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A true account of going through UCLA’s famed Daniel Freeman Paramedic Program—and practicing emergency medicine on the streets of Los Angeles. Nine months of tying tourniquets and pushing new medications, of IVs, chest compressions, and defibrillator shocks—that was Kevin Grange’s initiation into emergency medicine when, at age thirty-six, he enrolled in the “Harvard of par A true account of going through UCLA’s famed Daniel Freeman Paramedic Program—and practicing emergency medicine on the streets of Los Angeles. Nine months of tying tourniquets and pushing new medications, of IVs, chest compressions, and defibrillator shocks—that was Kevin Grange’s initiation into emergency medicine when, at age thirty-six, he enrolled in the “Harvard of paramedic schools”: UCLA’s Daniel Freeman Paramedic Program, long considered one of the best and most intense paramedic training programs in the world. Few jobs can match the stress, trauma, and drama that a paramedic calls a typical day at the office, and few educational settings can match the pressure and competitiveness of paramedic school. Blending months of classroom instruction with ER rotations and a grueling field internship with the Los Angeles Fire Department, UCLA’s paramedic program is like a mix of boot camp and med school. It would turn out to be the hardest thing Grange had ever done—but also the most transformational and inspiring. An in-depth look at the trials and tragedies that paramedic students experience daily, Lights and Sirens is ultimately about the best part of humanity—people working together to help save a human life.


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A true account of going through UCLA’s famed Daniel Freeman Paramedic Program—and practicing emergency medicine on the streets of Los Angeles. Nine months of tying tourniquets and pushing new medications, of IVs, chest compressions, and defibrillator shocks—that was Kevin Grange’s initiation into emergency medicine when, at age thirty-six, he enrolled in the “Harvard of par A true account of going through UCLA’s famed Daniel Freeman Paramedic Program—and practicing emergency medicine on the streets of Los Angeles. Nine months of tying tourniquets and pushing new medications, of IVs, chest compressions, and defibrillator shocks—that was Kevin Grange’s initiation into emergency medicine when, at age thirty-six, he enrolled in the “Harvard of paramedic schools”: UCLA’s Daniel Freeman Paramedic Program, long considered one of the best and most intense paramedic training programs in the world. Few jobs can match the stress, trauma, and drama that a paramedic calls a typical day at the office, and few educational settings can match the pressure and competitiveness of paramedic school. Blending months of classroom instruction with ER rotations and a grueling field internship with the Los Angeles Fire Department, UCLA’s paramedic program is like a mix of boot camp and med school. It would turn out to be the hardest thing Grange had ever done—but also the most transformational and inspiring. An in-depth look at the trials and tragedies that paramedic students experience daily, Lights and Sirens is ultimately about the best part of humanity—people working together to help save a human life.

30 review for Lights and Sirens: The Education of a Paramedic

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mary Robinson

    Thought this was a fascinating look at the actual education/internship portion of becoming a paramedic – and how few students are able to successfully complete training and make it in this profession. It was overwhelming to me how hard this job/calling seems to be. The field calls are gripping and sometimes heartbreaking. Think it may be too detailed for some, but would obviously be excellent for anyone considering this profession.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    This book really captured my attention because it tells the story of a profession many people including myself take for granted. I couldn't put this book down once I started reading. I was completely engrossed in the authors journey to become a paramedic because I am also on a constant journey to reach a new goal or find a new job. I could relate to his trials and tribulations. I admire that he didn't give up and was patient with himself. I enjoyed learning about the life of a paramedic. I could This book really captured my attention because it tells the story of a profession many people including myself take for granted. I couldn't put this book down once I started reading. I was completely engrossed in the authors journey to become a paramedic because I am also on a constant journey to reach a new goal or find a new job. I could relate to his trials and tribulations. I admire that he didn't give up and was patient with himself. I enjoyed learning about the life of a paramedic. I couldn't believe that some many people put themselves through the struggles of this profession to provide service to people they don't even know. I have a greater respect for paramedics and see them as self-less human beings.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Noelle

