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The Collected Works of Anton Chekhov: Plays, Short Stories, Diary & Letters (Unabridged): Three Sisters, Seagull , The Shooting Party, Uncle Vanya, Cherry ... Ward No. Six, Swedish Match, Nightmare, Be

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This carefully crafted ebook: “The Collected Works of Anton Chekhov: Plays, Short Stories, Diary & Letters (Unabridged)” is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Anton Chekhov (1860–1904) was a Russian physician, dramaturge and author who is often referred to as one of the seminal figures in the birth of early modernism in the theatre This carefully crafted ebook: “The Collected Works of Anton Chekhov: Plays, Short Stories, Diary & Letters (Unabridged)” is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Anton Chekhov (1860–1904) was a Russian physician, dramaturge and author who is often referred to as one of the seminal figures in the birth of early modernism in the theatre. He made no apologies for the difficulties he posed to the readers, insisting that the role of an artist was to ask questions, not to answer them. Content: Introduction: Biography by Constance Garnett Novel: The Shooting Party Plays: On the High Road Swan Song Ivanoff Anniversary Jubilee Proposal Wedding Bear Boor Seagull Reluctant Hero Uncle Vanya Three Sisters Cherry Orchard On the Harmfulness of Tobacco Wood Demon Novellas and Short Stories: Living Chattel Bliss Joy At The Barber’s Enigmatic Nature Classical Student Matter of Classics Death of A Government Clerk Daughter of Albion Trousseau Inquiry Fat and Thin Tragic Actor Slanderer Bird Market Choristers Album Minds in Ferment Chameleon In The Graveyard Oysters Swedish Match Safety Match The Marshal’s Widow Small Fry In an Hotel Boots Nerves Country Cottage Malingerers Fish Horsey Name Gone Astray Huntsman Malefactor Father of the Family Dead Body Cook’s Wedding In A Strange Land Overdoing It Old Age Sorrow Oh! The Public Mari D’Elle The Looking-Glass Art A Blunder Children Misery Upheaval Actor’s End The Requiem Anyuta Ivan Matveyitch The Witch Story Without an End Joke Agafya Nightmare Grisha Lov


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This carefully crafted ebook: “The Collected Works of Anton Chekhov: Plays, Short Stories, Diary & Letters (Unabridged)” is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Anton Chekhov (1860–1904) was a Russian physician, dramaturge and author who is often referred to as one of the seminal figures in the birth of early modernism in the theatre This carefully crafted ebook: “The Collected Works of Anton Chekhov: Plays, Short Stories, Diary & Letters (Unabridged)” is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Anton Chekhov (1860–1904) was a Russian physician, dramaturge and author who is often referred to as one of the seminal figures in the birth of early modernism in the theatre. He made no apologies for the difficulties he posed to the readers, insisting that the role of an artist was to ask questions, not to answer them. Content: Introduction: Biography by Constance Garnett Novel: The Shooting Party Plays: On the High Road Swan Song Ivanoff Anniversary Jubilee Proposal Wedding Bear Boor Seagull Reluctant Hero Uncle Vanya Three Sisters Cherry Orchard On the Harmfulness of Tobacco Wood Demon Novellas and Short Stories: Living Chattel Bliss Joy At The Barber’s Enigmatic Nature Classical Student Matter of Classics Death of A Government Clerk Daughter of Albion Trousseau Inquiry Fat and Thin Tragic Actor Slanderer Bird Market Choristers Album Minds in Ferment Chameleon In The Graveyard Oysters Swedish Match Safety Match The Marshal’s Widow Small Fry In an Hotel Boots Nerves Country Cottage Malingerers Fish Horsey Name Gone Astray Huntsman Malefactor Father of the Family Dead Body Cook’s Wedding In A Strange Land Overdoing It Old Age Sorrow Oh! The Public Mari D’Elle The Looking-Glass Art A Blunder Children Misery Upheaval Actor’s End The Requiem Anyuta Ivan Matveyitch The Witch Story Without an End Joke Agafya Nightmare Grisha Lov

