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Exiled Home: Salvadoran Transnational Youth in the Aftermath of Violence

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In Exiled Home, Susan Bibler Coutin recounts the experiences of Salvadoran children who migrated with their families to the United States during the 1980–1992 civil war. Because of their youth and the violence they left behind, as well as their uncertain legal status in the United States, many grew up with distant memories of El Salvador and a profound sense of disjuncture In Exiled Home, Susan Bibler Coutin recounts the experiences of Salvadoran children who migrated with their families to the United States during the 1980–1992 civil war. Because of their youth and the violence they left behind, as well as their uncertain legal status in the United States, many grew up with distant memories of El Salvador and a profound sense of disjuncture in their adopted homeland. Through interviews in both countries, Coutin examines how they sought to understand and overcome the trauma of war and displacement through such strategies as recording community histories, advocating for undocumented immigrants, forging new relationships with the Salvadoran state, and, for those deported from the United States, reconstructing their lives in El Salvador. In focusing on the case of Salvadoran youth, Coutin’s nuanced analysis shows how the violence associated with migration can be countered through practices that recuperate historical memory while also reclaiming national membership. 


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In Exiled Home, Susan Bibler Coutin recounts the experiences of Salvadoran children who migrated with their families to the United States during the 1980–1992 civil war. Because of their youth and the violence they left behind, as well as their uncertain legal status in the United States, many grew up with distant memories of El Salvador and a profound sense of disjuncture In Exiled Home, Susan Bibler Coutin recounts the experiences of Salvadoran children who migrated with their families to the United States during the 1980–1992 civil war. Because of their youth and the violence they left behind, as well as their uncertain legal status in the United States, many grew up with distant memories of El Salvador and a profound sense of disjuncture in their adopted homeland. Through interviews in both countries, Coutin examines how they sought to understand and overcome the trauma of war and displacement through such strategies as recording community histories, advocating for undocumented immigrants, forging new relationships with the Salvadoran state, and, for those deported from the United States, reconstructing their lives in El Salvador. In focusing on the case of Salvadoran youth, Coutin’s nuanced analysis shows how the violence associated with migration can be countered through practices that recuperate historical memory while also reclaiming national membership. 

36 review for Exiled Home: Salvadoran Transnational Youth in the Aftermath of Violence

  1. 5 out of 5

    Naomi

    I checked this book out of the library as part of a research paper and it was so good that I bought myself a copy to have forever. That's really the best review I can give any book. But more practically, the combination of ethnographic research, political context, and continued relevance made this book really powerful. That and it's at the intersection of my interests in Latin America, immigration, and law. I checked this book out of the library as part of a research paper and it was so good that I bought myself a copy to have forever. That's really the best review I can give any book. But more practically, the combination of ethnographic research, political context, and continued relevance made this book really powerful. That and it's at the intersection of my interests in Latin America, immigration, and law.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alejandro

  3. 4 out of 5

    Craig

  4. 5 out of 5

    Brenda Amaya

  5. 5 out of 5

    calliegunz

  6. 5 out of 5

    Koko

  7. 5 out of 5

    Megan

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    973.00468 C871 2016

  9. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Clementi

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alison

  11. 5 out of 5

    Julie Kircher

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kerry

  14. 4 out of 5

    Duke Press

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jesse Ortiz

  16. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Pineda

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cindy Mejia

  18. 4 out of 5

    Yesenia Villalta

  19. 5 out of 5

    Gail

  20. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

  21. 4 out of 5

    Donna M. Principe

  22. 4 out of 5

    Iris

  23. 4 out of 5

    Deborah

  24. 5 out of 5

    Carolina Quinteros

  25. 4 out of 5

    hami

  26. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Mendoza

  27. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  28. 5 out of 5

    Yang

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Navas

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kayla

  31. 5 out of 5

    Kate

  32. 4 out of 5

    Jessika

  33. 5 out of 5

    Jorge

  34. 4 out of 5

    L

  35. 5 out of 5

    Perri

  36. 5 out of 5

    Mattingly Dramer

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