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Unleashing the Ideavirus: Stop Marketing AT People! Turn Your Ideas into Epidemics by Helping Your Customers Do the Marketing thing for You.

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The book that sparked a marketing revolution. "This is a subversive book. It says that the marketer is not--and ought not to be--at the center of successful marketing. The customer should be. Are you ready for that?" --From the Foreword by Malcolm Gladwell, author of The Tipping Point. Counter to traditional marketing wisdom, which tries to count, measure, and manipulate th The book that sparked a marketing revolution. "This is a subversive book. It says that the marketer is not--and ought not to be--at the center of successful marketing. The customer should be. Are you ready for that?" --From the Foreword by Malcolm Gladwell, author of The Tipping Point. Counter to traditional marketing wisdom, which tries to count, measure, and manipulate the spread of information, Seth Godin argues that the information can spread most effectively from customer to customer, rather than from business to customer. Godin calls this powerful customer-to-customer dialogue the ideavirus, and cheerfully eggs marketers on to create an environment where their ideas can replicate and spread. In lively detail, Godin looks at the ways companies such as PayPal, Hotmail, GeoCities, even Volkswagen have successfully launched ideaviruses. He offers a "recipe" for creating your own ideavirus, identifies the key factors in the successful spread of an ideavirus (powerful sneezers, hives, a clear vector, a smooth, friction-free transmission), and shows how any business, large or small, can use ideavirus marketing to succeed in a world that just doesn't want to hear it anymore from the traditional marketers.


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The book that sparked a marketing revolution. "This is a subversive book. It says that the marketer is not--and ought not to be--at the center of successful marketing. The customer should be. Are you ready for that?" --From the Foreword by Malcolm Gladwell, author of The Tipping Point. Counter to traditional marketing wisdom, which tries to count, measure, and manipulate th The book that sparked a marketing revolution. "This is a subversive book. It says that the marketer is not--and ought not to be--at the center of successful marketing. The customer should be. Are you ready for that?" --From the Foreword by Malcolm Gladwell, author of The Tipping Point. Counter to traditional marketing wisdom, which tries to count, measure, and manipulate the spread of information, Seth Godin argues that the information can spread most effectively from customer to customer, rather than from business to customer. Godin calls this powerful customer-to-customer dialogue the ideavirus, and cheerfully eggs marketers on to create an environment where their ideas can replicate and spread. In lively detail, Godin looks at the ways companies such as PayPal, Hotmail, GeoCities, even Volkswagen have successfully launched ideaviruses. He offers a "recipe" for creating your own ideavirus, identifies the key factors in the successful spread of an ideavirus (powerful sneezers, hives, a clear vector, a smooth, friction-free transmission), and shows how any business, large or small, can use ideavirus marketing to succeed in a world that just doesn't want to hear it anymore from the traditional marketers.

30 review for Unleashing the Ideavirus: Stop Marketing AT People! Turn Your Ideas into Epidemics by Helping Your Customers Do the Marketing thing for You.

