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This is not a normal diet book, and I am not a normal diet book author. I'm not a doctor. Nor am I a nutritionist, psychologist, sports hero, gourmet chef, or any of the other vocations that seem to qualify people to tell you how to lose weight. I'm an engineer by training, a computer programmer by avocation, and an businessman through lack of alternatives. From grade school This is not a normal diet book, and I am not a normal diet book author. I'm not a doctor. Nor am I a nutritionist, psychologist, sports hero, gourmet chef, or any of the other vocations that seem to qualify people to tell you how to lose weight. I'm an engineer by training, a computer programmer by avocation, and an businessman through lack of alternatives. From grade school in the 1950's until 1988 I was fat--anywhere from 30 to 80 pounds overweight. This is a diet book by somebody who spent most of his life fat. The absurdity of my situation finally struck home in 1987. ``Look,'' I said to myself, ``you founded one of the five biggest software companies in the world, Autodesk. You wrote large pieces of AutoCAD, the world standard for computer aided design. You've made in excess of fifty million dollars without dropping dead, going crazy, or winding up in jail. You've succeeded at some pretty difficult things, and you can't control your flippin' weight?'' Through all the years of struggling with my weight, the fad diets, the tedious and depressing history most fat people share, I had never, even once, approached controlling my weight the way I'd work on any other problem: a malfunctioning circuit, a buggy program, an ineffective department in my company. As an engineer, I was trained to solve problems. As a software developer, I designed tools to help others solve their problems. As a businessman I survived and succeeded by managing problems. And yet, all that time, I hadn't looked at my own health as something to be investigated, managed, and eventually solved in the same way. I decided to do just that. This book is a compilation of what I learned. Six months after I decided being fat was a problem to be solved, not a burden to be endured, I was no longer overweight. Since then, my weight hasn't varied by more than a few pounds. I'm hungry less often at 145 pounds than I was at 215. I look better, feel great, and have more energy for the things I enjoy. I spend only a few minutes a day maintaining this happy situation. And I know I'll be able to control my weight from now on, because I have the tools I need, the will to use them, and the experience to know they work. The tools are now in your hands. Live long and prosper.


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This is not a normal diet book, and I am not a normal diet book author. I'm not a doctor. Nor am I a nutritionist, psychologist, sports hero, gourmet chef, or any of the other vocations that seem to qualify people to tell you how to lose weight. I'm an engineer by training, a computer programmer by avocation, and an businessman through lack of alternatives. From grade school This is not a normal diet book, and I am not a normal diet book author. I'm not a doctor. Nor am I a nutritionist, psychologist, sports hero, gourmet chef, or any of the other vocations that seem to qualify people to tell you how to lose weight. I'm an engineer by training, a computer programmer by avocation, and an businessman through lack of alternatives. From grade school in the 1950's until 1988 I was fat--anywhere from 30 to 80 pounds overweight. This is a diet book by somebody who spent most of his life fat. The absurdity of my situation finally struck home in 1987. ``Look,'' I said to myself, ``you founded one of the five biggest software companies in the world, Autodesk. You wrote large pieces of AutoCAD, the world standard for computer aided design. You've made in excess of fifty million dollars without dropping dead, going crazy, or winding up in jail. You've succeeded at some pretty difficult things, and you can't control your flippin' weight?'' Through all the years of struggling with my weight, the fad diets, the tedious and depressing history most fat people share, I had never, even once, approached controlling my weight the way I'd work on any other problem: a malfunctioning circuit, a buggy program, an ineffective department in my company. As an engineer, I was trained to solve problems. As a software developer, I designed tools to help others solve their problems. As a businessman I survived and succeeded by managing problems. And yet, all that time, I hadn't looked at my own health as something to be investigated, managed, and eventually solved in the same way. I decided to do just that. This book is a compilation of what I learned. Six months after I decided being fat was a problem to be solved, not a burden to be endured, I was no longer overweight. Since then, my weight hasn't varied by more than a few pounds. I'm hungry less often at 145 pounds than I was at 215. I look better, feel great, and have more energy for the things I enjoy. I spend only a few minutes a day maintaining this happy situation. And I know I'll be able to control my weight from now on, because I have the tools I need, the will to use them, and the experience to know they work. The tools are now in your hands. Live long and prosper.

