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Bethel pastor and bestselling author Kris Vallotton delivers a powerful, liberating teaching for women, revealing the special role and vital purpose God has for them.


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Bethel pastor and bestselling author Kris Vallotton delivers a powerful, liberating teaching for women, revealing the special role and vital purpose God has for them.

30 review for Fashioned to Reign Audiobook

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tony

    Kris hits some great points about empowering women but the book suffers from poor editing and a confusing structure. It is interspersed with visions he's had, profiles of women in history and some points where he actually does some teaching. If you're not familiar with his preaching voice, you could easily miss his tone. The book is written like a transcript from some of his sermons, which isn't always a good thing. There's a reason books are books and sermons are sermons. Different media is mean Kris hits some great points about empowering women but the book suffers from poor editing and a confusing structure. It is interspersed with visions he's had, profiles of women in history and some points where he actually does some teaching. If you're not familiar with his preaching voice, you could easily miss his tone. The book is written like a transcript from some of his sermons, which isn't always a good thing. There's a reason books are books and sermons are sermons. Different media is meant to be consumed in different ways. All that aside, if you can get past some of his stranger theories about Adam being created as both a man and woman (he admittedly says it's just a thought), there is some gold hidden in the book. I loved the context he brings to the main passages used against women in ministry/leadership. He points to the goddess worship in the 3 locations where Paul writes the most prohibitive language towards women. Kris is definitely no scholar and his research comes across as such. But he does have some powerful revelation if you have ears to hear it. I would recommend the book simply for the gold nuggets you can mine out of it but don't expect the most compelling writing.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lacey

    I really wanted to give this book 5 stars for content. But I agree with a previous reviewer that, unless you're familiar with Kris' preaching and manner, the style can be off-putting. It may turn off more academic types, which is a shame because there is some quality exegesis happening here. Kris does a fantastic job of unfolding historical and cultural contexts, as well as relying on original language study, and most importantly, looking at the whole spectrum of scripture, as he discusses this I really wanted to give this book 5 stars for content. But I agree with a previous reviewer that, unless you're familiar with Kris' preaching and manner, the style can be off-putting. It may turn off more academic types, which is a shame because there is some quality exegesis happening here. Kris does a fantastic job of unfolding historical and cultural contexts, as well as relying on original language study, and most importantly, looking at the whole spectrum of scripture, as he discusses this topic. I particularly enjoyed his look Jesus' treatment of women within his own socio-historical context, which, as it turns out, radically elevated women and their treatment within society. He then goes on to demonstrate how New Testament writers actually reinforced this pattern, and how commonly misunderstood verses can be better understood in connection to the specific issues in the churches they were addressing. Very well done, and well thought out, I just wish the presentation had been cleaned up a little.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alastair

    One of the worst books I have read to date. The twisting of scripture that occurs for the arguments that Kris want's to make to is at times almost hilarious (but unfortunately it is such a dangerous matter that It's hard to find humour in it). What looks like exegesis in this book is actually quite often the interpretation of a "vision" that Kris has had based, often departing from quite markedly, some text in the Bible. The clearest example of this is early on in the book when Kris tells a stor One of the worst books I have read to date. The twisting of scripture that occurs for the arguments that Kris want's to make to is at times almost hilarious (but unfortunately it is such a dangerous matter that It's hard to find humour in it). What looks like exegesis in this book is actually quite often the interpretation of a "vision" that Kris has had based, often departing from quite markedly, some text in the Bible. The clearest example of this is early on in the book when Kris tells a story vaguely resembling Genesis 1 and 2, with some marked differences (such as Eve being created far earlier than the Bible states). This is then used to undermine Adams position as a Biblical prophet and turn Eve into a prophetess (this is the early foundations for a fallacious argument about 1 Timothy). The disrespect that is shown for the actual word of God, when compared to Kris' subjective visions is phenomenal. The book also promotes known Prosperity Preachers (such as Joyce Meyers) as being bastions of women in ministry. If that is the best example that could be sourced, it would be like the Apostles putting forward Judas as an upstanding disciple. It either shows that Kris has no discernment when it comes to preachers (assuming popularity makes them a Christian rather than the faith they preach) or that he himself is promoting the false gospel of wealth and health (which is the vilest creation to call itself Christian in history). Either situation gives serious reason for alarm. In any case, reading this book has only been useful to me in getting a better understanding of what 2 Peter 3:15-16 is referring to. If a person has to go so far out of the realms of orthodox Christianity to support their view, they are wrong. The godly thing to do would be to accept that and repent of the aberrant belief, Kris seems to have knuckled down and tried to spread it. I can only pray that he does repent and stop trying to twist and undermine the authority of Scripture to gain popularity and support a socially acceptable theology.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jeanette