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sue Cartwright

    ‘The primary goal of a product or service is not just to satisfy the needs of one user. It has to deliver so much wow, be so cool, so neat and so productive, that the user tells five of their friends.’ They key message when it comes to building a virus-worthy cool product or service, identifying a ‘hive’ and promoting an idea, is the importance of WORDS. Words matter because they are how you start an ideavirus. You have to make it easy for people to ‘get it’ with one glimpse of your website or o ‘The primary goal of a product or service is not just to satisfy the needs of one user. It has to deliver so much wow, be so cool, so neat and so productive, that the user tells five of their friends.’ They key message when it comes to building a virus-worthy cool product or service, identifying a ‘hive’ and promoting an idea, is the importance of WORDS. Words matter because they are how you start an ideavirus. You have to make it easy for people to ‘get it’ with one glimpse of your website or one phrase in your book review. The words you use have to make them want it – now and forever. ‘One of the key elements in launching an ideavirus is concentrating the message. If just 15% of a group is excited about it, it’s not enough. You only win when you totally dominate and amaze the group you’ve targeted. That’s why focusing obsessively on a niche is what successful idea merchants do.’ In this book, Seth explains how the customer should be placed at the centre of marketing and how to harness the contagious power of information through the art of successful communication.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    There's good advice on marketing, especially online marketing, but the approach is most relevant to products and services that are related to communications (such as online communications tools), or are very public. I struggle to think of ways to apply this to marketing the services of my web agency, OptimWise. Other small businesses will likely have the same challenge applying the lessons. Godin explains how to go beyond word of mouth to spreading an "ideavirus": a big idea that runs amok across There's good advice on marketing, especially online marketing, but the approach is most relevant to products and services that are related to communications (such as online communications tools), or are very public. I struggle to think of ways to apply this to marketing the services of my web agency, OptimWise. Other small businesses will likely have the same challenge applying the lessons. Godin explains how to go beyond word of mouth to spreading an "ideavirus": a big idea that runs amok across the target audience; a fashionable idea that propagates through a section of the population, teaching, changing, and influencing everyone it touches. Godin frequently cites Hotmail as an example of an ideavirus. Hotmail offered free email, which attracted attention, but it really became an ideavirus because every email included an ad for Hotmail in the email signature. It also helped that Hotmail worked smoothly; it was easy to sign up and use. Ideavirus Sequence 1. Invent a virus-worthy idea 2. Make it smooth and persistent 3. Incent powerful sneezers 4. Get their permission to follow up Notes Consumers actively resist marketing, so stop marketing at them. Create an environment where consumers market to each other. Marketing is about spreading ideas. Concentrate the message. 1%, or even 15% of the group being excited about your idea is not enough. You must dominate and amaze your target group. Focus obsessively on a geographic, demographic, or psychographic group. Word of mouth tends to be slower, more analog, and quicker to die off than ideavirus. Give people a reason to listen, then create an infrastructure that amplifies their ability to spread word of mouth. Primary goal of a product or service is not just to satisfy needs of one user. It must be so cool and productive that consumer tells 5 friends. Start by "paying" users to spread ideavirus, and when you reach critical mass, start charging for it. In viral marketing, the medium carries the message. The more people use it, the more the ideavirus spreads. Examples: Hotmail, VW Beetle, online affiliate programs. Viral marketing requires that product is communication-focused, or very public. Rewards go to first, fastest, coolest, very best. You must be brave and bold in creation of products and services. To get permission to start an ongoing dialog with the user about your products and their needs, create an ideavirus. Create products so dynamic and virus-worthy that you earn attention and permission. What to do with website visitors: 1. Get permission to follow up. Make it easy for them to learn why they should embrace your idea over time. 2. Make as many supporting manifestos available as possible, to turn consumers from skeptics into converts. Show endorsements, press reviews, criticisms and common objections. 3. Make it easy for consumers to spread ideavirus by providing a multitude of "tell a friend" tools and rewards for spreading word. Try to convert your idea into a virus that has to do with communication. It's much more likely to go viral. Best is an actual communication tool. Inventing words or musical concepts can work too. Find powerful sneezers and beg, cajole, bribe them to use tool.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Shog Al Maskery

    Its sweet and to the point. Very outdated for anyone reading it in the last 10 years but still as affective and important.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jonyleo

    Treat a product or service like a human or computer virus, contends online promotion specialist Seth Godin, and it just might become one. In Unleashing the Ideavirus, Godin describes ways to set any viable commercial concept loose among those who are most likely to catch it--and then stand aside as these recipients become infected and pass it on to others who might do the same. "The future belongs to marketers who establish a foundation and process where interested people can market to each othe Treat a product or service like a human or computer virus, contends online promotion specialist Seth Godin, and it just might become one. In Unleashing the Ideavirus, Godin describes ways to set any viable commercial concept loose among those who are most likely to catch it--and then stand aside as these recipients become infected and pass it on to others who might do the same. "The future belongs to marketers who establish a foundation and process where interested people can market to each other," he writes. "Ignite consumer networks and then get out of the way and let them talk." Godin believes that a solid idea is the best route to success in the new century, but one "that just sits there is worthless." Through the magic of "word of mouse," however, the Internet offers a unique opportunity for interested individuals to transmit ideas quickly and easily to others of like mind. Taking up where his previous book Permission Marketing left off, Godin explains in great detail how ideaviruses have been launched by companies such as Napster, Blue Mountain Arts, GeoCities, and Hotmail. He also describes "sneezers" (influential people who spread them), "hives" (populations most willing to receive them), and "smoothness" (the ease with which sneezers can transmit them throughout a hive). In all, an infectious and highly recommended read. --Howard Rothman --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

