web site hit counter At War on the Gothic Line: Fighting in Italy, 1944-45 - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

At War on the Gothic Line: Fighting in Italy, 1944-45

Availability: Ready to download

In the autumn of 1944, as Patton’s army paraded through Paris, another Allied force was gathering in southern Italy. Spearheaded by over 100,000 American troops, this vast, international army was faced with a grim task—break The Gothic Line, a series of interconnected German fortifications that stretched across the mountains of northern Italy. Striving to reach Europe’s vu In the autumn of 1944, as Patton’s army paraded through Paris, another Allied force was gathering in southern Italy. Spearheaded by over 100,000 American troops, this vast, international army was faced with a grim task—break The Gothic Line, a series of interconnected German fortifications that stretched across the mountains of northern Italy. Striving to reach Europe’s vulnerable underbelly before the Red Army, these Allied soldiers fought uphill against entrenched enemies in some of the final and most brutal battles of the Second World War. In At War on the Gothic Line, veteran war correspondent and historian Christian Jennings provides an unprecedented look inside this unsung but highly significant campaign. Through the eyes of thirteen men and women from seven different countries, Jennings brings history to life as he vividly recounts the courageous acts of valor performed by these soldiers facing such overwhelming odds, even as many experienced discrimination at the hands of their allies and superiors. Witness the courage of a young Japanese-American officer willing to die for those under his command. Lie in wait with a troop of Canadian fur trappers turned snipers. Creep along mountain paths with Indian warriors as they assault fortified positions in the dead of night. Learn to fear a one-armed SS-Major guilty of some of the most atrocious war-crimes in the European theater. All these stories and more pack the pages of this faced-paced, action-heavy history, taking readers inside one of the most important, and least discussed, campaigns of World War Two.


Compare

In the autumn of 1944, as Patton’s army paraded through Paris, another Allied force was gathering in southern Italy. Spearheaded by over 100,000 American troops, this vast, international army was faced with a grim task—break The Gothic Line, a series of interconnected German fortifications that stretched across the mountains of northern Italy. Striving to reach Europe’s vu In the autumn of 1944, as Patton’s army paraded through Paris, another Allied force was gathering in southern Italy. Spearheaded by over 100,000 American troops, this vast, international army was faced with a grim task—break The Gothic Line, a series of interconnected German fortifications that stretched across the mountains of northern Italy. Striving to reach Europe’s vulnerable underbelly before the Red Army, these Allied soldiers fought uphill against entrenched enemies in some of the final and most brutal battles of the Second World War. In At War on the Gothic Line, veteran war correspondent and historian Christian Jennings provides an unprecedented look inside this unsung but highly significant campaign. Through the eyes of thirteen men and women from seven different countries, Jennings brings history to life as he vividly recounts the courageous acts of valor performed by these soldiers facing such overwhelming odds, even as many experienced discrimination at the hands of their allies and superiors. Witness the courage of a young Japanese-American officer willing to die for those under his command. Lie in wait with a troop of Canadian fur trappers turned snipers. Creep along mountain paths with Indian warriors as they assault fortified positions in the dead of night. Learn to fear a one-armed SS-Major guilty of some of the most atrocious war-crimes in the European theater. All these stories and more pack the pages of this faced-paced, action-heavy history, taking readers inside one of the most important, and least discussed, campaigns of World War Two.

57 review for At War on the Gothic Line: Fighting in Italy, 1944-45

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Very good WWII history on the war north of Rome.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Amy Pandit

