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Nobody has ever escaped from the Iceberg. It's a privately-owned prison deep in the Mojave Desert, staffed by brutal guards and surrounded by desolate wasteland. Inside the walls, gangs and predators are constant threats; outside the walls, there's nothing but a sniper's bullet or a slow death in the desert heat. Framed for murder and snared in a deadly curse, Daniel Faus Nobody has ever escaped from the Iceberg. It's a privately-owned prison deep in the Mojave Desert, staffed by brutal guards and surrounded by desolate wasteland. Inside the walls, gangs and predators are constant threats; outside the walls, there's nothing but a sniper's bullet or a slow death in the desert heat. Framed for murder and snared in a deadly curse, Daniel Faust lands behind bars with a target on his back. Worse, with Faust out of the picture, the Chicago mob is making its bid for control of Las Vegas. If he can't engineer his escape in time to stop them, none of his friends are safe. Then there's the matter of the warden's dark secret, the one that's filling up the prison morgue with body bags. Faust has been caged, buried, cut off from his allies and his magic. His enemies think they've won. They're about to learn, the hard way, that this is one sorcerer who always has a trick up his sleeve. Nobody has ever escaped from the Iceberg. But the Iceberg has never had a prisoner like Daniel Faust.


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Nobody has ever escaped from the Iceberg. It's a privately-owned prison deep in the Mojave Desert, staffed by brutal guards and surrounded by desolate wasteland. Inside the walls, gangs and predators are constant threats; outside the walls, there's nothing but a sniper's bullet or a slow death in the desert heat. Framed for murder and snared in a deadly curse, Daniel Faus Nobody has ever escaped from the Iceberg. It's a privately-owned prison deep in the Mojave Desert, staffed by brutal guards and surrounded by desolate wasteland. Inside the walls, gangs and predators are constant threats; outside the walls, there's nothing but a sniper's bullet or a slow death in the desert heat. Framed for murder and snared in a deadly curse, Daniel Faust lands behind bars with a target on his back. Worse, with Faust out of the picture, the Chicago mob is making its bid for control of Las Vegas. If he can't engineer his escape in time to stop them, none of his friends are safe. Then there's the matter of the warden's dark secret, the one that's filling up the prison morgue with body bags. Faust has been caged, buried, cut off from his allies and his magic. His enemies think they've won. They're about to learn, the hard way, that this is one sorcerer who always has a trick up his sleeve. Nobody has ever escaped from the Iceberg. But the Iceberg has never had a prisoner like Daniel Faust.

30 review for The Killing Floor Blues

  1. 5 out of 5

    ✘✘ Sarah ✘✘ (former Nefarious Breeder of Murderous Crustaceans)

    🃏 Get Those Magic Decks Of Cards Out of Storage We're Doing the Danny-Boy-IS-MINE⁠ Thingie Again Buddy Reread (GTMDoCOoSWDtDBIMTABR™) with the MacHalos and Stuff 🃏 ➽ And the moral of this rereread is: my Danny Boy + Invisibility Cloak, Grown Ups of the Fished Up Morals Edition (ICGUotFUME™) = Believe me, you don't want to know. [May 2018] ☢ Daniel Faust and Cait are Mine Mine Mine Buddy Reread with my MacHalo Wives and Daughters and Stuff (DFaCaMMMBRwmMWaSaS™) ☢ Actual rating: 8 stars. Damn right. ➽ 🃏 Get Those Magic Decks Of Cards Out of Storage We're Doing the Danny-Boy-IS-MINE⁠ Thingie Again Buddy Reread (GTMDoCOoSWDtDBIMTABR™) with the MacHalos and Stuff 🃏 ➽ And the moral of this rereread is: my Danny Boy + Invisibility Cloak, Grown Ups of the Fished Up Morals Edition (ICGUotFUME™) = Believe me, you don't want to know. [May 2018] ☢ Daniel Faust and Cait are Mine Mine Mine Buddy Reread with my MacHalo Wives and Daughters and Stuff (DFaCaMMMBRwmMWaSaS™) ☢ Actual rating: 8 stars. Damn right. ➽ And the moral of this reread is : one day girls Caitlin will rule the world, that is all. She is the bloodthirsty demon damsel in no bloody fishing distress whatsoever to Danny Boy's deliciously ruthless knight in tarnished (if black magic and Jack Daniel's-infused) armor. Or, in short, the She-Ra to his He-Man. No offense, Danny Boy, but Cait kinda sorta kicks wayyyyy more ass than you do. But hey, worry not Boyfriend Mine, for I still lurves you to death Eisenberg Correctional and back and stuff! [Original review] In case you missed the previous episodes: I kind of like this series. Not much, mind you. Just a little bit. How do you go from Best UF Series with a Male Lead Status (BUFSwaMLS™) straight to Top 5 Favourite UF Series Ever Grade (T5UFSEG™)? Here's how: ① You create a delicious male lead worthy of my High Security Harem (HSH™). Not one of those wimps who worry about being good, saving humanity and all that crap. Hell no. One of those hot dudes with highly bendable morals and slightly dubious motives. Good enough to eat and stuff. ② You add a badass, ruthless, cool as a cucumber female demon side-kick who slightly enjoys blood shedding. And inflicting pain. Delightfully tasty. ③ You throw in glorious gender role reversal. Whereby the helpless knight in his not so shining armour gets rescued by the damsel in no distress. And more. Hell yeah. ④ You inject a brilliant (if weirdly assorted) Scooby Gang of characters who all happen to think anything legal is greatly overrated. And who love nothing more than to pull on devious schemes with Danny Boy. But hey, they're not all bad. Oh no. They'd gladly torture kill anyone or break any law that gets in the way of their somewhat dysfunctional family. And if that doesn't scream love, dedication and loyalty, I don't know what would. Chopping someone to tiny little pieces and then eating their internal organs, maybe? Hmmm. Could be. ⑤ You manage to make a boring prison setting exciting, cool, and generally awesome. Wow. Now that really is unheard of in Decapod Land. And in Kirky Land, too, it seems. Damn. I think I've just given poor James Tiberius a heart attack, my Little Barnacles. ⑥ You write a dark, gritty, riveting, intriguing and slightly captivating oh-so-delicious story. And you somehow manage to sprinkle it with a generous dose of humour, too. ⑦ Your name is Craig Schaefer. You are therefore slightly talented and cool and stuff. » And the moral of this Crappy Non-Review is: I think I'm just about to kidnap Craig S. and lock him up until he writes the next instalment. Kidnapping with a justifiable cause isn't illegal, is it now? Especially when the victim is your future husband's daddy, right? Right. That's what I thought. Sending Fleet Admiral DaShrimp and his crustacean goons on a Search and Slightly Abduct Mission (SaSAM™) as we speak. Quick reminder for the Alzheimer prone: Danny Boy is mine. He is MINE, I tell you! Get it? Good. · Book 1: The Long Way Down ★★★★★ · Book 1.5: The White Gold Score ★★★★★ · Book 2: Redemption Song ★★★★★ · Book 3: The Living End ★★★★★ · Book 4: A Plain-Dealing Villain ★★★★★ · Book 6: The Castle Doctrine ★★★★★ · Book 6.1: Sweet, Blissful Certainty ★★★ · Book 7: Double or Nothing ★★★★★ · Book 7.1: A Drive in the Country ★★★★ · Book 7.2: Sixty Six Seconds ★★★★ · Book 8: The Neon Boneyard ★★★★★ · Book 9: The Locust Job ★★★★★