30 review for The Hacker's Diet: How to Lose Weight and Hair Through Stress and Poor Nutrition

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lucas

    Note: This book is available as a free ebook on the author's website, along with the web tools & spreadsheets for weight tracking. I think this is a useful book, but significantly too long for what is a pretty limited amount of content. The book can be summarized as follows: 1. Calories in / calories out are all that matter for weight loss. 2. Track your weight consistently; preferably first thing in the morning, naked. 3. The trend line of an exponentially-smoothed moving average of your weight c Note: This book is available as a free ebook on the author's website, along with the web tools & spreadsheets for weight tracking. I think this is a useful book, but significantly too long for what is a pretty limited amount of content. The book can be summarized as follows: 1. Calories in / calories out are all that matter for weight loss. 2. Track your weight consistently; preferably first thing in the morning, naked. 3. The trend line of an exponentially-smoothed moving average of your weight can be used to compute your average daily calorie balance. He has built a convenient web tool for doing this, as well as various spreadsheets that seem to be broken on the Excel 2011. 4. The trend line should be tracked to ensure that you are staying at a consistent calorie deficit until your goal weight is achieved. 5. Count calories and plan your meals to create a negative feedback system between your calorie balance and diet. 6. Exercising is good for your health and you should do it, but only slightly useful for weight loss. (1) is a truism, only useful as an axiom. I think (2)-(4) are true, useful, and innovative. For (5) I've found counting calories to be an enormous PITA, and I doubt that I'll ever succeed in following a weight loss plan that involves counting calories. (That's just my personality, your results may vary.) I think he really understates the case for exercise. First burning an average of a few hundred calories a day can be achieved by a vigorous workout several times a week. Increasing muscle mass can add to your base metabolism. Finally, I've found that exercise seems to help fix my "broken appetite". When I exercise regularly, I find it much easier to eat reasonable amounts of food without having to count calories. I'd recommend skimming the book, not reading it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin

    It is hard to describe what it feels like to suddenly have some control over an area of your life where you previously felt powerless. After reading this book I started tracking my weight daily and lost over 25 lbs; simply tracking my weight as described in the book made me aware of my progress even when it was otherwise undetectable, preventing me from giving up too soon. Most diet advice is written by professionals who spend all of their time thinking about health and are acutely aware of all t It is hard to describe what it feels like to suddenly have some control over an area of your life where you previously felt powerless. After reading this book I started tracking my weight daily and lost over 25 lbs; simply tracking my weight as described in the book made me aware of my progress even when it was otherwise undetectable, preventing me from giving up too soon. Most diet advice is written by professionals who spend all of their time thinking about health and are acutely aware of all the nutrients you need to be ingesting on a daily basis so as not to contract scurvy. As a result, the advice they give tends to be overwhelming and to hold it all in your head you must summarize it as YOU ARE DOING EVERYTHING WRONG. John Walker is a software engineer who decided one day to approach his weight as an engineering problem: your body has inputs (food) and outputs (water and waste) and the difference between the two dictates your weight loss or gain. It's slightly more complicated than that, but not much. Walker has the credibility of someone who is recommending something that they have done themselves. More importantly, he did not lose weight and become a fitness guru who advocates that you do the same to change your life, too. He, like a lot of overweight people, already had a pretty good life and just wanted to lose some weight and keep the rest of it mostly the same.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Simon Kozlov

