web site hit counter Work Clean: The life-changing power of mise-en-place to organize your life, work, and mind - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Work Clean: The life-changing power of mise-en-place to organize your life, work, and mind

Availability: Ready to download

The first organizational book inspired by the culinary world, taking mise-en-place outside the kitchen. Every day, chefs across the globe churn out enormous amounts of high-quality work with efficiency using a system called mise-en-place—a French culinary term that means “putting in place” and signifies an entire lifestyle of readiness and engagement. In Work Clean, Dan Cha The first organizational book inspired by the culinary world, taking mise-en-place outside the kitchen. Every day, chefs across the globe churn out enormous amounts of high-quality work with efficiency using a system called mise-en-place—a French culinary term that means “putting in place” and signifies an entire lifestyle of readiness and engagement. In Work Clean, Dan Charnas reveals how to apply mise-en-place outside the kitchen, in any kind of work. Culled from dozens of interviews with culinary professionals and executives, including world-renowned chefs like Thomas Keller and Alfred Portale, this essential guide offers a simple system to focus your actions and accomplish your work. Charnas spells out the 10 major principles of mise-en-place for chefs and non chefs alike: (1) planning is prime; (2) arranging spaces and perfecting movements; (3) cleaning as you go; (4) making first moves; (5) finishing actions; (6) slowing down to speed up; (7) call and callback; (8) open ears and eyes; (9) inspect and correct; (10) total utilization. This journey into the world of chefs and cooks shows you how each principle works in the kitchen, office, home, and virtually any other setting.


Compare

The first organizational book inspired by the culinary world, taking mise-en-place outside the kitchen. Every day, chefs across the globe churn out enormous amounts of high-quality work with efficiency using a system called mise-en-place—a French culinary term that means “putting in place” and signifies an entire lifestyle of readiness and engagement. In Work Clean, Dan Cha The first organizational book inspired by the culinary world, taking mise-en-place outside the kitchen. Every day, chefs across the globe churn out enormous amounts of high-quality work with efficiency using a system called mise-en-place—a French culinary term that means “putting in place” and signifies an entire lifestyle of readiness and engagement. In Work Clean, Dan Charnas reveals how to apply mise-en-place outside the kitchen, in any kind of work. Culled from dozens of interviews with culinary professionals and executives, including world-renowned chefs like Thomas Keller and Alfred Portale, this essential guide offers a simple system to focus your actions and accomplish your work. Charnas spells out the 10 major principles of mise-en-place for chefs and non chefs alike: (1) planning is prime; (2) arranging spaces and perfecting movements; (3) cleaning as you go; (4) making first moves; (5) finishing actions; (6) slowing down to speed up; (7) call and callback; (8) open ears and eyes; (9) inspect and correct; (10) total utilization. This journey into the world of chefs and cooks shows you how each principle works in the kitchen, office, home, and virtually any other setting.

30 review for Work Clean: The life-changing power of mise-en-place to organize your life, work, and mind

  1. 5 out of 5

    *TANYA*

    I’m looking to apply for a new position with my current employer and I wanted to brush up on my organizational skills. Very helpful and I learned a thing or two. : )

  2. 5 out of 5

    7jane

    This is a book about making life more organised and stress-free, with time-management involved too. It uses the mise-en-place organisation way of chefs, put in non-kitchen world, to help us focus and maintain self-discipline, to manage our life when several things to do happen at once, when one should be able to balance work and home, and manage one's time well. The book is dotted with life situations of the world of chefs, gathered through inteviews, giving us examples as the book flows on. The This is a book about making life more organised and stress-free, with time-management involved too. It uses the mise-en-place organisation way of chefs, put in non-kitchen world, to help us focus and maintain self-discipline, to manage our life when several things to do happen at once, when one should be able to balance work and home, and manage one's time well. The book is dotted with life situations of the world of chefs, gathered through inteviews, giving us examples as the book flows on. The book is organised in three parts, though one should start making notes from the second part on, not just the last part. First part talks about how mise-en-place works, and what the chaos of one's working life can be without it at its extreme-ish end. The second part breaks the concept in parts, including some exercises. And the third part takes us to how to practice the concept in our everyday life, including a run through a day with it. It's clear that the author mainly puts the concept in use in the office world, but the plan does work with other kinds of jobs, if one plans (and changes to suitable form) one's use of it. Students of the culinary school apply it to outside world too, for example in preparing for tomorrow, other kinds of study, organising personal space, social activities... For me, I've kind of used the 'preparing for later activities' already, making sure that I can quickly prepare my tea in the evening, and such. I made a lot of notes reading this book, because I realised quite soon that making notes right from the start of second part was important. I think sometimes the usefulness of the book is shown in how much notes one makes out of it. This one got a lot (and I write small already, so). I'm sure I will be using what I learned from here for my daily life and its organisation. I don't have a job right now, but even within my loose-fit life I can find myself thinking of using this to feel that I get more done than before. So, great book, and recommended. :)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    If you have a job, a goal, or a dream, you need to read this. If you are chronically late, overwhelmed, or stuck, you need to read this. If you want to improve in any way, you need to read this.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gabi