    The parallels between paramedic school and nursing school made me laugh. For instance, "I made a fresh pot of coffee, tore open a thick stack of white flash cards, and immediately began writing. Four hours later, when I'd made only a modest dent in the material, it dawned on me that I was spending all my time creating flash cards and none of my time studying them." I know that feeling. In general, this book made me thankful for the hard work that paramedics put in everyday. We nurses and doctors The parallels between paramedic school and nursing school made me laugh. For instance, "I made a fresh pot of coffee, tore open a thick stack of white flash cards, and immediately began writing. Four hours later, when I'd made only a modest dent in the material, it dawned on me that I was spending all my time creating flash cards and none of my time studying them." I know that feeling. In general, this book made me thankful for the hard work that paramedics put in everyday. We nurses and doctors work in a controlled environment. Paramedics are out in the elements, in sometimes dangerous, hostile environments.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie A.

    My mom happened to check this out of the library literally days after I idly wondered to myself what kind of formal education it takes to become a paramedic, and I am impressed by the serendipity of her timing. This answered all my questions and confirmed the difficulty level is unreal, particularly once you get to the field internship. It absolutely blows my mind that anyone is able to graduate from this kind of program, let alone so many people that the job competition is fierce and the pay fo My mom happened to check this out of the library literally days after I idly wondered to myself what kind of formal education it takes to become a paramedic, and I am impressed by the serendipity of her timing. This answered all my questions and confirmed the difficulty level is unreal, particularly once you get to the field internship. It absolutely blows my mind that anyone is able to graduate from this kind of program, let alone so many people that the job competition is fierce and the pay for such a challenging and important job is not through the roof. Overall, while I was not blown away by the writing style or stories, I appreciated the straightforward and utilitarian focus on the program and the nature of the job without getting sidetracked by the author's personal narrative.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Diana

    Actual rating 3.75 stars I thought this was a great book on becoming a paramedic. I liked the fact that the author focused on his paramedic classes and internship, instead of discussing the cases he has been on. I felt that it was a unique way of writing a book like this. Most of the other medical biographies I have read were about life after school and their "weird" cases. I liked that he tried to show how difficult the training is and the issues many go through trying to follow their dreams. I Actual rating 3.75 stars I thought this was a great book on becoming a paramedic. I liked the fact that the author focused on his paramedic classes and internship, instead of discussing the cases he has been on. I felt that it was a unique way of writing a book like this. Most of the other medical biographies I have read were about life after school and their "weird" cases. I liked that he tried to show how difficult the training is and the issues many go through trying to follow their dreams. I recommend it for those who enjoy medical biographies.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Oliver Eike

    This book is one i feel more people would do good to read. Not just medical practitioners, but people in general. For a professional attitude during a job where you frequently see people at their most scared or weakest requires compassion and that is something that i feel is often bleeding away in today's society. I have had doctors that ask me for movie recommendations when i visit asking for help. Be it about migraines, severe insomnia, anxiety that left me struggling to breathe, tinnitus so b This book is one i feel more people would do good to read. Not just medical practitioners, but people in general. For a professional attitude during a job where you frequently see people at their most scared or weakest requires compassion and that is something that i feel is often bleeding away in today's society. I have had doctors that ask me for movie recommendations when i visit asking for help. Be it about migraines, severe insomnia, anxiety that left me struggling to breathe, tinnitus so bad i struggled to hear people talking to me or even with severe dizziness. And the doctors can barely be bothered to do the minimum of their job. This book let me fantasize about good medical staff. It helped restore faith in humanity to a degree. Sounds a bit dramatic for a book about someone training to be a paramedic, but Paramedics are those first on site during an emergency. They go into dangerous situations carrying a medical bag. Heroes that do what so few dare to do. To risk themselves to help others. And that to me was inspiring and heart warming to read about. If you are aiming to work in a medical profession of any sort, i feel this book could be useful to get a glance at the spirit of the job.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Page

    My husband is a small-town EMT, so it's not like I can read this book and go "omg that's my life!" But I feel a certain understanding of how rough it might be, just from reading the author's words and descriptions. I certainly couldn't do it--and I wouldn't want to, either! My husband is a small-town EMT, so it's not like I can read this book and go "omg that's my life!" But I feel a certain understanding of how rough it might be, just from reading the author's words and descriptions. I certainly couldn't do it--and I wouldn't want to, either!

