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30 review for The Urban Monk: Eastern Wisdom and Modern Hacks to Stop Time and Find Success, Happiness, and Peace

  1. 4 out of 5

    JDK1962

    I liked this, but I found the authorial presence a bit wearing as the book progressed. There's some really good observations and advice, then there's some stuff that just made me say "wha....?". Just for some context, I'm a skeptic by nature, but am still meditating and doing yoga in the spirit of hope. :) Anyway, I think I got some ideas out of this, and I definitely think he's pointed in the right direction. Unfortunately, his BS filter is (IMHO) set on "Oprah" so exercise some due diligence. I liked this, but I found the authorial presence a bit wearing as the book progressed. There's some really good observations and advice, then there's some stuff that just made me say "wha....?". Just for some context, I'm a skeptic by nature, but am still meditating and doing yoga in the spirit of hope. :) Anyway, I think I got some ideas out of this, and I definitely think he's pointed in the right direction. Unfortunately, his BS filter is (IMHO) set on "Oprah" so exercise some due diligence. One example is in the resource section, where he recommends Centerpointe Research; a quick Google search turned up reviews/articles (at scambust.org, beyondgrowth.net, and others) that would make me think pretty hard and do a hell of a lot more research and looking for alternatives before I turn over hundreds of dollars to these guys. People who don't want to read (about) four letter words should stop reading now. I had a Norwegian colleague a number of years ago who used to swear inappropriately. Apparently, when he learned his English (which was very good), he learned to wildly overuse various curse words, and instead of being used for emphasis, they just felt random. That's what this book seemed like to me: casual use of curse words that feels off-putting at first, and then as you progress through the book, is even more off-putting. And I don't even consider myself someone who is put off by coarse language (certainly not by sh-t or f-ck). An example from p. 160: "Sure, getting into the wild is awesome, but let's face it: We've all got jobs and shit to do in town." I would think the an "urban monk," rather than doing "shit" in town (implying things of little intrinsic value) would be better served by finding a way of cutting out those worthless tasks. The emphasis provided by "shit" is just weird. If he had said "We've all got jobs and things to do in town," there's no judgement of the tasks being done in town. Of course, this could just be me being picky...but I felt it was either a strange use of the word, or just the way he talks and he wanted to carry that into his writing for some reason ("Yo, I'm gonna f-ck your sh-t up, homes.").

  2. 5 out of 5

    Doug

    This wasn't horrible, just not very enlightening either - mainly a lot of the same generic self-help stuff that has been recycled ad nauseum. The 'woo-woo' is kept to a minimum though (other than a few shout outs to ayahuasca and shamanism!) and there are some links to his website that are helpful. Two minor complaints...for a spiritually enlightened guy, he uses 'shit', 'crap' (and even a couple of f-bombs) a lot! Secondly, whenever he is talking about Urban Monks he uses feminine pronouns, whi This wasn't horrible, just not very enlightening either - mainly a lot of the same generic self-help stuff that has been recycled ad nauseum. The 'woo-woo' is kept to a minimum though (other than a few shout outs to ayahuasca and shamanism!) and there are some links to his website that are helpful. Two minor complaints...for a spiritually enlightened guy, he uses 'shit', 'crap' (and even a couple of f-bombs) a lot! Secondly, whenever he is talking about Urban Monks he uses feminine pronouns, which I initially thought nice ...until he switched to male pronouns on the chapter about money ...sexism much? Why not just use gender non-specific ones instead (i.e., they, their)?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jaclyn Day

    This is one of many in a long list of Buddhist-style self help books available now. It’s not the best, and it’s not the most memorable, and often it can feel more like scrolling a well-edited Pinterest feed rather than reading a book. But—and this is a big but—if you need a reminder to slow down and practice self-care, there is no better cheerleader than Shojai. From sleep to exercise to eating to meditation, Shojai continually reinforces the importance of stress management. If this means cuttin This is one of many in a long list of Buddhist-style self help books available now. It’s not the best, and it’s not the most memorable, and often it can feel more like scrolling a well-edited Pinterest feed rather than reading a book. But—and this is a big but—if you need a reminder to slow down and practice self-care, there is no better cheerleader than Shojai. From sleep to exercise to eating to meditation, Shojai continually reinforces the importance of stress management. If this means cutting back on intense exercise, so be it. If this means sleeping an extra hour or two, fine. Still, the book is merely good, not great, and you can probably glean the same information from Shojai's recent promo interviews.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