    An interesting but flawed history of fighting in Italy in 1944-1945. For some reason, the author has chosen to focus on a few units which fought up the Italian peninsula -- the Maratha Light Infantry (Indian), the 442nd RCT (U.S. Japanese-Americans), the 92nd Division (African-Americans) and the Westminster Regiment (Canadian). Virtually nothing is said of the other mainline U.S. and British units which took part in the fighting. The author clearly wishes to emphasize the uniquely international An interesting but flawed history of fighting in Italy in 1944-1945. For some reason, the author has chosen to focus on a few units which fought up the Italian peninsula -- the Maratha Light Infantry (Indian), the 442nd RCT (U.S. Japanese-Americans), the 92nd Division (African-Americans) and the Westminster Regiment (Canadian). Virtually nothing is said of the other mainline U.S. and British units which took part in the fighting. The author clearly wishes to emphasize the uniquely international nature of the Allied troops that fought in Italy, which is fine, but concentrating on just a few units takes away from an understanding of the whole picture. The maps in the book are drawn by hand and look rather amateurish. They often lack much detail about terrain, which is crucial to understanding the fighting in Italy. Finally, the book is marred by poor editing. There are some sentences which aren't quite clear and more than a few typographical errors ("Acnona" instead of "Ancona," for one). There are also outright and inexcusable errors of fact. For example, the author places Fort Huachuca (which was famous during the Apache wars) in Mississippi instead of Arizona. He refers to the unit identifiers for U.S. companies in World War II as "Alpha, Baker, Charlie..." when they were in fact "Able, Baker, Charlie," something anyone with a modicum of knowledge about the U.S. military ought to know. ("Able" changed to "Alpha" and "Baker" to "Bravo" in 1956. "Charlie" is still "Charlie.") He places the Trieste Gap in southern Yugoslavia instead of northern Yugoslavia. All in all, a worthwhile read, but disappointing in some respects.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Thad Blaine

    Jennings: "Operation Chrysler had parachuted into this volatile mix to establish a show of authority and liaison in the area in anticipation of an early German surrender. The mission was then changed to help the partisan units with parachute drops of arms and supplies." Wikipedia: "Originally, Mission Chrysler was to establish a show of authority and liaison in the area in anticipation of an early Axis capitulation. When this did not happen, the mission was changed to assist the partisan units wi Jennings: "Operation Chrysler had parachuted into this volatile mix to establish a show of authority and liaison in the area in anticipation of an early German surrender. The mission was then changed to help the partisan units with parachute drops of arms and supplies." Wikipedia: "Originally, Mission Chrysler was to establish a show of authority and liaison in the area in anticipation of an early Axis capitulation. When this did not happen, the mission was changed to assist the partisan units with arms and supplies." Jennings: "On December 2, Major Holahan sent Lieutenant Icardi to meet with the local Communist commander, Vincenzo Moscatelli, a partisan leader who operated in the mountains above the lake. This was arranged by a middleman who also wanted the arms drops funneled through him. The Communists, who made up three-quarters of the partisans in the Chrysler area, were supposed to receive equal allocations of the two arms drops, but they frequently stole weapons and equipment intended for rival groups." Wikipedia: "On December 2, 1944, Holohan sent Icardi to meet with the local communist commander, Vincenzo Moscatelli. This was reluctantly arranged by Aminta Migliari, aka Giorgio, who had wanted the arms drops funneled through him. Although Migliari proved to be treacherous, the OSS men had to rely on him for support. The communists, who made up about 75% of the partisans in the Chrysler area, were supposed to receive equal allocations of the two arms drops, but they frequently raided drops intended for rival groups."

  4. 4 out of 5

    John

    An interesting read that highlights some of the experiences of troops serving in Italy near the end of the war. It is strong on individual narratives, but never really captures the larger picture of the final year of war. A companion book focusing on the higher level of war in Italy would be a great complement to it, or perhaps the other way around.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jim Blessing

    This was a difficult read regarding the miltary aspects of this conflict. Ivan Houston and Daniel Inouye are the heros in the story.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Keith PJ Duggan

    Excellent read. Up to date historical research and compelling story telling. I learned a lot and thoroughly enjoyed it

  7. 4 out of 5

    Francis

    It is an incredible story, just don't think it was written very well. Some unnecessary repetition and a bit disjointed to me. I did not know that Brazil sent soldiers to fight on the Italian front. I did like that the book covered the US Army, English Army, Australian, New Zealand, the resistance and the German army in the Italian theater. Unfortunately, our lack of resolve allowed communism to expand throughout Europe as is shown at the end and with allied dealings with communist resistance figh It is an incredible story, just don't think it was written very well. Some unnecessary repetition and a bit disjointed to me. I did not know that Brazil sent soldiers to fight on the Italian front. I did like that the book covered the US Army, English Army, Australian, New Zealand, the resistance and the German army in the Italian theater. Unfortunately, our lack of resolve allowed communism to expand throughout Europe as is shown at the end and with allied dealings with communist resistance fighters. It was sad to read how much Roosevelt and Churchill kowtowed to Stalin. It seems some of the Germans wanted to surrender, however as soon as Stalin found out about it the allies immediately backed away. Wonder how many unnecessary deaths occurred as a result of lengthening the war. One of the most interesting parts of the book was concerning, "Operation Unthinkable." This was about Churchill's plan to militarily confront the Soviets after the war if they refused to recognize the freedom of the Eastern European nations. Certainly when we had the BOMB, we had the opportunity to force the Soviets to back down. Sadly, we did not use our power to free millions upon millions of people and by our inaction lead to the deaths of millions upon millions over the post-war decades. Another interesting aspect of the book was mob justice. When a mob wants revenge they'll settle for just about anything or anyone. Of course those who were involved in war crimes or treason should have been arrested, tried and punished if found guilty. In some cases the mobs beat the justice system to it. Whether or not they punished the right people or not, who knows? I liked the story, but the writing style just did not appeal to me. I am going to try the author's book on Bosnia.

