web site hit counter Black Box Thinking: The Surprising Truth About Success - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Black Box Thinking: The Surprising Truth About Success

Availability: Ready to download

What links the Mercedes Formula One team with Google? What is the connection between Dave Brailsford's Team Sky and the aviation industry? What links the inventor James Dyson and the basketball player Michael Jordan? They are all Black Box Thinkers. Whether developing a new product, honing a core skill or just trying to get a critical decision right, Black Box Thinkers aren't What links the Mercedes Formula One team with Google? What is the connection between Dave Brailsford's Team Sky and the aviation industry? What links the inventor James Dyson and the basketball player Michael Jordan? They are all Black Box Thinkers. Whether developing a new product, honing a core skill or just trying to get a critical decision right, Black Box Thinkers aren't afraid to face up to mistakes. In fact, Black Box Thinkers see failure as the very best way to learn. Rather than denying their mistakes, blaming others, or attempting to spin their way out of trouble, these institutions and individuals interrogate errors as part of their future strategy for success.How many of us can say that we have such a healthy relationship with failure? Learning from failure has the status of a cliché, but this book reveals the astonishing story behind the most powerful method of learning known to mankind, and reveals the arsenal of techniques wielded by some of the world's most innovative organizations. It also reveals the dangers of failing to learn from mistakes. In healthcare, hundreds of thousands of patients die from preventable medical errors every year due to a chronic lack of Black Box ThinkingUsing gripping case studies, exclusive interviews and really practical takeaways, Matthew Syed - the award-winning journalist and best-selling author of Bounce - explains how to turn failure into success, and shows us how we can all become better Black Box Thinkers.


Compare

What links the Mercedes Formula One team with Google? What is the connection between Dave Brailsford's Team Sky and the aviation industry? What links the inventor James Dyson and the basketball player Michael Jordan? They are all Black Box Thinkers. Whether developing a new product, honing a core skill or just trying to get a critical decision right, Black Box Thinkers aren't What links the Mercedes Formula One team with Google? What is the connection between Dave Brailsford's Team Sky and the aviation industry? What links the inventor James Dyson and the basketball player Michael Jordan? They are all Black Box Thinkers. Whether developing a new product, honing a core skill or just trying to get a critical decision right, Black Box Thinkers aren't afraid to face up to mistakes. In fact, Black Box Thinkers see failure as the very best way to learn. Rather than denying their mistakes, blaming others, or attempting to spin their way out of trouble, these institutions and individuals interrogate errors as part of their future strategy for success.How many of us can say that we have such a healthy relationship with failure? Learning from failure has the status of a cliché, but this book reveals the astonishing story behind the most powerful method of learning known to mankind, and reveals the arsenal of techniques wielded by some of the world's most innovative organizations. It also reveals the dangers of failing to learn from mistakes. In healthcare, hundreds of thousands of patients die from preventable medical errors every year due to a chronic lack of Black Box ThinkingUsing gripping case studies, exclusive interviews and really practical takeaways, Matthew Syed - the award-winning journalist and best-selling author of Bounce - explains how to turn failure into success, and shows us how we can all become better Black Box Thinkers.