    Somewhat famous in select circles, an engineer's take on diet books, written by the guy who co-founded Autodesk. Dude just rocks in every chapter of the book - down-to-earth, rational, cynical in a good way, everything you would expect from a seasoned hacker. His basic ideas: - no miracles, the only way to lose weight is to burn more calories than you eat. - 3500 calories = 1 pound of fat. By changing intake you can manage how fast you will lose/gain weight. - Difference between people who stay slim Somewhat famous in select circles, an engineer's take on diet books, written by the guy who co-founded Autodesk. Dude just rocks in every chapter of the book - down-to-earth, rational, cynical in a good way, everything you would expect from a seasoned hacker. His basic ideas: - no miracles, the only way to lose weight is to burn more calories than you eat. - 3500 calories = 1 pound of fat. By changing intake you can manage how fast you will lose/gain weight. - Difference between people who stay slim no matter what they eat is not metabolism, but their body feedback loop (i.e. they don't feel hungry for a while after they eat a lot) - don't ever look at day-to-day weight, use running average only - just measure and plan everything you eat, could be anything - just manage calories. But there are useful hacks. Dude has a huge table of ingredients with calories - Exercise not for the sake of losing weight, but to live longer. Has his own program, if you want it. Book includes a ton of excel spreadsheets to do tracking and planning, actually very useful. And it's very motivational, at least for geeks. Simple system that's easy to track and optimize, a lot of handles to tweak, hacks and formulas. If you make diet into RPG, how bad could it be? Can't say I have weight problems (maybe yet), but I definitely want to at least try measuring and living with it sometime.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dinh

    The intro to the book really catches you - There's an old Wall Street tale: a tyro asks an old-timer, “How do you make money in the market.” The wise man answers, “Nothing could be simpler: buy low, sell high.” The beginner asks, “How can I learn to do that?” The sage responds, “Ahhhh…that takes a lifetime.” Simple doesn't mean easy. There is no magic secret to losing weight and keeping it off, just as there is no hidden key to instant wealth. Nonetheless, every year another crop of “magic diet” The intro to the book really catches you - There's an old Wall Street tale: a tyro asks an old-timer, “How do you make money in the market.” The wise man answers, “Nothing could be simpler: buy low, sell high.” The beginner asks, “How can I learn to do that?” The sage responds, “Ahhhh…that takes a lifetime.” Simple doesn't mean easy. There is no magic secret to losing weight and keeping it off, just as there is no hidden key to instant wealth. Nonetheless, every year another crop of “magic diet” and “secrets of investing” books appear on already-creaking shelves. The human capacity to ignore inconvenient facts and avoid unpleasantness is immense. Success in any endeavour requires coming to terms with the true nature of the task at hand and, if the goal is worth the effort, getting on with it. “How can I lose weight?” “Simple, eat less food than your body burns.” “How can I learn to do that?” Read this book. And John Walker is true to his word. The book is short and simple, with an analytical approach to dieting from an engineer's perspective that really made sense to me. The book gives you the tools you need to succeed, and it's been working out very well for me.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ken Doherty

    I read this book about the year 2000, and have used the weight tracking tool ever since. I really appreciate the way Mr. Walker has made it available to all who want to use it. I read a hard copy, but it is available, free, electronically. Out of the goodness of his heart, he maintains a website where I continue to log and track my weight. He and it have helped me. Plus, he has lots of other nifty things on his website.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    Read for the second time (at least; maybe third)... I've used it before, and most recently used its methods to get halfway to a weight loss goal. But I got lazy and started to plateau, so I read this again as a way to refresh my memory. It's all great stuff, especially if you're an engineer or statistician and you want to just cut all the mushy feelings stuff out of dieting and just get in control of your weight. Read for the second time (at least; maybe third)... I've used it before, and most recently used its methods to get halfway to a weight loss goal. But I got lazy and started to plateau, so I read this again as a way to refresh my memory. It's all great stuff, especially if you're an engineer or statistician and you want to just cut all the mushy feelings stuff out of dieting and just get in control of your weight.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Murdock

    Written by an engineer for engineers, apparently without the help of an editor. I'm an engineer and it was hard for me to not lose focus and skim over parts of this book, but(!) overall, I really liked his engineering approach to managing weight. He broke the problem down well and came up with very some simple, pragmatic, and effective tools (the hallmark of good engineering). Using moving averages (exponentially smoothed, no less) show weight trends and to keep the fluctuations in daily weight Written by an engineer for engineers, apparently without the help of an editor. I'm an engineer and it was hard for me to not lose focus and skim over parts of this book, but(!) overall, I really liked his engineering approach to managing weight. He broke the problem down well and came up with very some simple, pragmatic, and effective tools (the hallmark of good engineering). Using moving averages (exponentially smoothed, no less) show weight trends and to keep the fluctuations in daily weight from driving you nuts is genius. The fact that he provides Excel spreadsheets and Hacker Diet Online versions of his tools for free is a nice added bonus, and maybe a nod to non-engineers who might want to try out these no-nonsense techniques for losing and managing weight.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bruno Arine