  5. 4 out of 5

    John Montgomery

    Seth Godin explores how to turn a good business idea into an infectious "ideavirus" that spreads like wildfire. Early adopters, customers and key influencers, called "sneezers", will spread an ideavirus far more effectively than traditional, interruption-based marketing methods. The trick is to invent a virus-worthy idea, make it smooth and persistent, give powerful sneezers incentive to spread it, and get permission to follow up with its recipients. The key is to carefully identify and choose t Seth Godin explores how to turn a good business idea into an infectious "ideavirus" that spreads like wildfire. Early adopters, customers and key influencers, called "sneezers", will spread an ideavirus far more effectively than traditional, interruption-based marketing methods. The trick is to invent a virus-worthy idea, make it smooth and persistent, give powerful sneezers incentive to spread it, and get permission to follow up with its recipients. The key is to carefully identify and choose the right target group, a "hive", in which to unleash the virus, and to design your product idea or company as an ideavirus right from the start. This book provides a method for effective viral marketing or propagation of ideas. Although many of the stories in this decade-old book are dated, their lessons are still relevant. The author has a breezy style that makes this book a quick, fun and useful read. What's cool is that this book was designed as an ideavirus. Godin's outlines his strategy for making the book an ideavirus on pages 124-5. In reading the book, one experiences first hand the process of creating and receiving an ideavirus. The book embodies its own concepts. It clearly worked because it got me to sneeze Godin's manifesto.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dane Cobain

    I was a little disappointed by this one. I’ve been a pretty big Seth Godin fan for a while now, but this particular book feels a lot more dated than others, thanks partly due to its references to Napster, AOL and Yahoo! being revolutionary. Still, at least it does show that Godin was ahead of the times and on trend even way back when, and some of the ideas here are still applicable in terms of working with “sneezers” – which we now call “influencers“. I can’t give this one anything lower than a t I was a little disappointed by this one. I’ve been a pretty big Seth Godin fan for a while now, but this particular book feels a lot more dated than others, thanks partly due to its references to Napster, AOL and Yahoo! being revolutionary. Still, at least it does show that Godin was ahead of the times and on trend even way back when, and some of the ideas here are still applicable in terms of working with “sneezers” – which we now call “influencers“. I can’t give this one anything lower than a three out of five because I’m pretty sure I would have found this useful if I’d read it five years ago. Unfortunately, I didn’t, and while I would recommend reading some of Godin’s books, this isn’t where I’d start. In terms of the central concept, it’s basically about how sometimes, as a species, something catches on like a cold and is “sneezed” from one person to another. It’s certainly a believable theory, especially because Godin backs it up with some fairly solid examples. The companies that he mentions might not be relevant anymore, but they certainly were back in their heyday. And hey, come on. If nothing else, you’ll get a pretty good idea of how far we’ve really come along in the last ten years.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Richard Newton

    Reading this book has reminded me of a couple of things. Generally, I read business books because they are professionally useful rather than literary masterpieces - and I grade them according to this expectation. Secondly, how hard in this era of turbulent change it is to write a book with lasting appeal. I probably am reading this book too late as it was originally published in 2001 and it's now 2017. It is full of interesting useful advice, but it feels so dated - examples like how brilliant ya Reading this book has reminded me of a couple of things. Generally, I read business books because they are professionally useful rather than literary masterpieces - and I grade them according to this expectation. Secondly, how hard in this era of turbulent change it is to write a book with lasting appeal. I probably am reading this book too late as it was originally published in 2001 and it's now 2017. It is full of interesting useful advice, but it feels so dated - examples like how brilliant yahoo, hotmail and palm pilots are, are much of the problem. If they were so great, where are they now? But scrape below the specific examples and technical references and I still think there are some good ideas here - perhaps not unique or novel, but maybe they were 16 years ago. Godin is deliberately contentious and uses a lot if hyperbole which some people love, but I find irritating. But it's an easy read, he is no doubt a smart guy, and I very much doubt he cares what I think!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Berker Koccaz

    Better to read this book after Permission Marketing.. Yes it's outdated but some ideas are still catchy.. Hoping to implement those ideas soon.. Better to read this book after Permission Marketing.. Yes it's outdated but some ideas are still catchy.. Hoping to implement those ideas soon..