30 review for The Collected Works of Anton Chekhov: Plays, Short Stories, Diary & Letters (Unabridged): Three Sisters, Seagull , The Shooting Party, Uncle Vanya, Cherry ... Ward No. Six, Swedish Match, Nightmare, Be

  1. 5 out of 5

    Francisco

    This is going to be one of those reviews that continues over time. I'm not quite done reading the complete works. I don't read this book continuously. I save it for days when I need something to hold on to. There's no need to describe those kind of days. If you understand, you understand. Do you have a book you can read, an author you can hold on to when you need to? I was fortunate to start reading this book from the end - the section that contains his letters and journal entries. Then I went o This is going to be one of those reviews that continues over time. I'm not quite done reading the complete works. I don't read this book continuously. I save it for days when I need something to hold on to. There's no need to describe those kind of days. If you understand, you understand. Do you have a book you can read, an author you can hold on to when you need to? I was fortunate to start reading this book from the end - the section that contains his letters and journal entries. Then I went on to his fictional work more or less in the order they were written. Starting with his letters and journal entries gave me a sense of the man and reading his work in chronological order is giving me a sense of his writing and how it developed and deepened. I'm one of those that finds it hard to separate the author from his work, that the depth and integrity of one (or lack thereof) finds its way into the second. One of the reasons I like Chekhov's works so much is because I like Chekhov the man. There's something simple and solid and generous about him. Something about how he carried on with his dual vocation of medicine and writing that is refreshingly egoless. He has a wonderfully balanced awareness of the role that writing plays in his life. It is hard to describe this balanced awareness of his vocation. It's like he knows he is a good writer and he has a gift and he probably suspects he will be read forever but so what, he's not different than you or me. When still young and starting to write, he writes to D.V. Grigorovich after the latter commented on a story written by Chekhov: "I have a gift which one ought to respect. I confess before the pure candor of your heart that hitherto I have not respected it. I felt that I had a gift but I got it in the habit of thinking that it was insignificant." Writing is a gift which one ought to respect. Not exalt. Not believe it makes you superior. Respect implies awareness of both the preciousness, the ordinariness, and the burdens of the gift. And you can see that for Chekhov the gift was something gratuitous, unearned even though it would require hard, constant work to maintain. It was something to be used- given to him so that he could give it to others. There's a beautiful symmetry in his life between his practice of medicine and his writing. I want to say that his writing heals the spirit just like his medicine heals bodies. But I don't want to anger my friend Chekhov in heaven by romanticizing what he did too much. He would not want me to do that. He would want my words to be plain like his. "Literature is only art insofar as it paints life as it really is," he says in his journals. His stories and plays heal our spirit because they are truth- full, reality-full. Not just in the sense that Chekhov is never squeamish about showing us the worst in us but also because he is never afraid to show us the best. And when he shows us the worst in ourselves, the silly, fearful, self-aggrandizing, poor selves that we are, he does it with a quiet compassion and hope. And there are days when that's the kind of author and writing we need.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Hatch

    From this collection, I read: Short stories: * A Chameleon * Kashtanka * Vanka * Ward No. 6 * Rothschild's Fiddle (List recommended by Anannya Mondal.) Novellas: * My Life * An Anonymous Story Plays: * Ivanov * The Bear * The Seagull * The Cherry Orchard What I liked Chekhov's writing often grapples with existentialism in interesting, almost philosophical ways. "Ward No. 6" and "An Anonymous Story" are good examples of this. "Kashtanka", "Vanka", and "A Chameleon" were all enjoyable for different reasons. I suppo From this collection, I read: Short stories: * A Chameleon * Kashtanka * Vanka * Ward No. 6 * Rothschild's Fiddle (List recommended by Anannya Mondal.) Novellas: * My Life * An Anonymous Story Plays: * Ivanov * The Bear * The Seagull * The Cherry Orchard What I liked Chekhov's writing often grapples with existentialism in interesting, almost philosophical ways. "Ward No. 6" and "An Anonymous Story" are good examples of this. "Kashtanka", "Vanka", and "A Chameleon" were all enjoyable for different reasons. I suppose Chekhov was quite good at writing short stories: (1) have an interesting idea, (2) put it on paper, (3) revise to make it nice and concise, (4) done. These three stories don't take much time to read, and they're memorable. Of the plays that I read, "The Cherry Orchard" (his last play) was my favorite. Honestly, his plays blend together—they're all about unhappy nobility who have lost their sense of meaning in life following the emancipation of the serfs—but "The Cherry Orchard" was the best executed of these. It has some thought-provoking symbolism about breaking with the past. If what Chekhov writes about corruption in Russia in those times is true, then I'm glad he was around to call people out on it. What I didn't like I said above that Chekhov often grapples with existentialism in interesting ways. Well, unfortunately, he more commonly grapples with it in deeply uninteresting ways. I lost count of the number of times his plays and stories referenced suicide. Chekhov seems to enjoy writing about miserable people out of pure sadism. He proposes no solutions; he just lets them wallow in their misery. On a similar vein, his characterization is essentially pessimistic. He sometimes strings words together in poetic ways, but invariably the purpose is to paint someone or something in as unflattering a light as possible.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Stirling

