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All in Her Head

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As a young girl growing up in the Midwest, Sunny experiences the shame and stigma of scandal when her father is banned from their church for having an affair with the pastor’s best friend’s wife. As Sunny grows older, she begins to build the life she’s always wanted: she marries, buys a house, enrolls in graduate school, and soon has a baby on the way. But when she experie As a young girl growing up in the Midwest, Sunny experiences the shame and stigma of scandal when her father is banned from their church for having an affair with the pastor’s best friend’s wife. As Sunny grows older, she begins to build the life she’s always wanted: she marries, buys a house, enrolls in graduate school, and soon has a baby on the way. But when she experiences the psychological phenomena of orgasmic labor, it triggers a chain of bizarre events, and she gradually descends into a world of delusion and paranoia. As Sunny struggles to separate the real from the unreal, she relies upon friends and family to ground her in truth and love—and keep her from going over the edge into madness.


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As a young girl growing up in the Midwest, Sunny experiences the shame and stigma of scandal when her father is banned from their church for having an affair with the pastor’s best friend’s wife. As Sunny grows older, she begins to build the life she’s always wanted: she marries, buys a house, enrolls in graduate school, and soon has a baby on the way. But when she experie As a young girl growing up in the Midwest, Sunny experiences the shame and stigma of scandal when her father is banned from their church for having an affair with the pastor’s best friend’s wife. As Sunny grows older, she begins to build the life she’s always wanted: she marries, buys a house, enrolls in graduate school, and soon has a baby on the way. But when she experiences the psychological phenomena of orgasmic labor, it triggers a chain of bizarre events, and she gradually descends into a world of delusion and paranoia. As Sunny struggles to separate the real from the unreal, she relies upon friends and family to ground her in truth and love—and keep her from going over the edge into madness.

56 review for All in Her Head

  1. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Morales

    I could not stop reading from the beginning to the end..... I cried, I laughed, I cringed, I reflected, and I thought deeply about certain struggles in my own life (mostly past), but most importantly I developed a love for Sunny. We all have secrets in our lives that affect us in one way or another, some of us developed coping skills early on in life, and others continue to need a little extra time to develop them, however, it doesn't make them better than the rest or vice versa. Sunny continued I could not stop reading from the beginning to the end..... I cried, I laughed, I cringed, I reflected, and I thought deeply about certain struggles in my own life (mostly past), but most importantly I developed a love for Sunny. We all have secrets in our lives that affect us in one way or another, some of us developed coping skills early on in life, and others continue to need a little extra time to develop them, however, it doesn't make them better than the rest or vice versa. Sunny continued to fight through from childhood, from the separation of her parents, through her marriage with Jack and then divorce, through her thoughts in her mind, to succeeding in becoming an educated professional in this fast paced society we live in. Too many of times we read and hear in the news about those with mental illness living in the streets, in and out of the hospital, hurting themselves and others, but we don't get to hear and see much of those that work full time and raise their children and give lectures and volunteer their services, but here is Sunny to show the world that no, she isn't perfect, none of us are, but with the love and support of her friends and family, you can grow from it all.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Swensonbooks

    I picked up the book and kept turning the pages until I finished; reading it in one long sitting. I received an Advanced Review Copy in exchange for an honest review. Great title because what woman hasn't been told "it's all in your head"? As a reader I was pulled into her stories of early childhood experiences of being raised by Christian Kansan parents and how church turned traumatic when they outed her father's infidelities at a Sunday service. Sunny Mera writes so I could imagine clearly wha I picked up the book and kept turning the pages until I finished; reading it in one long sitting. I received an Advanced Review Copy in exchange for an honest review. Great title because what woman hasn't been told "it's all in your head"? As a reader I was pulled into her stories of early childhood experiences of being raised by Christian Kansan parents and how church turned traumatic when they outed her father's infidelities at a Sunday service. Sunny Mera writes so I could imagine clearly what it was like for her post-partum and during her delusional states of erotomania. This is a story about motherhood, mental illness, treatment, and recovery. When someone experiences a psychotic split with reality, a break, stigma and shame accompanies a patient into recovery. Sunny Mera writes honestly about a horrifying experience.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Teresa Kander

