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An important anthology that reaffirms the classic doctrine of substitutionary atonement and counters the ongoing attacks against it. If ever there was a time and a need for an enthusiastic reaffirmation of the biblical doctrine of substitutionary atonement, it is now. With this foundational tenet under widespread attack, J. I. Packer and Mark Dever’s anthology plays an imp An important anthology that reaffirms the classic doctrine of substitutionary atonement and counters the ongoing attacks against it. If ever there was a time and a need for an enthusiastic reaffirmation of the biblical doctrine of substitutionary atonement, it is now. With this foundational tenet under widespread attack, J. I. Packer and Mark Dever’s anthology plays an important role, issuing a clarion call to readers to stand firm in the truth. In My Place Condemned He Stood combines three classic articles by Packer—“The Heart of the Gospelâ€; his Tyndale Biblical Theology Lecture, “What Did the Cross Achieveâ€; and his introductory essay to John Owen’s The Death of Death in the Death of Christ—with Dever’s recent article, “Nothing but the Blood.†It also features a foreword by the four principals of Together for the Gospel: Dever, Ligon Duncan, C. J. Mahaney, and Al Mohler. Thoughtful readers looking for a compact classic on this increasingly controversial doctrine need look no farther than this penetrating volume. “Here is vintage J. I. Packer accompanied by some younger friends. The magisterial but too-little-known essay ‘What Did the Cross Achieve?’ is itself worth the price of the whole book. And there is much more besides. Here, then, are gospel riches, and In My Place Condemned He Stood marks the spot where the buried treasure lies. Start digging!†Sinclair B. Ferguson, Senior Pastor, First Presbyterian Church, Columbia, South Carolina “The essays in this volume by Packer and Dever are some of the most important things I have ever read. If you want to preach in such a way that results in real conversions and changed lives, you should master the approach to the cross laid out in this book.†Tim Keller, Senior Pastor, Redeemer Presbyterian Church, New York City “This book contains some of the finest essays that have ever been written on the death of Christ.†David F. Wells, Professor of Historical and Systematic Theology, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary “Every student and pastor should own this volume, for the contents are so precious that they deserve more than one reading.†Thomas R. Schreiner, Professor of New Testament Interpretation, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary “Writing with the precision of learned theologians and the passion of forgiven sinners, J. I. Packer and Mark Dever explain the meaning of atonement, substitution, and propitiation—not just as words, but as saving benefits we can only receive from a crucified Savior.†Philip Graham Ryken, Senior Minister, Tenth Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia


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An important anthology that reaffirms the classic doctrine of substitutionary atonement and counters the ongoing attacks against it. If ever there was a time and a need for an enthusiastic reaffirmation of the biblical doctrine of substitutionary atonement, it is now. With this foundational tenet under widespread attack, J. I. Packer and Mark Dever’s anthology plays an imp An important anthology that reaffirms the classic doctrine of substitutionary atonement and counters the ongoing attacks against it. If ever there was a time and a need for an enthusiastic reaffirmation of the biblical doctrine of substitutionary atonement, it is now. With this foundational tenet under widespread attack, J. I. Packer and Mark Dever’s anthology plays an important role, issuing a clarion call to readers to stand firm in the truth. In My Place Condemned He Stood combines three classic articles by Packer—“The Heart of the Gospelâ€; his Tyndale Biblical Theology Lecture, “What Did the Cross Achieveâ€; and his introductory essay to John Owen’s The Death of Death in the Death of Christ—with Dever’s recent article, “Nothing but the Blood.†It also features a foreword by the four principals of Together for the Gospel: Dever, Ligon Duncan, C. J. Mahaney, and Al Mohler. Thoughtful readers looking for a compact classic on this increasingly controversial doctrine need look no farther than this penetrating volume. “Here is vintage J. I. Packer accompanied by some younger friends. The magisterial but too-little-known essay ‘What Did the Cross Achieve?’ is itself worth the price of the whole book. And there is much more besides. Here, then, are gospel riches, and In My Place Condemned He Stood marks the spot where the buried treasure lies. Start digging!†Sinclair B. Ferguson, Senior Pastor, First Presbyterian Church, Columbia, South Carolina “The essays in this volume by Packer and Dever are some of the most important things I have ever read. If you want to preach in such a way that results in real conversions and changed lives, you should master the approach to the cross laid out in this book.†Tim Keller, Senior Pastor, Redeemer Presbyterian Church, New York City “This book contains some of the finest essays that have ever been written on the death of Christ.†David F. Wells, Professor of Historical and Systematic Theology, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary “Every student and pastor should own this volume, for the contents are so precious that they deserve more than one reading.†Thomas R. Schreiner, Professor of New Testament Interpretation, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary “Writing with the precision of learned theologians and the passion of forgiven sinners, J. I. Packer and Mark Dever explain the meaning of atonement, substitution, and propitiation—not just as words, but as saving benefits we can only receive from a crucified Savior.†Philip Graham Ryken, Senior Minister, Tenth Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia

30 review for In My Place Condemned He Stood: Celebrating the Glory of the Atonement

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    This is one of the most significant books I've ever read. It deals with one of the most important theological battles of our day--literally, a crucial argument--and in dealing with it, presents a concise, straight-forward, and gracious defense and explanation of an incredibly important doctrine: the penal substitutionary view of the atonement. The book is primarily composed of several essays by Packer and Dever relating to the atonement, here collected in one place for the first time. Packer is, This is one of the most significant books I've ever read. It deals with one of the most important theological battles of our day--literally, a crucial argument--and in dealing with it, presents a concise, straight-forward, and gracious defense and explanation of an incredibly important doctrine: the penal substitutionary view of the atonement. The book is primarily composed of several essays by Packer and Dever relating to the atonement, here collected in one place for the first time. Packer is, as always, brilliant and humble and direct. Dever's contribution was much smaller and less "intellectual" but still very helpful. The table of contents is as follows: Foreword (Ligon Duncan, R. Albert Mohler Jr., Mark Dever, and C.J. Mahaney) -- discussing the need for the book and the reasons why they decided to compile it Preface: A Tract for the Times (J.I. Packer and Mark Dever) -- further explanation of the need for the book, and a preview of what they hoped to accomplish: the defense of a doctrine through the creative exposition of it Introduction: Penal Substitution Revisited (J.I. Packer) -- short overview of "the best part of the best news that the world has ever heard" The Heart of the Gospel (J.I. Packer) -- (chapter 18 of Knowing God) defends the concept of propitiation as opposed to expiation, and explains how an understanding of propitiation is necessary to fully comprehend every other vital Scriptural truth (examples given: the driving force in Jesus' life, the destiny of those who reject God, God's gift of peace, the dimensions of the love of God, and the glory of God) What Did the Cross Achieve? The Logic of Penal Substitution (J.I. Packer) -- the thickest intellectual part of the book, but this is no dry and dusty theological argument: Packer's passion for Christ and reverence for the Scriptures is overwhelmingly evident as he lays out a clear and forthright case for penal substitution as the truest and most God-glorifying understanding of the atonement (of particular interest in this chapter is the part of his argument based on limited atonement) Nothing But the Blood (Mark Dever) -- a short and sweet overview of four criticisms of penal substitution, the Scriptural backing for the doctrine, and the fact that it isn't possible to be "too atonement-centered"; if we truly understand this doctrine, it's impossible for our everyday lives to not be deeply affected by it Saved By His Precious Blood: An Introduction to John Owen's The Death of Death in the Death of Christ (J.I. Packer) -- a brilliant, brilliant comparison of the "old gospel" and the "new gospel"; a definition and defense of "Calvinism" in general; and an exposition of limited atonement -- plus, one of the best paragraphs presenting the gospel that I've ever read Epilogue: Christ-Centered Means Cross-Centered (J.I. Packer and Mark Dever) -- the importance of the cross in the Scriptures, and the necessity of thinking in Christ-centered and cross-centered terms Books on the Cross of Christ (Ligon Duncan) -- short