  2. 5 out of 5

    carol.

    Hot damn, that was fun! I don't mean 'fun' in the hanging with the bestie sense, eating dinner while we dish over the latest at work. No, I mean 'fun' in the Hollywood blockbuster, Six Flags roller coaster kind of meaning. I started this on the exercise bike, and kept my nose in the book until I finished. The last book that did that to me was... well, it was Night Fall, only that was more 'edge-of-my-seat, nail-biting' kind of engaged. But neither of the recent Connelly 'thrillers' had me riveted Hot damn, that was fun! I don't mean 'fun' in the hanging with the bestie sense, eating dinner while we dish over the latest at work. No, I mean 'fun' in the Hollywood blockbuster, Six Flags roller coaster kind of meaning. I started this on the exercise bike, and kept my nose in the book until I finished. The last book that did that to me was... well, it was Night Fall, only that was more 'edge-of-my-seat, nail-biting' kind of engaged. But neither of the recent Connelly 'thrillers' had me riveted, so there you go. Make no mistake, this is bloodier and more 'hands-on' in violence than prior Faust books. One of the many reasons I prefer books over visual media. Did I just say I prefer books over visual media? It begins as Faust regains consciousness on a prison bus with his last memories of a detention cell after arrest. It's a great device; it allows a few minutes of orientation for the reader as Faust tries to reconcile his last memories from book four, A Plain-Dealing Villain, to now. Aside from that, there is little backstory, presuming the reader knows Faust, people who are important to him and general events. I appreciate that in a multi-book series; it's tiresome as a reader to have the author re-explain everybody for those who are starting at the current book (grumbling about catering to mass-market ensues). Although Faust is terribly out of his element in this book, away from both his friends and his city, so those jumping in should be able to catch up. Characterization is one of the enjoyable aspects of this series. In the first scene, we meet the man with the Smile, "a man built of shadow and fog, a living negative scratched onto the film of the world," a perfect, inscrutable and ominous antagonist. Faust does less soul-searching here about morality, appropriately accepting who he is and is becoming. There's a wide variety of bit characters in the jail setting. Perhaps some are stereotypical, but we gain more insight as Faust comes to know them better--just like real life. I've had trouble at other points with Caitlin's general niceness, but she's all passion here, meaning loving her opportunities for violence. It's actually quite fun in an ass-kicking kind of way. Tone again shines, with Schaefer walking the delicate balance between the awfulness of Faust's situation and trademark humor/cynicism. Faust's voice remains so dry, it snaps and crackles like dry ice. At one point he explains events in book four by saying, "we did our best. We didn't figure he had a warehouse filled with living mummies in crates. In retrospect, probably should have seen that coming." Then, as he walks into the prison yard, he notes, "The set-up wasn't too shabby...I could imagine I was on a college campus, if it weren't for the fences, the gun towers, and the razor wire." Just like college. In hell. As a female reader, I have to appreciate a couple of choice incidents. One, is that Faust has no trouble owning up to being 'a damsel in distress' to his quite powerful girlfriend, Caitlin. Two, there's some leftover emotional business from book four with his friend, Pixie. It was resolved completely appropriately. There's a lovely line where he says, "I just listened." Plotting might be the most debated aspect of the story. Certainly much about the prison might have seemed Hollywood stereotypical, except--and this is a big one--it was interesting. Plot is balanced between the human threat of the prison and the magical threat of the mysterious Smile. I know Schaefer is creating an overarching plot for the series but in this book, the meta is left dangling. Everything else feels resolved reasonably well, however, so take that for what you will. No cliff-hangers--it's like when the aforementioned bestie tells you a story that basically boils down to a jerk manager being a jerk. Why? Who really knows? Sometimes you just have to figure out how to play the hand, right? In short, loads of fun, and I had to restrain myself from immediately going on to the next book. I did download it, and a '1.5' novella. I'm calling it inspiration to get back to the gym sooner rather than later. Maybe even today.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Choko