  8. 5 out of 5

    chloe

    Fascinating look into the training that goes into becoming a paramedic. I had a hard time putting this down it was so interesting.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sierra Hunt

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I have been so excited to read this since I got it. I’m glad I was finally able to get to it. Since starting to work in law enforcement a couple of years ago, I have become obsessed with ridealongs in all the different areas of first responders. I thought that’s what this book would be like and it definitely was not. It was a lot more about, well, the education of a paramedic (shocker given the title, right?) and less about the individual calls he went on. I should have expected it given the tit I have been so excited to read this since I got it. I’m glad I was finally able to get to it. Since starting to work in law enforcement a couple of years ago, I have become obsessed with ridealongs in all the different areas of first responders. I thought that’s what this book would be like and it definitely was not. It was a lot more about, well, the education of a paramedic (shocker given the title, right?) and less about the individual calls he went on. I should have expected it given the title, but I wasn’t expecting this book to be so academic. I would have thought it would be more exciting and I was expecting to spend more time out in the field on the ambulance. I still enjoyed this book, because I love memoirs and I got really invested in Kevin’s journey. And years of watching medical dramas on tv have left me with somewhat of an interest in medicine so I enjoyed learning about that as well. I just don’t think this is a book that I could recommend to everyone. I feel like I learned a lot from this book and am definitely more interested in emergency field medicine than I was before. Weirdly, I credit my years of medical dramas for the fact that I was able to learn so much. I’m not saying watching Grey’s Anatomy has qualified me to perform surgery or anything, but it played a large part in first exposing me to all of that medical vocabulary, so that I had a vague idea of what a lot of those big words had to do with before I started this book and got better definitions. If I went into this book a little bit more blind, I think I would have been overwhelmed by all of the medical terminology and I wouldn’t have been able to enjoy the book as much. It was also extremely interesting seeing how the medicine in this book differed or was similar to the medicine in fictional situations. One show in particular I was able to draw parallels with was 9-1-1. I started this book earlier this year and then picked it back up in December so that I could finish it before the year was over. During the time that I had put this book down, I watched almost three seasons of 9-1-1 and it’s crazy to me how similar that show was to this book. It makes sense, because the writers of that show did ridealongs with LAFD for a year while working on the show to try to make it as accurate as possible. I would have enjoyed the book anyway, but that extra connection definitely increased my enjoyment. I was so excited to jump right into this that I never really stopped to think about what kind of things we might encounter during his schooling. I’m fairly squeamish and very emotional and afraid of death and bad things happening in general. I started to get afraid a little ways into this that I wasn’t going to be able to make it through the whole thing. There were definitely parts of this that were a little gross that I just tried to get through as quickly as possible and parts that were very sad, but overall that aspect didn’t end up being as bad as I had started to fear. Even though it wasn’t what I expected, my favorite part of this book was still the field internship section. I would not be able to handle my preceptors being so hard on me. I know they’re only doing it because they want him to be the best he can be and because there are lives at stake, but I buckle under that kind of thing. I’m glad that paramedic school is so exacting, because if I ever need that sort of intervention, I would hope that the paramedics who show up know what they’re doing. But it was tough to read about him going through all of that stress. After going on this journey with him, I’m glad he successfully made it through to become a paramedic. I feel like I was able to celebrate that victory with him. I’m really glad he included the section at the end about where he’s been working since graduating paramedic school, because I would have been dying of curiosity. I feel like I wanna keep tabs on him now to see what he does with his career. I also really wanna go on a fire department ridealong now, so I’m going to make sure that happens. I wish that he had included a little bit more information about the other graduates of Class 36. I wanted to know who else made it through and who didn’t. At the very least, I just wanted a total number of people who graduated and people who failed out. This was such an emotional ride. I did end up enjoying this even though it wasn’t what I was expecting, but I don’t think it’s for everybody.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Susanna