    I couldn't finish this book. While the scientific benefits of meditation are well-documented, and I can abide the religious mysticism wrappings even if I don't believe in them, I found the anti-science nonsense (e.g., dangers of GMOs and promotion of "detox" treatments) unpalatable. Even Dalai Lama XIV proclaimed, “If scientific analysis were conclusively to demonstrate certain claims in Buddhism to be false, then we must accept the findings of science and abandon those claims.” I couldn't finish this book. While the scientific benefits of meditation are well-documented, and I can abide the religious mysticism wrappings even if I don't believe in them, I found the anti-science nonsense (e.g., dangers of GMOs and promotion of "detox" treatments) unpalatable. Even Dalai Lama XIV proclaimed, “If scientific analysis were conclusively to demonstrate certain claims in Buddhism to be false, then we must accept the findings of science and abandon those claims.”

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Booth

    There is a lot of good insight in this book and its worth it for that but the hip know it all tone of the author is off-putting. He brags an awful lot too which makes you wonder about the validity of the Buddhist part, but if you can get past his presence and just pay attention to the history stories and advice, then you might learn something. Try and get past his sanctimoniousness and just focus on what is left.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Candice

    I received this book through a Goodreads giveaway. Pedram Shojai, the creator of well.org, has written a self-help book that combines Eastern wisdom, practices, and medicine with what he calls “modern hacks” to help readers achieve balance, peace, and happiness in their lives. Each chapter focuses on a different aspect of life, including stress, money, time, sleep, and diet. Each chapter opens with a case study based on Shojai’s clients, presenting their need for change and improvement in a partic I received this book through a Goodreads giveaway. Pedram Shojai, the creator of well.org, has written a self-help book that combines Eastern wisdom, practices, and medicine with what he calls “modern hacks” to help readers achieve balance, peace, and happiness in their lives. Each chapter focuses on a different aspect of life, including stress, money, time, sleep, and diet. Each chapter opens with a case study based on Shojai’s clients, presenting their need for change and improvement in a particular area of life. The author then proceeds to break down the problem into smaller categories, and offer “urban monk wisdom”, which are ways that anyone can affect change in each specific area and achieve more peace and balance in their life. Many practical solutions are described, including meditation, exercise, and lifestyle changes. The author includes a personal anecdote in each chapter as well, entitled “Personal Journeys”, which serves as an example of how he has overcome the challenge presented in the chapter. Each chapter concludes with the action plan of the client introduced at the beginning of the chapter, and a bit of a followup of how successful they were. One of the most useful aspects of the book is the resources section at the back. There are several video links per chapter that demonstrate specific exercises and meditation practices. The videos I accessed were short, and of good quality. There are also links to other resources that the author has used to support his work and his writing. Some of the material presented in the book are common sense, but some, especially for readers unfamiliar with Eastern medicine and meditation practices, will seem like novel ideas (even though they’re ancient) and may help some readers view their challenges in a new way, and give additional avenues to wellness and wholeness. I found the tone of the author’s writing to be encouraging, if at times self-inflated. It must be difficult to write a book encouraging people to join you on a path to wellness without making it sounds like you have all the answers and this is really the only way to go about it. Unfortunately, that is sometimes the feeling I got reading this book. It seemed that big promises were made, for example, “this exercise will …” (p. 19) What if this exercise doesn’t do it for me? Have I failed? How can I believe that the next exercise might do what it should? He also claims in several places throughout the book to have helped “thousands” of people, which is impressive, until he stated on page 115 that he spends “thousands of hours a month on the phone”. There are only 730 hours in each month. Are they both exaggerations, and how can I take the previous claim seriously? Also, if you are sensitive to profanity being used in a work of non-fiction, beware. The author uses the word “shit” and “bullshit” liberally, sometimes twice on a page. Although those words are not particularly offensive to me, I believe they should be reserved for emphasis in works of fiction. In a work of non-fiction, like a self-help book that is probably meant to reach people of a variety of ages and backgrounds, I think the use of such words diminishes the message and reduces the credibility of the author. Much like the excessive use of the word “stuff” would. What meaning do those words hold? It actually makes me question the author’s education. The author also uses the “f-word” several times, for example, “we’ve been sitting in those f___ing chairs ...” (p. 110) Do those chairs really need that much emphasis? I was put off by this, and each time I came to another offensive word, and there are many of them, unfortunately the author’s credibility crumbled a bit more for me. Overall, though, the messages and practices presented in The Urban Monk are accessible, intriguing and manageable. The author sums it up well in the last chapter with a very encouraging invitation to readers to set their own path in a manageable way, with hope that change can occur, resulting in a calm and balanced life. There are lots of choices offered in this book, and anyone who reads it will likely be intrigued by at least one, if not many, of the ways to affect change in their own life.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Wow. This book is a steaming pile of horse ****. That's not to say there aren't good points in this book, but man, this book a sham. Some things, like promoting vegetarianism and the benefits of eating lean protein (contradictions) or telling you to engage with your old hobbies (even after years of neglect) but throw away that tennis racket that's been sitting in the garage for years, are just blatant. Other things are far more subtle. The guy uses some classic con tricks, such as "In this field Wow. This book is a steaming pile of horse ****. That's not to say there aren't good points in this book, but man, this book a sham. Some things, like promoting vegetarianism and the benefits of eating lean protein (contradictions) or telling you to engage with your old hobbies (even after years of neglect) but throw away that tennis racket that's been sitting in the garage for years, are just blatant. Other things are far more subtle. The guy uses some classic con tricks, such as "In this field there are a lot of phonies and con artists, but not me! I'm the real deal!" and a constant partial appeal to authority (how many times does he list 'exciting' research being done by Dr. X and A, B and C). This guy is just casting as wide of a net as possible to try and catch as many readers as possible with a point or two they already agree on and then sell them on his company's services. He is promoting consumerism through asceticism and enlightenment. Sure there was stuff I agreed with, yes there was a bunch of stuff I think is new age garbage (he doesn't explicitly suggest that you buy this piece of tubing with some LEDs and a dial but he comes close), but I never felt like he had a consistent, non-apologetic solution based on my positive actions aside from, 'meditate more and do what Dr. Oz and every other self-help book says to do'. Eat less garbage, exercise more, find work-life balance. Thanks. I didn't realize those were the things I was missing. Where's the 'eastern' wisdom in that (way to continue to use those cultural biases and memes that you so strongly disapprove of)? I wouldn't recommend this book to anyone.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mary Drayer

    A MUST read....Some good healthful tips- breathing techniques, turning off your cell devices, eating healthier, “grounding” yourself, and even resources to help you get into BALANCE! You can take a chapter at a time or skip around....

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    This book seems targeted at people who consider Tai Chi and Chai Tea to be equally mysterious.... I chose this book primarily because of how polarized a lot of the reviews for it were.... Rather than having a love-it or hate-it reaction, though, I was left feeling just kind of 'meh' towards it.... The profanity wasn't distracting to me. The 'insights' didn't change my world. It wasn't great. It wasn't horrible. It was just... ok. There were quite a few parts of the book where things were discussed This book seems targeted at people who consider Tai Chi and Chai Tea to be equally mysterious.... I chose this book primarily because of how polarized a lot of the reviews for it were.... Rather than having a love-it or hate-it reaction, though, I was left feeling just kind of 'meh' towards it.... The profanity wasn't distracting to me. The 'insights' didn't change my world. It wasn't great. It wasn't horrible. It was just... ok. There were quite a few parts of the book where things were discussed with a bit more authority and confidence than they probably deserved... Scientific and medical claims really should include footnotes, if they are to be included at all.... I think that was the only thing that really annoyed me throughout the book. The author didn't do a very good job of establishing himself as someone with a scientific background, so when he mentions gut-flora, mitochondria, etc., I question those claims more than when he is discussing qigong, kung-fu, or meditation.... As long as the book is read with an understanding of where the author's coming from and you use a bit of critical thinking, it's a decent enough book. Perhaps my opinion of it will change later down the road, but for now I give it a solid 2.5.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kelly L Arnold