30 review for Black Box Thinking: The Surprising Truth About Success

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    What a great book! For a nonfiction, it would be remarkable easy to read for those who don't usually read nonfiction. It's filled with so many examples from so many industries that I can't even remember them all; from medicine, aviation, Unilever detergent nozzles, DreamWorks movies, law enforcement, vacuum cleaners, and even child welfare social workers. The book tackles a number of important aspects of failure, such as the idea of complexity and how the world we live in is an immensely complex What a great book! For a nonfiction, it would be remarkable easy to read for those who don't usually read nonfiction. It's filled with so many examples from so many industries that I can't even remember them all; from medicine, aviation, Unilever detergent nozzles, DreamWorks movies, law enforcement, vacuum cleaners, and even child welfare social workers. The book tackles a number of important aspects of failure, such as the idea of complexity and how the world we live in is an immensely complex place making it difficult if not impossible to account for all variations and/or conditions. In order for the human brain to understand this complexity, we all use the narrative fallacy to simplify things so we can better understand. Another aspect of the situation is the need for marginal gains through repetitive testing, much like the evolutionary process. Marginal gains occur through bottom-up testing, as opposed to top-down analysis and planning which is what many of us do. We look at a problem, think about it, arrive at a logical solution, then apply the solution only to find it doesn't work for some unplanned for reason or due to complexity that we don't understand. Iterative testing instead will yield marginal gains with each iteration until the desired result is reached. Blame is another very important aspect of failure. Professional athletes don't look back on years of practice as a string of failures. Practice is what drives improvement. In all things. When blame is assigned, it undermines openness and learning in a field. However, when the professional has an internal fear of failure (either due to the corporate climate where blame is assigned or whether it is tied to the ego due to years of experience or education), we sometimes can't even admit our mistakes to ourselves. One of the most helpful ideas I discovered in this book is the idea of the pre-mortem. Prior to beginning a major project, assemble everyone together and assume the project has run its course and is now a huge embarrassing failure. What are some ways we could have prevented this outcome? How did the failure come about? And my favorite tongue-in-cheek list in the entire book: The 6 phases of a project 1. Enthusiasm 2. Disillusionment 3. Panic 4. Search for the guilty 5. Punishment of the innocent 6. Rewards for the uninvolved Yup, that about sums it up.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    This came highly recommended by the friend who lent me it but it seems to have taken me forever to finish it. The central point and some of the examples are interesting but to me it just said the same thing over and over again. Relieved to have finished it, to be honest !

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mario Tomic

    How do some learn from mistakes and become better while others never seem to improve? What if the problem is that no one has taught us how to deal with failure? This brilliant book reveals a framework for how to use mistakes as learning tools and transform short-term failures into long-term success. The book is full of engaging stories and interesting anecdotes on how the human psyche has the potential to deal with failure in a variety of ways. For me, one of the most interesting parts was the o How do some learn from mistakes and become better while others never seem to improve? What if the problem is that no one has taught us how to deal with failure? This brilliant book reveals a framework for how to use mistakes as learning tools and transform short-term failures into long-term success. The book is full of engaging stories and interesting anecdotes on how the human psyche has the potential to deal with failure in a variety of ways. For me, one of the most interesting parts was the one on how the ego has the potential to make us completely oblivious to life-threatening mistakes happening right in front of our eyes. Becoming a "Black box thinker" will undoubtedly make you more successful in life. Overall, Matthew has nailed it once again! His previous book Bounce is one of my personal favorite personal development books. And as for Black Box Thinking, I highly recommend the book as it will give you powerful tools to deal with mistakes and make you a lot more aware of what's going in your mind and the minds of people around you in high-pressure situations.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Maddie Browse

    I don't rate non-fiction so here is a quick review! The overall concept of this was really interesting, I especially enjoyed the focus on how mistakes are reported and acted upon to inform future events! The fact that in so many industries mistakes are hidden for fear of getting in trouble is terrifying, and I feel I also learnt from a personal development perspective that making mistakes and learning from them isn't a bad thing, but is in fact incredibly important and the quickest and easiest wa I don't rate non-fiction so here is a quick review! The overall concept of this was really interesting, I especially enjoyed the focus on how mistakes are reported and acted upon to inform future events! The fact that in so many industries mistakes are hidden for fear of getting in trouble is terrifying, and I feel I also learnt from a personal development perspective that making mistakes and learning from them isn't a bad thing, but is in fact incredibly important and the quickest and easiest way to learn! Overall I would recommend this, but I did feel that the last 100 pages or so got very repetitive and felt a little redundant! The same case studies were used repeatedly and not much extra value was being drawn from them at the end!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Cassandra Kay Silva