    So very, very good! 😈😈😈😈😈

  4. 4 out of 5

    Milda Page Runner

    Another awesome book in Daniel Faust series. They are like candy. I can't stop myself. I'm sure I 'll finish... once I run out of published books. Another awesome book in Daniel Faust series. They are like candy. I can't stop myself. I'm sure I 'll finish... once I run out of published books.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    4.5 Stars Probably my favorite Daniel Faust book so far, just edging the first in my opinion. Killing Floor Blues switches up the usual formula we’ve seen in the first four books and delivers exciting action that makes me very curious to read the sixth book. At the end of the last book, Faust had just been (successfully) framed for murder and arrested. Killing Floor Blues picks up with Faust on his way to a privately run prison out in the desert. Even as far as prison’s go, this is a bad one, wit 4.5 Stars Probably my favorite Daniel Faust book so far, just edging the first in my opinion. Killing Floor Blues switches up the usual formula we’ve seen in the first four books and delivers exciting action that makes me very curious to read the sixth book. At the end of the last book, Faust had just been (successfully) framed for murder and arrested. Killing Floor Blues picks up with Faust on his way to a privately run prison out in the desert. Even as far as prison’s go, this is a bad one, with sadistic guards, racial conflict simmering, and mysterious disappearances. A good chunk of the book takes place with Faust behind bars, a location shift that I thought worked very well. Despite a static location for much of the book, things stayed interesting as Faust navigated a number of threats and even managed to learn a bit more about the broader conflict taking place as he plotted how to escape. I found the glimpse into prison life fascinating and sadly all too realistic (at least in some aspects-there is a plot twist later on that I sure hope isn’t realistic). Honestly, after reading five Daniel Faust books now I’m not really sure they fit into the stereotypical urban fantasy area. There are elements of different genres all combined into one package, with some urban fantasy, a little bit of horror, and some thriller mixed in. Whatever you call it, it works very well and gives this series a very distinctive feel that I haven’t seen anywhere else. The last 20-25% of the book really flew by as things came to a head. I almost wish the pace had slowed down a touch right at the end so that certain things could be fleshed out a bit more. Still, this was a very fun book, with more of what has become Faust’s trademark plans of how to do what seemingly can’t be done.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    This was another fast paced and extremely fun instalment in the Daniel Faust Series. As always there was a perfect balance between the humour and the dark and gritty moments. Faust is a great character. He and his friends are easy to like despite the fact that they are no saints. The story in this one picked up in the aftermath of the shock happenings at the end of the last book. Faust, framed for murder, now finds himself in the maximum security prison Iceberg. To make matters worse, the Smile, This was another fast paced and extremely fun instalment in the Daniel Faust Series. As always there was a perfect balance between the humour and the dark and gritty moments. Faust is a great character. He and his friends are easy to like despite the fact that they are no saints. The story in this one picked up in the aftermath of the shock happenings at the end of the last book. Faust, framed for murder, now finds himself in the maximum security prison Iceberg. To make matters worse, the Smile, and his agents want him to die there, and the sooner the better. The guards themselves are a corrupt lot and every prisoner in Iceberg fears being dragged away to Hive B. A wing of the prison that has been on lock down for over a year. As if that was not enough Nicky has disappeared and that leaves the Vegas criminal underworld in disarray just when the Chicago Mob are looking to make their move. The prison break story was pretty fun. As was the usual cool magical stuff Faust and his team indulge in. Some of the happenings in this one promise interesting future happenings for Faust. I'm already eager for the next instalment! A very enjoyable read. Rating: 4.5 stars. Audio Note: Adam Verner does a great job with this series. I'm still not keen on his voice for Caitlin, but apart from that he is almost perfect.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lo9man88

    In this episode Daniel wakes up disoriented in a prison bus ! He tries to figure out what's going on but there is a chunk of his memory missing , he is welcomed to said prison with a hardcore committee that does not give a flying F*** about anybody or anything... And so it begins: another chapter of Faust's journey : a scary one but definitely very exciting.... The author upped the ante in this novel, our anti-hero is forced between two unbelievable choices : kill or be killed and his need to survi In this episode Daniel wakes up disoriented in a prison bus ! He tries to figure out what's going on but there is a chunk of his memory missing , he is welcomed to said prison with a hardcore committee that does not give a flying F*** about anybody or anything... And so it begins: another chapter of Faust's journey : a scary one but definitely very exciting.... The author upped the ante in this novel, our anti-hero is forced between two unbelievable choices : kill or be killed and his need to survive proved to be too strong ... In order to break out he needed to perform some very cool and horrifying spells such as the hand of glory, the king of worms and a demon summoning , and let me tell you it was a bloodbath .

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mr. Matt

    The Killing Floor Blues picks up where the last book left off. Faust wakes up to find himself in a maximum security prison for a murder he did not commit. Someone using some pretty powerful magic set him up. That's the first problem. And it's a big one. Here's the thing. His second problem is a pretty big one too. He doesn't remember the trial. It was only a day ago that he was arrested and now he's being sent away for life. A powerful hex is convincing everyone that he knows and meets that he d The Killing Floor Blues picks up where the last book left off. Faust wakes up to find himself in a maximum security prison for a murder he did not commit. Someone using some pretty powerful magic set him up. That's the first problem. And it's a big one. Here's the thing. His second problem is a pretty big one too. He doesn't remember the trial. It was only a day ago that he was arrested and now he's being sent away for life. A powerful hex is convincing everyone that he knows and meets that he did, in fact, go through six months of investigation and trial. Faust needs to solve both problems to get out of prison. Inside the prison, Faust is forced to deal with the tensions of the prison politics - both among the prisoners and with the guards. Worse yet, something weird is going on. Prisoners in this max security prison are disappearing - specifically prisoners with no family or real social connections - people exactly like Faust. He just keeps getting dealt bum cards. On the whole the book was good, but a bit of a let down based on the other Faust books. The mysteries are unraveled. Faust being Faust, he uses his wits and magic to save his neck and bust out of prison. (In a particularly cool scene he actually crafts and uses the Hand of Glory as part of his escape plan.) The rub was the actual 'danger' in the prison. The author would have his readers believe that an unscrupulous Warden has corrupted his entire staff and is running for profit death matches on a weekly basis. I'm not buying it. Too far fetched. Three stars out of five.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Montzalee Wittmann

    The Killing Floor Blues by Craig Schaefer and narrated by the great Adam Verner is book five in the series! I thought this was the best book so far. Most of the book takes place in a prison where Daniel is held on bogus charges. Lots of action and craziness ensues as usual for these books! Great unpredictability, fantasy, action, and exciting characters! Adam Verner is a magic man himself when it comes to narration! Totally awesome!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alissa