    There is good information in this book and good ideas to take into practice. However, the book itself was full of distracting tangents. Sometimes so much would happen between the case study at the beginning of the chapter that by the time he went to wrap up the results at the end, I'd completely forgotten who he was talking about and what their issues were. The main thing that drove me crazy while reading this book was the unnecessary use of shit, fuck, and hell. Seriously? This book could be a There is good information in this book and good ideas to take into practice. However, the book itself was full of distracting tangents. Sometimes so much would happen between the case study at the beginning of the chapter that by the time he went to wrap up the results at the end, I'd completely forgotten who he was talking about and what their issues were. The main thing that drove me crazy while reading this book was the unnecessary use of shit, fuck, and hell. Seriously? This book could be a good resource to all ages, but I felt like the writer was dropping curse words just to drop them. The first few uses seemed to be used for emphasis, but then it was just too frequent and I'm a frequent user of these words myself! Just did a search for the number of times each word was used: shit - 58 Fuck - 6 Hell - 19 Damn - 2. This is far too frequent to appeal to the masses and it is certainly not something I will recommend for my kids to read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cindy Heaton

    There are some great tips in here. I was actually loving the book until the author starting writing about herbal remedies. I have nothing against those, I use supplements all the time. However, I am skeptical about asking a plant what uses it can be used for and expecting an answer. Yup. He lost me there. Of course the Shaman's that he's referring to are probably high when they do this, but yeah, I'll pass on that. I'll still keep the book, because there is a lot of other helpful information in There are some great tips in here. I was actually loving the book until the author starting writing about herbal remedies. I have nothing against those, I use supplements all the time. However, I am skeptical about asking a plant what uses it can be used for and expecting an answer. Yup. He lost me there. Of course the Shaman's that he's referring to are probably high when they do this, but yeah, I'll pass on that. I'll still keep the book, because there is a lot of other helpful information in here to keep everything balanced if you apply it. I'd still recommend it, just be aware there are some out there ideas. The saner suggestions far outweigh those though.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Zhivko Kabaivanov

    The Urban Monk (2016) is a field guide for how to navigate modern life with a more monk-like mentality. Drawing on Eastern spiritual traditions, contemporary science, and the lives of our ancestors, it’s packed full of practical tips on how we can integrate ancient wisdom into our modern lifestyles. It addresses a wide range of personal problems, including stress, unhealthy diets, and a lack of time, energy, and sense of purpose.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kristopher Kerwin

    Some interesting points but a lot of it didn't connect with me. The writer will help you with insomnia, weight excess, debt, low energy or lack of time. If your life is already well balanced and you don't have major problems, this book might not be for you. Some interesting points but a lot of it didn't connect with me. The writer will help you with insomnia, weight excess, debt, low energy or lack of time. If your life is already well balanced and you don't have major problems, this book might not be for you.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sue King

    Didn't really resonate with me. I wanted to like it, but I felt this book lacked focus. I am glad there are resources at the end including links to videos because trying to explain certain meditation practices via the written word is hard to process. For me anyway. Didn't really resonate with me. I wanted to like it, but I felt this book lacked focus. I am glad there are resources at the end including links to videos because trying to explain certain meditation practices via the written word is hard to process. For me anyway.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brandi D'angelo