    The difference between energy in and energy out dictates whether you are going to pile up fat our burn it; some people require less energy, some require more, but in the end, the universal laws of Thermodynamics won't change just because you have a lazy thyroid. Engineering can be summed up as the art of simplifying complex models, and the author accomplished that regarding human physiology in a quite elegant fashion in this book. By the end of the book you'll understand why counting calories, a The difference between energy in and energy out dictates whether you are going to pile up fat our burn it; some people require less energy, some require more, but in the end, the universal laws of Thermodynamics won't change just because you have a lazy thyroid. Engineering can be summed up as the art of simplifying complex models, and the author accomplished that regarding human physiology in a quite elegant fashion in this book. By the end of the book you'll understand why counting calories, although tedious, is the only dieting method which stands the test of time.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    A very nerdy way to approach dieting but exactly what I was looking for! Even though this plan allows you to ignore healthy foods and ignore exercise, he makes logical arguments to not do so and encourages you to look at the plan as a whole. There is a lot of work to do in the beginning to track calories and get in the habit of recording your weight every morning, but if you are the nerdy, computery, mathy, engineery, logical type and are looking to lose weight, this is it!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    The Hacker's Diet is the weight loss book for engineering types. Its recipe is really simple: If eat more calories than you burn, you will gain weight. To lose weight, you should eat less and exercise more. The chapter on Signal to Noise where he explains moving averages and daily calorie excess/deficit is inspirational. Keep track of your weight everyday but, rather than panicking every time you weight goes up a few ounces, focus on the moving average for more realistic feedback. If your weight t The Hacker's Diet is the weight loss book for engineering types. Its recipe is really simple: If eat more calories than you burn, you will gain weight. To lose weight, you should eat less and exercise more. The chapter on Signal to Noise where he explains moving averages and daily calorie excess/deficit is inspirational. Keep track of your weight everyday but, rather than panicking every time you weight goes up a few ounces, focus on the moving average for more realistic feedback. If your weight today is below the line, you get a green dot and you are good. If it's above the line, you ate too much yesterday and should be a bit more careful today. Your daily deficit is the difference between your calorie intake and the number of calories that you burn each day. A daily deficit of 500 means you will lose about a pound per week. Mr Walker wants us to count calories to figure out the deficit/excess but I've found that you can get really close by estimating it from your recent weight loss/gain. I wrote a little web app to keep track of it. If the number is red, you are gaining weight. If it's green you are losing weight. The most amazing thing is that the difference between gaining and losing is usually the difference of an extra can of Coke (190 cals) or side of french fries (320 cals).

  11. 4 out of 5

    Senthil Kumaran

    This is the first health book that I could not put down. This is the book that is helping me to manage my weight and my health. So, it is a life-saving book for me. I was worried about my weight gain, and my lack of time to do exercises. I have 2 kids now and have an hour commute to my work. Both of these leave me with very less time to do exercises regularly, and I was constantly feeling worried about weight gain. This book helped to break the problem into two. a) Managing Weight. b) Doing Exercis This is the first health book that I could not put down. This is the book that is helping me to manage my weight and my health. So, it is a life-saving book for me. I was worried about my weight gain, and my lack of time to do exercises. I have 2 kids now and have an hour commute to my work. Both of these leave me with very less time to do exercises regularly, and I was constantly feeling worried about weight gain. This book helped to break the problem into two. a) Managing Weight. b) Doing Exercises. For a), I completely understood how this can be controlled by paying attention to the Calorie intake. That' it. I adjusted my calories and I went back to -3KG within 3 weeks. I have goal to go -13 kgs further so that I can maintain my weight at a desirable number. I am into managing of my weight now. Once that is done, I know the need and utility value for exercises and I will able to make time for it to live for longer so that I could continue doing whatever I like. Rarely, self-help books have proved valuable to me. This the 2nd self-help book that I can say that, it has proved valuable to me and the concepts taught will remain with me for the rest of my life. Thank you, John Walker.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    I was listen to Krista Scott-Dixon speak on the Barbell Science podcast about how some health and nutrition clients want all the data and to track all the things. John Walker (co-creator of AutoCAD!) would be this kind of clients I suspect. Walker gives a feedback method for maintaining weight loss with a thermometer metaphor and a tiny bit of math (but if you want all the math he's got that too at the end of the book) Just think, there was a time before MyFitnessPal! You had to look up all the I was listen to Krista Scott-Dixon speak on the Barbell Science podcast about how some health and nutrition clients want all the data and to track all the things. John Walker (co-creator of AutoCAD!) would be this kind of clients I suspect. Walker gives a feedback method for maintaining weight loss with a thermometer metaphor and a tiny bit of math (but if you want all the math he's got that too at the end of the book) Just think, there was a time before MyFitnessPal! You had to look up all the calorie counts yourself! Maybe you kept track of things on paper! Anyway, I loved all the old school references. Maybe get a meal service instead of frozen meals, I hear they are pretty good. And like he says: the method that works for you is the method that works.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Gruia Novac