    Truly a strong start. The opening plunges you in the heart of Daniel’s bleak predicament, and it was insta-engagement, it kept me on the edge of my seat. I wasn’t expecting such immersive experience even if I liked the previous books. “And you are not the chosen one, Daniel Faust. You’re merely a man. Here by the grace of cosmic accident and bad luck. Your best hope is to scurry out of the way, like an ant dodging the footfalls of elephants.” As usual, pacing and writing are spot-on, I couldn’t pu Truly a strong start. The opening plunges you in the heart of Daniel’s bleak predicament, and it was insta-engagement, it kept me on the edge of my seat. I wasn’t expecting such immersive experience even if I liked the previous books. “And you are not the chosen one, Daniel Faust. You’re merely a man. Here by the grace of cosmic accident and bad luck. Your best hope is to scurry out of the way, like an ant dodging the footfalls of elephants.” As usual, pacing and writing are spot-on, I couldn’t put the novel down and last night, after a day of work martyrdom, I convinced myself at 2am. The focus here is completely on Daniel, who is facing more and more hard choices, and by the end there are a few more clues about the bigger conflict in the making. I’m eager for more. When you don’t adhere to many principles in life, you guard the ones you do have. They’re the only things that let you look yourself in the mirror in the morning, that let you pretend, every once in a while, that you’re a good person deep down inside.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    5 Stars "You know all those movies where the bad guy gets captured, but it turns out that was the key to his master plan all along? Not gonna lie. I’d always wanted to do that." The Killing Floor Blues by Craig Schaefer is a terrific book and fifth in the Daniel Faust series. Many people draw comparisons of this book to that of Jim Butcher's Dresden Files, but this one leans more to the 'R' Rated side than does the really 'PG' Dresden Files. I confess that the whole urban fantasy series has becom 5 Stars "You know all those movies where the bad guy gets captured, but it turns out that was the key to his master plan all along? Not gonna lie. I’d always wanted to do that." The Killing Floor Blues by Craig Schaefer is a terrific book and fifth in the Daniel Faust series. Many people draw comparisons of this book to that of Jim Butcher's Dresden Files, but this one leans more to the 'R' Rated side than does the really 'PG' Dresden Files. I confess that the whole urban fantasy series has become my guilty pleasure reads. My love for the genre elevates everything I read. I only know that right now, I cannot seem to get enough from a genre filled with everything from ghosts and spirits, to Wolves and vamps, Gods and Demons, and sorcerers and cops. I love it. Our main protagonist Daniel Faust is a sorcerer, a Thief, and pretty much not a good guy. He is however perfect for our lead role. Faust is not 'PG'. I loved the pacing, the world building, and the magic. I only wish that there was more. Caitlyn is a fantastic character and she pretty much steals all the pages that she is on. These are not good people. The Killing Floor Blues works by bringing us a fresh story, an intimate plot, and by making our hero Faust use his roots and not his magic to overcome the situations. The setting was awesome and Faust fit right in. I loved the way that his fearless and loose lipped attitude literally colored the pages. The writing was great as usual and made for an easy page Turner. A real guilty pleasure of mine. I love the characters, the magic, and the dark grit. I am a fanboy of the urban fantasy genre. Highly recommended!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Another solid entry in the Daniel Faust series, although this one is less focused on Faust's magic and his backup team than on his brains and abilities to break out of prison. Yes, prison. The one drawback with this one is the focus on the prison: how/why he was there (unanswered), who had the power to cast a spell over EVERYONE (unanswered), and the prison break itself. From that last point alone, it was a plot like every other prison break book/movie/TV show: protagonist is taken to prison, mak Another solid entry in the Daniel Faust series, although this one is less focused on Faust's magic and his backup team than on his brains and abilities to break out of prison. Yes, prison. The one drawback with this one is the focus on the prison: how/why he was there (unanswered), who had the power to cast a spell over EVERYONE (unanswered), and the prison break itself. From that last point alone, it was a plot like every other prison break book/movie/TV show: protagonist is taken to prison, makes a couple of friends, makes more enemies, tries to break out, one of the friends dies in the attempt, decides to break-out again by taking on the warden himself. It's a good thing Mr. Schaefer is such a good writer. This plot in the hands of a lesser author would have failed miserably. The final third of the book was good, but it was too contrived: everything, and I mean everything, went Faust's way, and there was really no challenge for him and the others. Kind of a let down, really. Okay, with this volume, I'm done with Daniel Faust until the next book is published (is it on the radar anywhere yet?). I am now starting into the spin-off series, Harmony Black.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kira

    These books keep getting better and better! Since Daniel was locked up for most of the book, he wasn’t around his friends. The story was just as fascinating. He knows how to bargain and how to manipulate when he needs to. Trouble seems to find him wherever he goes, and jail is no exception. For once it finally seemed like he came on top, well, somewhat anyway. Usually he achieves his goal but with a considerable debt. He didn’t walk away debt free but isn’t completely fucked either. This one was These books keep getting better and better! Since Daniel was locked up for most of the book, he wasn’t around his friends. The story was just as fascinating. He knows how to bargain and how to manipulate when he needs to. Trouble seems to find him wherever he goes, and jail is no exception. For once it finally seemed like he came on top, well, somewhat anyway. Usually he achieves his goal but with a considerable debt. He didn’t walk away debt free but isn’t completely fucked either. This one was dark. The title of this book is there for a reason. Lots of death is all I’m going to say about it. Nothing further was revealed about Caitlin. I’m suspicious of everything now. She said she wants him alive, but is that because she loves him or because she’s using him for something? I want to read the next one. There aren’t anymore books in the series after that. I’m not sure if it’s the final book or not. If it is, I’m not ready for this series to be over.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Maraya21 (The Reading Dragon)

    🔥 Time for us MacHalos to bake a cake for lovely Danny boy! ;P 🔥 W O W. F U C K I N G W O W. W O W Jumpin' Jesus on a pogo stick! Can you spell "Brutal"? Cause I can: Daniel Fucking Faust bitches! ~ Pre-Read Review type thingy ~ 🔥 Time for us MacHalos to bake a cake for lovely Danny boy! ;P 🔥 W O W. F U C K I N G W O W. W O W Jumpin' Jesus on a pogo stick! Can you spell "Brutal"? Cause I can: Daniel Fucking Faust bitches! ~ Pre-Read Review type thingy ~