  9. 4 out of 5

    Al

    Read it 19 years too late, and found it mostly unintentionally funny because of the references. But I'm sure it was fresh in its day. Still, if for some reason you feel like checking it out, it wasn't a bad experience. And it was a quick read. But I'd much rather recommend Seth's blog. He writes every single day, and it's mostly thought-provoking. Read it 19 years too late, and found it mostly unintentionally funny because of the references. But I'm sure it was fresh in its day. Still, if for some reason you feel like checking it out, it wasn't a bad experience. And it was a quick read. But I'd much rather recommend Seth's blog. He writes every single day, and it's mostly thought-provoking.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mary Warner

    I went through a period of time many years ago where I voraciously read a lot of Seth Godin's books. It was interesting to read this now and see how dated the book is and how much I have grown away from some of Godin's ideas about marketing. I went through a period of time many years ago where I voraciously read a lot of Seth Godin's books. It was interesting to read this now and see how dated the book is and how much I have grown away from some of Godin's ideas about marketing.

  11. 5 out of 5

    ManOfLaBook.com

    All of those who read this book in order to find a formula or even a guideline are in for a disappointment. This is not a textbook, this is a book written to give one an idea. The book does not teach you how, or why, it opens up a whole new way of thinking and gives the reader new directions to embrace change, and follow new ideas in order to take the business in a new direction. This book has given me many things to think about, I view the marketing department in a whole new way, and as someone All of those who read this book in order to find a formula or even a guideline are in for a disappointment. This is not a textbook, this is a book written to give one an idea. The book does not teach you how, or why, it opens up a whole new way of thinking and gives the reader new directions to embrace change, and follow new ideas in order to take the business in a new direction. This book has given me many things to think about, I view the marketing department in a whole new way, and as someone who has a say in the company, I even bring out new ideas which break the mold and take the company into a new direction. This book has given me the tools to come up with those ideas.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ben Mautner

    I usually like Godin's writing, but this book is embarrassingly useless. I usually like Godin's writing, but this book is embarrassingly useless.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Trader

    Author gives you his thesis early, and then gives you 200 pages worth of examples and nuances on target audiences, etc. Nothing to see here, folks, move along.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Oliver Gassner

    An inspiring must-read If yo are in communication.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa Princessa

    This book is 20 years old at the point of me reading it... WOW The key message in these blinks: To succeed in the modern economy, you have to create and spread compelling ideas, not just physical products and services. The most effective way to spread them is to turn them into ideaviruses. These allow you to bypass traditional advertising, which is no longer an effective approach to marketing. To unleash an ideavirus, you have to select the right hive, find the right sneezers, and make sure the id This book is 20 years old at the point of me reading it... WOW The key message in these blinks: To succeed in the modern economy, you have to create and spread compelling ideas, not just physical products and services. The most effective way to spread them is to turn them into ideaviruses. These allow you to bypass traditional advertising, which is no longer an effective approach to marketing. To unleash an ideavirus, you have to select the right hive, find the right sneezers, and make sure the idea of your product or service can be as smoothly transmitted as possible.  What to read next: Poke the Box, by Seth Godin You’ve just learned about turning an idea into an ideavirus – but how do you develop a good idea for a product or service in the first place? You’ve surely heard the expression “think outside the box.” Well, Seth Godin has another suggestion: Go one step farther, and poke the box!  To explain what he means by this, Godin tells the story of an electronic, box-shaped toy that his uncle invented for his cousin. It had various buttons on it, and depending on how you pressed them, you’d produce different combinations of light and sound. The point of it was to poke around and see what happens. And that’s precisely what you need to do to come up with an innovative idea! To learn more about how to adopt this playful approach to idea development, check out our blinks to Poke the Box, by Seth Godin. 