    I really liked the anecdotal stories in this book. They were fun and interesting. It also gave me a lot of food for thought on the way that large corporate organizations and complex structures are managed. Even in smaller areas we often talk about how people don't leave a workplace, they leave a manager- this idea is extrapolated further to understand how the broader company culture affects overall performance and output based on fear of reprimand vs reward of change. I really liked this approac I really liked the anecdotal stories in this book. They were fun and interesting. It also gave me a lot of food for thought on the way that large corporate organizations and complex structures are managed. Even in smaller areas we often talk about how people don't leave a workplace, they leave a manager- this idea is extrapolated further to understand how the broader company culture affects overall performance and output based on fear of reprimand vs reward of change. I really liked this approach, most of the content could have been summarised to a fairly singular point to this book but because the anecdotes were interesting I didn't mind so much that this was reiterated.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Vikash

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Once in a while there's a book that you can't keep down. You're willing to know that what's next and you are amazed how much it relates to you. This Book is one such book. The book is powerful enough to change the way you think of failure. We all know that we should be learning from our failures but hardly it happens that we apply the learning. This book explains with compelling stories that how we can learn from our failures and how is our life totally dependent on it. Favorite Quote-“Learn from t Once in a while there's a book that you can't keep down. You're willing to know that what's next and you are amazed how much it relates to you. This Book is one such book. The book is powerful enough to change the way you think of failure. We all know that we should be learning from our failures but hardly it happens that we apply the learning. This book explains with compelling stories that how we can learn from our failures and how is our life totally dependent on it. Favorite Quote-“Learn from the mistakes of others. You can’t live long enough to make them all yourself.” What's the best part about the book? The structure of the book along with short stories is an absolute delight Few actionable pointers from the book:- 1.Create a system from failures- You're going to fail and you are going to fail n a lot of things. But have a mindset of applying the lessons you learnt from failing to avoid the same failures again. It works on the principle Black box is used for in an Airplane. So that the same error is not repeated again. 2.Cognitive Dissonance- You can be your worst enemy if you're busy hiding your mistakes in your closet with a fear of shame. PLEASE accept your mistakes, stop hiding them, stop blaming others, that's the only way you can improve and grow. 3.The Beckhem effect:- We all know how great player David Beckhem was. He was shamed once early in his career, but despite of letting himself down from it he used his will power to overcome it. Always accept your failures and grow out of your ego to contribute for self growth. Be Beckhem. Who is this book for? It's for everyone Because we all will fail at some point or the other.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sonny Recio

    Black box thinking starts by storytelling the undeniable mistakes in the healthcare sector, particularly with the case of Elaine Bromiley's. It appears that healthcare industry was not open to mistakes that are happening inside especially if the case was life-threatening because the whole industry encourages 0% mistakes since they're dealing with life itself. Any mistakes made will be costly and unforgivable. With this, the author clearly stated that mistakes are essential and responsible for th Black box thinking starts by storytelling the undeniable mistakes in the healthcare sector, particularly with the case of Elaine Bromiley's. It appears that healthcare industry was not open to mistakes that are happening inside especially if the case was life-threatening because the whole industry encourages 0% mistakes since they're dealing with life itself. Any mistakes made will be costly and unforgivable. With this, the author clearly stated that mistakes are essential and responsible for the direct improvement, and I have no qualms for that. He goes on with other stories like unjust justice system which blames an innocent suspect, discovery of dropbox through failures and flaws of the business model of other companies, and so forth. As I read this book, I also learned something that is related to our thinking biases, namely "cognitive bias" which affects the way we interpret failures which I haven't realized till then since we recreate or reframe the way we view failures which I will admit to myself as well. It was good that the author did some further emphasis as why we really have to embrace failures and how to learn from it 100% of the time to minimize redundant failures along the way. In fact, I bought this book just for the very same reason to optimize my learnings when I fail. But it would have been made shorter. At some point, I got bored in lengthy history recaps that emphasize failure in the past. But what I like most about this book is the later part where he emphasized that failures or mistakes are a way of improving one's own creativity. At some point, it can lead us to create or innovate things, which I thought it's something I lack(creativity). I've been passionate in doing something creative for a long time, be it an art, a creative web design of the sorts. I didn't comprehend that failures are part of making your creation or creativity flourish and is applicable for creativity as well. That's where I appreciate this book for the better. Overall, what was explained in this book is self-explanatory and can be realized with common sense as failure is really a way for us to learn. We all know that. Or maybe I just read lots of self-help books that I wasn't able to pick up lots of things from this book. But this is not to say this book is bad or unreadable at all. For beginners, you can learn a lot from this book. But for like me who reads a lot of self-help books and blogs every day, I think I only learn a little bit from this. But I'm still grateful I read this.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Brian Johnson