    This was a tough read for me. I kept thinking "This is just crazy talk," and then I realized that was the POINT. The way the book is written actually gives readers a chance to see her life as she saw it at the time. The book is an eye-opening view of motherhood, marriage, mental illness, treatment and recovery. I admire Sunny for her bravery in putting it all out there for the world. She will make you laugh and cry, and rail at the current state of mental health care in this country. **I received This was a tough read for me. I kept thinking "This is just crazy talk," and then I realized that was the POINT. The way the book is written actually gives readers a chance to see her life as she saw it at the time. The book is an eye-opening view of motherhood, marriage, mental illness, treatment and recovery. I admire Sunny for her bravery in putting it all out there for the world. She will make you laugh and cry, and rail at the current state of mental health care in this country. **I received a copy of this book from Booksparks in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are entirely my own.**

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bailey Skye

    I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. To put it bluntly, this book broke my heart. Sunny Mera's words had me fully engaged every time I picked it up. As a young woman I don't have any personal experience with postpartum ailments that I could relate to, but the topic of mental illness is what drew me in. As a teenager, and even now as an adult, I have struggled with depression. When I was in Grade 11 I was recommended for antidepressants by my psychiatrist, but my Dad re I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. To put it bluntly, this book broke my heart. Sunny Mera's words had me fully engaged every time I picked it up. As a young woman I don't have any personal experience with postpartum ailments that I could relate to, but the topic of mental illness is what drew me in. As a teenager, and even now as an adult, I have struggled with depression. When I was in Grade 11 I was recommended for antidepressants by my psychiatrist, but my Dad refused, wanting to treat me with more natural remedies. My Dad did not understand depression, he'd had no personal experiences with mental illness and didn't know why I couldn't just choose to be happier. My Dad and I had always been so close and the fact that I felt distanced from him because of what was going on with me was completely disheartening. Sunny Mera is completely right when she says that it is comforting to read of others' experiences, and although her illness is not the same as mine, there is still the comfort of knowing you are not alone. I am so grateful that my generation is becoming way more aware and accepting of mental illness and we are slowly killing that stigma that it's "all in your head". "The idea was so deeply rooted in me, so much a part of me, that I didn't know how to release the roots and repot it somewhere else besides my heart." Sunny writes this beautiful story of her journey through postpartum psychosis and her later diagnosis of schizophrenia that will make you laugh, make you cry. You'll worry, you'll hope, and you'll reflect on your own journey. But perhaps, most importantly, this story will shed some light to those in the dark, and some hope for those who understand.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jaclyn Moore

    **I would like to thank the publisher for providing this Advance Reader Copy to review** "All in her head" was outstanding. More than once, I had to flip back a page or two just to reread the incredible struggles that Sunny faced with her mental illness. Initially, I was drawn to this book by the title and the incredible cover art but the inside was equally enthralling and addictive. Sunny Mera beautifully describes her vast struggles with mental illness in a way that is educational, unbelievable **I would like to thank the publisher for providing this Advance Reader Copy to review** "All in her head" was outstanding. More than once, I had to flip back a page or two just to reread the incredible struggles that Sunny faced with her mental illness. Initially, I was drawn to this book by the title and the incredible cover art but the inside was equally enthralling and addictive. Sunny Mera beautifully describes her vast struggles with mental illness in a way that is educational, unbelievable and empathetic. This book became highly addictive almost right off bat but once Sunny began to describe her orgasmic birth, her irrational obsession with Dr. Richard, and her life-threatening paranoia, it was nearly impossible to turn away or put down. I would recommend this book to women of all ages, those interested in mental illness and anyone who loves a fast-paced, detail packed story.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tina Leinenweber