    This quote from the book kind of sums up our collective health problem: "There's something happening in our modern times. Something is wrong. We scratch our heads and wonder why everyone is tired, sick, unhappy, and out of energy. We do this while we eat processed muffins, drink dairy from a sick cow, take mood drugs, breathe in lead as we cross the street, and slather on creams that are filled with chemicals we can't pronounce." The Urban Monk is chock full of ideas for addressing our stressful, This quote from the book kind of sums up our collective health problem: "There's something happening in our modern times. Something is wrong. We scratch our heads and wonder why everyone is tired, sick, unhappy, and out of energy. We do this while we eat processed muffins, drink dairy from a sick cow, take mood drugs, breathe in lead as we cross the street, and slather on creams that are filled with chemicals we can't pronounce." The Urban Monk is chock full of ideas for addressing our stressful, sleepless, unhealthy, unsocial and anti-natural lives. I think everyone can find something to help them in this book and I like how he devotes the last chapter to giving you a last push to get going. Isn't that where most of us fail to launch? We all know what we need to do, but we don't do it. Overall, I liked this book very much. I would've given it 5 stars, but I didn't care for his liberal use of certain cuss words, which were unnecessary.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Easy to read, several bits of practical advice, and chapter length was palatable. Some of the sections were laden in profane language which is odd considering the author was a monk. There wasn't much in the way of advice on the motivation and keeping consistent with the exercises and other changes despite plenty of examples of positive results of people who stuck with the changes recommended to them. Seems to be an inconsistency there of how they recommend making changes but don't offer solid adv Easy to read, several bits of practical advice, and chapter length was palatable. Some of the sections were laden in profane language which is odd considering the author was a monk. There wasn't much in the way of advice on the motivation and keeping consistent with the exercises and other changes despite plenty of examples of positive results of people who stuck with the changes recommended to them. Seems to be an inconsistency there of how they recommend making changes but don't offer solid advice on how to stick with the plan.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    Not much new here if you follow a primal / paleo lifestyle. The exercises are helpful. I agree with others that the use of foul language feels stilted and manufactured. I certainly do my fair share of swearing but I think an urban monk should be above that. IMHO the terms "sh!t" and "bullsh!t" we're overused and distracted from the message in the book. Worth a read if you are struggling with life. If you have your sh!t together already, not so much (pun intended). Not much new here if you follow a primal / paleo lifestyle. The exercises are helpful. I agree with others that the use of foul language feels stilted and manufactured. I certainly do my fair share of swearing but I think an urban monk should be above that. IMHO the terms "sh!t" and "bullsh!t" we're overused and distracted from the message in the book. Worth a read if you are struggling with life. If you have your sh!t together already, not so much (pun intended).

  18. 4 out of 5

    Zermeena

    While the author made some good points, I found it very difficult to relate them to my life. Perhaps this book is aimed at millennials, but it certainly wasn't for me. Towards the end he became repetitive. His science was shaky at best and the use of profanity was appalling. I couldn't help but think that it goes against the Buddhist doctrine of right speech. Which then lead me to wonder what kind of training he had. While the author made some good points, I found it very difficult to relate them to my life. Perhaps this book is aimed at millennials, but it certainly wasn't for me. Towards the end he became repetitive. His science was shaky at best and the use of profanity was appalling. I couldn't help but think that it goes against the Buddhist doctrine of right speech. Which then lead me to wonder what kind of training he had.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Drobg62

    Just ok Based on other reviews this book appears helpful to many but for me there was simply very little new information.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Gerardo Vales C.

    A lot of helpful tips about meditation, fitness and human growth. The author does a good job by trying to bring peace and guidence to your busy lifestyle.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Reising