    “In this book we will examine how we respond to failure, as individuals, as businesses, as societies. How do we deal with it, and learn from it? How do we react when something has gone wrong, whether because of a slip, a lapse, an error of commission or omission, or a collective failure…? … The purpose of this book is to offer a radically different perspective. It will argue that we need to redefine our relationship with failure, as individuals, as organizations, and as societies. This is the mos “In this book we will examine how we respond to failure, as individuals, as businesses, as societies. How do we deal with it, and learn from it? How do we react when something has gone wrong, whether because of a slip, a lapse, an error of commission or omission, or a collective failure…? … The purpose of this book is to offer a radically different perspective. It will argue that we need to redefine our relationship with failure, as individuals, as organizations, and as societies. This is the most important step on the road to a high-performance revolution: increasing the speed of development in human activity and transforming those areas that have been left behind. Only by redefining failure will we unleash progress, creativity, and resilience.” ~ Matthew Syed from Black Box Thinking Failure. Some of us lean into it and learn as much as we can from it, and some of us prefer to avoid thinking about it and/or pretend it never happened. As you may guess, one approach leads to dramatically better performance over the long run. (Hint: Seeing failure as feedback + learning opportunities is a very wise idea.) This book is all about, as the sub-title suggests, “Why Most People Never Learn from Their Mistakes—But Some Do.” It’s a fascinating read. Matthew is a brilliant, award-winning writer who brings the wisdom to life via great story telling. (To put it in perspective, I read this and his other book Bounce in < 72 hours—Black Box on a Friday + a little bit of Saturday and Bounce on Sunday.) The book is geared more toward high-level concepts and organizational applications than individual self-help per se, but it’s packed with Big Ideas: 1. Black Box Thinking - What is it? 2. 50 lbs for an A vs. Perfect piece of pottery. 3. Marginal Gains --> Extraordinary gains. 4. 2,003 + 50,000 = Beckham’s magic formula. 5. Cognitive Dissonance + Galileo. ----- Here's my video review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cCFIY... And click here to find 250+ more of my reviews: http://bit.ly/BrianReviews Brian

  9. 5 out of 5

    Damaskcat

    I found this a totally fascinating and thought provoking read. It looks at a subject which we tend to try and avoid in the twenty first century - failure. The culture is to cover up failures and not talk about them or even think about them. The author uses examples from the airline industry, medicine, inventions and many other backgrounds - including the industrial revolution - to illustrate failures which can be very useful and instructive. If you have had recent experience of a medical situatio I found this a totally fascinating and thought provoking read. It looks at a subject which we tend to try and avoid in the twenty first century - failure. The culture is to cover up failures and not talk about them or even think about them. The author uses examples from the airline industry, medicine, inventions and many other backgrounds - including the industrial revolution - to illustrate failures which can be very useful and instructive. If you have had recent experience of a medical situation where mistakes were made then maybe this book should come with a warning as you could find some of the situations described uncomfortable. I almost gave up on the book in the first chapter because it reminded me of a personal experience but I persevered through that first chapter and found myself completely absorbed in the book. Airlines and aviation generally has learned from its failures which is one of the main reasons why air travel is so safe. Failures are studied closely to try and establish ways of preventing them. People are encouraged to report failures so that situations can be addressed. The author explores failures in medicine which could have lead to constructive changes and opportunities for people to examine their behaviour . In medicine consultants are regarded as God and rarely challenged but to avoid problems medicine needs to change its culture so that failures are examined so that future failures can be prevented. The author quotes some interesting examples from industry where a culture of reporting failures results in a much more relaxed and creative working environment when compared with an environment where failures are punished. He also quotes James Dyson and his thousands of prototypes for the original bag-less vacuum cleaner. The point being that you don't just invest something new - you have to make a lot of mistakes and have a lot of failures before you finally arrive at the finished product. The idea that failure is part of life and you need failures in order to learn is an interesting one and it made me wonder if schools which don't allow people to fail aren't doing their students any favours. Failures and mistakes are part of life and need to be treated constructively.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Huyen Chip

    This book made me think of applying black box thinking to writing. Why can't we publish a MVP of a book and iterate on it? This book made me think of applying black box thinking to writing. Why can't we publish a MVP of a book and iterate on it?