    I was so excited to receive a copy of this book from Goodreads Giveaways! Although I am not in the culinary field, I find it absolutely fascinating. Work Clean looked like the perfect marriage of two of my favorite things: organization and culinary culture. Overall I was very pleased with the book, and found a lot of practical methods that would apply to my daily workplace organization. At times the author’s explanation of the method was a little heavy, a required a few re-reads to make sense. H I was so excited to receive a copy of this book from Goodreads Giveaways! Although I am not in the culinary field, I find it absolutely fascinating. Work Clean looked like the perfect marriage of two of my favorite things: organization and culinary culture. Overall I was very pleased with the book, and found a lot of practical methods that would apply to my daily workplace organization. At times the author’s explanation of the method was a little heavy, a required a few re-reads to make sense. However, the concept of mise-en-place in work and life is conveyed in such a way that I was able to pull what worked for me. My absolute favorite part of this book was the stories told throughout. There are multiple snapshots of lives of chefs, and how mise-en-place affected and continues to affect them every single day. I also enjoyed the hypothetical stories about how to use mise-en-place in the workplace. There was one particular story about an employee being disorganized and how it essentially threw off his entire day. It was so relatable I was wincing while reading it! This book is definitely worth a read for anyone looking for a new method of staying on top of everything, while avoiding excessive stress and burnout. Although I do not think I will implement the complete mise-en-place system, I have definitely adapted parts of it into my daily regime and would happily suggest it to others.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    I am so pleased that I received this book as a Giveaway from the author. I only wish I had had the opportunity to read it decades ago. "Work Clean" uses the chef's philosophy of mise-en-place (pronounced as 'mee's on plahhs') as a metaphor for organizing and elevating one's work, family/home and inner self's life through organization. I had never heard of mise-en-place until two years ago when I was watching a cooking show on the Food Network. One of the famous chefs on the network (it was Ann B I am so pleased that I received this book as a Giveaway from the author. I only wish I had had the opportunity to read it decades ago. "Work Clean" uses the chef's philosophy of mise-en-place (pronounced as 'mee's on plahhs') as a metaphor for organizing and elevating one's work, family/home and inner self's life through organization. I had never heard of mise-en-place until two years ago when I was watching a cooking show on the Food Network. One of the famous chefs on the network (it was Ann Burrell) taught a group of inexperienced cooks the process of mise-en-place, which I took to mean: prepare all the ingredients before you begin cooking so it is easier to do the actually cooking part. After reading this book, I realize my understanding of mise-en-place was very simplistic. It can actually be compared to some Eastern religions. Mise-en-place is mindfulness and behaviors that allow one to successfully accomplish one's goals. That, too, might be a simplistic definition. The three main values of mise-en-place are preparation, process and presence. Obviously those values (preparation, process and presence) can be applied to any human endeavor, so "Work Clean: the life-changing power of mise-en-place to organize your life, work, and mind" by Dan Charnas can be used in one's office, classroom, garden, child-rearing, and any other activity in one's life. I really wish I had know this technique as I began my teaching career and when we bought our first house. Organization does not come easily to me, so when I have tried to be organized in the past, I literally spent almost all of time and energy on figuring out how to be organized. I still didn't accomplish what needed to be accomplished. The key ingredient I believe are those three values (preparation, process and presence). I realize I never internalized the organization piece. I was just viewing it as another task instead of a state of mind, a philosophy, if you will. The book is written using mise-en-place. It is structured in a highly organized manner with ten chapters each breaking down an element of mise-en-place. Actually, Dan Charnas identifies these ten concepts as "ingredients" of working clean. They range from planning, arranging the work space, cleaning as you go, to slowing down in order to speed up, just to name a few. Each chapter or "ingredient" of working clean is sectioned into headings and subheadings including diagrams. The pages are visually easy to read. You can take from the powerful philosophy what you want. You can read it for tips to be more organized in the kitchen. Or perhaps you could use the concepts to streamline your lesson planning, or to set up your mise-en-place workstation better. You can even practice mise-en-place for everything you do, just as the great chefs do. You can also keep coming back to it to improve and further utilize the concepts. I certainly plan to! I also intend to gift this book to my daughter and son-in-law, to give them the gift of mise-en-place as they begin their married life together!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    Almost finished with this book, and I can already tell it will be a re-read. I might even buy a hard copy because it’s that good. If you’re routinely scattered, discombobulated, or stressed, this book will help. If you’re already super organized and want to fine-tune your skills (sharpen your knife, if you will) then this book is also for you. Simply put, if you want to be a more efficient and functional human, read this now. #miseenplace