lists approaching further study from various angles, including top ten must-reads; short, popular introductory books; sermons; pastoral application; systematic theologies; chronological listing of historically significant works; and important confessional statements Annotated Bibliography (Ligon Duncan) -- very helpful and comprehensive bibliography (gives further information on all the books and authors mentioned in the previous section, plus many more) In summation, I really can't recommend this book highly enough. I am so grateful for Packer and Dever and the truth and wisdom that they have taken the time and effort to expound. I hadn't understood even a tiny fraction of the glory and beauty and wonder of the atonement, and while I know that I've just barely scratched the surface, this book gave me a window onto a whole new vista of the goodness and mercy of God and the preciousness of Christ. I realized that I hadn't any business thinking I knew anything when I didn't understand the heart of the gospel. I definitely plan to pursue this study further. "If the true measure of love is how low it stoops to help, and how much in its humility it is ready to do and bear, than it may fairly be claimed that the penal substitutionary model embodies a richer witness to divine love than any other model of atonement, for it sees the Son at his Father's will going lower than any other view ventures to suggest."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    Excellent! Read it!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    This is a strange little book. It consists of a Forward with contributions from four different people, a magazine article Packer wrote, a chapter from his book Knowing God, a highly technical treatise on penal substitution, an introduction he penned for John Owen's The Death of Death in the Death of Christ, a brief article Mark Dever wrote for Christianity today, a Prologue and Epilogue co-authored by Packer and Dever, and two bibliography sections written by Ligon Duncan. It's a mishmash of pie This is a strange little book. It consists of a Forward with contributions from four different people, a magazine article Packer wrote, a chapter from his book Knowing God, a highly technical treatise on penal substitution, an introduction he penned for John Owen's The Death of Death in the Death of Christ, a brief article Mark Dever wrote for Christianity today, a Prologue and Epilogue co-authored by Packer and Dever, and two bibliography sections written by Ligon Duncan. It's a mishmash of pieces with no sense of coherency to the composition. But as for content, there is some real treasure here. It's actually a marvel to see Packer's range of writing style. His chapter from Knowing God is written plainly for a popular audience, yet loses nothing of substance in doing so; there is no dilution. That's followed by an essay of completely different form: heavily academic, taking up important theological points but in a very esoteric manner. And in his Introduction to Owen, he almost takes a fighter's stance. The gentle man Packer stands tall and outlines what he frames as a defense of Calvinism, but is really broader and more significant than that. It's a sharp-tongued refutation of false teachings and a sure-handed articulation of proper biblical theology. It is absolutely spectacular. The whole book is worth that single essay alone. Five stars for Packer's pieces. One star docked for the odd mixture of sources. Would have been a standout if it were expanded by an essay or two and confined to being only a collection of Packer's work.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Gossett