  11. 4 out of 5

    Samson Sunny

    In this book author says we have to give more importance to failures. We need to track the failure and note why and how we failed. This information will help us to improve the future steps that we are taking. Failing information is very important. All the innovation comes from many failures all successful people failed many times. It is not they are talented. They practised well and they took serious about their failure and they learnt from it. This book giving so many examples that reduces the In this book author says we have to give more importance to failures. We need to track the failure and note why and how we failed. This information will help us to improve the future steps that we are taking. Failing information is very important. All the innovation comes from many failures all successful people failed many times. It is not they are talented. They practised well and they took serious about their failure and they learnt from it. This book giving so many examples that reduces the concentration. Author gave different different title but all titles having similar contents. If the book is shorter it would be very good. It is difficult to read all complete chapters. I just skimmed the content. Middle half of the book is very boring. But anyhow the point is very clear. Learn from mistakes instead of sitting ideal and not doing anything.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nukes

    It is hereby truthfully resolved by yours truly that he shall no longer fear actualising failure. He shall henceforth embrace failure as a learning tool by recording all the actions, in-actions and inertias in a personal blackbox. The blackbox shall reviewed without fear or favour. Hard questions shall be asked when results are below par. No longer shall he wait for the perfect product. Instead the prototype shall be launched as per the deadline as is where is. Iteration as a process is hencefort It is hereby truthfully resolved by yours truly that he shall no longer fear actualising failure. He shall henceforth embrace failure as a learning tool by recording all the actions, in-actions and inertias in a personal blackbox. The blackbox shall reviewed without fear or favour. Hard questions shall be asked when results are below par. No longer shall he wait for the perfect product. Instead the prototype shall be launched as per the deadline as is where is. Iteration as a process is henceforth the preferred method of solving problems. I resolve that sneers, giggles, and mirth from my readers are all the same; positive feedback. I can write more about this book. I can write better about this book. But I need the time to read another book as good this one. So I will click save.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ivan Tchernev

    I'm going to start failing a lot more in life now, and it's all thanks to Matthew Syed. Thank goodness for him. Black Box Thinking is a book about failure, and how far, far too many aspects of our lives take exactly the wrong approach to it. His central argument is that nothing is more central to personal, systemic and societal progress than an open, honest and healthy approach to failure. Researched and supported by an exhaustive list of examples, the book was a pleasure to read, and I hope that I'm going to start failing a lot more in life now, and it's all thanks to Matthew Syed. Thank goodness for him. Black Box Thinking is a book about failure, and how far, far too many aspects of our lives take exactly the wrong approach to it. His central argument is that nothing is more central to personal, systemic and societal progress than an open, honest and healthy approach to failure. Researched and supported by an exhaustive list of examples, the book was a pleasure to read, and I hope that I can take its lessons forward into my own life.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    Marvellously easy to read. The story of the BA pilot will break your heart. Really good ideas and well articulated

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sebastiaan

    This book provided me with more useful information than my college education.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Matas Kaminskas

    It's a really good read ! It's a really good read !

  17. 5 out of 5

    Myles

    A very compelling read on why failure is crucial for progress. Syed manages to convey his points with great anecdotes and really brings to life what could be quite a dry subject. Highly recommended.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dunja *a chain reader*

    Absolutely great, mind-blowing book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Oliver Clarke