    "It is a battle that puts the sexes at war with each other as each sex creates standards from its own strengths that demean the other." (39) "Whatever your take is on evolution, there is a huge difference between a species evolving into all of the species on the planet. It is important to understand that Darwin's scientific theories have led us into cultural mind-sets that have been extremely destructive to the dignity of both women and men[. . .] This argument created two important core transit "It is a battle that puts the sexes at war with each other as each sex creates standards from its own strengths that demean the other." (39) "Whatever your take is on evolution, there is a huge difference between a species evolving into all of the species on the planet. It is important to understand that Darwin's scientific theories have led us into cultural mind-sets that have been extremely destructive to the dignity of both women and men[. . .] This argument created two important core transitions in our thinking. First, instead of women and men being created in the image of God, as people once commonly believed, Darwinism taught us that our ancestors were not divine. Instead, they were apelike and had ultimately evolved from a amoeba. This transformed the way society valued human life because it reduced humans down to the level of smart apes. Second, Darwin's theory of evolution taught us that we came about through a series of genetic mutations that transpired over billions of years. This meant there was no divine design or purpose for which we came about an no Creator who loved us enough to die for us. We are just the human race... all alone on this God-forsaken rock we call Earth, floating through the cosmos on a purposeless journey to nowhere. Darwin's theory taught us that we are born to die with no eternity before us and no heaven after us." (40) "The ramifications of having God as our Daddy (rather than some ape dragging is knuckles in the African jungle somewhere) is life changing. I hope you can see that which you believe about your origin makes a difference in the way you value yourself and humanity in general." (42) "God took the woman out of the man so that they could experience yada with each other the way Adam did with God." (47) // "yada" translates as "relations" or "to know" and means "to be aware, to experience, to know very well, to understand, to learn and to regard" different from sexual relations "The Bible says that Adam and the animals were both formed from dirt (which explains why our DNA is so closely linked). The Hebrew word formed is yatsar. But God fashioned (the Hebrew word hanah) the woman out of more sophisticated material. She is a second-generation creation." (47) "'believing every word of the Bible' requires a relationship with the Spirit of God so that we can discern how to apply the Scriptures in a way that leads to the outcome the Author intended. Thousands of years ago, the wisest man in the world wrote, 'Knowledge is easy to one who has understanding' (Proverbs 14:6). It is only when we understand the heart of God that we can apply the knowledge of the Scriptures in a way that embraces His purposes." (83) "...we often read the Bible to validate what we already believe is true, and we recount the stories in our minds to satisfy some need we have to be right instead of being transformed. Second, the Bible commonly recounts stories in which God does not give us His perspective on the characters who lack integrity or whose worldview is flawed. [. . .] It simply highlights the fact that we need the Holy Spirit to lead us into all truth and that the Bible's silence on a matter does not mean that God condones a person's behavior." (85) "The book of Proverbs was Solomon's greatest contribution to mankind. It was written to reveal to us the wisdom of a man in right relationship with God. But Ecclesiastes shows us the thoughts of the wisest man in the world after he has lost relationship with God." (86) "...the Bible in the hands of the devil is not true. It takes the Word of God plus the Spirit of God to equal the Truth of God. The Word of God in the hands of anyone besides the Holy Spirit always leads to religion, bondage and death. 