  7. 5 out of 5

    Snorre Lothar von Gohren Edwin

    It is a great book if you want to understand more about the kitchen. It is a great book if you need elementary introduction to how to work clean and efficient. It is an entertaining book with all its stories. But if you have been doing trying to work clean for some years it is quite repetitive. One nice take away was that one can now have 3 words on how to express this philosophy. Mise en place. I keep my work life Mise en place. I keep my personal life Mise en place. So everything I write about It is a great book if you want to understand more about the kitchen. It is a great book if you need elementary introduction to how to work clean and efficient. It is an entertaining book with all its stories. But if you have been doing trying to work clean for some years it is quite repetitive. One nice take away was that one can now have 3 words on how to express this philosophy. Mise en place. I keep my work life Mise en place. I keep my personal life Mise en place. So everything I write about here https://vongohren.me/posts/ now have three simple words to explain the way of life. That is nice

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sam Spurlin

    I've been waiting for a book like this for a long time and it mostly lived up to expectations. The sections near the end where he tries to translate the concept into a cut and dry personal organization/management system (ala GTD) wasn't useful to me and I disagree with some of the key tenets (like putting tasks on the calendar) -- but that's mostly a function of how deep I'm into GTD already. For somebody who does not already have an organizing philosophy or system that may actually be useful. T I've been waiting for a book like this for a long time and it mostly lived up to expectations. The sections near the end where he tries to translate the concept into a cut and dry personal organization/management system (ala GTD) wasn't useful to me and I disagree with some of the key tenets (like putting tasks on the calendar) -- but that's mostly a function of how deep I'm into GTD already. For somebody who does not already have an organizing philosophy or system that may actually be useful. The more conceptual and philosophical sections definitely gave me stuff to think about and ideas of how to translate into my own life and work.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

    Best productivity book I've read. hands down. Best productivity book I've read. hands down.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Stijn Zanders

    It's great to read about a completely different perspective on organising your work. Professional kitchens are one of the most organised work places and thus there are good concepts coming from them such as call and callback or cleaning as you go. I don't like how all concepts are translated into office work, but I have learned some new practices that I will start using. It's great to read about a completely different perspective on organising your work. Professional kitchens are one of the most organised work places and thus there are good concepts coming from them such as call and callback or cleaning as you go. I don't like how all concepts are translated into office work, but I have learned some new practices that I will start using.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    This was a particularly fun read for me as someone interested both in cooking and in productivity.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Wessel

    Since the development of shows like Top Chef and Hell's Kitchen, I have become fascinated with the mechanics of restaurants and chef's. This book addresses some of my questions while providing a different way of thinking through or at least talking about time management skills needed by most. Since the development of shows like Top Chef and Hell's Kitchen, I have become fascinated with the mechanics of restaurants and chef's. This book addresses some of my questions while providing a different way of thinking through or at least talking about time management skills needed by most.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    This book really spoke to me, probably because it jives simultaneously with a lot of my life philosophies & neuroses. Basically, it takes the principles of mise-en-place used by professional chefs & looks at how non-chefs can maybe become more productive/happier by employing them. Some are more applicable than others and I'm not saying I immediately implemented every strategy in the book, but I did spend half a day stripping down my office & getting rid of the stacks of papers & books that tend This book really spoke to me, probably because it jives simultaneously with a lot of my life philosophies & neuroses. Basically, it takes the principles of mise-en-place used by professional chefs & looks at how non-chefs can maybe become more productive/happier by employing them. Some are more applicable than others and I'm not saying I immediately implemented every strategy in the book, but I did spend half a day stripping down my office & getting rid of the stacks of papers & books that tend to accumulate, another half day cleaning out my work & personal email inboxes (not quite at zero, but close), & have gotten super rigorous about using time efficiently, working harder at not wasting things (especially food), & constantly cleaning up after myself. I have a feeling that if you enjoyed Marie Kondo, you'll probably like this one (though you may need it less now).