    I’ve read a few books like this lately, partly because there is a crossover with my day job, but mostly because I like ideas. This was definitely the best. It’s an extremely well written and engrossing examination of a simple concept, that failure is valuable because it helps us get better. Unlike some other similar books it never felt like it outlived it’s welcome. The examples used to illustrate the point were well chosen and often grippingly relayed. I was surprised at what a page turner ‘Bla I’ve read a few books like this lately, partly because there is a crossover with my day job, but mostly because I like ideas. This was definitely the best. It’s an extremely well written and engrossing examination of a simple concept, that failure is valuable because it helps us get better. Unlike some other similar books it never felt like it outlived it’s welcome. The examples used to illustrate the point were well chosen and often grippingly relayed. I was surprised at what a page turner ‘Black Box Thinking’ could be, and also that it moved me deeply at times. In summary then, this is intellectually stimulating, great fun to read and full of insight. I loved it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    David Msomba

    Great insight on how we should build a culture of analysing and learning from our mistakes and failures. I learn alot from the many great examples and case studies that the author has outline throughout this book. I do believe is a culture that we real need to cultivate not only on personal level but many fields that keep cultivating denialism of failure, cognitive dissonance and keep on embracing cover up altitude,when comes to understand why they fail. I cant recommend this enough.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dipra Lahiri

    Well researched, compelling stories that illustrate the key theme - that failure and the willingness to learn from it, leads to success. Corporates would do well to adopt this mindset.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Temuujin Nyamdavaa

    Black Box Thinking is an unique book about failure as well as how to make use of mistake to bounce back from adversity. Matthew Syed, who also wrote another bestseller Bounce, which I haven’t yet read, offered us totally different view of failure and success with his work. To be honest, before reading this book, I reckon that failure is uncomfortable situation that should be avoided. But, now I have a totally different insight into it. The book starts with a totally new perspective about failure Black Box Thinking is an unique book about failure as well as how to make use of mistake to bounce back from adversity. Matthew Syed, who also wrote another bestseller Bounce, which I haven’t yet read, offered us totally different view of failure and success with his work. To be honest, before reading this book, I reckon that failure is uncomfortable situation that should be avoided. But, now I have a totally different insight into it. The book starts with a totally new perspective about failure. To make it clearer, the author tours readers through the process of two most responsible industries in the world and how they both react when it comes to failure. Both are considered as significant and responsible fields because they both deal with human life. Though both are assumed as responsible due to such aforementioned thing, totally different results are presented. In health care, failure and its misconceptions are everywhere following cover-ups. For individuals in healthcare, talent is favoured. In aviation, failure is now rare and seen as a learning opportunity. People in aviation think that talent is not enough and favours persistent. The author tries to re-formulate a conception of failure based on the two different perception of error in aviation and healthcare throughout book. It seems to me that the author successfully tells us that the combination of right mindset of failure and right system for turning failure into success is the secret of high performance. Before this book, I read another book titled Mindset: The New Psychology of Success written by Carol Dweck, a professor of psychology at Stanford University. The book also deals with the conception of failure and argues that growth mindset plays in important, perhaps the most important role, in individual’s development. Black Box Thinking also continues to stick with this argument and defend the importance of failure. Personally, I can’t tell that Matthew Syed and Carol Dweck are both right at this moment. But, circumstances and experiences I have had recently seems to confirms its validity. Having an example of profession is also down-to-earth to me, as a reader. It undoubtedly gives me a moment to reflect my own belief having to do with mistake as well as related to my profession. One particular thing I learned as well as experienced after reading this book is that testing our assumptions, seeing their flaws and learning from them. In chapter 3, the strangest thing about success is that it is built upon failure. When confronting the moment of failure, as the part 2 of this book tells, we tend to pose symptoms of denial, convictions, and blame. Instead, we should test first and have an expectation to learn from it. We sometimes carry the fallacy of perfectionism and fear failure when attempting something new. But, providing we have a bottom to up approach, it is possible to learn from the fall and come up with solutions to problems. Another interesting topic concerned success is the notion of marginal gains in chapter 9. Sir David Brailsford, who started the dominance of British cycling after he became a general manager of his country’s team, became an exemplar of how marginal gain can have big impact in high performance rather than sole big defining change. Small changes in every area of our life doesn’t make a difference at a time, however, add over the long term. Everything related to our certain goal could improve by only 1 percent, then those small gains would add up to remarkable achievement. With deep analysis of failure and success as well as some insightful and practical systems towards success, Matthew Syed managed to convey his secrets weapons towards success in life.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Yernar