    I took my time, tried to experiment, and asked myself a lot of questions while reading each chapter in this book. It is a very good general overview of a healthy lifestyle, and the last chapter contains a wonderful synopsis of each area of focus. The author apparently has a deep background in various eastern health practices, and there is something to be gained from the perspective he has on all the subjects he tackles in the book, whether or not one buys into every philosophy. The challenge for I took my time, tried to experiment, and asked myself a lot of questions while reading each chapter in this book. It is a very good general overview of a healthy lifestyle, and the last chapter contains a wonderful synopsis of each area of focus. The author apparently has a deep background in various eastern health practices, and there is something to be gained from the perspective he has on all the subjects he tackles in the book, whether or not one buys into every philosophy. The challenge for the reader who wants to improve his/her health is to determine which area is in most need of focus first for them individually. Anyone who tries to cover every aspect simultaneously will get overwhelmed. For me, there are some solid ideas to implement - I love the 100-day gong ideas, the exercises he outlines for meditation and breathing, the concepts of being in tune with nature and getting rid of excess things we do not need. Maybe it's just because I am into it, but I feel a real change in the air in the society of friends and neighbors I have, to go in this direction - almost like more people are genuinely getting tired of advertising BS (even in medicine) and too much technology that clouds our brains and relationships. I listened to the author speak for 45 minutes on a webinar offered by the functional medicine clinic I attend, and was impressed enough to pick up this book, as well as "Focus" - which I'll read next. I liked this book, despite the too-often use of coarse language, (because I don't speak in those terms). He wasn't like that on the webinar, but I think in the book it simply underscores his personality and passion, and it didn't bother me enough to keep me from getting the concepts he wrote about. In the end I am increasingly attracted to and fascinated by "eastern" ways of thinking holistically about health, and this book was a solid step in gaining more understanding. From here, picking certain aspects and going deeper appears to be the path. One has to be willing to experiment with patience and dedication. I don't consider myself "an urban monk" (yes, that terminology was corny, although, for him authentic) - but I'd definitely like to become more balanced and grounded in applying healthy principles.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jnunham

    I really enjoyed reading this book. I've adopted several of the techniques discussed in this book (pomodoro technique, barefoot walking, going by candlelight at night, etc.), and feel like it has helped improve my inner peace and overall relationship with life. Each chapter starts out with a description of one of his clients and the struggles they were encountering in their life. The rest of the chapter goes on to explain various techniques that can be used to deal with the problems mentioned th I really enjoyed reading this book. I've adopted several of the techniques discussed in this book (pomodoro technique, barefoot walking, going by candlelight at night, etc.), and feel like it has helped improve my inner peace and overall relationship with life. Each chapter starts out with a description of one of his clients and the struggles they were encountering in their life. The rest of the chapter goes on to explain various techniques that can be used to deal with the problems mentioned through Urban Monk Wisdom, Modern Hacks, etc. Also scattered throughout the chapters are blocks of "Personal Journey" stories that the author experienced. I didn't really find these useful and they often showed up in weird places on the pages that made following the sentences difficult. Initially I had a hard time getting through the first chapter or so, because the author talked about themself quite a bit and in a fashion that seemed arrogant to me. This doesn't last throughout the book, but may be something that stops people from reading the book further. There are also some suggestions thrown in about taking different types of supplements, drinking kombucha, etc. The author does suggest consulting with a medical professional throughout some of these suggestions, but someone who is misinformed may take his advice without talking to a doctor and end up getting sick. I would encourage everyone to do their own research on the health benefit claims the things he suggests throughout the book have and talk to their doctor before starting any of them. Overall, this is a positive book and is full of encouraging advice everyone can use to improve their life. If you go in to it with an open mind and do your own research on the claims made, you will enjoy this book.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jean de Oliveira Quevedo

    This book offer the idea that middle to upper class western urban people can improve their life by adopting the concept of a Urban Monk, someone that despite all the rush can attain the balance of a mythical eastern monk . Analysing several cases of modern urban routine, the author identifies the problems of a life that is always on the rush, such as addiction to information and nomofobia; irregular eating habits and industrialized food; low sleep and sedentary routine. As this book was released This book offer the idea that middle to upper class western urban people can improve their life by adopting the concept of a Urban Monk, someone that despite all the rush can attain the balance of a mythical eastern monk . Analysing several cases of modern urban routine, the author identifies the problems of a life that is always on the rush, such as addiction to information and nomofobia; irregular eating habits and industrialized food; low sleep and sedentary routine. As this book was released in 2016 these informations on how this rushing and unmindfull way of life is bad to our health are pretty familiar to most people, so in this aspect I would say Pedram doesn't tell us anything new. To solve the problems of all this unwholesome way of life he advises about having a mindfull attitude, using real life cases and showing practices that, allegadly, are a mix of modern meditation techniques with the wisdom from Taoism and Qigong, in adittion to some obscure herbalism and traditional medicine. It's hard to really know if all the references he make on the chemical processes of the body and the properties of the plants are true if you are not a doctor or scientist yourself. The suggestion of being a Urban Monk is very apealing, but it can give a frivolous idea about monasticism and being a urban person: you might think that monks don't get stressed or sick from time to time, or that urban people cannot be enlightened...yet, I really like the "urban monk" thing, it gives you power. I only fear that this narrative is just a way to sell courses over the internet. Taking this book with a proper view can be really helpful if you are fighting bad habits and want to improve your well being. Use it as a guide but don't take it too seriously.