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Charnas does an excellent job taking the culinary concept of mise-en-place and applying it towards the workaday world and its tasks. I especially enjoyed the interviews with various chefs, which helped provide a lot of underpinning to the concept, as well as providing a behind-the-scenes look into how professional kitchens are run. There is a lot of useful information, some of which I was able to implement in my own work. I did find the final section, where Charnas compiles all of the ideas from Charnas does an excellent job taking the culinary concept of mise-en-place and applying it towards the workaday world and its tasks. I especially enjoyed the interviews with various chefs, which helped provide a lot of underpinning to the concept, as well as providing a behind-the-scenes look into how professional kitchens are run. There is a lot of useful information, some of which I was able to implement in my own work. I did find the final section, where Charnas compiles all of the ideas from the rest of the book, to be a bit overwhelming; no matter what your career, though, there is lots of food for thought. **I received an ARC from the publisher via Edelweiss. All opinions are my own.**

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mr. Banks

    I stumbled upon this book while wondering through an airport bookstore in Danang, Vietnam. It was hidden amongst a myriad of business books, autobiographies, and some of the notable classics of self-help (think Thinking Fast and Slow). So here I was, staring at a sleek, clean, and well laid out cover called Work Clean. I read the subtitle and immediately knew that this book was for me. For the past year I’ve been travelling around the world staying on friend’s coaches, hotels, hostels, airbnbs, a I stumbled upon this book while wondering through an airport bookstore in Danang, Vietnam. It was hidden amongst a myriad of business books, autobiographies, and some of the notable classics of self-help (think Thinking Fast and Slow). So here I was, staring at a sleek, clean, and well laid out cover called Work Clean. I read the subtitle and immediately knew that this book was for me. For the past year I’ve been travelling around the world staying on friend’s coaches, hotels, hostels, airbnbs, and other rooms that usually didn’t come with a private kitchen. During this time, and for a bit before, I have been obsessing over travel food shows, shows about fine dining chefs, and any other kitchen or cooking related programs. I’ve also read the beginning of a few cook books, watched cooking tutorials on YouTube, and listened to Anthony Bourdain’s Kitchen Confidential audiobook. In another life, I used to be an avid cook, but as I’ve been travelling I haven’t had the opportunity to cook or prepare my own meals. My hypothesis for obsessing over these cooking shows is due to my self-imposed lack of a dedicated cooking space. However, when I read the subtitle of the Work Clean book, it immediately dawned on me that my obsession with great chefs wasn’t the fact that I didn’t have the opportunity to cook like them, it was my inability to be as productive, or as I recently learned, to be as effective as them in their daily work. For quite some time now, I’ve realized that I’m not the greatest at discipline and productivity. This is something I’ve tried to solve by reading countless willpower and productivity books and blog posts. Unfortunately, each one taught me only some basic tools to become slightly more productive, or provided scientific reasons on why my brain was failing to be productive, and not how to stay productive after the fresh ideas faded from my mind. To be disciplined and more effective with my work, I needed a new strategy to deal with my lack of focus, and I believe that this book provided me with the fresh eyes to carry me through the difficult troughs. The book’s author, Dan Charnas, touts the concept of mis-en-place to be the godsend of a chef’s productivity, and I believe that there is a lot of truth in this statement. Not being a chef myself, I only have the anecdotal evidence of friends and family who are chefs (cooks), and from watching documentaries and TV shows about being a chef. With every conversation I’ve had, and in every show, the discussion of a chef’s mis-en-place is