who can say, "Me too." I enjoyed the writing and the storytelling in this book--which is excellent. It held my attention throughout the entire book. Why the four stars instead of five? I fault the publisher and designer for that failure. The entire book is set in the wrong font (san serif) which has been proven to be more difficult to read. If I scanned through the hundreds of books on my shelf, they are all set in a serif font (like Georgia or New Times Roman). Why? It is easier to read. Frankly, it is a shame that Nelson Books messed up on such a basic book production area. I would not be surprised if this single detail holds back this title from reaching the intended audience. Other than the typeface, I recommend this title.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    "Me Too" looked at how Jesus understands our suffering. The author covered a wide variety of topics: vulnerability, praying, fear, loving your enemy, hospitality, grace, forgiveness, suicide, abortion, second chances, and more. Each chapter felt self-contained rather than building on each other, through the theme of Jesus understanding our suffering and being the answer that we're looking for is found in each. The author looked to the Bible and Jesus' example of how he dealt with various issues. "Me Too" looked at how Jesus understands our suffering. The author covered a wide variety of topics: vulnerability, praying, fear, loving your enemy, hospitality, grace, forgiveness, suicide, abortion, second chances, and more. Each chapter felt self-contained rather than building on each other, through the theme of Jesus understanding our suffering and being the answer that we're looking for is found in each. The author looked to the Bible and Jesus' example of how he dealt with various issues. He also used stories from modern life. The writing was casual, so it's easy to read and understand. The author used a very encouraging and compassionate tone and came from a "me, too" view of struggles. Overall, I enjoyed this book and would recommend it. I received a review copy of this book from the publisher through BookLook.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I really wanted to give this book five stars, and I probably would have had I not read it directly after reading Jesus Prom (Jon's first book). Both books are perspective changing and life changing, but the messages are so similar that it's hard, at times, to tell the two books apart. While Jon's voice is strong in this book (as well as his first), I was hoping for just a bit more from his second book! Don't get me wrong, I love this book and I'll return to it time and time again, just NOT immed I really wanted to give this book five stars, and I probably would have had I not read it directly after reading Jesus Prom (Jon's first book). Both books are perspective changing and life changing, but the messages are so similar that it's hard, at times, to tell the two books apart. While Jon's voice is strong in this book (as well as his first), I was hoping for just a bit more from his second book! Don't get me wrong, I love this book and I'll return to it time and time again, just NOT immediately after reading Jon's previous book!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Cassandra

    I recevied complimentary product. Breaking down the simplicity of the book is not easy and most of what I read required deep thinking. The author inputs a great amount of his belief in how God works and helps to ease the reader. I found it to be uplifting and would recommend this book to anyone feeling blue.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Miller

    Love Jon Weece as a pastor and a teacher...great book relating our experiences to God, he's been in our shoes and this world is not the writer of our story Love Jon Weece as a pastor and a teacher...great book relating our experiences to God, he's been in our shoes and this world is not the writer of our story

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    3 1/2 stars- basic, good message

  21. 4 out of 5

    Heather Norman

  22. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Newman

  23. 5 out of 5

    Erin Todd

  24. 5 out of 5

    sarah

  25. 4 out of 5

    Brian D Crace

  26. 4 out of 5

    Philip Floor

  27. 4 out of 5

    Swa

  28. 5 out of 5

    Christina Strickler

  29. 5 out of 5

    Steven Powell

  30. 4 out of 5

    Katharine Wheeler

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