  15. 5 out of 5

    J.F. Penn

    Still loving Daniel Faust. This has less magic at the beginning as Daniel finds himself trapped inside an inescapable prison with a dark secret at its centre. But soon, his magical friends get involved ... Lots of fun! Great series.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kateblue

    This is the best Craig Schaefer book I have read. Daniel Faust has had some really bad days in the previous book, but the days in this book may be the worst ever. So many interesting concepts in the worldbuilding, and I did not forecast what would happen at all. Except I figured DF would get out of most problems (after all, there are at least 4 more books following this one, it's not like he's going to die or anything.) Highly recommend. Even though some of the DF books I read before I wasn't TH This is the best Craig Schaefer book I have read. Daniel Faust has had some really bad days in the previous book, but the days in this book may be the worst ever. So many interesting concepts in the worldbuilding, and I did not forecast what would happen at all. Except I figured DF would get out of most problems (after all, there are at least 4 more books following this one, it's not like he's going to die or anything.) Highly recommend. Even though some of the DF books I read before I wasn't THAT crazy about, this one made reading all of them worthwhile.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lukasz

    That was something. Daniel swears off his criminal ways for good and quietly does his time behind bars. He thinks about his life and starts to see where things went wrong. He becomes a better man who realizes he must pay his debt to society. The book follow his heart-breaking transformation into a law-abiding citizen. In a parallel world that is. Because in our world Craig Schaefer has different plans for Daniel. As a cruel man he torments Daniel without mercy. The Killing Floor Blues picks up where That was something. Daniel swears off his criminal ways for good and quietly does his time behind bars. He thinks about his life and starts to see where things went wrong. He becomes a better man who realizes he must pay his debt to society. The book follow his heart-breaking transformation into a law-abiding citizen. In a parallel world that is. Because in our world Craig Schaefer has different plans for Daniel. As a cruel man he torments Daniel without mercy. The Killing Floor Blues picks up where the last book left off. Faust wakes up to find himself in a maximum security prison for a murder he did not commit. He doesn't remember the trial. Some powerful magic was involved. Inside the prison, things aren’t merry and joyful – prison politics and tension between races are pretty tense. Guards are sadistic psychos who won’t hesitate to kill prisoner for fun. Some weird stuff is happening in Hive B - prisoners are disappearing. Faust uses his wits and magic to save his neck and bust out of prison. While the book was pretty good and easy to read it didn’t charm me as much as previous entries. Plotting wasn’t bad but felt a bit weaker than in previous books. Some twists and parts of the story were strong and creative. Others felt a bit forced. Plot is balanced between the human threat of the prison and the magical threat of the mysterious Guy with a Cheshire Smile. Everything is resolved reasonably well. I would, however, like to know why Warden Lancaster does what he does . Bad guys motivations were very shallow and they mostly fell flat. In short, good fun, perfectly readable and enjoyable. To me, though, weaker that previous three books.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Chris Torretta

    HOLY! This is going to be tough to write a review for but what I can say is that Craig Schaefer is up to his usual tricks. Loved this! Full review coming soon. Received by author, through audiobookreviewer.com, in exchange for an honest review. THIS! I don’t even know how to write the review for this. There are so many feels! First of all being that I do not want Daniel Faust’s story to end. Coming to the end of a good book is like a tragedy. Being involved in this series though, it just pulls you HOLY! This is going to be tough to write a review for but what I can say is that Craig Schaefer is up to his usual tricks. Loved this! Full review coming soon. Received by author, through audiobookreviewer.com, in exchange for an honest review. THIS! I don’t even know how to write the review for this. There are so many feels! First of all being that I do not want Daniel Faust’s story to end. Coming to the end of a good book is like a tragedy. Being involved in this series though, it just pulls you in and does not let go! Instead of that suffocating feeling, I got all the feels of being comforted and safe. Maybe I just won’t stand so close to Faust since he is CONSTANTLY in trouble! If you have read the others, and I highly suggest you do, then you know book four ended on a massive cliff hanger. We are awaiting Daniel’s fate and then book five starts and Daniel is not where I expected him to be. Like he did not have enough problems with everything that is about to happen in Las Vegas, oh no… apparently someone felt that he needed a vacation, in the form of prison. I think this is my favorite of the series. There just something about Faust that lets everyone around him know that he will not bow down, no matter what is happening. Everyone around him seems to be in power and yet he can waltz in with a smile on his face. He doesn’t even have any real cards to play but he finds them in mysterious places that only Faust would be able to find. With no wizarding tricks up his sleeve, literally and figuratively, Faust is left to deal with his problems within the prison, on his wits. He’s a quick thinker even when it looks like he cannot come up with anything else. Somehow Adam Verner was able to keep up with this. There are so many different action points and so much going on that I was worried, but I did not even have time to worry because Faust kept going, and so did Adam! This was exceptionally narrated and by now I expect that from Adam Verner. This voices are just as shrewd as the characters, dripping with poison and menace. Even with so much going on, Adam never misses a beat! Either that or the production team is fan freaking tastic because there are no hiccups at all, and with all this action I would think someone would skip somewhere. Incredibly well done and this book deserves it. Adam Verner and Daniel Faust go hand in hand. I’m really hoping that Adam will narrate the Harmony Black books if they go to audible as well. In short: If you like Urban Fantasy, this is a must read. I loved all five book and I am hoping for more!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Pippa DaCosta