    promotes false information and incomplete information. ur better off reading some keto book

  14. 5 out of 5

    John Kirk

    There's a lot of good advice in this book, but it doesn't start offering direct instruction until p89 (out of 199), so it takes a few hours of reading to get to that point. By contrast, you can be up and running with WeightWatchers (online) in about 5 minutes. I started reading this book on his website a few years ago, but never finished it; now that it's available in epub format, I've actually been able to stick with it, because I can read it on the train etc. On my Sony Reader, it works pretty There's a lot of good advice in this book, but it doesn't start offering direct instruction until p89 (out of 199), so it takes a few hours of reading to get to that point. By contrast, you can be up and running with WeightWatchers (online) in about 5 minutes. I started reading this book on his website a few years ago, but never finished it; now that it's available in epub format, I've actually been able to stick with it, because I can read it on the train etc. On my Sony Reader, it works pretty well: the only problems are tables (e.g. his fitness ladder) and equations, which don't display properly. The author talks about "true weight", but doesn't say how he calculated it. If he just made the figures up, then came up with a trend formula that matches his fictitious numbers, that's not particularly useful. I do actually believe him, but it would work better with some kind of neutral verification. E.g. "we used calipers and my Excel formula, and the results match, so you can use this as a simple alternative to invasive procedures". Based on my own experience, I've found that his trend line (based on daily weight) is much better than the weekly weigh-in at WeightWatchers. My trend has consistently gone down over the past few months, whereas my weekly weight fluctuates, and I either get warnings that I'm losing weight too fast or condolences that I've been regaining weight. I read the 4th edition, which still talks about saving Excel files to a floppy disk. He explains how to do all the calculations on paper, and also talks about the Excel files that you can download from his website; unfortunately those were designed for an older version, so they don't work in Excel 2010. The good news is that he now has online tools on his website, so you don't need to use Excel or pen and paper; it's just a pity that he only mentions this as a "by the way" section at the very end of the book. Since the book is free, I don't want to sound ungrateful, but it would benefit from a more thorough overhaul. He advocates calorie counting, which is very similar to WeightWatchers. The main difference is that he considers all calories to be equal, whereas WW look at protein, carbohydrate, fat, and fibre.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    This book succeeds at being exactly what you would expect it to be. I had discovered the companion online weight tracking tool, which I used for a while before finally wondering "What is actually going on behind the scenes here?" So I read this book to find out. This is a no-frills, engineering approach to tracking and managing weight loss. The book is simply meant to describe the methodology, and it does just that. It was probably longer than necessary for my purposes, but I appreciate that Walk This book succeeds at being exactly what you would expect it to be. I had discovered the companion online weight tracking tool, which I used for a while before finally wondering "What is actually going on behind the scenes here?" So I read this book to find out. This is a no-frills, engineering approach to tracking and managing weight loss. The book is simply meant to describe the methodology, and it does just that. It was probably longer than necessary for my purposes, but I appreciate that Walker put in all of the information so that we, the readers, can choose to engage with as much of the minutiae as we so desire. I found this interesting and informative to understanding Walker's weight loss tool, and I would recommend it for that. But that is probably the extent of it; I can't imagine anyone else would find it of much interest or use.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Geoff Young

