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Wayfinding Part 1: Rats and Rafts

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Wayfinding is the ancient seafaring art of navigating according to the natural signs. As a self-help philosophy, Wayfinding means being aware of our environment and our responses to outside stimuli. It also means learning about the environment for which we evolved, and how it differs from the environment in which we live. Wayfinding is not a destination. It is a neverendi Wayfinding is the ancient seafaring art of navigating according to the natural signs. As a self-help philosophy, Wayfinding means being aware of our environment and our responses to outside stimuli. It also means learning about the environment for which we evolved, and how it differs from the environment in which we live. Wayfinding is not a destination. It is a neverending journey. It doesn't have to be yours; it is simply a description of the path that I am on, with all my bumbling and lack of expertise on full display.


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Wayfinding is the ancient seafaring art of navigating according to the natural signs. As a self-help philosophy, Wayfinding means being aware of our environment and our responses to outside stimuli. It also means learning about the environment for which we evolved, and how it differs from the environment in which we live. Wayfinding is not a destination. It is a neverendi Wayfinding is the ancient seafaring art of navigating according to the natural signs. As a self-help philosophy, Wayfinding means being aware of our environment and our responses to outside stimuli. It also means learning about the environment for which we evolved, and how it differs from the environment in which we live. Wayfinding is not a destination. It is a neverending journey. It doesn't have to be yours; it is simply a description of the path that I am on, with all my bumbling and lack of expertise on full display.

30 review for Wayfinding Part 1: Rats and Rafts

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kenneth Buff

    If you read Hugh's blog then you already know that he is an inspiring guy. He likes to think out loud, and pass ideas back and forth with people. He likes to get people thinking, and that's what he does with this book, Wayfinding. Only instead of getting us thinking about publishing, he's getting us thinking about life, and what matters to us. He's not claiming to have all the answers, he's just sharing what he does know, talking to us like we're old friends. If you read Hugh's blog then you already know that he is an inspiring guy. He likes to think out loud, and pass ideas back and forth with people. He likes to get people thinking, and that's what he does with this book, Wayfinding. Only instead of getting us thinking about publishing, he's getting us thinking about life, and what matters to us. He's not claiming to have all the answers, he's just sharing what he does know, talking to us like we're old friends.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Gisela Hausmann

    "Rats and Rafts" is a phenomenal title for a fascinating concept presented by Hugh Howey. I have never read any of his books, I am not a sci-fi reader. The reason why I pulled this book was really the excellent title. I appreciated Hugh Howey's tying together two events, a lab rat experience in 1954 (also appreciated the nice presentation of historic events) and t Hugh Howey's fascination with wayfinding. To him, a passionate sailor, this comes easy. He dug up old examples, Thor Heyerdahl's fasc "Rats and Rafts" is a phenomenal title for a fascinating concept presented by Hugh Howey. I have never read any of his books, I am not a sci-fi reader. The reason why I pulled this book was really the excellent title. I appreciated Hugh Howey's tying together two events, a lab rat experience in 1954 (also appreciated the nice presentation of historic events) and t Hugh Howey's fascination with wayfinding. To him, a passionate sailor, this comes easy. He dug up old examples, Thor Heyerdahl's fascinating expedition and that of David Lewis who sailed from New Zealand to Tahiti, against the prevailing winds and currents, The lab experiment goes to show that rats can be stimulated to an extent, that they do not eat, abandon their young, and think of nothing else but look for more stimulation (of their brain). Howey explains that in his opinion the same is happening nonstop in today's world. Games, drinking, drugs, porn, etc... it's all stimulation that keeps people from doing what they know they should do. "... The rats represent our imprisonment..." Howey contrasts this experiment with the two explorers' adventures; they were people who "wayfinded" their way following natural signs and succeeded against common beliefs of scientists. Howey thinks that "wayfinding" can be "our salvation." I was fascinated with this short read. Having seen the endless sky in Mongolia where people, even children get on a horse and ride into the endless steppe, Westerns might call it "the nothing" or "everything looks the same", and also the starry sky in Tibet, where no emissions block the view, I have to fully agree with Howey. Indeed, I read every adventurer book from the mentioned Thor Heyerdahl's "Kon-Tiki" to Heinrich Harrer's "Seven Years in Tibet" and reading these books as a teenager set me off on my path. Though video games weren't invented then there would have been other distractions which I did not "consume" because I was addicted to reading adventure books. Howey recommends replacing "bad addictions" with "good additctions" (e.g. reading) Great concept books. Let's see where Howey takes it. Loved it. 5 stars, Gisela Hausmann, author & blogger