usually the centrepiece for the chef’s ability to provide consistent delivery (i.e. excellence). For a complete amateur, Charnas was able to convey the basic concepts of mis-en-place in an easy to digest way; giving everyone the toolkit for the chef’s superpower. Using interviews of famous chefs and describing the CIA’s (Culinary Institute of America) teaching process, the reader is provided with an inside look into a practice that imbues itself into a chef’s career and personal life. The book is divided into three sections. The first, an introduction of how mis-en-place provides the balance between focus and chaos, the yin and yang, of a chef’s life. Next, we are treated to the ten “ingredients” of how we can work clean. Each of these ingredients is a lesson we should apply in our daily lives, whether cooking or work, and they follow the consistent pattern of story of a chef, how chefs use the lesson, the takeaways for work life, exercises to build on the lesson, and finally a conclusion of the lesson. These ingredients take up the majority of the book and they range from learning how to plan, cleaning as you go, and the power of communication. Finally, Charnas concludes the book with a section dedicated to putting all these ingredients into practice using new terminology, a strategy of planning, and how mis-en-place provides the framework of a system of organization for systems of organization. I really appreciated the section named “A Day of Working Clean” where the reader is presented with examples of how to set up a daily meeze (planning), working through their processes, and how to stay present in a day of chaos. The lessons provide tools similar to other productivity books. Instead of abstract examples, though, they used examples of chefs and how kitchens employ the lessons in real life examples. With these kitchen examples, and work life applications, I was able to judge how I could personally apply the lessons in my everyday life. This was helpful for determining which ingredients I lacked, and which ones I was already practicing. However, there is a slight drawback to use only examples throughout the book. The argument on the basis of examples from top chefs requires you to trust the authority of chefs and the CIA rather than accurate studies and data backing these approaches. I struggle with productivity books that rely on this type of thesis due to my own personal bias against arguments of authority. There were also a couple contradictions between the lessons. For example, cleaning as you go was contradicted by the total utilization section when we learned some chefs had a messy home; an argument I struggled to accept. Nonetheless, my appreciation of chefs and the kitchen world overruled any issues I held, and I was able to accept many of the lessons and apply them into my daily life (and daily mezze!). Overall, I enjoyed the book and am already using the strategies I learned in my work, personal, and fitness life. There are many helpful lessons that I took away from the book, and I’m looking forward to see if there is a significant increase in the effectiveness of my projects. Only time will tell, so until then, it’s time to start the process.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    The advice was well-explained and clearly & briefly laid out at the end of each section, and the illustrative stories were more entertaining than they tend to be in books like these. I'm fairly well organized, these days, and I still learned quite a bit. I liked it a lot, and I'd recommend it to any young person getting ready to head out on their own. The advice was well-explained and clearly & briefly laid out at the end of each section, and the illustrative stories were more entertaining than they tend to be in books like these. I'm fairly well organized, these days, and I still learned quite a bit. I liked it a lot, and I'd recommend it to any young person getting ready to head out on their own.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    A fascinating look at the process of mise-en-place in the kitchen and how we non-chefs can apply the techniques to get us organized in our daily lives. Loved the concept of the Daily Meeze. I also appreciated the concept that a project that is 90% done is not done.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Josh Hamacher