'For the letter kills,' as Paul said, 'but the Spirit gives life' (2 Corinthians 3:6)." (95) // emphasis added "Jesus is perfect theology." (101) // Bill Johnson quotation "Some may argue about whether or not a woman should carry the title of leader, elder, apostle, prophet or the like, but true leaders are acknowledged by titles, not created by them." (114) "He wanted the woman to share her testimony. He wanted people to see that instead of Him becoming unclean when the woman on her cycle touched Him, she became clean." (123) "...there is a huge difference between every man having authority over every woman, and a husband (who is being called to lay down his life for his wife) having the authority to lead his bride." (147) // 1 Cor. 11:3 "It is my conviction that God's divine truth overrides man's finite facts. I am convinced that God has an answer before we ever have a problem. After all, Jesus was crucified before the foundation of the world." (166) "These verses (1 Tim. 2:11-15) stir up many difficult questions that we must honestly ponder as we navigate our way through this find, which can, if improperly excavated, be treacherously twisted to oppress women. Is Paul saying that a woman who has known the Lord for thirty years and has studied the Bible her entire life is not qualified to teach a brand-new male believer? Is Paul saying that there is no situation in which a woman should have authority over a man in a spiritual environment? Is Paul saying that because Eve was deceived, women should not be trusted with leadership ever again? What happened to the born-again experience that makes old things pass away and makes all things new? (See 2 Cor. 5:17)." (174) "Let me make it clear that while gender distinctions should not determine where men and women lead, they should make a difference in how men and women lead." (191) "God never gives a physical characteristic to one of His creations without it affecting the created one's divinely appointed role in life. As a matter of fact, I believe that God first determines a person's divine purpose, and then He designs the person with all of the characteristics needed to successfully apprehend his or her divine destiny." (192) "The chamber God used to fabricate the woman was probably removed from the cavity that encompassed Adam's heart. This was a prophetic statement that Speaks to the fact that woman was made to stand alongside of man, for it was from the side chamber that she was fashioned. That woman was taken from a chamber close to man's heart is indicative of her intuitive nature - the way she processes from the heart to the head, as opposed to man, who processes from the head to the heart." (199) "The hand that rocks the cradle is the hand that rules the world." (208) / William Ross Wallace quotation "I am reminded of Peter's exhortation to women: 'Let it be the hidden person of the heart, with the imperishable quality of a gentle and quiet spirit, which is precious in the sight of God' (1 Peter 3:4). We need to value equally the full spectrum of honorable women and empower them to be all God has called them to be." (210) "...some women are fighting a ghost from the past. For these women, any kind of conflict with a man is inflated, exaggerated and/or deemed discourteous. Whenever I have a disagreement with any woman who has the 'ghost syndrome,' I have learned to ask her to repeat back what she thinks I said. The difference between what I am trying to communicate and what she is hearing can be disheartening at times. Great communication requires both parties to take the time to listen to each other from the heart. [. . .] The 'ghost syndrome' can be triggered for various reasons in different women, and also in men." (211) // unreasonable or "hysterical" behavior is not gender specific "It is not enough to be right; we must be redemptive if we are ever going to see a revolution that empowers both sexes equally and honorably." (212) "I was created to help other people fulfill their destiny." (214) // Kathy Vallotton quotation regarding her greatest vision for her life "...the refusal to acknowledge the difference between the sexes is costing us a generation." (215) "After all, the apostle Paul said, 'Wives, be subject to your own husbands.' He did not say 'Women, be subject to every man.' As I have already stated, I do not think a theological case can be made that men as a sex have authority over women as a sex." (227) Quotations from the poem "Motherhood" by Christianna Maas (216-217) "...the pulse of life sends a constant reminder to both good and evil that I have yielded myself to Heaven and now carry its dream." "Our footsteps marking land for conquest, we move undetected through the common places." "Hope has feet, and it will run to the corners of earth, because I stood up against destruction."