  3. 4 out of 5

    Colby

    A neat look at why we humans do what we do from the perspective of author Hugh Howey. Well worth the quick read, and it might just make you rethink your motivations.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    A few reviews have referred to this as a self-help book, but I don’t see it that way. That label is too simplistic. I find most books labeled as self-help to be vague, shallow, or arrogant. None of that is true here. Hugh is relating his thoughts on human behavior, mostly speaking from his personal experiences and observations. The first part of the book is thought-provoking discussion. The second part is written as an informal memoir, relating stories from his travel experiences. I enjoyed both A few reviews have referred to this as a self-help book, but I don’t see it that way. That label is too simplistic. I find most books labeled as self-help to be vague, shallow, or arrogant. None of that is true here. Hugh is relating his thoughts on human behavior, mostly speaking from his personal experiences and observations. The first part of the book is thought-provoking discussion. The second part is written as an informal memoir, relating stories from his travel experiences. I enjoyed both parts. It’s a short book, well written and interesting, and I like the two-part format. I’m looking forward to reading the new installments as they’re published.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Dang I have a lot of levers.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jodi Krantz

    Having listened up to Part 6, I have rated this one 5 stars because it sold me on the rest of the series. I knew Hugh Howey from his other works, and was a little bit skeptical on this one. Was it going to be some self-help mumbo jumbo? I’m not a fan of those, so I was wary. It’s a short listen – about 40 minutes – so it was perfect for my morning commute. I decided to give it a try and don’t regret one bit. I caught myself having to pause and rewind at times because something or other he said got Having listened up to Part 6, I have rated this one 5 stars because it sold me on the rest of the series. I knew Hugh Howey from his other works, and was a little bit skeptical on this one. Was it going to be some self-help mumbo jumbo? I’m not a fan of those, so I was wary. It’s a short listen – about 40 minutes – so it was perfect for my morning commute. I decided to give it a try and don’t regret one bit. I caught myself having to pause and rewind at times because something or other he said got me thinking about how my own life fit into what he was describing, and what I could do to maintain/change it. The way it moved from a narrative to Howey presenting his theories was really well done; it kept the experience engaging and made me curious about what topic would come up next. Graham Vick, the narrator, has a very pleasant voice and fits this book so well I felt both as if a friend was talking to me, and as if Howey himself had narrated this book! Rats and Rafts is interesting enough to make a person want to get the rest of the series, and at the same time short enough that you don’t feel like you’ve wasted your time in case it turns out not to be your cup of tea.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tina

    Not the author's fault, I thought this book was a work of fiction, not part of a series that is a philosophical diatribe on how humanity got to where it is. Not in my wheelhouse at all and I won't be reading the remaining six books in the series. Maybe it's just what you are looking for but not anything I was. Not the author's fault, I thought this book was a work of fiction, not part of a series that is a philosophical diatribe on how humanity got to where it is. Not in my wheelhouse at all and I won't be reading the remaining six books in the series. Maybe it's just what you are looking for but not anything I was.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jason Stacy

    Excellent story! It's honest and compelling and true: I'm definitely looking forward to the next books in the series (though they're more essays than books... :) ). Excellent story! It's honest and compelling and true: I'm definitely looking forward to the next books in the series (though they're more essays than books... :) ).

