web site hit counter Apologetics: A Justification of Christian Belief - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Apologetics: A Justification of Christian Belief

Availability: Ready to download

Renowned theologian John Frame sheds much-needed light on the message and method of genuinely Christian apologetics in this landmark title. He insightfully examines apologetics in terms of proof, defense, and offense and clarifies the relationships of reason, proofs, and evidences to faith, biblical authority, and the lordship of Christ. Two subjects of particular note are Renowned theologian John Frame sheds much-needed light on the message and method of genuinely Christian apologetics in this landmark title. He insightfully examines apologetics in terms of proof, defense, and offense and clarifies the relationships of reason, proofs, and evidences to faith, biblical authority, and the lordship of Christ. Two subjects of particular note are Frame’s fresh look at probability arguments and a stimulating investigation into the problem of evil. Some of the most valuable elements of this book are Frame’s extensive use of Scripture and his presentation of specific lines of argument. There is also a model dialogue in the concluding chapter that shows how these lines of argument work in conversation. This is an extensively redeveloped and expanded version of Frame’s previous work, Apologetics to the Glory of God.


Compare

Renowned theologian John Frame sheds much-needed light on the message and method of genuinely Christian apologetics in this landmark title. He insightfully examines apologetics in terms of proof, defense, and offense and clarifies the relationships of reason, proofs, and evidences to faith, biblical authority, and the lordship of Christ. Two subjects of particular note are Renowned theologian John Frame sheds much-needed light on the message and method of genuinely Christian apologetics in this landmark title. He insightfully examines apologetics in terms of proof, defense, and offense and clarifies the relationships of reason, proofs, and evidences to faith, biblical authority, and the lordship of Christ. Two subjects of particular note are Frame’s fresh look at probability arguments and a stimulating investigation into the problem of evil. Some of the most valuable elements of this book are Frame’s extensive use of Scripture and his presentation of specific lines of argument. There is also a model dialogue in the concluding chapter that shows how these lines of argument work in conversation. This is an extensively redeveloped and expanded version of Frame’s previous work, Apologetics to the Glory of God.

30 review for Apologetics: A Justification of Christian Belief

  1. 5 out of 5

    John

    I've done quite a bit of reading on presuppositional apologetics over the last few years, reading Bahnsen, Frame, and Oliphant. But I'd never read Frame's "Apologetics." In fact, I'd not been aware of its existence until the 2015 revised edition. I naturally picked it up, eager to read another book by Frame on the subject. I began studying with Bahnsen's "Van Til's Apologetic" and followed that up by Frame's "Cornelius Van Til." So I knew to expect that Frame would be both critical of Van Til, bu I've done quite a bit of reading on presuppositional apologetics over the last few years, reading Bahnsen, Frame, and Oliphant. But I'd never read Frame's "Apologetics." In fact, I'd not been aware of its existence until the 2015 revised edition. I naturally picked it up, eager to read another book by Frame on the subject. I began studying with Bahnsen's "Van Til's Apologetic" and followed that up by Frame's "Cornelius Van Til." So I knew to expect that Frame would be both critical of Van Til, but also advance his work in a slightly different direction. Indeed, he continues that trajectory in "Apologetics". Frame is not quite so convinced of the power of Van Til's method, as Van Til and Bahnsen attempt to argue the point. Frame has received the chastening of postmodernism and applied its uncertainty to presuppositionalism. Some might say that he's compromised on the certainty of the logic of presuppositionalism, though he still insists upon the premise that only Trinitarian Christianity can adequately account for the world around us. The book is a sort of text book, though it doesn't read in the way one would expect a text book to read. Frame has a unique style--writing as a teacher to lay people, without talking down to them, or becoming pedantic. He's easy to read, easy to understand, even when he's communicating big ideas. In short, he's a great writer, and I would imagine he's a great teacher. One of the most helpful chapters in the book, is an imaginary conversation between a self-professed agnostic and a presuppositional apologist. Unlike others, writing similar dialogs, this one is actually instructive for the average churchman. It isn't written as though you're debating Richard Dawkins, but an average guy you'd encounter in the seat next to you on an airplane. In reflecting upon the differences between Bahnsen's and Frame's method, I think they are both valid, and are best understood as geared toward different audiences. Bahnsen's is best suited for intellectual debate, as shown in the famous Stein debate, whereas Frame's is much more practical, and should be used in arguing with laymen. I still believe Bahnsen's "Pushing the Antithesis" is the best introductory work on presuppositional apologetics, but Frame's "Apologetics" is a probably the best companion volume, in terms of scope and an alternate, even critical perspective. Highly recommended.