    An interesting take on personal organization, but nothing you haven't heard before. Some of the analogies were very, very strained. Personally, I enjoyed the vignettes about actual chefs more than the "real" content. An interesting take on personal organization, but nothing you haven't heard before. Some of the analogies were very, very strained. Personally, I enjoyed the vignettes about actual chefs more than the "real" content.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nora Flaherty

    Interesting, concrete and accessible ways to think about organization and time management, based on how chefs organize their work in restaurant kitchens.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Gabriel

    Amazing book. I'm already a fairly organized person with my own nightly rituals for reviewing and planning ahead and morning rituals for updating and scheduling plans into my day. It's the only way to live if I want to get things done. So in that respect, this book was just a validation of sorts. The elements that I absorbed from it that were new to me were a greater appreciation of my spaces and cleaning as I go. It inspired me to redesign how my painting space is set up, both digitally and phys Amazing book. I'm already a fairly organized person with my own nightly rituals for reviewing and planning ahead and morning rituals for updating and scheduling plans into my day. It's the only way to live if I want to get things done. So in that respect, this book was just a validation of sorts. The elements that I absorbed from it that were new to me were a greater appreciation of my spaces and cleaning as I go. It inspired me to redesign how my painting space is set up, both digitally and physically. I moved furniture around until I was happier with my computer/tablet set up, noted down the hotkeys that I hated and took the time to reassign them, and realized that the obvious answer to being a left-handed painter in a world of left-handed keyboard shortcuts was to move the keyboard all the way to my right where my non-dominant hand could take care of those tasks without disrupting the main action. Duh! But if you don't think about these things, if there's no physical room for experimenting because you haven't set yourself up ideally, these breakthroughs just don't occur. Additionally, it improved my process of learning to cook. I had Blue Apron for the month of June as a crash coarse in cooking things that weren't omelettes (which, B.A. is delicious, empowering, and expands your horizons, but I'm back on my delicious low-carb bullshit, now armed with new knowledge and abilities), and it wasn't until the last week of my subscription, when I was swallowing this book in huge daily gulps, that suddenly I found that there was plenty of time between tasks to breathe and clean as I went. Really transformed my experience in the kitchen. I would finish cooking and all I had left to clean was the very last pan I used. Suddenly, cooking didn't seem all that evil. Finally, my house is incredibly clean. Usually, we tidy up last-minute once every two weeks before the maids come to scrub and vacuum all the surfaces. But suddenly I not only seem unable to leave things lying around once I spot them out of the corner of my eye, I'm also unwilling to just drop something where it doesn't belong. My dad's been on my ADD ass my whole life about this, but this was the first time I've really seen the /value/ of cleanliness. Sure, I keep my workspace tidy and can feel it bothering me whenever things get out of control, but I don't think I've ever quite held /avoiding/ messes in such high esteem. I don't know how long this particularly high level of motivation will last, but perhaps long enough to build a habit of it. Or perhaps knowing the underlying philosophy will make it easier to recover after a relapse. Who knows? I'm staying optimistic. I think I would enjoy re-reading this in the future. In the meantime, I'll pass it along to my mom, who is constantly being crushed by her many duties as a math teacher. Grading, recommendations, and lesson planning/adjustment are always leaving her with little to no breathing room, and I hope I can deliver some order into her life with this book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    I knew I was going to love a book that helps with organization by drawing on the concept of Mise-en-place and using examples of chefs and restaurant kitchens to show you how to do it. I love books like Making of a Chef and Kitchen Confidential and these books were inspiration for this book about working smart and feeling better about the quality of the work that you do. This book was so much more than a book about organization. It touches on the personal and the spiritual in a way that I found r I knew I was going to love a book that helps with organization by drawing on the concept of Mise-en-place and using examples of chefs and restaurant kitchens to show you how to do it. I love books like Making of a Chef and Kitchen Confidential and these books were inspiration for this book about working smart and feeling better about the quality of the work that you do. This book was so much more than a book about organization. It touches on the personal and the spiritual in a way that I found really compelling. I am familiar with the Einsenhower matrix of rating things on the matrix of urgent and important to help me understand how things that are not important and urgent or not important and not urgent take up time from the important things. However, on a daily basis knowing this didn’t really help me change what I was doing. In this book, I learned about the matrix of expectation and ease for tasks: High expectation and high ease tasks are finishable Low expectation and low ease tasks are delayable Low expectation and high ease tasks are distracting High expectation and low ease tasks are complex that most need scheduling This new matrix helped me immediately. I am much more likely to think of something as a “finishable” task and this motivates me to complete it rather than put it off with a distracting task. There are many suggestions for how to turn complex tasks into action and the need to have balance in the types of activities you do in a given day. This book managed to inspire with specific things I can start doing right now AND was fun to read with stories of chefs and kitchens.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Joseph McBee

    When I picked up this book I thought it would be the same basic organizational and productivity principles that are in most books of this type only from the Master Chef angle. That would not have been a bad thing, most content of this sort is recycled, but because it presents that content from a fresh angle, it clicks with some people that other books of this type won't. I think what we have in WORK CLEAN is something truly fresh. This really is a different way of thinking about organization and When I picked up this book I thought it would be the same basic organizational and productivity principles that are in most books of this type only from the Master Chef angle. That would not have been a bad thing, most content of this sort is recycled, but because it presents that content from a fresh angle, it clicks with some people that other books of this type won't. I think what we have in WORK CLEAN is something truly fresh. This really is a different way of thinking about organization and productivity an I think it is more helpful than a lot else that is out there. Charnas tells lots of interesting stories of Chefs who are the top of their game. He then lays out the principles, skills, and best practices those chefs use that help make them successful. Finally, he pulls principles and habits that translate directly and some that translate indirectly into the world the rest of us live in. He repeats this recipe again and again in each chapter until the end when he brings all of the ingredients together into a simple and transformative system. I recommend this book to anyone. I think the lessons here can be used regardless of the work you do. I look forward to going back through this book more carefully and applying more of what I have learned.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brendan