  24. 4 out of 5

    William Gorman

    I really enjoyed the format of this book. The author gives a description of someone’s life, explains the problems that exist within that life, discusses the ancient monk wisdom that relates to that problem and then translates it into modern language so that we can all become Urban Monks. When I read this book again I will make sure I buy a paper copy of the book and read it with a pen so I can underline phrases that speak to me and make notes in it. I will also stop at each meditative practice a I really enjoyed the format of this book. The author gives a description of someone’s life, explains the problems that exist within that life, discusses the ancient monk wisdom that relates to that problem and then translates it into modern language so that we can all become Urban Monks. When I read this book again I will make sure I buy a paper copy of the book and read it with a pen so I can underline phrases that speak to me and make notes in it. I will also stop at each meditative practice and take time to work on and develop each practice before moving on to the next one. This is a great read in general but is also a great reference book as life goes on. Here are some major things that stuck with me the first time through. You are what you eat. This applies to more than just food Meditation is an operating system. Not an app. Life is Kung Fu!! And the reason for 4 stars instead of 5 was ... The only thing that I didn’t really need was the colorful language throughout the book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rianto Dermawan

    Sometimes we are looking for ways to live life with peace of mind and soul. Regardless of any religious worship that is performed ritually does not live up to expectations. Then we look for other methods or therapies or ideas that can be enlightening, self-improvement to find the true meaning of our lives. Pedram Shojam provides this alternative through this book. In fact, we really understand this phenomenon, especially if you have lived your life for up to 50 years. Like repeating a lesson tha Sometimes we are looking for ways to live life with peace of mind and soul. Regardless of any religious worship that is performed ritually does not live up to expectations. Then we look for other methods or therapies or ideas that can be enlightening, self-improvement to find the true meaning of our lives. Pedram Shojam provides this alternative through this book. In fact, we really understand this phenomenon, especially if you have lived your life for up to 50 years. Like repeating a lesson that we have memorized but that is how life goes on, we cannot escape the burden of problems. Body, soul and mind are unstable, like a cellphone battery that always has to be recharged. Reading this book is like recharging oneself, but this book is more aimed at young professionals, urban groups who are pursuing a career, status, life style. It is very useful as a reference to reflect on yourself when you face stresses that interfere with routine life.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Angela Alfonso

    ''When u seek enlightenment turn to the enlightened. '' This book was about fixing and changing one's life. Don't expect new, bright, wow ideas. The ideas in this book, are in many self-help books with proven success. But nonetheless, broken down into 10 Big Ideas I enjoyed reading the book. I will definitely try the GONG method (the committed practice of personal internal work). A takeaway from this book, you don't have to be in the perfect place to be able to meditate or exercise etc. Build a ''When u seek enlightenment turn to the enlightened. '' This book was about fixing and changing one's life. Don't expect new, bright, wow ideas. The ideas in this book, are in many self-help books with proven success. But nonetheless, broken down into 10 Big Ideas I enjoyed reading the book. I will definitely try the GONG method (the committed practice of personal internal work). A takeaway from this book, you don't have to be in the perfect place to be able to meditate or exercise etc. Build a holistic temple of life eg in the office, have a lifting weight and use when on a call. Hug a tree, lie on the grass, get out into nature. It's the operating system ( your body) that matters. I never understand why when writing a book, profanity words have to be used but maybe the author was trying to say 'hey this is me and I am real'