    Lights and Sirens Kevin Grange . I was very excited to start reading this book, I also didn’t realise how paramedic books are out there! I started with this one, as this is about the journey of someone studying to become a paramedic at the same time as I did (2011), but in a different country with completely different methods of training and learning. . I had no idea how the paramedic system works in America. This may sound harsh, but I am not surprised that there are so many medical law suits there! Lights and Sirens Kevin Grange . I was very excited to start reading this book, I also didn’t realise how paramedic books are out there! I started with this one, as this is about the journey of someone studying to become a paramedic at the same time as I did (2011), but in a different country with completely different methods of training and learning. . I had no idea how the paramedic system works in America. This may sound harsh, but I am not surprised that there are so many medical law suits there! They study for 4 months, do their practical hours, write exams, and boom, you’re a paramedic. Here in South Africa, you need a 4 year degree to have the same title and use the same skills. I must add that we never have to phone for permission to give drugs or medicine and we are completely independent practitioners. . Studying in South Africa means having class Monday to Friday (one day is set aside for medical rescue training, stuff like high angle, confined space rescue, LMVR, etc.) and then working two shifts on the weekend, either day or night shift. And we also have exam in between. And have to wake up early on Monday mornings for PT before class – military style (singing while jogging as a team in rows of three, etc.). It must be said the whole big ego thing of paramedics are not limited to America, it is rampant this side too! . I know this isn’t really a review of this book, more me comparing the 2 countries EMS systems, but it is very interesting for me how different our training was. In this book, the poor paramedic students are constantly studying (thank goodness they had a few mature, experienced firefighters with them that knows how important it was to work as a team) and they barely slept – defnitly something we had in common! One thing that stood out for me was the fact that there was just one female in the whole class! When I started out in first year, we were 10 females in a class of 30 (if I remember correctly), and that was already very strange for me. I know it’s a man’s world out there and everything, but JUST ONE FEMALE! Come on, America, I thought you guys are suppose to be so progressive. . Another thing that I had in common with the student in the book, was how important it was to try and stay sane. The main character tried to make time for a surf or a jog every now and then to just feel human and relax. Mental health is such an important thing and way too much overlooked in EMS. You see horrible things, yes, but you should never make it personal. You need to have empathy, not sympathy, to survive in this industry. . One very sad thing for me was how the author explained how bad the violence was in the area that he worked – on my first shift ever on an ambulance I saw 3 dead bodies, all murdered. It is a reality in first and third world countries. Agh I have so much to say about this book and EMS, especially in this COVID 19 time. Appreciate your first responders – they really are tuff and the one you want helping you in an emergency. Pray for their safety and mental health. It is bad out there. . I recommend this book for all Americans who wants to know more about EMS, people should know how hard they work (and that for very little money). EMS do it for the love of the job. There is no other job like it and I would do this job with a smile on my face (except when I’m really tired, then I can get grumpy) . #bookreview #bookstagram #bookstagramsouthafrica #booknerd #EMS #paramedic #lightsandsirens #kevingrange

  11. 5 out of 5

    Peter Lilja

    At age thirty-six, Daniel Freeman an aspiring LAFD firefighter enrolls in UCLA’s paramedic program. With aspiring confidence one of being the best emergency medical technicians in the country. Lights & Sirens The Education of a Paramedic, by Daniel Freeman gives you the first hand look of Paramedic school. From pushing medications to chest compressions and defibrillator shocks, he is introduced to the world of emergency medicine. Outside of the classroom, he’s either glued to a ER doctor’s hip, At age thirty-six, Daniel Freeman an aspiring LAFD firefighter enrolls in UCLA’s paramedic program. With aspiring confidence one of being the best emergency medical technicians in the country. Lights & Sirens The Education of a Paramedic, by Daniel Freeman gives you the first hand look of Paramedic school. From pushing medications to chest compressions and defibrillator shocks, he is introduced to the world of emergency medicine. Outside of the classroom, he’s either glued to a ER doctor’s hip, witnessing what happens after the patient if off the stretcher. Or he’s in the field riding shotgun in one of LA’s Paramedic ambulances, interacting and helping real patients in real situations. After closing the final pages I realized this was one of the best books I have ever read. It was just like I was riding shotgun in a screaming ambulance racing to the scene. It was full of inspiration and makes me, and hopefully the other readers, want to push farther and harder towards their goals. 10/10. Full stars from the beginning to end. Young people who are interested in the medical world, just like I have should read it. I would also recommend it to retired firefighters and paramedics who want to flash back to their past. The experience and how Kevin Grange could transform it in words was incredible. It was raw and as in depth as any story could get. Nearing the end, I realized Lights & Sirens brings out one the most incredible aspects of humanity; people working side by side to save a person in need of a second chance.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    Grange chronicles the trials and tribulations of getting through all phases of paramedic school, and while I went into the book expecting it to be the usual theme of reflecting on a career and the most memorable patients treated, I was pleased to read something different and get a strong picture of what it takes to become a paramedic. Grange certainly includes a fair share of patient stories, but the book is a chronological look at everything from walking through the door on the first day of sch Grange chronicles the trials and tribulations of getting through all phases of paramedic school, and while I went into the book expecting it to be the usual theme of reflecting on a career and the most memorable patients treated, I was pleased to read something different and get a strong picture of what it takes to become a paramedic. Grange certainly includes a fair share of patient stories, but the book is a chronological look at everything from walking through the door on the first day of school full of confidence but quickly being knocked down a peg, to facing 'fail and you're out' skills tests, to the culmination of all the learning as a paramedic intern in charge of the calls with an actual Los Angeles ambulance team. Grange and his fellow classmates were all EMTs looking to advance their training to the paramedic level, so they all had ambulance experience and a good foundation of medical knowledge, but paramedic school takes it all to a whole other level. Among other things, 'Lights and Sirens' gave me a new respect for our first responders, and gives me confidence that the men and women who made it through the training to be paramedics are indeed people I can trust my life with in an emergency.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Clare