    I'm not going to review this because, frankly, it's #5, and any review this far into a series is sorta moot anyway - nope, no review. It's an awesome series. Buy it. There, now onto the big issue... I'm going to ask a question about the elephant in the room. The elephant wears a white coat and kicks-ass, and if she knew I'd called her an elephant she'd promptly kick my ass seven ways to Sunday. Let's talk about Caitlin. (view spoiler)[ From the second we met her, bound to that douche, I haven't tru I'm not going to review this because, frankly, it's #5, and any review this far into a series is sorta moot anyway - nope, no review. It's an awesome series. Buy it. There, now onto the big issue... I'm going to ask a question about the elephant in the room. The elephant wears a white coat and kicks-ass, and if she knew I'd called her an elephant she'd promptly kick my ass seven ways to Sunday. Let's talk about Caitlin. (view spoiler)[ From the second we met her, bound to that douche, I haven't trusted her. Faust went all googly-eyed with very little questions asked. So, has she influenced him, or not? Is this all some elaborate plan? Faust isn't just some petty criminal, so does Cait already know what part he has to play, and she's about to play him? Maybe it's my track record with demons (I've known a few ;) ), or perhaps I have trust issues, but there's something.... And yet, I don't want her to questionable because Faust and Cait are so darn cute together. So, what do y'all think? Is Cait playing the long con? (hide spoiler)]

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ubiquitousbastard

    So, I started out this book yawning, and finished it still yawning. Perhaps this time it was purely a matter of personal taste. I cannot abide books about wrongful imprisonment/coping in jail or prison. God, that is so dull to me that I can't even express it. I think one, maybe two books ever have handled it in a way that didn't have me bored, but it certainly wasn't this book. This was like Prison Break, the lame show that I got bored of after a season. Except, I got bored of this almost right So, I started out this book yawning, and finished it still yawning. Perhaps this time it was purely a matter of personal taste. I cannot abide books about wrongful imprisonment/coping in jail or prison. God, that is so dull to me that I can't even express it. I think one, maybe two books ever have handled it in a way that didn't have me bored, but it certainly wasn't this book. This was like Prison Break, the lame show that I got bored of after a season. Except, I got bored of this almost right away. Then the ending was just a mess, in my opinion, thrown together far too quickly after the drawn out prison plot. The only thin I'm glad of is that there isn't another book out there that I would be compelled to read since I'm already so far into the series. When it comes out, I dearly hope it at least reaches the readability of the previous books in the series.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Diana

    This was definitely one of my favorite books in the series. This guys just seems to stumble into one catastrophe after another. My absolute favorite part had to be the part where he and Caitlin break out of prison together, murdering everyone around them and throwing back some karma. Plus, the part where he summoned her was absolutely adorable. That one moment where he thinks he might be about to die, but it's actually the demon he is in love with. Overall, this book was definitely amazing and I This was definitely one of my favorite books in the series. This guys just seems to stumble into one catastrophe after another. My absolute favorite part had to be the part where he and Caitlin break out of prison together, murdering everyone around them and throwing back some karma. Plus, the part where he summoned her was absolutely adorable. That one moment where he thinks he might be about to die, but it's actually the demon he is in love with. Overall, this book was definitely amazing and I cannot wait to read the next one in the series. This is one series that I can go back and read time after time without getting bored. Even though I know what happens, it will still be funny.

  22. 5 out of 5

    HєllyBєlly

    re-read in preparation for Neon Boneyard. I think this is my favourite book in the series so far - and Adam Verner does a fantastic job. The King of Worms...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mihir

    Full review over at Fantasy Book Critic CLASSIFICATION: Featuring a cast of anti-heroes and with a magician con-man as the protagonist, the Daniel Faust series is Richard Stark's Parker crossed with The Dresden Files and set in Las Vegas. OVERVIEW/ANALYSIS: The Killing Floor Blues was my favorite book of 2016 and possibly the best book in the Daniel Faust series (of the six I've read so far). This book while being such an awesome read, cannot be read as a standalone unfortunately. There will be Full review over at Fantasy Book Critic CLASSIFICATION: Featuring a cast of anti-heroes and with a magician con-man as the protagonist, the Daniel Faust series is Richard Stark's Parker crossed with The Dresden Files and set in Las Vegas. OVERVIEW/ANALYSIS: The Killing Floor Blues was my favorite book of 2016 and possibly the best book in the Daniel Faust series (of the six I've read so far). This book while being such an awesome read, cannot be read as a standalone unfortunately. There will be mild spoilers as I cannot discus much of its blurb without mentioning certain events from A Plain Dealing Villain. On a side note, I believe the events of Killing Floor Blues are set a little before the events showcased in Harmony Black (book 1 of the Harmony Black series). The prologue affords us another look at the Smile and his lackey Ms. Fleiss, most readers will recognize Fleiss from the events of the previous book wherein she hired Daniel Faust to steal an artifact in Chicago. The Smile & Fleiss talk about their efforts and this is the first inkling we get of the grand plan that the author has only hinted at so far. In our world, Daniel wakes up disoriented and finds himself on way to the Eisenberg correctional facility (also called Iceberg) in the Mojave desert. Confused as to why he's on way to prison without having a trial, Daniel finds out that he's already been tried and found guilty. Thoroughly befuddled by this rapid turn, Faust soon learns that a grand sinister plan is underway and he's been targeted for reasons unknown. While in prison, he has to figure out the way of life in prison and also keep himself from being a target of a drug gang that has a branch in Las Vegas (as retribution for his alleged murder of one of their own). There's also bikers from a club to whom he owes money and lastly he will have to contend the inhumane conditions & odious guards in the private prison. Faust learns soon that things are truly f***ed for him as he finds out more about the strange on-goings in prison, the way of life inside as well as he tries to figure out how he landed in prison. The author then gives us a breakneck storyline that's full of action, plot twists and some superb revelations that had me fall in love with this book. Going on to the positives, this book is one hell of an amalgamation of urban fantasy and a crime thriller. Think Prison Break mixed with a tad bit of Spartacus as well as Taken and you will get an inkling of what a crazy mix of a story this is. The story opens on a somber note but then quickly explodes as we get a fascinating look at private prisons and especially what a scenario might entail when a magician like Daniel Faust is thrown into the mix. The author isn't writing a polemic here so folks who want a detailed look at prisons and all the socio-economic factors that go into the prison populace won't find it here. What the readers will find is a story that will keep you excited, make you cringe and of course try to outguess the author. This is a perfect thriller if you ask me and one of the main reasons why this book was my top choice last year. Next up is the characterization, with the story having a sole narrative voice, it all depends on the character and Daniel Faust doesn't disappoint. With this being the fifth book in the series, the author has had plenty of time to perfect the character and his voice. Faust is a fascinating rascal of a character who doesn't shy away from the occasional violence but uses his brains, skills and talent to get what he wants. This story has him utilizing all three to survive in an environment which reminds him when he was helpless as a child. He swore never to have to experience those feelings but due to the actions of certain people, he finds himself a liar. The narrative never gets too bogged down with the character feeling dismayed as Faust is a fighter and he's already thinking on an escape plan. The beauty of the plot twists is that while it might seem that this book is about a prison break, it's not that entirely. The story takes a lot of turns and in hands of another author might have been a simple story focussing on a singular plot thread. Craig Schaefer refuses to take the simple route as has been evidenced by his writing career so far. He combines at least three different plots into this storyline and makes them all coherent and flow smoothly. I loved how this book while sticking to the prison escape tropes, yet managed to make the story interesting by adding in newer twists. The author also explores the idea of magic existing but doesn't give the character a simple-get-out-of-jail trick/card. While there is one scene that simply exists to set up something about the character and for future story set-up, I doubt readers will find fault with it and like me, most will enjoy its creepy, oozy factor (I'm using oozy for a very particular reason and you will understand when you read it). The story just zooms with all of its twists and then ends on a fascinating climax and then we find that there's more to the book. There's a coda plot twist that might upset a few readers but I enjoyed it as it was another way to upend reader expectations. Overall this story was one where I enjoyed it from cover to cover. Going on to the drawbacks, this was one book where I honestly found none. After finishing my primary read I've re-read a few more times and the excitement held up each time. For me that's a sign of an excellent read. CONCLUSION: The Killing Floor Blues is a book that mixes various genre plots and leaves the readers bemused. For me this book was one of the best fictional reads that I've ever read in a long time. I would recommend most readers on this series just so they can enjoy this volume as much as I did. Do not miss this book and this series, as by the time it will be finished this will be considered a classic one.