    I'm not really "finished" as this is his complete works! The Feb '18 selection for my book club was "anything by Checkhov". I looked up "best Checkhov short stories" on the web, and read 3 of them. The Lady With The Dog This seems to be his most popular short story, and I gather it's at least somewhat autobiographical. I really didn't connect with it though. I have trouble with adultery anyway, and didn't like the casual way it's treated here. Perhaps that's how it was in 1880's Russia, even thoug I'm not really "finished" as this is his complete works! The Feb '18 selection for my book club was "anything by Checkhov". I looked up "best Checkhov short stories" on the web, and read 3 of them. The Lady With The Dog This seems to be his most popular short story, and I gather it's at least somewhat autobiographical. I really didn't connect with it though. I have trouble with adultery anyway, and didn't like the casual way it's treated here. Perhaps that's how it was in 1880's Russia, even though it's pretty clear in the story that they're sneaking around and worried about being caught. His writing is really good, and he draws a detailed and engaging picture of the characters, although there's little detail about Gurov's job, or even of his life at all outside this relationship. But it is a short story after all! I was left with the feeling "why did Checkhov write this?". All that happens is they meet on holiday in Yalta, start an affair, he can't get her out of his mind and visits her in her carefully unnamed town, she then visits him in Moscow. They agree that they've unfortunately fallen in love and that difficulties lie ahead ... and the story ends there. The whole thing seemed capricious on his part, and she was just totally passive and accepting. I didn't get what they saw in each other, beyond boredom in their marriages. Not much insight there. The Bet I read this because I liked the title. Another finely drawn picture of events and characters. At a party the conversation turns to capital punishment versus life imprisonment. The host, a rich banker, is in favour of the death penalty, as being more humane than slowly killing someone through a life incarcerated. A guest says no, he could still have a life in prison which would be better than being executed. The banker bets him a fortune (literally) that he could not stay in voluntary captivity for 15 years. Read the story to find out more! I like this one the best of the 3 I read. The Black Monk Another of his more popular stories, which I think suffers from the same problem as The Lady With The Dog - overly passive and nervous women! I can't believe women were really like this then any more than they are now. Perhaps that's how Checkhov liked them. The main character sees the titular apparition; when he talks about it everyone thinks he's mad, which he believes too. He then essentially kills himself with the then accepted remedy - lots of bromide. In the meantime he's very cruel to his wife, abandons her and takes up with another woman. Is this a feature of Checkhov? Three's enough for me! His writing is great but I don't find the characters or situations that interesting, and his view of women is really irritating. And I'm really not that interested in Russian high society life in the late 1800s.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nilesh