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kari

    Does no one hire editors anymore?!? This was a very frustrating book to read, for multiple reasons. Poor writing style and editing. Partway through I looked up the author because I thought this might be his first book. Nope, he's written a bunch. Lots of tangents (sometimes mid-sentence), unnecessary additions, and an unclear target audience. There are mini-biographies on random women through the ages, but there is no real reason for these chapters. They don't connect strongly with the rest of t Does no one hire editors anymore?!? This was a very frustrating book to read, for multiple reasons. Poor writing style and editing. Partway through I looked up the author because I thought this might be his first book. Nope, he's written a bunch. Lots of tangents (sometimes mid-sentence), unnecessary additions, and an unclear target audience. There are mini-biographies on random women through the ages, but there is no real reason for these chapters. They don't connect strongly with the rest of the book, and their only purpose seems to be to provide examples of times that men were okay with women leaders. It seemed that this book was supposed to be targeted for women, but there is still a strong patriarchal view that really turned me away. In the first chapter where he gives his own vision of Adam and Eve, she is the prototypical male fantasy of this shy dumb beautiful creature that he can teach. Barf. More than once he mentions "rescuing the princesses", still appealing for men to be the rescuers...from situations that men have perpetuated. There are other times in the book that he is clearly writing to women; if he wanted to write to both sexes there needed to be more awareness of the language being used. I wish that there had been a strong (female) editor for this book. Because there are some things that were very useful and need to be talked about (esp. regarding translation issues, taking into account the culture of the times, Paul's writing style, etc.). But as often happens in Christian books, some of the hardest issues and passages were absent. I'm upset because this is a conversation that really needs to happen, but it was done poorly, and it feels like the publisher doesn't care enough to put out a well-written and researched book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Abigail Ford

    Great book with lots of scriptural evidence backing the equality of women. It explains the context behind "those" scriptures that seemingly demean or lower the worth of women. It was wonderful to hear the opinion coming from a man, not a women that felt the need to justify herself as equal or worthy. But a man, stepping up to say that women are valuable, and have great destinies, and that things should no longer be a "boy's club" as the author put it. The workbook that went along with this book Great book with lots of scriptural evidence backing the equality of women. It explains the context behind "those" scriptures that seemingly demean or lower the worth of women. It was wonderful to hear the opinion coming from a man, not a women that felt the need to justify herself as equal or worthy. But a man, stepping up to say that women are valuable, and have great destinies, and that things should no longer be a "boy's club" as the author put it. The workbook that went along with this book was not that great. It had similar content, which is fine, but the questions basically just made you repeat what you read. No exploring, deep questions that made you soul search. So I would personally just suggest getting the book, not the workbook. But that's just my personal opinion. I learned a lot about the cultures and to whom Paul and Peter were writing to in their letters that seemed "anti-women". Very informative and illuminating. Well done.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Paul Van buren

    I was raised in a home and church where women were honoured and worked alongside men. This book simply gave better understanding behind the four or so verses in the entire Bible that seem to be contrary to the heart of Father. It is well worth the read and will give encouragement to those who know this to be true in their spirit but are lacking the vocabulary to explain it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Twinkie Napier

    I could have done without the first 2 chapters, but the rest of the book was incredible and is a must read for every Christian when it comes to the topic of how women fit into the Kingdom of God.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Talia