  16. 5 out of 5

    Vinayak Hegde

    This is one of those books that have to be read at a point in time. Just like the author proposes, the ideas and the techniques (or the ideavirus as the author calls it - ideavirus is known as memes to laypeople) in the book are a little past their prime. They might have been more relevant when the book was published. Also the effect of the book was less pronounced on me due to some of the ideas in the book have been covered before in Malcolm Gladwell's Tipping Point (more genrically) or Geoffre This is one of those books that have to be read at a point in time. Just like the author proposes, the ideas and the techniques (or the ideavirus as the author calls it - ideavirus is known as memes to laypeople) in the book are a little past their prime. They might have been more relevant when the book was published. Also the effect of the book was less pronounced on me due to some of the ideas in the book have been covered before in Malcolm Gladwell's Tipping Point (more genrically) or Geoffrey Moore's Crossing the Chasm (More targeted towards early-stage startups and has more rigourous analysis of the similar ideas). One of the things I liked about the book is it's self referential. Seth Godin refers to the ideas in the book and how he wants them to spread. Then he has a number of hooks to make it viral. Last but not the least, in the afterword, he does a honest evaluation of experimenting with his techniques and how he failed and why. Nevertheless the some ideas in the book are still relevant though the terminology used in the book is no longer relevant and has not caught on (in the words of the author, the ideavirus has failed to catch on). The book does get repetitive after a while though the author keeps on pushing the narrative along with short chapters and some good examples. A good worthwhile read but don't expect to be dazzled with it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Isaac Serafino

    He shared some interesting ideas. It seems he was one of the pioneers of "viral marketing" before social networks. It was difficult to get past his rants about many ventures he used as examples and predicted would be amazingly successful, which have since amazingly failed. He also predicted what he called "interruption marketing" (traditional advertising including TV ads) would die--and that hasn't quite seemed to be happening, at least not yet. I was inspired to: make it smooth for customers to s He shared some interesting ideas. It seems he was one of the pioneers of "viral marketing" before social networks. It was difficult to get past his rants about many ventures he used as examples and predicted would be amazingly successful, which have since amazingly failed. He also predicted what he called "interruption marketing" (traditional advertising including TV ads) would die--and that hasn't quite seemed to be happening, at least not yet. I was inspired to: make it smooth for customers to share my idea with each other, to look to find and fill a "vacuum" which has no existing solution, to target communications tools, and to exploit opportunities around music sharing, intellectual property, and managing payment for digital content (which "wants to be free").

  18. 4 out of 5

    Britain

    Great book on viral marketing. Many of the reviews I’m reading are yammering on about how it’s outdated. Of course it’s outdated, it was published 18 years ago. Nothing stays completely relevant for that long but the message still rings true. I wonder what happened to some of the fallen companies that were mention in this book. Maybe they would still be relevant if they adapted to the ever-changing world of marketing. After being prompted by my curiosity, I did read Vindigo was shut down in 2008 Great book on viral marketing. Many of the reviews I’m reading are yammering on about how it’s outdated. Of course it’s outdated, it was published 18 years ago. Nothing stays completely relevant for that long but the message still rings true. I wonder what happened to some of the fallen companies that were mention in this book. Maybe they would still be relevant if they adapted to the ever-changing world of marketing. After being prompted by my curiosity, I did read Vindigo was shut down in 2008 after being bought by an outside investment company. Vindigo could have been Yelp. Palm could have kept the pace with the iPhone. It’s all about adaptation to your environment. I love Seth’s books and would recommend this to anyone interested in marketing.

  19. 5 out of 5

    J.

    This book is an old book, its talking about companies that no longer are and still remain. You know this is a testament to how effective the pointers in this book have been. I took my notes and now it can be retired. Its amazing that long before Memes were even in the public conscious, this author spoke of them, I wonder if even he knew how big this concept was going to become. Either way, good pointers and an admission that the creation of an ideavirus is both an art and a science. This book ne This book is an old book, its talking about companies that no longer are and still remain. You know this is a testament to how effective the pointers in this book have been. I took my notes and now it can be retired. Its amazing that long before Memes were even in the public conscious, this author spoke of them, I wonder if even he knew how big this concept was going to become. Either way, good pointers and an admission that the creation of an ideavirus is both an art and a science. This book needs to be revamped as we approach the 2020s.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Andrey

    This simply hasn't aged well. Some of it is still kind of relevant - for example, the concepts of powerful and prolific influencers still apply. But they aren't nearly elaborated enough in the book. The ideas of originality and appeal to core niches or "hives" are also useful. But overall, so much is missing from this, e.g. focus on user needs, adherence to core values (remember: "People don't buy what you do, they buy why you do it"). And, no, Seth - it looks like advertising isn't dead after a This simply hasn't aged well. Some of it is still kind of relevant - for example, the concepts of powerful and prolific influencers still apply. But they aren't nearly elaborated enough in the book. The ideas of originality and appeal to core niches or "hives" are also useful. But overall, so much is missing from this, e.g. focus on user needs, adherence to core values (remember: "People don't buy what you do, they buy why you do it"). And, no, Seth - it looks like advertising isn't dead after all ;)