  2. 5 out of 5

    B.J. Richardson

    The Bible is the ultimate standard for truth. How do we know the Bible is the ultimate standard for truth? Because God says so. How do we know God says so? Because the Bible tells us He does. This is the ultimate foundation of what is called presuppositional "apologetics". Frame is one of the leading proponents of this style of "apologetics" and this book is pretty much a university level textbook defining and explaining his view. The fact that I have the word in quotes should make it clear enough The Bible is the ultimate standard for truth. How do we know the Bible is the ultimate standard for truth? Because God says so. How do we know God says so? Because the Bible tells us He does. This is the ultimate foundation of what is called presuppositional "apologetics". Frame is one of the leading proponents of this style of "apologetics" and this book is pretty much a university level textbook defining and explaining his view. The fact that I have the word in quotes should make it clear enough that I do not in any way think this is a valid form of apologetics. Apparently I am not alone in this view. As the book itself acknowledges: "The presuppositional apologetic formulated by Cornelius Van Till is largely unheard of by most unbelievers. Those of the evidentialist camp [real apologists] are far better at popularizing their arguments than presuppositionalists." No. I think it is just more likely that no one takes Van Till's (and Frame's) circular reasoning seriously. To be fair, Frame acknowledges that his argument is circular. He defends this being so in two ways. First, that there is a difference between what he calls vicious circles and virtuous circles. He says the first set begs the question and the second set doesn't. His second defence is to say that all finite human reasoning is ultimately circular and that his circular reasoning is no less valid than the unbeliever using reasoning to reason that human reasoning is the ultimate standard for truth. While I think that the book does have some valuable tools for epistemology, for those who believe to better understand how and why they believe, I think it fails as a form of apologetics. I would highly doubt that anyone who is not a believer reading this book would be convinced in the slightest. I will take that a step further. This book is actually an excellent example of how *not* to do apologetics.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ben Zornes

    John Frame provides a useful gateway into the world of presuppositional apologetics. Building on such Christian thinkers like Van Til, he endeavors to show why Christian apologetics needs to operate with certain assumptions in place. In essence, we must avoid the temptation to think of reason as able to "stand on its own." All arguments for, or against, Christianity must use reason and logic (some arguments are stronger or more compelling), but for the Christian apologist we must not lean upon l John Frame provides a useful gateway into the world of presuppositional apologetics. Building on such Christian thinkers like Van Til, he endeavors to show why Christian apologetics needs to operate with certain assumptions in place. In essence, we must avoid the temptation to think of reason as able to "stand on its own." All arguments for, or against, Christianity must use reason and logic (some arguments are stronger or more compelling), but for the Christian apologist we must not lean upon logic alone to "get us there." Rather, Frame builds on Van Til and endeavors to show that it is impossible to stand in "neutral territory." The very moment we reach for rational arguments for (or against) we are reaching for something which God made and intended to be used in knowing and trusting Him. In essence, we must avoid the temptation to cede to godless wordlviews the idea that man is autonomous or that there is a "blank slate" from which to start from. In fact, for the presuppositionalist, man is not able to somehow start from scratch; all men know there is a God, but unbelieving man has suppressed this knowledge. That knowledge is there nonetheless and is inescapable.  This would be a helpful introduction to thinking about apologetics in a presuppositional vein, and overall the book was very accessible, but of course takes some dedicated brain energy to follow extended arguments. What I'm saying is, this isn't the sort of book to read right before bed...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Luke

    There are few books that as soon as I complete them I feel like I should or want to read again. This may in fact be the first. After finishing the book I feel like I have a sufficient basis to read it the first time. I would suspect that this would be the case with many. There were portions that I slogged through, I found benefit from it all. Take my rating as tentative, and from an unqualified reviewer though I have attempted to carefully read the book and process the thought. One insight I wou There are few books that as soon as I complete them I feel like I should or want to read again. This may in fact be the first. After finishing the book I feel like I have a sufficient basis to read it the first time. I would suspect that this would be the case with many. There were portions that I slogged through, I found benefit from it all. Take my rating as tentative, and from an unqualified reviewer though I have attempted to carefully read the book and process the thought. One insight I would give is that I believe I would have benefited from reading this book in a different order. I found that some of the appendices were very helpful in solidifying (well at least making gelatinous) concepts that were presented in earlier chapters. While some might be tempted to skip them I think just the contrary is merited. Reading the appendices prior to the main content would have been helpful. Maybe reading them first and then again afterward.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Thaddeus