    I read this book a few years ago and really liked it. One thing I never noticed was that God gave the command to Adam to "be fruitful and multiply" before there was ever a separate woman on the scene. Christianity has traditionally used this phrase to encourage people to have children, but it seems like before Eve, there were no children. Was Adam being disobedient because he didn't "be fruitful and multiply"? Or maybe that's not what that means. I doubt he was being disobedient. It seems to me l I read this book a few years ago and really liked it. One thing I never noticed was that God gave the command to Adam to "be fruitful and multiply" before there was ever a separate woman on the scene. Christianity has traditionally used this phrase to encourage people to have children, but it seems like before Eve, there were no children. Was Adam being disobedient because he didn't "be fruitful and multiply"? Or maybe that's not what that means. I doubt he was being disobedient. It seems to me like God didn't have a problem with either of them until they are from the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil. Kris Valloton has some interesting theories on man and woman especially in the beginning of this book. Some of it seems so far out, but let's face it, God is not status-quo and there are no rules that he doesn't make himself. So he can do whatever He wants, however strange it may seem to us (like creating tarantulas, may I add?). I don't know that I agree with all the author's hypotheses, but it does give me something to think about. Kris Valloton's writing on Psalm 68 and Ephesians 4 (pg. 65-66) doesn't really make sense to me when he is trying to connect spiritual warfare and women via these passages. I don't see the connection, but I'm not gonna say it isn't there because I don't know everything. There is a section on applying Scripture literally, all the way through, no matter what. Kris brings up the fact that the Bible is not a manual, and not every action or deed is what we ought to be doing. It's a story, a giant story, with many lessons in it. It is brought up that we need the Spirit of God to give us understanding, wisdom, discernment when reading the Bible. The Bible talks about this: "Not that we are adequate in ourselves to consider anything as if it were coming from ourselves, but our adequacy is from God, who made us adequate to be servants of a new covenant not based on the letter but on the Spirit, for the letter kills, but the Spirit gives life." — 2 Corinthians 3:5-6 NET I'm impressed with how well Kris shapes his argument. Instead of saying, "Oh, it's modern times and a woman can do whatever she wants, blah blah blah," he actually has a lot of substance to his ideas. He tries to look at it from every angle, to leave no stone/question unturned, and provide a logical step-by-step explanation of what he's thinking and what he believes. I don't agree with everything he wrote in this book, but I don't even agree with everything I do or say all the time either. Some quotes from the book: "One of the curses over women was increased pain during childbirth, but the verse that had the greatest negative impact on womanhood was God's proclamation that their husbands would rule over them. The Hebrew word for 'rule' is mashal, which means 'to have dominion.' It is important for us to realize that before the curse, husbands and wives were commissioned to co-reign together (see Genesis 1:27-28). It was only after the curse that husbands were given dominion over their wives. But the apostle Paul said, "'Christ redeemed us from the curse of the Law, having become a curse for us—for it is written, 'Cursed is everyone who hangs on a tree'" (Galations 3:13). When Jesus died on the cross, He broke the curse off mankind. Paul also said, "'For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus has set you free from the law of sin and death'" (Roman's 8:2). In light of these things, my question is, 'What makes us think that men were set free from the curse of the Law at the cross, but that women should still be under the curse that allows husbands to dominate them in the name of God?'" (Pg. 66-67) "Paul said, 'The husband is the head of the wife, as Christ also is the head of the church, He himself being the Saviot of the body' (Ephesians 5:23...). Too often we leave that little word as out of the equation. Christ demonstrated that headship is servant hood in motion. Headship is not about demanding husbands who reduce daughters of God to sex slaves or housemaids." (Pg. 226) Overall, a very good book. I'll probably read it again in a few years. 4 stars.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Bennett

