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Making Every Lesson Count: Six principles to support great teaching and learning (Making Every Lesson Count series)

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Packed with practical teaching strategies, Making Every Lesson Count bridges the gap between research findings and classroom practice. Shaun Allison and Andy Tharby examine the evidence behind what makes great teaching and explore how to implement this in the classroom to make a difference to learning. They distil teaching and learning down into six core principles - chall Packed with practical teaching strategies, Making Every Lesson Count bridges the gap between research findings and classroom practice. Shaun Allison and Andy Tharby examine the evidence behind what makes great teaching and explore how to implement this in the classroom to make a difference to learning. They distil teaching and learning down into six core principles - challenge, explanation, modelling, practice, feedback and questioning - and show how these can inspire an ethos of excellence and growth, not only in individual classrooms but across a whole school too. Combining robust evidence from a range of fields with the practical wisdom of experienced, effective classroom teachers, the book is a complete toolkit of strategies that teachers can use every lesson to make that lesson count. There are no gimmicky ideas here - just high impact, focused teaching that results in great learning, every lesson, every day. To demonstrate how attainable this is, the book contains a number of case studies from a number of professionals who are successfully embedding a culture of excellence and growth in their schools. Making Every Lesson Count offers an evidence-informed alternative to restrictive Ofsted-driven definitions of great teaching, empowering teachers to deliver great lessons and celebrate high-quality practice. Suitable for all teachers - including trainee teachers, NQTs, and experienced teachers - who want quick and easy ways to enhance their practice and make every lesson count.


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Packed with practical teaching strategies, Making Every Lesson Count bridges the gap between research findings and classroom practice. Shaun Allison and Andy Tharby examine the evidence behind what makes great teaching and explore how to implement this in the classroom to make a difference to learning. They distil teaching and learning down into six core principles - chall Packed with practical teaching strategies, Making Every Lesson Count bridges the gap between research findings and classroom practice. Shaun Allison and Andy Tharby examine the evidence behind what makes great teaching and explore how to implement this in the classroom to make a difference to learning. They distil teaching and learning down into six core principles - challenge, explanation, modelling, practice, feedback and questioning - and show how these can inspire an ethos of excellence and growth, not only in individual classrooms but across a whole school too. Combining robust evidence from a range of fields with the practical wisdom of experienced, effective classroom teachers, the book is a complete toolkit of strategies that teachers can use every lesson to make that lesson count. There are no gimmicky ideas here - just high impact, focused teaching that results in great learning, every lesson, every day. To demonstrate how attainable this is, the book contains a number of case studies from a number of professionals who are successfully embedding a culture of excellence and growth in their schools. Making Every Lesson Count offers an evidence-informed alternative to restrictive Ofsted-driven definitions of great teaching, empowering teachers to deliver great lessons and celebrate high-quality practice. Suitable for all teachers - including trainee teachers, NQTs, and experienced teachers - who want quick and easy ways to enhance their practice and make every lesson count.

56 review for Making Every Lesson Count: Six principles to support great teaching and learning (Making Every Lesson Count series)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rikki

    A really comprehensive book that keeps things simple - six strategy strands that should be used in any classroom. Experienced teachers may feel that some sections are teaching granny to suck eggs, but this is a great resource for NQTs and teachers early in their career, as it makes explicit what those with experience implicitly do.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ben Breen

    It is vitally important that teachers are constantly developing their practice, drawing from current research to boost outcomes for their classes. But with the pressures of the job, it's often impossible to find the time. Making Every Lesson Count does this work for you. Drawing from an extensive bibliography of up-to-date research, advice is broken into six sections: challenge, questioning, practice, feedback, modelling, and explanation. Each section is illustrated with practical teaching scenar It is vitally important that teachers are constantly developing their practice, drawing from current research to boost outcomes for their classes. But with the pressures of the job, it's often impossible to find the time. Making Every Lesson Count does this work for you. Drawing from an extensive bibliography of up-to-date research, advice is broken into six sections: challenge, questioning, practice, feedback, modelling, and explanation. Each section is illustrated with practical teaching scenarios, and an exploration of the issues often encountered when making the recommended changes. Current teaching fads - dialogic marking, 3-step lesson plans - are rejected in favour of more effective techniques, and it is clear that the authors are experienced and aware of the realities of the job. Equally, the authors are clear that there's no one size fits all approach -what works for one teacher may not for the next. And as such, the reader is encouraged to experiment with their practice, taking what works and leaving the rest. This is a dose of realism much needed in the profession. Whilst I had covered a lot of the material in teacher training, this was a well argued, concise exploration of how to improve your lessons. Techniques were useful, examples illustrative across a broad range of subjects, and arguments clear, compelling and easy to follow. Highly recommended.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Steve Candy

    As a teacher of some experience and a worrying level of cynicism I welcomed the chance to read this between my fourteenth and fifteenth years in the profession. From a work based perspective I got reassurance that I have been doing an awful lot of things right without checking myself for a long time. As somebody who will play a part in shaping the careers of less experienced colleagues it has also given me a wealth of material to assist with their development. Sometimes I cringed at the use of exc As a teacher of some experience and a worrying level of cynicism I welcomed the chance to read this between my fourteenth and fifteenth years in the profession. From a work based perspective I got reassurance that I have been doing an awful lot of things right without checking myself for a long time. As somebody who will play a part in shaping the careers of less experienced colleagues it has also given me a wealth of material to assist with their development. Sometimes I cringed at the use of exclamation marks to make a comedic point, there were many opportunities to engage a teacher reading with humour without resorting to condescension, but the overall tone was pitched successfully enough to speak to new and experienced practitioners. Perhaps the final chapter on embedding the ethos could have been worked into the previous chapters rather than being a standalone. If intending to use this book as a key part of your practice then I’d recommend focusing on a strategy a week from each of the six chapters in carefully selected lessons. Reflect on it, review it and then move forward in a way that suits you best. The last thing I believe the authors would’ve wanted was to create an army of robot teachers so allow for spontaneity and individuality to permeate.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Matt Butler