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sam Bronsonstonson

    I’m hooked...time to move on to the next island! Like Wool, this short book has left me excited and compelled to move on to part 2. More wonderful writing by Hugh Howey.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

    Not your usual fare from Howey, but interesting and thought provoking.

  11. 4 out of 5

    June

    Thought provoking If you have ever struggled with an addiction, or wanted to change a habit, you may find this book helpful.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Carin Camen

    Hugh Howey's Wayfinding series isn't his highest seller, which in my opinion is a loss to every reader who enjoys this author. It is in this series that you get to know the author on a deeper level. Hugh shares his innermost thoughts of his introspective journey as he sails around the world. I recommend that you read the entire series. We often look at what Hugh shares online and think it's all fun and games. The Wayfinding series, shares the reality of sailing and the daily struggles one goes th Hugh Howey's Wayfinding series isn't his highest seller, which in my opinion is a loss to every reader who enjoys this author. It is in this series that you get to know the author on a deeper level. Hugh shares his innermost thoughts of his introspective journey as he sails around the world. I recommend that you read the entire series. We often look at what Hugh shares online and think it's all fun and games. The Wayfinding series, shares the reality of sailing and the daily struggles one goes through physically and emotionally. It is in his journey around the world, that Hugh gives you access to his fears, insecurities and struggles. He is known for showing the world who he is, Wayfinding takes that concept and expands introspectively. Some of his philosophies may challenge you to think about your own. Whether you agree with him or not, isn't what's important. It's all about embracing the journey that he invites you to participate in. Wayfinding Part 1: Rats and Rafts Wayfinding Part 2: Hell and Heaven Wayfinding Part 3: Hot & Cold Wayfinding Part 4: Old World & New Wayfinding Part 5: Consciousness and Subconsciousness Wayfinding Part 6: Highs and Lows Wayfinding Part 7: In-Grouping and Out-Grouping Wayfinding - Food and Fitness Thank you Hugh for letting us be a part of your travels around the world. Your willingness to share personal insight and struggles in your Wayfinding journey helps to give hope in overcoming the storms of life, when the waves comes crashing down around you. While I enjoyed reading this series, I would thoroughly enjoy having this series undergo a rewrite with retrospective thoughts as you conclude your travels.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bobbiejoe Derhak

    Captured those quetions we all have had I wish I could put into words the feelings this book made me have as I read it. For someone nearing 40 and wondering what the hell im doing it feels good to know that i may not be the only one who wonders where life is headed and how i can look back with few regrets. I do not want to go through my entire life "faking it" or following routine. There are so many little addictions I want to change and adventures I want to take but have talked myself out of. HH Captured those quetions we all have had I wish I could put into words the feelings this book made me have as I read it. For someone nearing 40 and wondering what the hell im doing it feels good to know that i may not be the only one who wonders where life is headed and how i can look back with few regrets. I do not want to go through my entire life "faking it" or following routine. There are so many little addictions I want to change and adventures I want to take but have talked myself out of. HH brings up great points with great perspective. I am looking forward to the next in the series.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Graeme Ing

    Short, quick read and extremely thought provoking, as Howey always is. No world-shattering secrets here, but a genuine attempt to help us look beneath the veneer of our fast-paced modern lives and determine what is important to us.I for one intend to apply the knowledge acquired in the first half of this book. Sailors or anyone with a love for travel and adventure will like the latter part of the book. I'll definitely check out book 2. Short, quick read and extremely thought provoking, as Howey always is. No world-shattering secrets here, but a genuine attempt to help us look beneath the veneer of our fast-paced modern lives and determine what is important to us.I for one intend to apply the knowledge acquired in the first half of this book. Sailors or anyone with a love for travel and adventure will like the latter part of the book. I'll definitely check out book 2.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Julianne