    Listened to in audio format. At the age of 36 Kevin Grange decided to change careers and become a paramedic. He enrolled at UCLA on the paramedic programme, which is considered the best in the world. As expected it was arduous course with constant exams. Kevin discussed the other trainees on the course which got smaller each week when they didn't make the grade. This book.was a bit slow to get going. The book.really.started for me when he left college to start his internship in a hospital and then Listened to in audio format. At the age of 36 Kevin Grange decided to change careers and become a paramedic. He enrolled at UCLA on the paramedic programme, which is considered the best in the world. As expected it was arduous course with constant exams. Kevin discussed the other trainees on the course which got smaller each week when they didn't make the grade. This book.was a bit slow to get going. The book.really.started for me when he left college to start his internship in a hospital and then as an intern paramedic at the LA fire department. I enjoyed the patients he met and the procedures he performed on real life people. How he was initially he concentrated on the procedures instead of the patient. Kevin had to deal with shootings, heart attacks and the saddest of all a still birth. It was a joy to listen to how Kevin grew for an intern to fully fledged paramedic. I've always had an interest in books with a medical theme and this did not disappoint. This book is a must for anyone wanting to become a paramedic.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

    Overall, great book and especially great to read after taking ACLS. The stories in this book are touching, as well as the passion the author has for people and his job. I just want to highlight an excerpt from the book: "Along with revealing a whole new side of our health care system, teaching me to save lives, and giving me a better appreciation for the country I call home, my experience working in EMS over the years has taught me that the best treatment is often making a personal connection wi Overall, great book and especially great to read after taking ACLS. The stories in this book are touching, as well as the passion the author has for people and his job. I just want to highlight an excerpt from the book: "Along with revealing a whole new side of our health care system, teaching me to save lives, and giving me a better appreciation for the country I call home, my experience working in EMS over the years has taught me that the best treatment is often making a personal connection with your patient. Thanks to EMS, my worldview has expanded and I've discovered that, beyond all our differences, people are fundamentally the same. Like the Declaration of Independence states, we all have the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness and, as a paramedic, my job is to assist with that ever-important foundational element-good health." -Kevin Grange