    This was very easy to read and had lots of great strategies that I will be writing up later. Would strongly recommend to anybody else in my shoes. I liked the emphasis on growth mindset and the very natural structure of the book. It was a great synthesis of many key figures in the pedagogical literature. Not a criticism of the book but some parts were not entirely relevant to maths. I think this is to be expected as most teaching books I have read so far focus on maths. I left tabs (lots of them) This was very easy to read and had lots of great strategies that I will be writing up later. Would strongly recommend to anybody else in my shoes. I liked the emphasis on growth mindset and the very natural structure of the book. It was a great synthesis of many key figures in the pedagogical literature. Not a criticism of the book but some parts were not entirely relevant to maths. I think this is to be expected as most teaching books I have read so far focus on maths. I left tabs (lots of them) next to key sections of the book. I found this a more efficient strategy than just writing up as I went. It gave me more freedom as I didn't have to be at a desk.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jasmine Hutchinson

    As a newly qualified maths teacher (completed my NQT last year), I found the book informative and logically laid out. I enjoyed how each chapter started with two scenarios and also how it focused on a different teaching principal. Some pedagogy was not as applicable to mathematics (this was also the case during my training year) and I wish there was more about “Embedding the Ethos” throughout the book. Overall, it was a decent well thought-out book and I’m looking forward to reading Making Every As a newly qualified maths teacher (completed my NQT last year), I found the book informative and logically laid out. I enjoyed how each chapter started with two scenarios and also how it focused on a different teaching principal. Some pedagogy was not as applicable to mathematics (this was also the case during my training year) and I wish there was more about “Embedding the Ethos” throughout the book. Overall, it was a decent well thought-out book and I’m looking forward to reading Making Every Maths Lesson Count!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chris Reed

    This book explores strategies and options for teachers that develop greatness in teaching and learning. The 6 principles explained show a progression of learning that, I believe, will be effective and create a tone in that classroom that is conducive to quality learning and quality instruction.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Becki Bawler

    One of the best education ideas books I've read! One of the best education ideas books I've read!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Val Connell

    A really comprehensive book with effective strategies

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mícheál

    Readable, informative, pragmatic Bridges the gap between (genuinely useful) theory and practice so well, and so it is a really useful book about ‘teaching’; no nonsense, no fluff.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    V good- will definitely read the English one.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ed

    This was a reasonable book which ended up covering quite a lot of professional tips and tricks for "supporting great teaching". Being quite fresh into the profession there were quite a lot of repetitions from things I had heard in my training year but, on the other side of the coin there were some good points that were worth re-iterating. I can imagine that if you've been in the profession some time and are seeking some fresh help that this is a good place to turn to. There was quiet a focus of En This was a reasonable book which ended up covering quite a lot of professional tips and tricks for "supporting great teaching". Being quite fresh into the profession there were quite a lot of repetitions from things I had heard in my training year but, on the other side of the coin there were some good points that were worth re-iterating. I can imagine that if you've been in the profession some time and are seeking some fresh help that this is a good place to turn to. There was quiet a focus of English teaching in some of the chapters which was a bit annoying however most of the book tried to keep it balanced and appropriate for all subjects. A good book, for those in the profession or looking at starting it, but I don't see anyone reading it otherwise.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Zeba Clarke

    Very useful and inspiring.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sheila

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

  15. 4 out of 5

    Hakeem

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

  17. 5 out of 5

    Deirdre

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nina Elliott

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ayesha Aamir

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nicola

  21. 5 out of 5

    Shaun

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mr Andrew

  23. 5 out of 5

    Andy

  24. 5 out of 5

    John Scattergood

  25. 4 out of 5

    Adam Stubbs

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michael Watson

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mrs Claire Lisa Williams

  28. 5 out of 5

    Matt Bowman

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn Picks

  30. 5 out of 5

    Freya

  31. 5 out of 5

    Marina

  32. 4 out of 5

    Becky Wood

  33. 4 out of 5

    Corinne Campbell

  34. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Curtis

  35. 5 out of 5

    AJ Jonesy

  36. 4 out of 5

    Lydia Hopkins

  37. 5 out of 5

    Drvcourt

  38. 4 out of 5

    Ezekiel Joakin

  39. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Sosbe

  40. 4 out of 5

    Wesley Carroll

  41. 4 out of 5

    Georgina

  42. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Sweet

  43. 5 out of 5

    Wesley

  44. 5 out of 5

    Michele

  45. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

  46. 4 out of 5

    Janet Currah

  47. 4 out of 5

    Hashim Alsughayer

  48. 5 out of 5

    Becky

  49. 4 out of 5

    Chris Heal

  50. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Maher

  51. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

  52. 4 out of 5

    Pritesh

  53. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

  54. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  55. 4 out of 5

    Maha Abuzukhar

  56. 5 out of 5

    Euan

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