  27. 5 out of 5

    QUINNS

    You are urged to tackle problems that afflict people today with some simple hacks. The handful of techniques and exercises originated from our ancestors and ancient Eastern spiritual traditions. Get enough sleep at night by turning off your electronic light sources and getting in touch with nature by doing outdoor activities, alone or with other people. This book could help you sleep, exercise, socialise better and spend more time in nature. It also talks about Kungfu, qigong, and meditation in You are urged to tackle problems that afflict people today with some simple hacks. The handful of techniques and exercises originated from our ancestors and ancient Eastern spiritual traditions. Get enough sleep at night by turning off your electronic light sources and getting in touch with nature by doing outdoor activities, alone or with other people. This book could help you sleep, exercise, socialise better and spend more time in nature. It also talks about Kungfu, qigong, and meditation in raw details. These exercises will affirm us into feeling more energetic, overcoming stress, slowing down time, and developing a sense of purpose. Finally, looking out for your diet is also part of being an Urban Monk. Eat more slowly and savour the food benefits your body and mind. This book also recommends integrating soups, stews, and congees into your meal rotation to improve your diet.

  28. 4 out of 5

    ☯ 愛 ঝামেলা جميلة 美 ☮

    I'm giving this 3 stars because it took me forever to get myself to finish. You know how many library fines I had to pay for this. But then again, maybe it was worth it, because today was a good day to get this advice. I originally picked this book up because on my own, I had come up with the term "Urban Monk" because as a Muslim that's how I feel. Trying to lead a good and upright life, while still maintaining contact with society, as much as I don't want to at times. If you read it, I would pr I'm giving this 3 stars because it took me forever to get myself to finish. You know how many library fines I had to pay for this. But then again, maybe it was worth it, because today was a good day to get this advice. I originally picked this book up because on my own, I had come up with the term "Urban Monk" because as a Muslim that's how I feel. Trying to lead a good and upright life, while still maintaining contact with society, as much as I don't want to at times. If you read it, I would probably just go with the last couple of chapters, since it sums it all up pretty nicely. Maybe, it was just the action-overload that fried up my brain. But, yes, working on the particular areas that you are struggling in is probably always the best place to start.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Carielyn Mills

    too esoteric for me. every chapter starts with how terribly everyone is living, and that takes up most of each chapter before concluding with 'take this herb' or 'meditate' or other dumb shit like 'get earthing sheets' (?!!?). look, we get it. stressful jobs and poor choices of entertainment after work aren't healthy. you don't have to keep repeating the same scenario with a different person's name EVERY chapter. it took me forever to finish this because i was uninterested most of the time and h too esoteric for me. every chapter starts with how terribly everyone is living, and that takes up most of each chapter before concluding with 'take this herb' or 'meditate' or other dumb shit like 'get earthing sheets' (?!!?). look, we get it. stressful jobs and poor choices of entertainment after work aren't healthy. you don't have to keep repeating the same scenario with a different person's name EVERY chapter. it took me forever to finish this because i was uninterested most of the time and having to pick it back up took effort.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kate Singh

    Most of this is about the Urban predicament of living the city life, commutes, careers that suck the life out of your very bone marrow, and the American diet and lifestyle with the technology and lack of connection with family and community. I get all this and have shifted to a slow and old-fashioned life so I just read the book with compassion to the ones "still out there". I did get some ideas to utilize in my home. He is doing great work out there helping others and influencing positive chang Most of this is about the Urban predicament of living the city life, commutes, careers that suck the life out of your very bone marrow, and the American diet and lifestyle with the technology and lack of connection with family and community. I get all this and have shifted to a slow and old-fashioned life so I just read the book with compassion to the ones "still out there". I did get some ideas to utilize in my home. He is doing great work out there helping others and influencing positive change. Beware for the curse word sensitive as he loves the word sh--.

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