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tomi-Anne

    I really enjoyed this book. Grange does a wonderful job describing the challenges that a paramedic faces while going through such a rigorous program in such a little amount of time. Reading this book really makes you thankful and appreciate that there are people, like the author, his instructors, his preceptors, and his 'team' that have the compassion to go through this type of program and to help people in an emergent medical situation while some dangerous neighborhoods and some hairy situation I really enjoyed this book. Grange does a wonderful job describing the challenges that a paramedic faces while going through such a rigorous program in such a little amount of time. Reading this book really makes you thankful and appreciate that there are people, like the author, his instructors, his preceptors, and his 'team' that have the compassion to go through this type of program and to help people in an emergent medical situation while some dangerous neighborhoods and some hairy situations. It was a pretty quick, enjoyable read. If you liked this book, you may also like A Thousand Naked Strangers: A Paramedic's Wild Ride to the Edge and Back by Kevin Hazzard. Thanks to all of the Emergency workers out there! We appreciate you!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    For me, I know I've read a good book when I become engaged in a subject I had no previous desire to learn about. Once I read an entire nonfiction book on the history and usage of longitudinal measurement, and I learned that I wanted to know everything there was to know about longitudinal measurement. Likewise, reading this book, I learned that I wanted to know everything there was to know about paramedic school, even though I have exactly zero desire to entire the medical field in any capacity. For me, I know I've read a good book when I become engaged in a subject I had no previous desire to learn about. Once I read an entire nonfiction book on the history and usage of longitudinal measurement, and I learned that I wanted to know everything there was to know about longitudinal measurement. Likewise, reading this book, I learned that I wanted to know everything there was to know about paramedic school, even though I have exactly zero desire to entire the medical field in any capacity. Good book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bronwyn

    This book found me at an incredibly important juncture. For this reason and the extreme detail he uses to describe the education of a first responder undergoes, I had to give it five stars. Between my own experiences of first response and nursing, I found myself relating to so much of this book. From leaving your confidence at the door when starting a shift with a tough preceptor to the elation of actually helping someone and feeling that fulfillment of having done something meaningful, I read t This book found me at an incredibly important juncture. For this reason and the extreme detail he uses to describe the education of a first responder undergoes, I had to give it five stars. Between my own experiences of first response and nursing, I found myself relating to so much of this book. From leaving your confidence at the door when starting a shift with a tough preceptor to the elation of actually helping someone and feeling that fulfillment of having done something meaningful, I read this book slowly, trying to savour it. I will be reading this again.

  18. 4 out of 5

    G.M. Burrow

    A creative writing grad decides to become a paramedic. Talk about two perfect combinations for me, always on the hunt for an adrenaline rush of nonfiction penned by someone who can actually write. Kevin Grange is capable and affably conversational in his prose, but he almost doesn’t have to be—thanks to his terribly fascinating subject material. I had no idea paramedics knew so much and could handle such intense medical emergencies. When I met a paramedic in real life, I felt almost the same awe A creative writing grad decides to become a paramedic. Talk about two perfect combinations for me, always on the hunt for an adrenaline rush of nonfiction penned by someone who can actually write. Kevin Grange is capable and affably conversational in his prose, but he almost doesn’t have to be—thanks to his terribly fascinating subject material. I had no idea paramedics knew so much and could handle such intense medical emergencies. When I met a paramedic in real life, I felt almost the same awe as if I’d met someone who had climbed Everest. Hats off to these guys.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Abby

    While I enjoyed the stories of the calls, I couldn't bear the rest. Only because this is like reading my own autobiography. My paramedic schooling was nearly identical, only 13 months long. This book is a great read, IF you're not already a paramedic. I would have loved to read this before I went to school. My 1 star is not a fair representation of the book, but I only rate books a 1 if I don't finish it. If you're not a medic, read this book. If you are a medic, it's like reliving school, a hec While I enjoyed the stories of the calls, I couldn't bear the rest. Only because this is like reading my own autobiography. My paramedic schooling was nearly identical, only 13 months long. This book is a great read, IF you're not already a paramedic. I would have loved to read this before I went to school. My 1 star is not a fair representation of the book, but I only rate books a 1 if I don't finish it. If you're not a medic, read this book. If you are a medic, it's like reliving school, a hectic time most of us would love to forget.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    Such an accurate description of paramedic school and the struggles that come along with it. As someone that went through it too, I experienced a lot of goosebumps and choked up moments reminiscing on my own struggles during ther difficult time of my life. The way in which Grange describes what he sees and feels is beautifully written and perfectly accurate. Would recommend to anyone that wants to better understand what medics go through to achieve their license and the responsibility that comes Such an accurate description of paramedic school and the struggles that come along with it. As someone that went through it too, I experienced a lot of goosebumps and choked up moments reminiscing on my own struggles during ther difficult time of my life. The way in which Grange describes what he sees and feels is beautifully written and perfectly accurate. Would recommend to anyone that wants to better understand what medics go through to achieve their license and the responsibility that comes along with it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tracey