    I began reading this book at the end of December. With some Christian books it takes more than a month to read them, depending on the intensity of the subject and the style it’s written. This book is about setting women free and letting them live out their God-given purpose. Kris Vallotton grapples with Bible passages about women (particularly ones that are often misused) and shows Jesus’ heart for both male and female. I found it quite fascinating, and there wasn’t anything that I disagreed with, I began reading this book at the end of December. With some Christian books it takes more than a month to read them, depending on the intensity of the subject and the style it’s written. This book is about setting women free and letting them live out their God-given purpose. Kris Vallotton grapples with Bible passages about women (particularly ones that are often misused) and shows Jesus’ heart for both male and female. I found it quite fascinating, and there wasn’t anything that I disagreed with, but I admit I didn’t understand everything. I found the content to be very rich; every paragraph had to be thoroughly processed for me to grasp his point. To properly review this, I’d like to read it again because I don’t feel like I’ve fully understood. But some good thoughts… at the end of every chapter he has a few pages about a significant woman in history (such as Mother Teresa and Rosa Parks). I found this encouraging, motivating, and a nice break from the intensity of the chapter content. He also addresses every topic with respect and care; several times he pointed out he wasn’t trying to stereotype anyone or offend, he was trying to draw out God’s plan.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Crystal Elton

    I've just begun reading this book, and am so far completely disappointed in the author's loose, inaccurate, and false Biblical references. He says, for example, that all of the men abandoned Christ at the crucifixion. The gospel of John tells us that Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus went to lengths to take Jesus down from the cross, anoint and bury him in a nearby tomb. He also says that Mary Magdalene was the only person to have touched Christ before his ascension. What about "doubting Thomas" I've just begun reading this book, and am so far completely disappointed in the author's loose, inaccurate, and false Biblical references. He says, for example, that all of the men abandoned Christ at the crucifixion. The gospel of John tells us that Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus went to lengths to take Jesus down from the cross, anoint and bury him in a nearby tomb. He also says that Mary Magdalene was the only person to have touched Christ before his ascension. What about "doubting Thomas", who touched the holes in his hands and the hole in his side? In the story of Mary, Jesus tells her not to hold on to him - which could even mean she didn't touch him at all! These may seem to be small things, but I am confused and dismayed as to why a pastor would disregard the truth in making his arguments. To me it makes this a dangerous book - published as a Christian, Biblical book but written without careful attention to the truth. I also found his "imagining" of the Garden of Eden story unsettling - it left me uncomfortable and angry with God, although I couldn't say why. I recommend this book only to those would like to hone their skill at discernment.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Christine Ottaway

    This is the second time I've read it and I found it a very helpful book for helping to bring women into the fullness of who God has made them to be. The author takes us from God's command to both Adam and Eve to rule the world and subdue it through other general principles of God's heart for women before dealing with the three nitty gritty verses much used to keep women in their place. Sometime the explanations got a bit bogged down but overall they are very helpful for seeing what Paul actually m This is the second time I've read it and I found it a very helpful book for helping to bring women into the fullness of who God has made them to be. The author takes us from God's command to both Adam and Eve to rule the world and subdue it through other general principles of God's heart for women before dealing with the three nitty gritty verses much used to keep women in their place. Sometime the explanations got a bit bogged down but overall they are very helpful for seeing what Paul actually meant rather than how the church and men in the church have interpreted it. I enjoyed the final chapter on powerful women and what that means without losing their God given feminine attributes but I did find the five examples of powerful but very different women a little bit gushing. For those who do want to know how God views women and their role in the church and world, this is a good book to read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Meredith Lecklider

    If you can get past the "preaching style" of writing, and the...interesting first part of the book (his views on the Garden of Eden can only be described as interesting), then this book will get you thinking about some of the more difficult passages of Scripture regarding women and their role in the church and in marriage. It was not written in an academic way, but in that regard it makes it a very easy read. If you can get past the "preaching style" of writing, and the...interesting first part of the book (his views on the Garden of Eden can only be described as interesting), then this book will get you thinking about some of the more difficult passages of Scripture regarding women and their role in the church and in marriage. It was not written in an academic way, but in that regard it makes it a very easy read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jillian Armstrong

    Such a powerful book! I would love for everyone I know to read this. Kris Valloton carefully outlines the theological perspective of egalitarianism alongside his own personal views and experiences. He also shares snippets from the lives of inspirational women leaders like Harriet Tubman and Mother Teresa. I like how he incorporated a lot of hefty theology with his own vision and beliefs. Really really good!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jonah Daniel