    Dr. John M Frame's book Apologetics: A Justification of Christian Belief has long been regarded as one of the gold standards for textbooks in Apologetics by many as the glowing recommendations on this book by John Piper, Al Mohler and James N. Anderson clearly show. So, I had been excited to get into it myself, having read quite a bit of Cornelius Van Til and Greg Bahnsen's work - John Frame stands in that same line of Westminster Presuppositional Apologetics. However, he doesn't merely recite w Dr. John M Frame's book Apologetics: A Justification of Christian Belief has long been regarded as one of the gold standards for textbooks in Apologetics by many as the glowing recommendations on this book by John Piper, Al Mohler and James N. Anderson clearly show. So, I had been excited to get into it myself, having read quite a bit of Cornelius Van Til and Greg Bahnsen's work - John Frame stands in that same line of Westminster Presuppositional Apologetics. However, he doesn't merely recite what Van Til and Bahnsen had said from before, but his book offers a helpful expansion on the area of Presuppositional Apologetic methodology in a few notable ways. Frames first few chapters are introductory, covering the basics of Presuppositions, Circular Argumentation, Logic, Scripture & Natural Revelation, Philosophy & Metaphysics, etc. These provide a solid groundwork to launch into more detail on various topics and apologetic methods, critiques and arguments. The rest of the book is divided up into 3 sections: (1) Apologetics as Proof, (2) Apologetics as Defense and (3) Apologetics as Offense. In the first section - Apologetics as Proof - Frame goes through the Transcendental Argument for the existence of God (TAG). "Without God, there is no meaning (truth, rationality, etc.); therefore, God exists..." It is a proof from the impossibility of the contrary and was one of the main areas of development by Van Til. "God exists, in other words, because without Him it would not be possible to reason, to think, or even attach a predicate to a subject (predication)." [pg 69] At the outset, this argument can seem like it is simplistic and not very compelling, but Frame does a great job of fleshing out how this very simple concept works itself out in apologetic dialogue and answering the questions why things like science, logic and ethics demand the existence of God. After this is where I think Frame's work shines as distinct from Van Til. Whereas traditional VanTilian apologists may be skeptical of using direct argumentation (offering various evidences and proofs), and preferring instead to us indirect methodologies (arguing from the impossibility of the contrary and not putting the unbeliever in the 'judgment seat' over God's existence), Frame here offers a sort of 'hybrid' apologetic method. "This way of thinking opens to the presuppositional apologist many, perhaps all, of those arguments generally associated with traditional apologetics in the past. We should no longer be embarassed... to argue for the existence of God on the basis of cause, purpose, and values. These can be elements in an overall argument that has a transcendental purpose... A direct argument can, as easily as an indirect one, spring from the conviction that nothing is intelligible except through God." [pgs 91-92] I think this is where this book may be helpful to those who are committed to a Presuppositional Apologetic Methodology to open up their consideration as to how to use other apologetic arguments in their dialogs. Frame then presents Theistic Arguments suchas The Moral Argument, The Epistemological Argument, and some Metaphysical Arguments (Teleological, Cosmological and Ontological). He also considers Scripture's doctrine of scripture, arguments from prophecy and the rationale for the Gospel. His section on Apologetics as Defense deals with answering one of the biggest questions: The Problem of Evil. His discussion on this is thorough and comprehensive. Frame considers a number of possible defenses (such as the Free Will Defense, Best Possible World Defense - a la William Lane Craig, The Character Building Defense) and offers critiques of their strengths and weaknesses in light of philosophical and biblical considerations. His second part of dealing with the Problem of Evil posits his Biblical Response. These chapters were especially helpful to me. Lastly, Frame puts forward the method of Apologetics as Offense - giving a critique of unbelief in various forms. He also includes a chapter as an example apologetic conversation to help envision what an exchange based on the methodology he has laid out in the book might look like. The Appendixes of the book deal with Van Til and the Ligonier Apologetic, Some interactions with other theologians, Fideism, Circular Reasoning, Divine Aseity and Espistemological Perspectives in Evangelicalism and are helpful discussions on these topics. I found overall the book was well written, however, I did find myself slugging through some parts of it (which is understandable for a book of this size which is attempting to address a wide array of topics comprehensively). I think for what it is, this book is definitely one of the top resources in its category. I'd recommend it for any student of apologetics, pastors, lay-leaders, or those with such a bent. It would be difficult reading though for those totally unfamiliar with the topic, but would serve as a great textbook for a course. My disagreements with Frame's thoughts were minor and few, and for the most part I found many areas of agreement and enlightenment. It was worth the read, and I can definitely see myself coming back to it as a reference material in the future.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    A very comprehensive case for the presuppositional approach to apologetics.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    This is my favorite book on apologetics so far! It was readable and clear, but didn’t shy away from the difficult arguments that need to be made. I would recommend it as an introduction to reformed apologetics, or a precursor to reading Van Til.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Roberts