    I've enjoyed quite a few books by paramedics, as well as surgeons and other doctors, but this book follows a paramedic student through his training, both classroom and in the field. Makes me look at all the work I did in college, student teaching, and graduate school and think, "Whoa. I'm kinda a wimp." I'm amazed at how much these guys learn and practice--and what an asset they are to the medical community! I've enjoyed quite a few books by paramedics, as well as surgeons and other doctors, but this book follows a paramedic student through his training, both classroom and in the field. Makes me look at all the work I did in college, student teaching, and graduate school and think, "Whoa. I'm kinda a wimp." I'm amazed at how much these guys learn and practice--and what an asset they are to the medical community!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Zachary Ransom

    This memoir really reminded me of the experience of Paramedic School. While the programs we attended were scheduled differently, the intensity and emotional roller coaster seem to be almost identical. I enjoyed this read but caught myself wondering if this book created or simply reiterated many of the cliches involved in the experience/field. My inclination is toward the latter, but either way it took away from the author's originality and authenticity. This memoir really reminded me of the experience of Paramedic School. While the programs we attended were scheduled differently, the intensity and emotional roller coaster seem to be almost identical. I enjoyed this read but caught myself wondering if this book created or simply reiterated many of the cliches involved in the experience/field. My inclination is toward the latter, but either way it took away from the author's originality and authenticity.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    Really interesting subject matter and the arc is quite good - a year of training and the episodes that take place in class and in clinical and ambulance internship. Found it a but hu-rah macho chest beating US patriot at times and some of the prose was a bit ho hum - "the tension in the room could light a power station" but all pretty forgivable. Enjoyable and would recommend to prospective EMTs and Paras especially US based. Really interesting subject matter and the arc is quite good - a year of training and the episodes that take place in class and in clinical and ambulance internship. Found it a but hu-rah macho chest beating US patriot at times and some of the prose was a bit ho hum - "the tension in the room could light a power station" but all pretty forgivable. Enjoyable and would recommend to prospective EMTs and Paras especially US based.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Empathy

    I'm giving a poor review because this book was too simplified for a paramedic to read. I would suggest this to people who aren't in the medical field who want to know what schooling is like in the US rather than actual stories, which is I guess what the title says but I was expecting stories from his ambulance ride-outs and stuff not just classroom stories. I'm giving a poor review because this book was too simplified for a paramedic to read. I would suggest this to people who aren't in the medical field who want to know what schooling is like in the US rather than actual stories, which is I guess what the title says but I was expecting stories from his ambulance ride-outs and stuff not just classroom stories.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Prentice Parton

    I enjoy how Kevin takes us on his journey through one of the most challenging medic schools in the country. I think that someone who reads this that hasn't been exposed to the medic terminology could find themselves a bit lost, but anyone with an interest or experience in EMS should pick this one up. I enjoy how Kevin takes us on his journey through one of the most challenging medic schools in the country. I think that someone who reads this that hasn't been exposed to the medic terminology could find themselves a bit lost, but anyone with an interest or experience in EMS should pick this one up.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ed Landsberg

    This book is one of the best books I have ever read. I'm already missing it and look forward to reading it again. A must read for my EMS/Firefighter friends and anyone else interested in first responder emergency medicine. This book is one of the best books I have ever read. I'm already missing it and look forward to reading it again. A must read for my EMS/Firefighter friends and anyone else interested in first responder emergency medicine.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Genna

    This book is incredible. The author is inspiring, humbling, and his story is fascinating. These people are real life heroes. I had no idea the gruelling training they undertake before they even get out amongst it. Everyone should read this to understand what these amazing professionals do.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    If you have interests in becoming a paramedic, or have a general interest in real-life stories about medicine, this is an interesting, informative memoir of how one paramedic endured several grueling months of education and field training in order to become a paramedic in LA.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Brendan Winters

    A well-written memoir of a paramedic’s education and training. I highly recommend this book for anyone in medicine, or those curious about the paramedic profession. Grange’s experience in his training mirrored mine, and reminded me of how awesome the job can be.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    As someone who really wants to go into the emergency medicine field, I found this book very intriguing. It gave me a lot of new information about the field and how to get into it, which is something I love about this book. I loved the way it was written as well. Totally recommend!

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