    Because the description of this book is short and vague, as are most of Hugh Howey's book descriptions, I did not realize this is a self-help book. It's short so I tried to stick with it anyway but I just couldn't. I felt like it just went in circles, but then again I guess that's what many philosophy- and psychology-based texts do. It's probably not a bad book if this is they type of text you're looking for but it was not what I was looking for from Howey. Because the description of this book is short and vague, as are most of Hugh Howey's book descriptions, I did not realize this is a self-help book. It's short so I tried to stick with it anyway but I just couldn't. I felt like it just went in circles, but then again I guess that's what many philosophy- and psychology-based texts do. It's probably not a bad book if this is they type of text you're looking for but it was not what I was looking for from Howey.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    Hugh writes a short, thought provoking story of his own experience sailing from Cuba in frightening weather and applies his lessons learned to doing the things in life that promote long term happiness ( a positive surge of dopamine) versus short term pleasure. He encourages and reminds us all to take stock of how we live our lives.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    This is an intriguing little how-to book. I appreciate the lack of padding, the thought-provoking content, and (although to a lesser extend) the beginning of a travelogue at the end. Howey's point is that addictive behaviors all have a similar root and thus a similar solution. I'm not sure if I would have paid for it. But as a "free" borrow through Kindle Unlimited, the title was a good value. This is an intriguing little how-to book. I appreciate the lack of padding, the thought-provoking content, and (although to a lesser extend) the beginning of a travelogue at the end. Howey's point is that addictive behaviors all have a similar root and thus a similar solution. I'm not sure if I would have paid for it. But as a "free" borrow through Kindle Unlimited, the title was a good value.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Streettwanderer

    Another great Howey book. This came at just the right time. I'm constantly impressed with Hugh Howey, and how I always seem read his work at just the right time for it to alter my course, in sometimes subtle, sometimes not so subtle ways. Another great Howey book. This came at just the right time. I'm constantly impressed with Hugh Howey, and how I always seem read his work at just the right time for it to alter my course, in sometimes subtle, sometimes not so subtle ways.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Matthew p Parker

    ......great food for thought. Always excited to see anything new from Hugh. Didn't know exactly what this short story was about. Knew it had something to do with sailing. Enjoyed it. Looking forward for part two. Thanks Hugh .keep em coming. ......great food for thought. Always excited to see anything new from Hugh. Didn't know exactly what this short story was about. Knew it had something to do with sailing. Enjoyed it. Looking forward for part two. Thanks Hugh .keep em coming.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Arlin R Davis

    Not what I expected, but wow! I've read several of Hugh Howey's books and I expected to find another unique work of fiction. What I found was a well written challenge to live life fully. Can't wait to read the next installment. Not what I expected, but wow! I've read several of Hugh Howey's books and I expected to find another unique work of fiction. What I found was a well written challenge to live life fully. Can't wait to read the next installment.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rick.Johnson

    A thoughtful adventure I love being able to find out more about an author who has written so many very good books. I will look forward to the next installment and being able to tag a long on the adventure at least vicariously.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    Proof that writing great fiction is a different skill from writing good essays or making ones inner dialog compelling to others. I probably would be kinder in my review if I had not paid for this, and if he was not selling these separately - sorry, but serials also work better in fiction.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michelle S. Bruner

    I'm intrigued and can't wait to read more! This book seems to have come into my hands at the right time. Just what I need- to get off my island! I'm intrigued and can't wait to read more! This book seems to have come into my hands at the right time. Just what I need- to get off my island!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Torben

    Interesting view of life, personal behaviour, aims, sights. Easy to read but lots of important assumptions. I like it and head over directly to part 2.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tom Hailand

    Fantastic Hugh Howey is pretty darn amazing. I'd preorder part two if it was available. This book truly did come along at the right moment, thanks Hugh Fantastic Hugh Howey is pretty darn amazing. I'd preorder part two if it was available. This book truly did come along at the right moment, thanks Hugh

  26. 4 out of 5

    Adam Vine

    Part memoir, part self-help, part philosophizing on our over-distracted and over-comforted modern condition. I dug it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tyler Runde

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jen

  29. 5 out of 5

    James

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rcb

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