    Four and a half stars! While I know John Frame is smart sometimes he is too smart for me! This book most of the time was accessible to my feeble brain, but also at times I was left wondering how a person as dumb as me could ever be a teacher. This book lays out an understanding of the presuppositional apologetic method and does it very well. I really enjoyed the final chapter where Dr. Frame created a dialogue between two people on a plane. That was incredibly useful. Highly recommended!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

    Frame interviewed about this book here. Frame interviewed about this book here.

  10. 5 out of 5

    John

    John M. Frame is a household name in the Reformed Tradition and has been at the forefront of Reformed theology for several decades. Frame is J. D. Trimble Professor of Systematic Theology and Philosophy at Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando, Florida, and the author of the magisterial four-volume Theology of Lordship series and A History of Western Philosophy and Theology. Still, one of Frame's most influential and widely used books remains Apologetics to the Glory of God. Now, extensively John M. Frame is a household name in the Reformed Tradition and has been at the forefront of Reformed theology for several decades. Frame is J. D. Trimble Professor of Systematic Theology and Philosophy at Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando, Florida, and the author of the magisterial four-volume Theology of Lordship series and A History of Western Philosophy and Theology. Still, one of Frame's most influential and widely used books remains Apologetics to the Glory of God. Now, extensively redeveloped and expanded, including a new name, Frame's apologetic masterpiece is better than ever. Apologetics: A Justification of Christian Belief is largely the result of the editorial work of Joseph E. Torres and his desire to ensure the continued legacy of Frame's apologetic footprint two decades after the publication of Apologetics to the Glory of God. Frame's presuppositional approach is both lucid and clear, and his keen awareness and ability to bring practical illustrations into the heart of the material is unparalleled. This was seen and recognized in the previous edition, but it is even more evident here. Torres has integrated both previously published and unpublished Frame material to furnish the interior of his apologetic framework found in the previous edition. Some of the previously published work comes from Frame's monumental work titled The Doctrine of God: A Theology of Lordship (P&R, 2002), such as the material on miracles, evolution, and the problem of evil. Additional material has been designated to footnotes and Torres has done a fantastic job not only organizing the volume but offering contextual annotations to help the reader position Frame's work within his larger corpus of literature. There is much to be applauded about this volume. Torres has done a phenomenal service to all Framean enthusiasts everywhere, both in cohesively bringing together Frame's apologetic thinking and the overall organization of the volume. Those acquainted with Apologetics to the Glory of God will welcome such updates and find this second edition extremely useful. Concerning presuppositional apologetics, in my opinion, there are few communicators more helpful and influential than Frame. Still many fatally misunderstand this apologetic approach, misrepresenting it as an irrational circular argument among other things. Frame and Torres have taken such caricatures into consideration throughout, making an already clear and helpful presentation clearer and more helpful. Apologetics: A Justification of Christian Belief by John M. Frame and edited by Joseph E. Torres is by far one of the best introductions to presuppositional apologetics. Frame is readable and clear, and Torres has done an outstanding job bringing together Frame's literary output on apologetic related matters accessible within a single volume. It comes highly recommended, and, in my opinion, possesses the ability to outlast the twenty-year run of the first edition. Regardless if you already own Apologetics to the Glory of God, there is so much new material in this second edition that it deserves a new name. Oh, wait! Maybe that's why it got one?!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mike Felker