    Chekhov is perhaps the best short story teller of all time. Short stories are about those tiny things that make the daily life. So much in our routine is unusual, noteworthy, absurd, and interesting, even if without much material consequences. Their pithy depiction requires an ability to detect them in their full glory but with minimum additional stuff. Highly complex characters may have to be developed in a span of a few words. Right interactions have to be formed to cause the story to emerge w Chekhov is perhaps the best short story teller of all time. Short stories are about those tiny things that make the daily life. So much in our routine is unusual, noteworthy, absurd, and interesting, even if without much material consequences. Their pithy depiction requires an ability to detect them in their full glory but with minimum additional stuff. Highly complex characters may have to be developed in a span of a few words. Right interactions have to be formed to cause the story to emerge with adequate background and ambience. And they still have to be wrapped up in a double hurry but without appearing hurried, sensational or prosaic. Chekhov manages this almost every time while vividly presenting the nineteenth century Russia with characters from almost every age, class and behavioral varieties. In fact, most of his stories could be from almost any era, any place, even as they are uniquely pre-Communist Russia's. A must read

  5. 5 out of 5

    Steve Graham

    I had previously known his plays so this was an introduction for me to his short stories. I understand why he’s called the master of the short stories!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Gleb

    I of course did not read every story, by page count I read about 35% of it, and based my reading off ones that were recommended, had interesting titles or were written about in his brief biography. Chekhov, in a departure away from the Russian aristocracy, writes many a story about peasants and peasant life. Evident also in Chekhov's philanthropic work in providing books and building schools for them, he quite enjoys people beyond the literary and academic groups where he could have comfortably r I of course did not read every story, by page count I read about 35% of it, and based my reading off ones that were recommended, had interesting titles or were written about in his brief biography. Chekhov, in a departure away from the Russian aristocracy, writes many a story about peasants and peasant life. Evident also in Chekhov's philanthropic work in providing books and building schools for them, he quite enjoys people beyond the literary and academic groups where he could have comfortably remained. Of the stories I enjoyed the most they revolve around 'normal people', not great war heroes or princes, but a doctor in a rural town, a medical student, a village police commissioner, a orchard owner, etc... that experience the same issues we encounter today. Doubt over marriage, being falsely accused of crimes, poor decisions during college and more. This sort of focus made it interesting to realize how similar life is between all of us, even in 1890's Russia. The dialogue is lively. Of course there are plenty of stories that revolve around a man loving a woman, which get's kinda boring. Like every Russian author there are stories of highly misunderstood mental illness, having nervous breakdowns and hallucinations, which is intriguing to realize how they are written about less as a problem and more sort of fantastical, not fully understood, a lot of potassium bromide is prescribed. The comedic/parody plays are also really funny!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Peter Sprengelmeyer

    I am glad that I read the Wikipedia entries and online reviews before reading these plays. They are slow and without a lot of action, but that is the point. The main action is supposed to be happening off-stage, and the characters are reacting to these events. I think that these (Cherry Orchard and Three Sisters) would be better read after seeing them performed, but now that I have read them I am still looking forward to finding a production to experience it. There are still elements that come o I am glad that I read the Wikipedia entries and online reviews before reading these plays. They are slow and without a lot of action, but that is the point. The main action is supposed to be happening off-stage, and the characters are reacting to these events. I think that these (Cherry Orchard and Three Sisters) would be better read after seeing them performed, but now that I have read them I am still looking forward to finding a production to experience it. There are still elements that come out in the reading and which I enjoyed (e.g., the use of the chopping down of trees as symbolic of the ending of something that seemed established was well-done). Glad I read them for the historical place, but I would rather have seen them performed.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Scott Ralph

    A remarkable author. This collection gives you a much broader exposure to his work than his well known plays

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lulu

    1880 - 1904

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mckenzie

  11. 5 out of 5

    Brian K. Sperber

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rich Gatlin

  13. 4 out of 5

    North Landesman

  14. 5 out of 5

    Venetia

  15. 5 out of 5

    martin buckby

  16. 4 out of 5

    Quadrotextual

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlyn

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ernesto

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mark Spurlock

  20. 4 out of 5

    Omar

  21. 4 out of 5

    death before decaf

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nick Merican

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ivan Karamazov

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jesper

  25. 5 out of 5

    Norrie

  26. 5 out of 5

    Aridany

  27. 5 out of 5

    Pier Damiano D'ignazio

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ronald Sienkiewicz

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mr J

  30. 5 out of 5

    Farryn

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