    About a decade ago I was 50 pounds overweight and my body was starting to complain. I lost 20 pounds on my own and then plateaued, figuring that was as good as it would get. Then I read this book and used the tools it provides to lose the remaining 30, which I have kept off ever since. There is no trick to this diet, which is best summarized as "eat only as many calories as you need." That's hardly novel, but what is novel is the author's presentation of the human body as a system of inputs and o About a decade ago I was 50 pounds overweight and my body was starting to complain. I lost 20 pounds on my own and then plateaued, figuring that was as good as it would get. Then I read this book and used the tools it provides to lose the remaining 30, which I have kept off ever since. There is no trick to this diet, which is best summarized as "eat only as many calories as you need." That's hardly novel, but what is novel is the author's presentation of the human body as a system of inputs and outputs. He turns weight loss into an engineering problem that can be solved by math. The book is written in straightforward language, with insights that seem obvious only after the fact. If it didn't save my life, it improved it a great deal, which isn't bad for a text that the author generously makes available for free.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jared

    An engineer's approach to diet: identify the problem, fix the problem, ensure that the problem never reappears. Energy in - energy burned - energy eliminated = fat stored or burned. Given that background, leave aside all the fluffy stuff and the fad diet books and get down to brass tacks and your ideal weight. And then he gives you the tools to make it happen. His computing tools are outdated -- who uses spreadsheets for behavior modification in the day of the smartphone? -- but it turns out there An engineer's approach to diet: identify the problem, fix the problem, ensure that the problem never reappears. Energy in - energy burned - energy eliminated = fat stored or burned. Given that background, leave aside all the fluffy stuff and the fad diet books and get down to brass tacks and your ideal weight. And then he gives you the tools to make it happen. His computing tools are outdated -- who uses spreadsheets for behavior modification in the day of the smartphone? -- but it turns out there are a bunch of apps out there that will do the same thing.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dustin

    A look at dieting and weight loss from an engineering perspective written by the creator of AutoCAD. For a book written by a software engineer and with that title you'd expect it to be a some dense tome but it's actually a pretty easy read. The book does a great job of explaining the central idea that weight loss can be looked at as engineering problem and what that means for losing excess weight and maintaining a goal weight afterwards. I'd definitely recommend anyone thinking about weight loss A look at dieting and weight loss from an engineering perspective written by the creator of AutoCAD. For a book written by a software engineer and with that title you'd expect it to be a some dense tome but it's actually a pretty easy read. The book does a great job of explaining the central idea that weight loss can be looked at as engineering problem and what that means for losing excess weight and maintaining a goal weight afterwards. I'd definitely recommend anyone thinking about weight loss to check it out.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Harsh Pareek

    Well motivated, but drags on far too long. However, this book was written pre-1990 and while the basic principles still hold, the book might not be current on some details. I like that he recommends a frozen/microwavable food diet. I independtly found that to be easiest to manage.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Emily Horsman

    A few solid points articulated in a perfect manner. However a lot of this book has dated concepts and some flawed conclusions and facts.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    Quite good. A plan for weight loss and maintenance based on engineering and rational thought, rather than some gimmick. Makes it seem like it's actually possible. Quite good. A plan for weight loss and maintenance based on engineering and rational thought, rather than some gimmick. Makes it seem like it's actually possible.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Miren

    Un enfoque "ingenieril" para perder peso. Curioso, pero interesante. Un enfoque "ingenieril" para perder peso. Curioso, pero interesante.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    2010.0201-2010.0204

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    I used this book to lose about 65 pounds.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    A bit maths-heavy for those of us with BA degrees but I've tried it before and the basic formula of eating less than you burn to lose weight is sensible. A bit maths-heavy for those of us with BA degrees but I've tried it before and the basic formula of eating less than you burn to lose weight is sensible.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    An engineer's perspective on how the body gains and loses weight. Well thought out and well written. An engineer's perspective on how the body gains and loses weight. Well thought out and well written.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dawid

    An engineer's take on dieting. Well written, entertaining and at the same time insightful. An engineer's take on dieting. Well written, entertaining and at the same time insightful.

  28. 4 out of 5

    David Cattarin

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brodie

  30. 4 out of 5

    Petr

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