    I will recommend this book to anybody who wants to look into the atonement, and what it actually accomplished, for as long as I live. Packer in this book, was precise in how he broke down, and explained the two views of Universal Redemption and Penal Substitution, and how only one can be biblically accurate and assure the salvation of anyone. (Basically a breakdown of how the view of the atonement is what separates Calvinism and Arminianism) "For the Lamb to be the lamp of the city of God means I will recommend this book to anybody who wants to look into the atonement, and what it actually accomplished, for as long as I live. Packer in this book, was precise in how he broke down, and explained the two views of Universal Redemption and Penal Substitution, and how only one can be biblically accurate and assure the salvation of anyone. (Basically a breakdown of how the view of the atonement is what separates Calvinism and Arminianism) "For the Lamb to be the lamp of the city of God means that the thought of the Son of God made flesh and slaughtered for our sins in order to save us will never leave the minds of glorified saints as they fellowship with the Father and Son and will frame all their thinking about everything else" "God Saves Sinners" Please read this!!!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Knowlton Murphy

    Gold. These essays offer substantial evidence that substitutionary atonement as a means of propitiation for our sin is at the heart of biblical Christianity--and they do so in a way that awes and inspires greater affection for Christ. Packer was already instrumental in helping me reconcile a high view of God's sovereignty with mission/evangelism...so in many ways reading his defense of Calvinism in his intro for Owen's "Death of Death in the Death of Christ" felt like a sort of theological homec Gold. These essays offer substantial evidence that substitutionary atonement as a means of propitiation for our sin is at the heart of biblical Christianity--and they do so in a way that awes and inspires greater affection for Christ. Packer was already instrumental in helping me reconcile a high view of God's sovereignty with mission/evangelism...so in many ways reading his defense of Calvinism in his intro for Owen's "Death of Death in the Death of Christ" felt like a sort of theological homecoming. Despite this book's brevity and accessibility, I read it very slowly over a period of two years or so--so, sadly, many of it's treasures evade memory just now. The memory of their existence is already compelling me to read it again, though.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    This is a compilation of the best essays on the atonement according to the leaders of "Together 4 the Gospel." It was awesome. I read this for Resurrection weekend just to get my mind set on the work of Christ on the Cross a little more. I have to say at times I was weeping as I read what Christ accomplished for God's elect. Hallelujah! What a Savior! This is a compilation of the best essays on the atonement according to the leaders of "Together 4 the Gospel." It was awesome. I read this for Resurrection weekend just to get my mind set on the work of Christ on the Cross a little more. I have to say at times I was weeping as I read what Christ accomplished for God's elect. Hallelujah! What a Savior!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Josh Anders

    Picked up this collection of essays to read some the legendary J.I. Packer, who just passed a few weeks ago. This book contains 3 essays by Packer, which are all outstanding, and one by Dever, which was fine. The last sentence in Dever’s essay is horrible, if i am understanding it correctly. Probably best to skip this one and just read Packer’s essays. Packer argues that penal substitution is the only Biblical way to view the cross and ultimately leaves the reader in awe of Christ’s work. ‘What Picked up this collection of essays to read some the legendary J.I. Packer, who just passed a few weeks ago. This book contains 3 essays by Packer, which are all outstanding, and one by Dever, which was fine. The last sentence in Dever’s essay is horrible, if i am understanding it correctly. Probably best to skip this one and just read Packer’s essays. Packer argues that penal substitution is the only Biblical way to view the cross and ultimately leaves the reader in awe of Christ’s work. ‘What did the cross achieve?’ Should be read by every Christian. The last essay, ‘Saved by His Precious Blood,’ (intro essay to Owen’s famous ‘The Death of Death’) is probably the best short argument for Calvinism I have read. Packer masterfully shows that Arminianism, brought to its end, it’s detrimental to the gospel. One would be hard pressed to read this essay and at least wonder how anyone could Biblically believe that Christ died to achieve the possibility of salvation and not the actual salvation of His church.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tyler Brown

    A short book of beautiful theology. This is a later compilation of four essays that were published in different contexts, which makes for a diverse read. The first chapter is a classic from Knowing God. It is a clear and accessible defense of propitiation. The second is an academic paper from Tyndale house. This is more academic and assumes knowledge of the major players and theories. The third is Dever's CT article, in many ways a summary of Packer's second essay. Fourth is the introduction to A short book of beautiful theology. This is a later compilation of four essays that were published in different contexts, which makes for a diverse read. The first chapter is a classic from Knowing God. It is a clear and accessible defense of propitiation. The second is an academic paper from Tyndale house. This is more academic and assumes knowledge of the major players and theories. The third is Dever's CT article, in many ways a summary of Packer's second essay. Fourth is the introduction to Owen's Death of Death; a beautifully written treatment. For a laymen's first book on the Atonement, Piper's 50 reasons would be better. For someone wanting to study the doctrine in detail, Stott's Cross of Christ would be better.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Emma