  24. 5 out of 5

    THE BIBLIOPHILE (Rituranjan)

    A good continuation to the series with a tightly focused story with the vibes of Prison Break, blended in a heightened sense of tension, danger, and grittiness. The setting was claustrophobic, and I liked reading about Daniel being backed into an inescapable corner by an unknown enemy. It was interesting to see the resilient side of our Vegas sorcerer, along with his frustrations, and his ingenious plan to escape from his predicament. I think that this is the story which gives a wake-up call to D A good continuation to the series with a tightly focused story with the vibes of Prison Break, blended in a heightened sense of tension, danger, and grittiness. The setting was claustrophobic, and I liked reading about Daniel being backed into an inescapable corner by an unknown enemy. It was interesting to see the resilient side of our Vegas sorcerer, along with his frustrations, and his ingenious plan to escape from his predicament. I think that this is the story which gives a wake-up call to Daniel. He introspects, tries to find allies in the brutal prison environment, and also tries to piece up the faded memories erased by some serious magic. The scenes regarding the bloody fights was visceral and gut-wrenching. We also get to see a new player in the game, The Network for the first time, who are responsible for spreading slow corruption in the system. I loved the last part, where Caitlin makes an appearance and kicks some ass. The underworld of Vegas is in turmoil, and there are lot of factions coalescing for the power grip. The ending was well done, and it's good to see some changes in Daniel Faust's uptake on the whole situation.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mē-chan

    I loved it! On to the next one.

  26. 5 out of 5

    kartik narayanan

    Read the full review at my site https://wp.me/p89tYT-g1 He held out his hand. “Give it to me,” he hissed as his fingernails lengthened into claws. “If you insist,” I said. Then I shot him in the face. The "Daniel Faust” series, written by Craig Schaefer, is an urban fantasy starring an anti-hero. The series consists of 7 books and a novella so far. Unlike other urban fantasy series like The Dresden Files, this series is far more violent, gritty and is noir in its approach to this setting. The prot Read the full review at my site https://wp.me/p89tYT-g1 He held out his hand. “Give it to me,” he hissed as his fingernails lengthened into claws. “If you insist,” I said. Then I shot him in the face. The "Daniel Faust” series, written by Craig Schaefer, is an urban fantasy starring an anti-hero. The series consists of 7 books and a novella so far. Unlike other urban fantasy series like The Dresden Files, this series is far more violent, gritty and is noir in its approach to this setting. The protagonist, the eponymous Daniel Faust, is a violent con-man and sorcerer who has few moral qualms remaining but guards those jealously. In one way, you could of this of as The Saint moved to modern times, with a lot of occult and magic thrown in. This series is also a backbone for the universe, Craig Schaefer is building, with multiple references to the 'Revanche Cycle' and 'Harmony Black' characters and series. But enough about the setting and comparisons, what is this series really like? I had a blast reading the series. It was unique, funny, violent and profane. It has all the elements that I now expect from the author. The pacing is brilliant and the characters are well fleshed out. You end up caring about all the main characters and even the ones on the sidelines. Read the full review at my site https://wp.me/p89tYT-g1