    As others have already commented in their reviews, once I opened the book I read it cover to cover. Looking through the lens of Sunny Mera you're entranced by a clearly written and compassionately raw outlook from a character who for a time was trapped by her own fragile reality. All throughout the book you're cheering behind as Sunny finds a path to guide her out of her own darkness, and are reminded of our own experiences with questioning if something is all in our head. A wonderful read!! As others have already commented in their reviews, once I opened the book I read it cover to cover. Looking through the lens of Sunny Mera you're entranced by a clearly written and compassionately raw outlook from a character who for a time was trapped by her own fragile reality. All throughout the book you're cheering behind as Sunny finds a path to guide her out of her own darkness, and are reminded of our own experiences with questioning if something is all in our head. A wonderful read!!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Stacia Chappell

    I would rate it a 5: for sure: you keep your aduience on their feet: great reading

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    Riveting look into the world of mental illness and psychosis, read my review at http://pennyformythoughts-nona.blogsp... Riveting look into the world of mental illness and psychosis, read my review at http://pennyformythoughts-nona.blogsp...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Debi Lantzer Stout

    I wasn't really sure what to expect when I accepted the challenge of reading All in Her Head by Sunny Mera, but what I can tell you now is that this book had me completely plugged in from cover to cover. I read the book in one sitting, not because I had a spare 20 hours, but because it's both captivating and only 256 pages. As a mother to one son, I can't say that I have any personal experience with postpartum, thank God. The topic of mental illness runs rampant in my family and in particular, t I wasn't really sure what to expect when I accepted the challenge of reading All in Her Head by Sunny Mera, but what I can tell you now is that this book had me completely plugged in from cover to cover. I read the book in one sitting, not because I had a spare 20 hours, but because it's both captivating and only 256 pages. As a mother to one son, I can't say that I have any personal experience with postpartum, thank God. The topic of mental illness runs rampant in my family and in particular, the struggle of many of my family members with depression. We watch Sunny Mera's walk through life as a young woman, through marriage and then through her pregnancy and then giving birth. She brings her baby home and paranoia starts in. After bringing the baby home she begins to get paranoid and begins to fall apart. Thankfully, medication was effective for Sunny and no one "criminalized" her as a result of her mental illness. I learned that Sunny Mera wrote this book because she felt that the thing she needed on her life journey was more role models to explain how to share her mental illness. She felt that if she could heard more of these stories, it would have helped her during her dark days and then during her early days of insight. After spending a decade writing a narrative, she is sharing her story in the hopes that it will share her real hope for building a reality that is a place where others will want to live. Honestly, after reading this book it blows my mind to think that this woman was able to complete graduate school and that she could actually work at meaningful employment during her struggle with mental illness. The bottom line is that her story shows readers both the support from her family, as well as her own intelligence, persistence and endurance. This book is a good read for anybody who has suffered with mental illnesses and delusional problems or anybody who has loved somebody with a mental illness.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Naomi Yaeger

    I received an Advance Reader Copy. Sunny Mera's book, “All in Her Head,” takes the reader inside the mind of a frightened woman. As readers we get to know Sunny as a girl and watch her grow into a young woman and a newlywed. We watch her through pregnancy and as she gives birth. It is during her labor that something strange happens to her. She experiences what she calls a birthgasm. An orgasm during the birthing process. After bringing the baby home she begins to get paranoid and loses items. Sh I received an Advance Reader Copy. Sunny Mera's book, “All in Her Head,” takes the reader inside the mind of a frightened woman. As readers we get to know Sunny as a girl and watch her grow into a young woman and a newlywed. We watch her through pregnancy and as she gives birth. It is during her labor that something strange happens to her. She experiences what she calls a birthgasm. An orgasm during the birthing process. After bringing the baby home she begins to get paranoid and loses items. She believes people are sneaking in her house, moving items around and screwing around with her mind. When she answers the phone and it’s a wrong number, she takes it as a coded message from her doctor. She has several wrong numbers. She becomes obsessed with her obstetrician and believes he is in love with her, clinically called erotomania. She wonders why it happened to her. Her husband doesn’t want to talk about it. If something goes wrong with her computer she believes that it is someone playing a game with her. She thinks lots of things are secret messages for her, like signs along the highway or license plates. As I read, I recalled that after my father died I took lots of coincidences as signs to help me make decisions. That lasted only a short while, and I believe it was a normal part of grief. I found the first part of the book easy to read. The second part of the book sometimes was confusing for me to understand. But if it's confusing for the reader to understand what's going on or why she can't just accept random events, just imagine how confusing it must be for her. It is amazing that she was able to finish graduate school and hold down jobs through this. A testament to her intelligence, tenacity and supportive family. This book is a good read for anybody who has suffered with mental illnesses and delusional problems or anybody who has loved somebody with a mental illness.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kristin (Kritters Ramblings)