    What Frame has accomplished in this updated volume is a helpful bridge between presuppositional and classical/evidentialist apologetics. Much of this bridge is the implementation of evidences in presuppositional apologetics. While it is commonly argued that presuppositionalist can't or won't use evidences, Frame shows that even within a presuppositionalist framework, evidences can have a proper place. This is why I would hesitate to place Frame neatly within the presuppositionalist camp. Those w What Frame has accomplished in this updated volume is a helpful bridge between presuppositional and classical/evidentialist apologetics. Much of this bridge is the implementation of evidences in presuppositional apologetics. While it is commonly argued that presuppositionalist can't or won't use evidences, Frame shows that even within a presuppositionalist framework, evidences can have a proper place. This is why I would hesitate to place Frame neatly within the presuppositionalist camp. Those who are strictly Van Tillian may find some disagreement with Frame and feel that he isn't being true to the method. The good news is, Frame doesn't hesitate to bring out his differences with those in the Van Tillian camp. What you'll find here is Frame going at great length to stress the similarities as well as the differences. This is why I would more appropriate call Frame's approach as integrative as opposed to strictly presuppositional or classical. The reason I gave this only 4 out of 5 stars is because it was largely theoretical rather than apologetical. In other words, there was so much time explaining and defending presuppositionalism and less time engaging arguments with non-Christians and how Christians are to respond to them. I would have like to have seen Frame engaging more direct arguments from atheists. Overall, this is an excellent book that every apologist should read. And it would be a great book to give to a classical apologist so as to warm them up to the method rather than going straight into Bahnsen or Van Till.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tyler Brown

    There is much I appreciate about this volume. Frame make a great case for a qualified presuppositional approach to apologetics. His deep knowledge of Van Till helps him carefully point out where he is lock-step with VT, where he thinks VT was inconsistent or unclear, and where he openly differs from him. This book is not so technical with philosophical thinkers and references that it can't be read by a lay-person, but it comes pretty close. My only criticisms are 1) some of Frame's critiques of There is much I appreciate about this volume. Frame make a great case for a qualified presuppositional approach to apologetics. His deep knowledge of Van Till helps him carefully point out where he is lock-step with VT, where he thinks VT was inconsistent or unclear, and where he openly differs from him. This book is not so technical with philosophical thinkers and references that it can't be read by a lay-person, but it comes pretty close. My only criticisms are 1) some of Frame's critiques of culture come across like a crotchety old man when he mocks "rap music" and the like. 2) Frame is constantly referencing his other books in the footnotes and body of the work, which makes me wonder if there is anything unique in this book or just a rehashed version of Lordship series.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Keith Pinckney

    A classic work by Frame. Excellent in parts, lagged in others. Dense in parts, crystal clear in others. Enjoyed it overall, think he could have made it 60 pages shorter (Including the appendix). I am grateful for Frame’s work here and appreciate him being a cross-disciplinarian (Philosopher, Apologist, Theologian). Strongest part of his book was the front half.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Deborah

    It is substantially a comprehensive understanding of presuppositional apologetics refining and refuting its original proponent – Van Til. The author advances his own framework which, for me, taints the methodology. Sir Frame is indeed an intellectual. However, I am still not convinced of the said methodology.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    John Frames Presuppositionalism This book is a comprehensive presentation of the apologetics of John Frame. John Frame has influenced James Anderson’s apologetics and many others as well. This will help the read distinguish the similarities and differences between Frame on the one hand and Van Til and Bahnsen on the other hand.

  16. 5 out of 5

    George

    This revised version of Frame's "Apologetics to the Glory of God" is truly a gem to be cherished in any Christian's library. In it, Frame succinctly shows how to make a case for the Christian worldview using Van Til's apologetic methodology (albeit in a revised way). This revised version of Frame's "Apologetics to the Glory of God" is truly a gem to be cherished in any Christian's library. In it, Frame succinctly shows how to make a case for the Christian worldview using Van Til's apologetic methodology (albeit in a revised way).