  21. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Mae

    Reading this in 2019 was more about gaining perspective than learning anything. If anything, Godin proves himself to be prophetic in seeing how viral marketing will (and has) evolved over the 18 years since this book was published. My main takeaway is that idea viruses thrive in a vacuum, but that vacuum is always to a niche group of consumers who really do have a need for your idea, and the first one to get there will dominate.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Synthia Salomon

    “To succeed in the modern economy, you have to create and spread compelling ideas, not just physical products and services. The most effective way to spread them is to turn them into ideaviruses. These allow you to bypass traditional advertising, which is no longer an effective approach to marketing. To unleash an ideavirus, you have to select the right hive, find the right sneezers, and make sure the idea of your product or service can be as smoothly transmitted as possible.”

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dave Applegate

    Godin explain how to make an idea go viral before the modern virality tools and channels existed. This focus on virality before YouTube, TikTok, etc. existed forces godin to talk more about the first principles behind a viral idea and the mechanics behind virality. I feel like my thinking is more flexible, and I'd do a better job as a marketer both creating viral marketing campaigns and taking advantage of new platforms / opportunities after reading this book. Godin explain how to make an idea go viral before the modern virality tools and channels existed. This focus on virality before YouTube, TikTok, etc. existed forces godin to talk more about the first principles behind a viral idea and the mechanics behind virality. I feel like my thinking is more flexible, and I'd do a better job as a marketer both creating viral marketing campaigns and taking advantage of new platforms / opportunities after reading this book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Omar M. Khateeb

    How do you get something to go viral? The answer lies in how viruses function in nature. They need a host that can serve to replicate the virus and spread it to another host through physical contact or transference by a cough or sneeze. In marketing, the hosts are people (your customers) and the way they spread is through the medium you choose (social media, word-of-mouth, etc).

  25. 4 out of 5

    Felipe CZ

    Another great book by Seth Godin, which states that everytime we market a product or service, we market an idea, which should be designed to resonate with our target audience in order to be spread. By turning them into "ideaviruses", we have to select the right hive, find the right sneezers, and make sure the idea can be transmitted smoothly. Another great book by Seth Godin, which states that everytime we market a product or service, we market an idea, which should be designed to resonate with our target audience in order to be spread. By turning them into "ideaviruses", we have to select the right hive, find the right sneezers, and make sure the idea can be transmitted smoothly.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Filipa Canelas

    If you just create an Ideavirus — an idea that quickly spreads through an environment, without the need to interrupt. Your customers, the sneezers, will market your idea at a much faster pace. Like the spread of a virus. Are you more likely to buy a product because you saw an ad or because your 10-year friend recommended it? Read more here: https://www.filipacanelas.com/blog/id... If you just create an Ideavirus — an idea that quickly spreads through an environment, without the need to interrupt. Your customers, the sneezers, will market your idea at a much faster pace. Like the spread of a virus. Are you more likely to buy a product because you saw an ad or because your 10-year friend recommended it? Read more here: https://www.filipacanelas.com/blog/id...

  27. 4 out of 5

    Iago Seleme

    Good explanation of the new trend in marketing, still very relevant even though published a while ago. Nice examples of how to achieve growth through word of mouth and technology enhanced word of mouth, i. e. word of mouse.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Soul

    Using the power of internet to learn the art and science of "Going Viral" too bad for me I've seen documentary on netflix "explained" recently about how these going viral when used by malicious parties create an "epidemic" in true sense. Using the power of internet to learn the art and science of "Going Viral" too bad for me I've seen documentary on netflix "explained" recently about how these going viral when used by malicious parties create an "epidemic" in true sense.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rich Baker

    How do ideas spread? When people want to spread them. Not everyone wants to, but those who do (sneezers) will spread them voraciously as long as the ideas are remarkable. Highly recommend this book to anyone who makes things they want people to talk about.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kojo Baffoe

    I suspect I read this book some years too late. It is interesting when taking into consideration where we are today. Some valuable insights, especially when you look at the evolution of marketing. Spot on with some predictions.

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