    My last three years' books were so average that i didn't even want to mention them here. Black Box thinking encouraged me to restore my goodreads account and rate it. The main idea of the book is about learning from failures and ideas might be similar with Growth Mindset by Dweck. However, the design and the way how the topic is introduced and developed is just great. MUST-READ book! My last three years' books were so average that i didn't even want to mention them here. Black Box thinking encouraged me to restore my goodreads account and rate it. The main idea of the book is about learning from failures and ideas might be similar with Growth Mindset by Dweck. However, the design and the way how the topic is introduced and developed is just great. MUST-READ book!

  24. 4 out of 5

    An Te

    This is a compelling book. It is assumed in this book that errors just occur and are a natural part of life and its concomitant complexities. Its main thrust concerns the articulation of two different cultures in dealing with this complexity. The first is the shut down of all inquiry and learning through pre-emptive blame. The second is the just culture of thorough investigations into the underlying factors that have contributed to the error that established a learning culture and growth mindset This is a compelling book. It is assumed in this book that errors just occur and are a natural part of life and its concomitant complexities. Its main thrust concerns the articulation of two different cultures in dealing with this complexity. The first is the shut down of all inquiry and learning through pre-emptive blame. The second is the just culture of thorough investigations into the underlying factors that have contributed to the error that established a learning culture and growth mindset that responds to negative experiences with an attitude willing to learn and adapt accordingly. The justice systems, systems engineering, aviation, healthcare and the personal approaches to learning of prominent sportspeople and software start-ups are drawn on making this book engaging for a general readership. My personal interest for reading this book has been, primarily, for the healthcare component. I have been moved to explore the area of human factors, ergonomics and organisational culture which is of pertinence to my early career research. I am very glad I have read this book as it has enabled me to understand some of the shifts in attitudes and values that are needed in the healthcare industry. I have an understanding of the theory. It's quite another thing changing the culture. I am certainly and less concerned about the direction in which healthcare now needs to move. And so with this clarity attained, I would like to resolutely affirm and recommend this book to a general readership and to those interested in organisational culture, innovation and learning.

  25. 4 out of 5

    LaMarr D

    "Black Box Thinking" is phenomenal! It forces you to think deeply about the decisions you have made personally and professionally – and more importantly, the failures as a result of those decisions. No matter if you are an employee or an entrepreneur, the book also compels you to think about how your company makes its decisions and how things can be improved in your work environment. The way we have been conditioned and taught to view failure is wrong and, in Syed’s view, we should embrace failu "Black Box Thinking" is phenomenal! It forces you to think deeply about the decisions you have made personally and professionally – and more importantly, the failures as a result of those decisions. No matter if you are an employee or an entrepreneur, the book also compels you to think about how your company makes its decisions and how things can be improved in your work environment. The way we have been conditioned and taught to view failure is wrong and, in Syed’s view, we should embrace failure as an opportunity to improve versus using failure to blame someone. Going forward, this perspective will be something I use in all areas of my life. That sounds simple, but this book illustrates how powerful a simple change in thinking can produce extraordinary outcomes, both good and bad. “Black Box Thinking” should be required reading for anyone seeking to grow personally and professionally. The author did a great job of weaving historical examples from the aviation, healthcare, and sports industries to support each point made throughout the book. An excellent feature! It was a perfect read and I will be reading it again in the future, for sure.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    If you are looking for a warm and fuzzy book with step by step instructions on how to learn from your mistakes this isn’t the book for you. I will admit - that is what I came into the book expecting. What I got was SO much more. Riddled with real life stories, examples and scientific evidence this book really breaks down the psychological issues and games we play not only as individuals but as organizations to avoid, deny and even penalize failure and how much it hurts us to do so. I love the real If you are looking for a warm and fuzzy book with step by step instructions on how to learn from your mistakes this isn’t the book for you. I will admit - that is what I came into the book expecting. What I got was SO much more. Riddled with real life stories, examples and scientific evidence this book really breaks down the psychological issues and games we play not only as individuals but as organizations to avoid, deny and even penalize failure and how much it hurts us to do so. I love the real world examples and stories and it was fun to learn about the grit some people have had that have led them to the success they have achieved like David Beckham and James Dyson. I’m left with 3 big takeaways: 1. Don’t just avoid failure. Embrace it. Use it as a tool to improve your skills, mindset and life. 2. Avoid hospitals as much as possible (unless you live in Seattle as I do and can go to Virginia Mason 😂🙈) 3. Go buy a Dyson vacuum cleaner ASAP. 🤪