  17. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    Very helpful, like all of Frame’s major works. He interacts clearly and charitably with other schools of apologetics, and also gives an excellent primer on the theology and methodology of presuppositional apologetics.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    Best book on Christian apologetics I've read. Addresses apologetics as proof, defense, and offense. Really like the emphasis on presupositions of worldviews as the basis of interpreting facts. The transcendental argument for the existence of God is pretty powerful logically and rhetorically. Best book on Christian apologetics I've read. Addresses apologetics as proof, defense, and offense. Really like the emphasis on presupositions of worldviews as the basis of interpreting facts. The transcendental argument for the existence of God is pretty powerful logically and rhetorically.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Laurent Dv

    The most comprehensive work on apologetics (especially presuppositionalism, method, evidence, theistic proofs from a van tilian perspective). Very accessible.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Carl Di-Palma

    helpful in places, frustrating and a hard slog in others.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sean McGowan

    Very good book. Classic Frame. His discussion on the classic "problem of evil" here and in his Doctrine of God is one of the best treatments of the subject. Very helpful. Very good book. Classic Frame. His discussion on the classic "problem of evil" here and in his Doctrine of God is one of the best treatments of the subject. Very helpful.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jelmer

    Worst book on apologetics I've ever read. Would not recommend. Only finished it because I needed to read it for school but will suggest scrapping it from the curriculum. Worst book on apologetics I've ever read. Would not recommend. Only finished it because I needed to read it for school but will suggest scrapping it from the curriculum.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Pastor Matt

    Professor Frame makes a compelling case but I have a lot of questions...

  24. 5 out of 5

    Chris Wray

    This book has had a huge impact on my thinking, and has shaped how I approach topics of apologetics, worldview and knowledge with both Christians and non-Christians. To my mind the two most important points that Frame makes are: 1. Everyone has presuppositions: We all have core beliefs or prior commitments that we cannot detach ourselves from and that we use to judge the truth or goodness of everything else. For the Christian, these are the truth of Scripture and the Lordship of Jesus Christ. 2. This book has had a huge impact on my thinking, and has shaped how I approach topics of apologetics, worldview and knowledge with both Christians and non-Christians. To my mind the two most important points that Frame makes are: 1. Everyone has presuppositions: We all have core beliefs or prior commitments that we cannot detach ourselves from and that we use to judge the truth or goodness of everything else. For the Christian, these are the truth of Scripture and the Lordship of Jesus Christ. 2. Truth is an ethical concept: In other words, there are things that everyone ought to believe. We all know it instinctively, but only Christianity gives an adequate basis for the fact. The other main points that Frame makes throughout the book (and helpfully summarized in the foreword by Vern Poythress) are: The Mirage of "Religious Neutrality": The temptation is to picture a discussion in apologetics as a religiously neutral search for truth. The Bible indicates that this picture is completely unrealistic. Vicious and Virtuous Circularity: Everyone has fundamental prior commitments or presuppositions, and we who are believers in Christ are already presupposing our loyalty to Christ and the truth about Christ presented in the Bible. A disciple is committed, the whole person is involved and no one is religiously neutral. If our loyalty to Christ leads us to submitting to his teaching in the Bible, we move in a kind of circle in which the teaching of the Bible functions as our standard for sifting claims. The teaching in the Bible profoundly influences our beliefs. Among those beliefs is belief in Christ, which the Bible confirms. Analogously, people with other basic commitments - to reason or to pleasure - have their beliefs influenced by their commitments. We ought to acknowledge the existence of these circles, rather than try to ignore them. Given that the circles exist, we can still present evidence and arguments. The Centrality of the Bible in Human Living: When he created man, God never intended that we should find our way in the world just by using our minds and observing the creation around us. God spoke. God instructed. And because it was God who spoke, he spoke with absolute authority, the authority of the Creator. He guides us by speaking to us and today he speaks through the completed canon of Scripture. He intends that his words should have a central role in guiding the whole of life. Discipleship involves listening to God's instruction. And we are not only to listen, but to obey- to keep God's commandments. The Disastrous Fruit of Independence: Followers of Christ submit to his teaching. Most other people do not, preferring an autonomy that is generally assumed rather than being discussed or questioned. Non-believers think that their approach is obviously right, and that Bible-believing Christians are naive or dogmatic or both. There is a polarisation between Christians, who submit to the teaching of God in the Bible, and non-Christians, who do not. This autonomy represents a form of deep rebellion against God, and questions of apologetics arise when Christian proclamation meets resistance and objections. Christians and non-Christians do not think alike and do not make the same assumptions about the role of the Bible, the role of "making up one’s own mind", and how to run one's own life. Points for Apologetic Discussion: When we consider typical intellectual objections to Christianity in the West, we find at least three vulnerabilities among the underlying assumptions. 1. Irony. Non-Christians think of Christian faith as ignorant and dogmatic, but they have ignorance and dogmatism of their own. 2. A truly consistent autonomy has no basis for moral judgments or knowledge. If God does not exist, moral standards evaporate into personal or social preferences, and the attempt to pronounce judgments about anything evaporates into the will to exercise power, according to which a person projects his subjective preferences onto others. Similarly, knowledge evaporates into skepticism as we cannot be sure our mental apparatus is properly in tune with the world. 3. No one lives a truly consistent autonomy, so the non-Christian secretly depends on God and his good gifts in issues of morality and knowledge. The Pervasiveness of General Revelation: A robust doctrine of general revelation helps apologetics because it enhances appreciation of human dependence on God and the human knowledge of God that unbelievers are engaged in suppressing. This is vital, as suppression of general revelation, if conceded, leads to suppression of special revelation as both the special claims of Scripture and the resurrection of Christ will soon lose plausibility. I cannot recommend this highly enough, it is a must have for any Christians library. My detailed summary of the book and Frames arguments, based on clipped passages from my Kindle, is available here: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B9P...