    This is probably the deepest book I've ever read. There were times I had to really slow down to try and just figure out what Packer was saying. His introduction to Owen's Death of death was the highlight of the book in my opinion. Phenomenal chapter! I probably won't recommend this to many people because of its difficulty to read (not because of old style writing or bad writing, but because of deep theology), but it's the best work in penal substitution I know of. This is probably the deepest book I've ever read. There were times I had to really slow down to try and just figure out what Packer was saying. His introduction to Owen's Death of death was the highlight of the book in my opinion. Phenomenal chapter! I probably won't recommend this to many people because of its difficulty to read (not because of old style writing or bad writing, but because of deep theology), but it's the best work in penal substitution I know of.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Matt Crawford

    In my Place is a brief and short gem that I would recommend to any layperson wanting time dig deeper into the subject of the atonement. It would be a nice asset to any pastor or biblical scholar. Though they may have been able to read parts of it before. Aside from the annotated bibliography at the end of the book, it is a collection of essays that may have been read elsewhere. In particular is packers introduction to the death of death by John Owen. Get this gold!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Colin Michaelis

    This book contains 4 essays, 3 by Packer and 1 by Dever that are solid teaching on the cross, substitutionary atonement and penal substitution. The book was so humbling and so good. Humbling because reading Packer stretched my mind a lot and in some parts it simply was over my head. Good because the theology is so central to sound Christian belief and a counter to false views on soteriology and even careless ways of talking about salvation.

  12. 5 out of 5

    John Benzing

    Why Five Star for this book? Because, as other great books on the Atonement that I’ve read, Christ’s work for sinners on the Cross, God the Father’s gracious acceptance of that work and the Holy Spirit’s application of it to sinners are shown as the “stars” of the salvation. Thanks be to God for His unspeakable gift.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Austin Kim

    This book provides a biblical understanding on the doctrine of atonement. Admittedly, it is one of the more heady books I've read and I will definitely have to re-read it in the future, but it grew my appreciation of what was accomplished by God on the cross. Mark Dever's contribution helped to clear up some of the more academic portions of J.I. Packer's writing. Solid, biblical, and worshipful. This book provides a biblical understanding on the doctrine of atonement. Admittedly, it is one of the more heady books I've read and I will definitely have to re-read it in the future, but it grew my appreciation of what was accomplished by God on the cross. Mark Dever's contribution helped to clear up some of the more academic portions of J.I. Packer's writing. Solid, biblical, and worshipful.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Usherwoodm

    Excellent book, looking forward to reading this again and again in the coming years!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Joe Roseman

    This was supremely helpful and I will certainly read it again.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mark Nenadov

    Excellent essays by J. I. Packer and Mark Dever on this crucial Christian doctrine. It has a good annotated bibliography too.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Sammy

    Amazing clarity on the subject of atonement plus additional reading suggestions, some of the best, by other notable authors.

  18. 5 out of 5

    John

    This excellent compilation of Packer's essays on the atonement is definitely worth the read for those interested in the subject or seeking to deepen their understanding of the cross. Each essay is quite different, so I would recommend the reader pass those which he/she doesn't feel gripped by. If you've never engaged the subject, Dever's contribution might be the best place to start. If you're particularly interested in the basics of Calvinism, start with Packer's introduction to "The Death of D This excellent compilation of Packer's essays on the atonement is definitely worth the read for those interested in the subject or seeking to deepen their understanding of the cross. Each essay is quite different, so I would recommend the reader pass those which he/she doesn't feel gripped by. If you've never engaged the subject, Dever's contribution might be the best place to start. If you're particularly interested in the basics of Calvinism, start with Packer's introduction to "The Death of Death" in ch. 4; and if you want to plunge into penal substitutionary atonement to its core, read ch. 2 "What did the Cross Achieve?" I only have three minor critiques of the book, the first two of which can't really be helped: 1) the age of some of the chapters shows from time to time -- while the opponents Packer squares up against are still legitimate, some have morphed in minor and substantive ways; 2) the nature of a collection of essays is that there isn't a real movement to the book. That's not the fault of the book, but every chapter feels like you're starting afresh; and well, you are; 3) I do wish there would have been a couple other chapters contributed by other authors -- there are aspects of the penal substitionary atonement I would have liked to see others deal with.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ray Wilkins