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ardon Pillay

    “A good pilot always evaluates what’s happened, so that he can apply what’s learned” The words of Viper from Top Gun ring quite strongly after a read of this book. It’s a very well weighted consideration of why we take failure at face value as a bad thing, and sometimes even ignore it, out of a need to delude ourselves into thinking that we are as good as we think we are. Syed argues that acknowledging failure is the right way to go; after all, even with the cleverest people on the planet, every “A good pilot always evaluates what’s happened, so that he can apply what’s learned” The words of Viper from Top Gun ring quite strongly after a read of this book. It’s a very well weighted consideration of why we take failure at face value as a bad thing, and sometimes even ignore it, out of a need to delude ourselves into thinking that we are as good as we think we are. Syed argues that acknowledging failure is the right way to go; after all, even with the cleverest people on the planet, every possibility can not be anticipated - so failures are inevitable. The optimum strategy is to be as pragmatic as possible with failures, like in aviation, where failures are published so the community can collectively learn from them. Nearly every field can learn from this approach, after all, it does offer some impressive returns, as seen in so many different contexts, from hospitals which adopted the approach, to maximising success in business.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Charlene

    Fantastic. If you liked Daniel Kahneman's Thinking Fast and Slow, you will like this. Syed examined the consequences of engaging in heuristic errors, as all of us do. There was a wonderful and heavy focus on decision making in criminal justice and medicine. What would it take to ensure fairer outcomes? How are we preventing such outcomes? Do we want to *feel* like we are making a difference more than we *actually* want to make a difference? What are the real goals when handing out justice or med Fantastic. If you liked Daniel Kahneman's Thinking Fast and Slow, you will like this. Syed examined the consequences of engaging in heuristic errors, as all of us do. There was a wonderful and heavy focus on decision making in criminal justice and medicine. What would it take to ensure fairer outcomes? How are we preventing such outcomes? Do we want to *feel* like we are making a difference more than we *actually* want to make a difference? What are the real goals when handing out justice or medical treatment? This book is significantly better than Nurtureshock but drives home the same point. In a related note, the author also includes a summary of Duckworth's grit research, which is all the rage since the book Grit came out. So, that will be a treat for readers interested in her work.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Zack

    I enjoyed the book and thought it was well delivered, but unfortunately didn't find too much original material here, this book focuses a lot on problem-solving in medicine and in aviation if you haven't read too much on these subjects then I would recommend this book. I enjoyed the book and thought it was well delivered, but unfortunately didn't find too much original material here, this book focuses a lot on problem-solving in medicine and in aviation if you haven't read too much on these subjects then I would recommend this book.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rachael

    This book is about how we can learn from failure and improve. It’s a shame that this book didn’t use that principal. It could have been shorter, more focused and less repetitive. It was extremely male centric and used almost exclusively male examples. It didn’t look at male ego as a barrier to admitting failure but when mentioning “surgeons” I didn’t get the feeling that included women. There was lots of moaning about doctors not learning from mistakes which is a shame as it propagates a singula This book is about how we can learn from failure and improve. It’s a shame that this book didn’t use that principal. It could have been shorter, more focused and less repetitive. It was extremely male centric and used almost exclusively male examples. It didn’t look at male ego as a barrier to admitting failure but when mentioning “surgeons” I didn’t get the feeling that included women. There was lots of moaning about doctors not learning from mistakes which is a shame as it propagates a singular, misinformed viewpoint. It does have some merit in bringing up examples of success built on failure that were less familiar but it was overly detailed. I didn’t need to know every free kick that David Beckham scored in a major tournament. In a nutshell, about 5 or 6 useful pointers but hard work to get to them.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.