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Fantastic Four (1961-1998) #9

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When the Fantastic Four announce bankruptcy, the Sub-Mariner offers them 1 million dollars to star in his own movie. As shooting begins, the team quickly learns that they've been tricked into fighting real foes, including the Sub-Mariner himself! Words and art by the legendary Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. When the Fantastic Four announce bankruptcy, the Sub-Mariner offers them 1 million dollars to star in his own movie. As shooting begins, the team quickly learns that they've been tricked into fighting real foes, including the Sub-Mariner himself! Words and art by the legendary Stan Lee and Jack Kirby.


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When the Fantastic Four announce bankruptcy, the Sub-Mariner offers them 1 million dollars to star in his own movie. As shooting begins, the team quickly learns that they've been tricked into fighting real foes, including the Sub-Mariner himself! Words and art by the legendary Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. When the Fantastic Four announce bankruptcy, the Sub-Mariner offers them 1 million dollars to star in his own movie. As shooting begins, the team quickly learns that they've been tricked into fighting real foes, including the Sub-Mariner himself! Words and art by the legendary Stan Lee and Jack Kirby.

30 review for Fantastic Four (1961-1998) #9

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sophia

    Namor becomes a movie producer! The Fantastic Four are broke and need money fast. They receive an invitation to star in a movie. When they go to Hollywood, they see the invitation was from Namor, the Sub-Mariner. But this was all part of his plan to defeat the Fantastic Four and marry Sue Storm! His plan is thwarted by Sue and the others (of course). Namor returns to the sea, defeated. Overall, a good comic if you want to read more about the individual powers of the FF and how they fight by them Namor becomes a movie producer! The Fantastic Four are broke and need money fast. They receive an invitation to star in a movie. When they go to Hollywood, they see the invitation was from Namor, the Sub-Mariner. But this was all part of his plan to defeat the Fantastic Four and marry Sue Storm! His plan is thwarted by Sue and the others (of course). Namor returns to the sea, defeated. Overall, a good comic if you want to read more about the individual powers of the FF and how they fight by themselves.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    The Fantastic Four have overextended their finances and are in dire straits! They need to sell off equipment to pay off debt and need to make money quickly to not end up out on the street! This gives the Sub-Mariner an opportunity to defeat the FF once and for all! This is a pretty silly story overall. Sub-Mariner’s master plan is to off the FF a million dollars to make a movie, and during the supposed filming he will defeat the men and take Sue as his own. Except for a straight-up fist fight wit The Fantastic Four have overextended their finances and are in dire straits! They need to sell off equipment to pay off debt and need to make money quickly to not end up out on the street! This gives the Sub-Mariner an opportunity to defeat the FF once and for all! This is a pretty silly story overall. Sub-Mariner’s master plan is to off the FF a million dollars to make a movie, and during the supposed filming he will defeat the men and take Sue as his own. Except for a straight-up fist fight with the Thing, the individual plans he has are also kind of silly - he sets up Mister Fantastic to fight a Cyclops, and the Human Torch to battle an African tribe that’s immune to fire. I suppose the ‘magic vs. technology’ idea is kind of interesting, but the conflicts themselves weren’t. There are some concepts here that are introduced for the first time and end up being kind of intriguing. The idea that superheroes have bills to pay and regular upkeep on their equipment is kind of eye-opening. I’m not sure Batman ever talked about doing an oil change on the Batmobile, or Superman worried about what the heating cost of the Fortress of Solitude came to. Reed actually talks about investing money and losing it in the stock market, and having to pay for equipment and rent, etc. It’s interesting that they have everyday costs and chores - it makes them more relatable and understandable to the common reader. On the other side of the coin, Namor is able to purchase his movie studio from plundering shipwrecks and hidden pirate treasure. He doesn’t have to work for his money and it all amounts to ill-gotten gains - kind of makes him even more the villain in this story. We also get to see Alicia Masters again this issue for a few panels and she has a positive effect on the Thing when he’s upset. She not only calms him down, but gets him thinking about things. She’s a nice character that will make a difference in his character going forward. While certainly not my favorite in these early issues, it does introduce some interesting concepts that Marvel will keep throughout the years.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Renate Rebolledo

    4 estrellitas solo porque me cae bien Namor

  4. 4 out of 5

    Noah White

    FANTASTIC FOUR #1-10 (The Fantastic Four’s First Arc) It is a very clever misnomer that Stan Lee, in his breakthrough creation, decided to name this the Fantastic Four. After all, the defining thematic arc of this story is that like any family these four are dysfunctional to the point there is a constant possibility of collapse. It works as a metaphor for the fact that, despite this group having incredible flaws and imperfections, they are still fantastic all the same. The story is an effectively FANTASTIC FOUR #1-10 (The Fantastic Four’s First Arc) It is a very clever misnomer that Stan Lee, in his breakthrough creation, decided to name this the Fantastic Four. After all, the defining thematic arc of this story is that like any family these four are dysfunctional to the point there is a constant possibility of collapse. It works as a metaphor for the fact that, despite this group having incredible flaws and imperfections, they are still fantastic all the same. The story is an effectively symbolic condemnation of the mythic suburban family dynamic of the 1950s, introducing a more realistic definition of a familial unit. It is not a flawless uniform system, but an incredibly nuanced set of intricate relationships hanging by a thread. It is quite a radical notion in its time of intense conservatism. It is fascinating to consider this story works as one of the early examples of non-linear storytelling, arguably an innovator in that style. It certainly works as an effective way of guiding the story's structural arc, as it first thrusts us into a situation that effectively establishes the tone, then jumps back in time to introduce the characters and their motivations. It's very mysterious; by refusing to immediately tell us who these people are, it effectively stimulates interest in their motivations and defining attributes. Here is where Stan Lee really gets to shine as a writer of dialogue. Each line of dialogue is tailor made to the individual who says it. You can tell from behavior in the speech and annunciation if the highly articulate Reed Richards is speaking or the disgruntled huffing Ben Grimm. It makes the story and its characters that much more immersive and real. The only real flaw with this aspect is just that the fight scenes have more talking than they should. I don’t know many people who go on a 5 sentence monologues every individual time they punch somebody in the face, but it certainly happens here. But ignoring the fight scenes being overly talky, the pure dialogue scenes among the family unit are truly something to marvel and almost null the affects of this. It is noteworthy that he introduced a process that fundamentally redefined the genre of comic books, by having the artist draw the illustrations first and drawing the dialogue after. It allowed for better visual storytelling and dialogue made to naturally fit that, and it informed the pacing of the dialogue to better fit with the pacing of the images.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Lutz

    Strange. Not bad, but strange. Sub-Mariner’s attempt to destroy the FF under the guise of a film project apparently still makes a better movie than any attempts in reality so far.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Danielinchi

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nickey

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dave Brown

  9. 4 out of 5

    Evan

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  11. 5 out of 5

    Bob

  12. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  13. 5 out of 5

    Koh1321

  14. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tomaz

  16. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

  17. 5 out of 5

    Carmela Valencia

  18. 5 out of 5

    Janina

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ethan

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dennis Schvejda

  21. 4 out of 5

    robinwritesallthethings

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kyriakigait

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  24. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

  25. 4 out of 5

    Joey Harris

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey Collins

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ada Machado

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rafael Sampaio

  29. 5 out of 5

    Marvin

  30. 4 out of 5

    Stefania

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