    I don’t disagree with a single thing Vallotton says about women in leadership or about their roles in the home. He nails it. That being said, there are some side stories here that really bugged me. Example: his story about being in a small town airport and not forgiving the workers after he was mistreated as a customer. There are others like this which neither help him prove his point or give him any points in terms of me engaging with him as an author.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Christine Bove

    Wonderful and insightful I would recommend this to everyone. It’s completely encouraging and insightful. Well worth reading and learning. Kris has a great way of bringing complex ideas and making it more tangible and applicable. For anyone who struggles with women being in leadership, this is an incredible read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn Tagariello

    Worth the time I took a journey with a group of women through this book. Multiple generations and diverse backgrounds and ethnicities. It changed the way we look at culture, society and churches, and helped us to appreciate our own backstories. It also empowered us to use our voices, alone and together to effect change where we live.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Abigail Nagy

    This book... Girls, get yourself one of these, it's a must. I'm not kidding. You need it. 🔥 And guys... If you ever intend to get married, you have to be aware of the incredible worth that daughters of God possess. This book is a good start. I highly recommend it to you as well! #empoweringwomen #itstimeforarevolution #fashionedtoreign #krisvallotton This book... Girls, get yourself one of these, it's a must. I'm not kidding. You need it. 🔥 And guys... If you ever intend to get married, you have to be aware of the incredible worth that daughters of God possess. This book is a good start. I highly recommend it to you as well! #empoweringwomen #itstimeforarevolution #fashionedtoreign #krisvallotton

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brandye Bradley

    One of the best books I've ever read about the woman's created purpose in leadership; and how we are faced to reign beside the men in our lives. Not beneath them, not above them, but equally with them. One of the best books I've ever read about the woman's created purpose in leadership; and how we are faced to reign beside the men in our lives. Not beneath them, not above them, but equally with them.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joe Voth

    To put it short and sweet, the book isn't perfect, but as far as theology goes, it is the perfect introduction to the scriptural arguments supporting women leading on the same plane as men in church and in marriage. To put it short and sweet, the book isn't perfect, but as far as theology goes, it is the perfect introduction to the scriptural arguments supporting women leading on the same plane as men in church and in marriage.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    A book of lots of learning! Not just about how God has a special heart for women but how important studying the Bible is, not just reading it. I was challenged & also empowered so I’d say that’s a great combo.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Yvonne Wiggins

    Great book looking into the intended construct and plan--Women of Destiny. Destiny awaits us all. And, as women, we have every right to rise up and answer to the call within us, as God has given us permission to do so.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Brandi McPeak

    Excellent and Needed This is a great biblical perspective on woman's role. Read this if you're interested in learning about women in church / ministry leadership roles. Excellent and Needed This is a great biblical perspective on woman's role. Read this if you're interested in learning about women in church / ministry leadership roles.

  24. 4 out of 5

    DarindaSue

    Chapter 1 was the only part of the book I liked.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Mann

    Really great arguments and cultural and historical interpretation of the Biblical texts supporting women in places of leadership and ministry.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    I couldn't put this but down. Kris explained so many things my wife and I have sought to understand over the years. Whatever your opinion is on this topic, you need to read this book. I couldn't put this but down. Kris explained so many things my wife and I have sought to understand over the years. Whatever your opinion is on this topic, you need to read this book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jemma

    Good stuff, good stuff. Another essential book that all women should read (and men too of course) Really guys. Read it.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lini Wall

    Best non fiction book I’ve ever read. So needed in the world.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elle Lew

    Great book on women in ministry!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Austin Preston

    Get it! This book has been amazing and life changing! My wife heard a sermon and was inspired to read the book. She says it's one of her all time favorites now. Get it! This book has been amazing and life changing! My wife heard a sermon and was inspired to read the book. She says it's one of her all time favorites now.

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