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    John Frame has been a strong proponent to the presuppositional apologetics. The new edition of the book hopes to make presuppositional apologetics easier to christian to understand and to pick up. Frame attempts in his first chapter to explain and make a case for presuppositional apologetics. He answers very clearly some of the common questions raised against presuppositional apologetics but also how we are to understand the terms thrown away by the critics. Frame hopes that by doing so, he would John Frame has been a strong proponent to the presuppositional apologetics. The new edition of the book hopes to make presuppositional apologetics easier to christian to understand and to pick up. Frame attempts in his first chapter to explain and make a case for presuppositional apologetics. He answers very clearly some of the common questions raised against presuppositional apologetics but also how we are to understand the terms thrown away by the critics. Frame hopes that by doing so, he would not only answer the critics, but also ensure that the critics would criticise presuppositional apologetics fairly. Although this is not an easy book to read, I have found Frame’s explanation extremely helpful at times. For example, In explaining why we cannot starting on the same premise as an unbeliever or an atheist, Frame uses the illustration a paranoid who suspects everyone who is out to kill him (i.e. wrong premise). Now no one in their right mind will ever counsel this person with the same premise, so why would we do that when it comes to apologetics? Why would we be so willing to give up our premise and take on the premise of the other person? Furthermore, unless the christian worldview is assume, there will always be contradiction in our lives that goes against any other premise. The only way that makes sense of the world is the Christian premise. An additional point on why I found this book helpful. Many books on apologetics focuses on the defence of the gospel, which is good and right. However many fail to see that apologetics can also take on an offensive approach. This is covered by Frame which shows convincingly that the task of an apologist, is not only to show the strength of his/her belief, but also to who the weakness of the other party’s belief. I also like how Frame gives an example of he shared the gospel to someone on the plane.I found that the example shows how he would approach the questions or objections an unbeliever would have towards christianity and how he employs the defence and offence of the gospel. Regarding the changes between the first and second edition, I’ve only read parts of the first edition. And based on what I’ve read (and if memory serves me right), I did not observe too many changes between the two edition. Readers will have to seek advice from other reviewers who have read both editions for more information on this. I do urge would-be readers to be persistent in reading this book. You might not find this book easy to read the first time round. But take it one step at a time, read and think through the book slowly. I think the book is aimed especially towards those who are currently studying in college or have studied at college. This will not be a walk in the park, but it will certainly help you think through apologetics slowly, thoughtfully and biblically. Rating: 4.5 / 5 Disclaimer: I was given this book free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review