    Sunny had a very traumatic experience during childbirth and she feels as though it put her into a depressive state and set off her brain down a very painful path. It is always hard to rate and review a memoir because you know that it is all truth and that the author is telling you about a moment in their own life, so to rate and review is weird. It makes it even weirder when you don't love the book. At the end of the book, she referenced Brain on Fire, which I reviewed here awhile ago and defini Sunny had a very traumatic experience during childbirth and she feels as though it put her into a depressive state and set off her brain down a very painful path. It is always hard to rate and review a memoir because you know that it is all truth and that the author is telling you about a moment in their own life, so to rate and review is weird. It makes it even weirder when you don't love the book. At the end of the book, she referenced Brain on Fire, which I reviewed here awhile ago and definitely enjoyed. I wished this book had had more of the feel of that one, this one felt too stream of crazy consciousness for me where as Brain on Fire felt more methodical. I couldn't concentrate on the flow of her writing and couldn't enjoy it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Susan Tripp

    Amazing. I had no idea what others can and do go through with mental health issues/diseases. I couldn't put the book down and read it straight through. I needed to see if and how Sunny came through. Her story had me enraged with her doctors and husband, then I cringed and was even fearful as she shared her story with no many. I was amazed she had such a strong support system around her and that sharing actually helped her, not hurt her. I was shocked to see how she was able to trust those around Amazing. I had no idea what others can and do go through with mental health issues/diseases. I couldn't put the book down and read it straight through. I needed to see if and how Sunny came through. Her story had me enraged with her doctors and husband, then I cringed and was even fearful as she shared her story with no many. I was amazed she had such a strong support system around her and that sharing actually helped her, not hurt her. I was shocked to see how she was able to trust those around her to help when she was at her worst. I am utterly amazed she was able to be such a good mother, a student and a have a career through such mental chaos.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    ARC from bookspark.com Wild ride through postpartum hell.

  14. 4 out of 5

    OTIS

  15. 5 out of 5

    Glenn

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cecilia Dunbar Hernandez

  17. 5 out of 5

    Joslyn Smith

  18. 4 out of 5

    Eugene Leventhal

  19. 5 out of 5

    Julie AllisWell

  20. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Love

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jean Connor

  22. 4 out of 5

    Meghan Long

  23. 5 out of 5

    Shanna

  24. 4 out of 5

    Marie

  25. 5 out of 5

    DaNeisha Moore

  26. 4 out of 5

    Claudia Vieira

  27. 4 out of 5

    Patti Clark

  28. 4 out of 5

    Diana Paul

  29. 5 out of 5

    Leslie Nack

  30. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  31. 5 out of 5

    Carla

  32. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

  33. 4 out of 5

    Tammye

  34. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Summey

  35. 5 out of 5

    Patrycja

  36. 5 out of 5

    Dr. Cole Marie Mckinnon

  37. 4 out of 5

    Ann Ellis

  38. 5 out of 5

    Joy Yerkie

  39. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia Schwarzer

  40. 5 out of 5

    Jaksen

  41. 5 out of 5

    Dawn Obrien

  42. 5 out of 5

    Vykki

  43. 5 out of 5

    Mary Simmons

  44. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Heare Watts

  45. 5 out of 5

    Joy Adams

  46. 4 out of 5

    Terry Pearson

  47. 4 out of 5

    Robin

  48. 5 out of 5

    Therese Wiese

  49. 5 out of 5

    Tina

  50. 4 out of 5

    Bettye Short

  51. 4 out of 5

    Leland Lee

  52. 5 out of 5

    Pam

  53. 5 out of 5

    Elaine Needelman

  54. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

  55. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl Wood

  56. 4 out of 5

    Yvonne Morris

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