  8. 4 out of 5

    David

    I received this book through a Firstreads giveaway on Goodreads. This book is a well written, very readable work of narrative non-fiction that covers the fighting in Italy after the liberation of Rome, on June 5, 1944. Christian Jennings effectively uses first hand accounts throughout the book making it feel less like a history text. I enjoyed that the author covered all aspects of the conflict from the Allies to the Germans and even the partisans. He concludes the book with with an epilogue to I received this book through a Firstreads giveaway on Goodreads. This book is a well written, very readable work of narrative non-fiction that covers the fighting in Italy after the liberation of Rome, on June 5, 1944. Christian Jennings effectively uses first hand accounts throughout the book making it feel less like a history text. I enjoyed that the author covered all aspects of the conflict from the Allies to the Germans and even the partisans. He concludes the book with with an epilogue to address what happened to the highlighted individuals after the war. Overall, an enjoyable read that anyone with an interest in World War II would appreciate.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dave Hoff

    Another WW2 Military history book. This one the battle of Italy. Author gives detailed accounts of weapons carried, battles fought. The slow process of defeating the Germans and the Italian Fascists, fighting northward. The Gothic Line the last German Line of defense, broken by the surrender of the enemy in Italy. Moved right into the Cold War as Russian and Yugoslavia, claiming a part of Europe that should have been freed. Good writing on the brave U.S. Army Nisei and Buffalo Soldiers and how h Another WW2 Military history book. This one the battle of Italy. Author gives detailed accounts of weapons carried, battles fought. The slow process of defeating the Germans and the Italian Fascists, fighting northward. The Gothic Line the last German Line of defense, broken by the surrender of the enemy in Italy. Moved right into the Cold War as Russian and Yugoslavia, claiming a part of Europe that should have been freed. Good writing on the brave U.S. Army Nisei and Buffalo Soldiers and how heroic they fought.

  10. 4 out of 5

    joan pauly

  11. 5 out of 5

    Simon

  12. 4 out of 5

    Robert

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jb3

  14. 5 out of 5

    John Tarttelin

  15. 5 out of 5

    Frank

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ivo

  17. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

  18. 4 out of 5

    Eddie Rasmussen

  19. 5 out of 5

    Larry Orr

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mark B.

  21. 5 out of 5

    SkipO

  22. 4 out of 5

    Thiago

  23. 5 out of 5

    Roland Lafrance

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  25. 4 out of 5

    Todd Woods

  26. 4 out of 5

    Gerard

  27. 4 out of 5

    Russ

  28. 5 out of 5

    Michael Kovan

  29. 5 out of 5

    St. Martin's Press Nonfiction

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brent

  31. 4 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  32. 5 out of 5

    Terry Pearson

  33. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Heare Watts

  34. 5 out of 5

    Lucy Meeker

  35. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Quintana

  36. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl Bradley

  37. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

  38. 5 out of 5

    Lucas

  39. 5 out of 5

    Todd Rumsey

  40. 5 out of 5

    Stacia Chappell

  41. 4 out of 5

    Mary

  42. 4 out of 5

    Kim Myers

  43. 5 out of 5

    Ann Ellis

  44. 4 out of 5

    Ron Frampton

  45. 5 out of 5

    Vince

  46. 5 out of 5

    Melinda M

  47. 4 out of 5

    Brenda Hoffman

  48. 4 out of 5

    Joy Adams

  49. 4 out of 5

    Ann Green

  50. 4 out of 5

    Tina

  51. 5 out of 5

    Gordon Bingham

  52. 5 out of 5

    Dayna

  53. 5 out of 5

    Sonia

  54. 5 out of 5

    Marla

  55. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Delzeith

  56. 4 out of 5

    Ian Hull

  57. 4 out of 5

    Helle Brown

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.