    I really like the first two sections of this before the last bit - so probably the first 80% of the book. It's very interesting to hear about how chefs approach their work and I think anyone could definitely take some stuff from those concepts to apply in their own lives. The last bit was like a weird chef-themed Getting Things Done, and you'd be better off reading Getting Things Done really. I want to read the book that explores whether it is really worth being a personal productivity maelstrom I really like the first two sections of this before the last bit - so probably the first 80% of the book. It's very interesting to hear about how chefs approach their work and I think anyone could definitely take some stuff from those concepts to apply in their own lives. The last bit was like a weird chef-themed Getting Things Done, and you'd be better off reading Getting Things Done really. I want to read the book that explores whether it is really worth being a personal productivity maelstrom and what the correct balance is between patting the cat and staring out the windows at the pigeons and achieving all of life's goals in a perfect whirl of culinary efficiency. But I haven't found that book yet. Every so often Charnas mentions that a lot of chefs have really terrible lives with drugs, and alcohol and ignored families and 90 hour work weeks and mental breakdowns. But there is not much examination of whether we should avoid the tips about how to be fantastic because perhaps there are terrible terrible costs involved.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Gloria

    Have had a long fascination with the concept of mise-en-place, a French phrase most commonly associated with chefs. Charnas reviews the premises of mise-en-place in a kitchen context and within the domain of the CIA (Culinary Arts Institute of America), but then adapts its ideas to the workplace. This is about efficiency, accomplishing both short- and long-term goals, pacing, and more. It is fine to adapt this to the workplace, but really it can be part of a person's approach to anything they do, Have had a long fascination with the concept of mise-en-place, a French phrase most commonly associated with chefs. Charnas reviews the premises of mise-en-place in a kitchen context and within the domain of the CIA (Culinary Arts Institute of America), but then adapts its ideas to the workplace. This is about efficiency, accomplishing both short- and long-term goals, pacing, and more. It is fine to adapt this to the workplace, but really it can be part of a person's approach to anything they do, including organizing the home which is only lightly touched on here. Mise-en-place suggests that you would never misplace your keys again, would be able to put dinner on the table quickly, and would never be late, among other benefits. This satisfies a foodie's interest in high-end restaurants and culinary training. Doesn't quite make the leap into our overall daily lives. Am hoping his next book Everything in its Place does just that.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Supinder

    A self-help productivity book based on the working of a Kitchen. What a concept! The key theme presented continuously throughout the book is that of a Mis-en-Place, the concept that everything has a place and that your workstation in life must be kept as clean as possible. This is combined with the idea of a ‘daily Meeze’ – a daily half-hour planning routine where all scheduling is done. Charnas buttresses these ideas by interviews and anecdotes involving famous/prominent people in the world of U A self-help productivity book based on the working of a Kitchen. What a concept! The key theme presented continuously throughout the book is that of a Mis-en-Place, the concept that everything has a place and that your workstation in life must be kept as clean as possible. This is combined with the idea of a ‘daily Meeze’ – a daily half-hour planning routine where all scheduling is done. Charnas buttresses these ideas by interviews and anecdotes involving famous/prominent people in the world of US cuisine. There are lots of allusions to US chefs that by doing a google search have restaurants that have now closed (the book was published in 2016). An interesting take with a USP – however, the points made by the author are too labored and could be made in a more concise manner. Nevertheless, the book and served to introduce me to new terminology and has reinforced ideas that I already encountered.

  26. 4 out of 5

    John

    I promised myself no more “productivity” books. After reading GTD and the 7 Habits, you’re probably 80% of the way there to being a productive person. With that as a backdrop, I approached this book with some skepticism but came away pleasantly surprised. I enjoyed the parallels between chefs/cooking and the lessons learned from the practice of mise-en-place, which is essentially the art and practice of focus and discipline in the culinary world and a concept discussed at length in this book. So I promised myself no more “productivity” books. After reading GTD and the 7 Habits, you’re probably 80% of the way there to being a productive person. With that as a backdrop, I approached this book with some skepticism but came away pleasantly surprised. I enjoyed the parallels between chefs/cooking and the lessons learned from the practice of mise-en-place, which is essentially the art and practice of focus and discipline in the culinary world and a concept discussed at length in this book. Some of the stories to start each chapter probably could be shorter, but for those looking to skim this book, you can scan those sections. The two key concepts I took away from this book are creating your “daily mezze” to prepare your upcoming day and making a quality control checklist, so you can learn from and minimize future errors. I would recommend this book to anyone who wishes to learn preparation and values from another craft (cooking) to apply those concepts to your line of work.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Lupton