  26. 4 out of 5

    David Velasquez

    I first discovered presuppositional apologetics when I was preparing a series of sermons on the reason for God. My first encounter was with Greg Bahnsen. What especially impacted me was listening to his famous debate with Gordon Stein. Through reading Greg Bahnsen I learned about John Frame. I'm glad that I was finally able to read his apologetic masterpiece. What I love about his apologetic approach (Presuppositionalism) is that it starts with a proper theology which then informs the methodolog I first discovered presuppositional apologetics when I was preparing a series of sermons on the reason for God. My first encounter was with Greg Bahnsen. What especially impacted me was listening to his famous debate with Gordon Stein. Through reading Greg Bahnsen I learned about John Frame. I'm glad that I was finally able to read his apologetic masterpiece. What I love about his apologetic approach (Presuppositionalism) is that it starts with a proper theology which then informs the methodology. Evidential/classical apologetics does the opposite. Apologists like William Lane Craig encourage believers to study more philosophy; John Frame encourages us to know God better through the Scriptures--the fountain of all wisdom and knowledge. Not only do I find the approach more biblical, but actually more effective and devastating in apologetic encounters with unbelievers of all sorts of worldviews. As a missionary in Spain I have used this approach numerous times and found it to be fruitful. I highly recommend this book to all my ministry practitioner friends.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Eddie Mercado

    John Frame's work on Apologetics (an expansion and update to Frame's Apologetics to the Glory of God) is a welcome addition to the formulation of Presuppositional (or Covenantal) apologetics! While Frame does depart from Van Til in certain areas (the biggest, I believe, regarding certainty of the Presuppositional argument), Frame is Van Tillian through and through. I did not agree with some of his departures, but they always caused me to think, and Frame was also charitable, which is really what John Frame's work on Apologetics (an expansion and update to Frame's Apologetics to the Glory of God) is a welcome addition to the formulation of Presuppositional (or Covenantal) apologetics! While Frame does depart from Van Til in certain areas (the biggest, I believe, regarding certainty of the Presuppositional argument), Frame is Van Tillian through and through. I did not agree with some of his departures, but they always caused me to think, and Frame was also charitable, which is really what makes Frame, Frame. This book follows very closely (almost to a T) his course on Apologetics (on iTunes U). It would be great to go alongside his course reading this particular book (because repetition is the mother of learning!). Among the most helpful ideas found in this work was Frame's distinction concerning narrow and broad circular reasoning, and of course, his discussion on apologetics as proof, defense, and offense.

  28. 4 out of 5

    James Bunyan

    Mammoth but really helpful when it comes to explaining and persuading of the pre-suppositional approach to apologetic reasoning. Some helpful implications for my speaking: -don't be scared of circular reasoning- it is not bankrupt! -appeal to the truth that people know deep inside -present Christianity as a comprehensive worldview -at the root of the universe is an absolute, trinitarian personality Chapter breakdown: 1. Apologetics: the basics 2. The Message of the Apologist 3. Apologetics as Proof: Some Mammoth but really helpful when it comes to explaining and persuading of the pre-suppositional approach to apologetic reasoning. Some helpful implications for my speaking: -don't be scared of circular reasoning- it is not bankrupt! -appeal to the truth that people know deep inside -present Christianity as a comprehensive worldview -at the root of the universe is an absolute, trinitarian personality Chapter breakdown: 1. Apologetics: the basics 2. The Message of the Apologist 3. Apologetics as Proof: Some Methodological Considerations 4. Apologetics as Proof: Transcendental Argument 5. Apologetics as Proof: Theistic Arguments 6. Apologetics as Proof: Proving the Gospel 7. Apologetics as Defense: the Problem of Evil Part 1- Questions, General Principles and Blind Alleys 8. Apologetics as Defense: The Problem of Evil Part 2- A Biblical Response 9. Apologetics as Offense: Critique of Unbelief 10. Talking to a Stranger Some excellent Appendices also

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hank Pharis

    Since I'm teaching a college course on apologetics this is one of half a dozen or so books that i have read recently on apologetics. In many ways this has been the best. It is more about the theory or philosophy behind defending the faith than about its practice. But it offers a crucial balance to the majority approach of depending on evidences and arguments and human persuasion. All of these things are great helps but they must be understood and practiced within a recognition of the true nature Since I'm teaching a college course on apologetics this is one of half a dozen or so books that i have read recently on apologetics. In many ways this has been the best. It is more about the theory or philosophy behind defending the faith than about its practice. But it offers a crucial balance to the majority approach of depending on evidences and arguments and human persuasion. All of these things are great helps but they must be understood and practiced within a recognition of the true nature of people and conversion. In other words, salvation comes from God not from persuasive arguments or evidence.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    Read for Apologetics class.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.