  27. 5 out of 5

    Victor

    I have some major issues with this book. It's really conflicting. I'm not going to use spoiler tags, but I am going to be discussing the plot to a not insignificant degree. You have been warned. Killing Floor Blues, or The One Where Daniel Faust Goes to Jail. Some really heavy weights sit on both the good and bad sides of my Reviewing Scales. On the good: Schaefer (kind of) tackles the shittiness of for-profit prisons. The bad: the false ending. I'll explain what I mean later, but I want to talk I have some major issues with this book. It's really conflicting. I'm not going to use spoiler tags, but I am going to be discussing the plot to a not insignificant degree. You have been warned. Killing Floor Blues, or The One Where Daniel Faust Goes to Jail. Some really heavy weights sit on both the good and bad sides of my Reviewing Scales. On the good: Schaefer (kind of) tackles the shittiness of for-profit prisons. The bad: the false ending. I'll explain what I mean later, but I want to talk about for-profit prisons first. So disclaimer, Schaefer pushes things really far to make Daniel Faust's temporary home an abysmal place. The funny thing about evil, is it can be really mundane. This is kind of how prisons are. But really bad things happen too. In this book, Schaefer ratchets things up because mundanity doesn't make for a great read. And that's fine. At this point, anytime I see something with a thesis of, more or less: Prisons are bad and do a bad job of rehabilitating criminals, I celebrate. Too often, people will shrug off the horrors of USA's prisons (for the record, something like 2.2 million people reside in prisons or jails this year, the most in the world) by saying it's the least worst option. To me that is the very definition of willful ignorance. For one thing, in 2014, 619,809 people were arrested for possession of marijuana. That's crazy. And those people will likely face difficulty finding jobs and housing in their future. Guess what that means? They'll likely turn back to crime. This country ritually writes off a portion of its population for seemingly nothing at all. But anyways, the ending of this book is bad. There's a perfect chance for it to end after Faust finally triumphs over the evils of Eisenberg. But then there's like 10 more chapters or something! This is to wrap up some of the extraneous plots concerning side characters which I have yet to be able to give a damn about. Looming over Faust's head throughout the book is the gang war about to engulf Las Vegas. A player in this war is Faust's friend, Jennifer Juniper. She's kinda cool, she does blood magic. It's really neat when she does that. But everything else about her is boring and tropy as hell. She's a lesbian hippy who Faust always goes to when he needs some heavy psychedelics to commune with ghosts. So instead of bowing out at the natural conclusion of Faust's prison break, we have to slog through another few precursory chapters of Faust and his crew rescuing Juniper. It falls so flat compared to the great climax of the reveal of the Killing Floor and Caitlin bursting in and raining blood down on everyone. That's where I'm at with this thing. I'm gonna take a break before reading the next one. I think I'm burnt out on Faust.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    The Killing Floor Blues is the fifth book in the Daniel Faust series written by Craig Schaefer. It centers on a magician and private investigator named Daniel Faust who lives in Los Vegas. Daniel Faust wakes up disoriented and finds himself on way to the Eisenberg correctional facility (also called Iceberg) in the Mojave Desert. Confused as to why he's on way to prison without having a trial, he finds out that he's already been tried and found guilty. Thoroughly befuddled by this rapid turn, Faus The Killing Floor Blues is the fifth book in the Daniel Faust series written by Craig Schaefer. It centers on a magician and private investigator named Daniel Faust who lives in Los Vegas. Daniel Faust wakes up disoriented and finds himself on way to the Eisenberg correctional facility (also called Iceberg) in the Mojave Desert. Confused as to why he's on way to prison without having a trial, he finds out that he's already been tried and found guilty. Thoroughly befuddled by this rapid turn, Faust soon learns that a grand sinister plan is underway and he's been targeted for reasons unknown. While in prison, he has to figure out the way of life in prison and also keep himself from being a target of a drug gang that has a branch in Las Vegas. There's also bikers from a club to whom he owes money and lastly he will have to contend the inhumane conditions and odious guards in the private prison. Faust learns soon that things are truly troubled for him as he finds out more about the strange on-goings in prison, the way of life inside as well as he tries to figure out how he landed in prison. The Killing Floor Blues is written rather well. The narrative is breakneck paced that is full of action, plot twists, and more importantly superb revelations that keeps the reader on edge. This installment is an amalgamation of urban fantasy and a crime thriller. The story opens on a somber note, but then quickly explodes as the readers get a fascinating look at private prisons and the shenanigans that Faust gets him into. All in all, The Killing Floor Blues is written rather well and is a wonderful continuation to what would hopefully be a wonderful series, which I plan to continue in the very near future.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lady

    From Bad To Worse •••NOT for the homophobic, transphobic, closedminded, or feint of heart!••• This series must be read in order. The first book is The Long Way Down. The second book is The White Gold Score. The third book is Redemption Song. The fourth book is The Living End. The fifth book is A Plain-Dealing Villain. This is the sixth book. I can't wait to read The Castle Doctrine! Getting busted by Harmony Black for the one crime he didn't commit was a low point for Daniel Faust... Waking on a p From Bad To Worse •••NOT for the homophobic, transphobic, closedminded, or feint of heart!••• This series must be read in order. The first book is The Long Way Down. The second book is The White Gold Score. The third book is Redemption Song. The fourth book is The Living End. The fifth book is A Plain-Dealing Villain. This is the sixth book. I can't wait to read The Castle Doctrine! Getting busted by Harmony Black for the one crime he didn't commit was a low point for Daniel Faust... Waking on a prison transfer bus was even lower. What happened to his missing 12 hours? How is he on his way to prison without so much as a hearing?! What about a trial? He's been whammies before but this is ridiculous! How could this happen? What kind of sinister magic can rewrite reality? Can he escape this fate or has his luck finally run out? Who has done this to him? Why does he feel like a pawn in a game he never knew existed? How much more can he take before madness swallows him whole?

  30. 4 out of 5

    Vinay Badri

    Best book of the series by far especially given the change of setting on this one The 2nd arc of Faust's journey has been fun. If book 4 was heist, book 5 is about a jail break and turns out to be rather well done. Following the events of book 4, and the start of book 5, there is a searing sense of confusion surrounding Faust, a curse that affects a lot of people's memories including Faust, necessitating a jail break. Now when the aforementioned prison hosts an illegal fighting league, a clash be Best book of the series by far especially given the change of setting on this one The 2nd arc of Faust's journey has been fun. If book 4 was heist, book 5 is about a jail break and turns out to be rather well done. Following the events of book 4, and the start of book 5, there is a searing sense of confusion surrounding Faust, a curse that affects a lot of people's memories including Faust, necessitating a jail break. Now when the aforementioned prison hosts an illegal fighting league, a clash between warring clans as well as an escalation of stakes outside, Faust finds himself juggling more things even as he tries to engineer the jail break The pacing of this book is stunning, the revelations on the broader nature of the story fed piecemeal and the hidden nature of the true enemy and Faust's importance revealed. Truly fun and sets up book 6 rather well

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