    Having read dozens of self-help books, which routinely I think are the best. This one tops all of them, by a longshot. Each sentence, paragraph, and chapter are surgically concise and clean, with nothing unnecessary. The result is a book that a practical, habitual, and cited resource for cleaning your room, your life, your mind, and your time. While reading it will take about 10 hours, implementation will take another 30, and that is what I am just commencing. The only downside of this book is th Having read dozens of self-help books, which routinely I think are the best. This one tops all of them, by a longshot. Each sentence, paragraph, and chapter are surgically concise and clean, with nothing unnecessary. The result is a book that a practical, habitual, and cited resource for cleaning your room, your life, your mind, and your time. While reading it will take about 10 hours, implementation will take another 30, and that is what I am just commencing. The only downside of this book is that its use of gender pronouns is overwhelmingly sexist; instances that should be gender neutral use the feminine pronoun. In English, the female gender pronouns are exclusive to the female gender, which usage deliberately excludes those identifying as masculine and non-binary, therefore excluding at least 50% of their possible audience from what should be gender neutral examples. Perhaps this is a sexist work of feminism to raise female portrayal and identification in such work, however if feminism believes females require the exclusion of others to raise females higher, then that is appalling. If however they mistakingly believe either gender pronoun is gender neutral, or wish to make it so, then they are still alienating their readers for their own activism. All this sexism and alienation could be avoided by just using gender-neutral pronouns.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Bear in mind, I have only read this book once-Kindle version. Goodreads thinks that I read and enjoyed the hardcover version. Can you tell me how to make that go away? I will have to reread this again. That's what happens when you simply read exercises that I should've been putting into practice. Like most "self-help books," much of the information is similar to what great grandma would've told us. Some of it is mixed in with a little "woo-woo factor." Seriously, I don't need to book an organizat Bear in mind, I have only read this book once-Kindle version. Goodreads thinks that I read and enjoyed the hardcover version. Can you tell me how to make that go away? I will have to reread this again. That's what happens when you simply read exercises that I should've been putting into practice. Like most "self-help books," much of the information is similar to what great grandma would've told us. Some of it is mixed in with a little "woo-woo factor." Seriously, I don't need to book an organization to tell me about spiritual practices. ;-) Having said that, I think this is a great book on putting things in order for the best outcomes. It allows room for things to go wrong. It gives you tools for handling all of that. If you do it instead of just reading that exercises. It would be fun to get a group of people together to work through the process.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jon Angell

    This was interesting and helpful. It explained how kitchens work, specifically how chefs organize a kitchen to turn out an incredible amount of food in timely fashion. How they plan, the theories on how to work efficently, how they apply certain skills specific to their trade. What is more the author talks of how some of these principle could be applied to other parts of our lives for good effect. I listened to it on audiobook. I re-listened to several chapters. I have no doubt I will listen to This was interesting and helpful. It explained how kitchens work, specifically how chefs organize a kitchen to turn out an incredible amount of food in timely fashion. How they plan, the theories on how to work efficently, how they apply certain skills specific to their trade. What is more the author talks of how some of these principle could be applied to other parts of our lives for good effect. I listened to it on audiobook. I re-listened to several chapters. I have no doubt I will listen to parts again and again. The information presented is detailed and complex ... but very interesting, I am so glad I heard the interview with the author on The Art of Manliness podcast ... episode #652 Chefs' Secrets for Organizing Your Life... If you think you might be interested in this book or just not sure, I suggest listening to the interview

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    Pretty sure I just stumbled upon the operating manual for my own brain. This is the most actionable productivity book I've ever read, at least for the particular type of project management I do as an environmental consultant. Much of the book is focused on cultivating a "delivery mentality," which is critical if you have many projects on short turnarounds. My favorite bit debunks the tension between fast and good by pointing out that for chefs, excellence is quality delivered. The book gets real Pretty sure I just stumbled upon the operating manual for my own brain. This is the most actionable productivity book I've ever read, at least for the particular type of project management I do as an environmental consultant. Much of the book is focused on cultivating a "delivery mentality," which is critical if you have many projects on short turnarounds. My favorite bit debunks the tension between fast and good by pointing out that for chefs, excellence is quality delivered. The book gets real about deadline stress and prioritization in imperfect circumstances, topics that other productivity systems gloss over. As a food nerd, I found the culinary angle to be fun, if a bit fawning and cheesy from time to time.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.