    I found this book to both informative and at time irritating. The biblical and theological discussion concerning Penal Substitution are excellent. Packer, in traditional fashion, is precise and thorough. However, packer at time can be irritating and condescending. There is, in evangelical as well as Baptist life, an ongoing to discussion as well as disagreement over the meaning of election and calling. Packer argues, that those who do not hold to the traditional doctrines of Calvinism, which in I found this book to both informative and at time irritating. The biblical and theological discussion concerning Penal Substitution are excellent. Packer, in traditional fashion, is precise and thorough. However, packer at time can be irritating and condescending. There is, in evangelical as well as Baptist life, an ongoing to discussion as well as disagreement over the meaning of election and calling. Packer argues, that those who do not hold to the traditional doctrines of Calvinism, which in his opinion are the traditional doctrines of the Apostolic Church, simply do not believe the gospel. Granted, non-Reformed Evangelicals have been kind to their Calvinist brethren, but let us set aside the heretical rhetoric and try to come to meeting point. For packer, it seems their can be no meeting point unless one becomes a Calvinist.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lillie

    I found this challenging to read but well worth it. I've always realized the sacrifice Christ made for us in terms of the physical torture and death, but it was only a few years ago that I began to understand how He really suffered. The spiritual pain He felt when my sins and the sins of the whole world were placed upon Him and separated Him from the Father was infinitely worse than the horrific physical pain He felt. In My Place Condemned He Stood reminded me of the magnitude of Jesus' sacrific I found this challenging to read but well worth it. I've always realized the sacrifice Christ made for us in terms of the physical torture and death, but it was only a few years ago that I began to understand how He really suffered. The spiritual pain He felt when my sins and the sins of the whole world were placed upon Him and separated Him from the Father was infinitely worse than the horrific physical pain He felt. In My Place Condemned He Stood reminded me of the magnitude of Jesus' sacrifice and made me even more grateful for His atonement.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Geoff Lanotte

    I doubt that I was the target audience for this book. It is a collection of 4 essays concerning the atonement and the doctrine of penal substitution. 3 of the essays are from Packer and 1 from Dever. I enjoyed all of them, although I believe the second was a little far over my head. I had to slow down and read it very carefully. The final essay which is Packer's introduction to Owen's "The Death of Death in the Death of Christ" was beautiful and worth the price of the book. The theology in these I doubt that I was the target audience for this book. It is a collection of 4 essays concerning the atonement and the doctrine of penal substitution. 3 of the essays are from Packer and 1 from Dever. I enjoyed all of them, although I believe the second was a little far over my head. I had to slow down and read it very carefully. The final essay which is Packer's introduction to Owen's "The Death of Death in the Death of Christ" was beautiful and worth the price of the book. The theology in these pages is rich and will leave you in awe of our glorious Savior.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Othym

    I found this book to be helpful in (1) understanding the substitutionary nature of the atonement, (2) understanding the Biblical Gospel and how to present it, and (3) understanding John Owen's book "The Death of Death in the Death of Christ." This book challenged me and made me think, especially in how I speak about the Gospel. "True Christ-centeredness is, and ever must be, cross-centeredness." -J.I. Packer I found this book to be helpful in (1) understanding the substitutionary nature of the atonement, (2) understanding the Biblical Gospel and how to present it, and (3) understanding John Owen's book "The Death of Death in the Death of Christ." This book challenged me and made me think, especially in how I speak about the Gospel. "True Christ-centeredness is, and ever must be, cross-centeredness." -J.I. Packer

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    Short, but convincing collection of previously published essays on the atonement by Packer and Dever. The book ends with an important annotated bibliography of books past and present on the atonement.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dylan Bailey

    This was one of the best books i read last year! Packer does a fabulous job of laying out and defending the doctrine of penal substitutionary atonement. If you wish to have a greater grasp of all that took place on the cross of Jesus, then i suggest reading this book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Simon

    This book has so much excellent stuff in it, but I wasn't as impressed as I thought I would be. Every pastor and Christian leader should read it, still. Dever's contribution is a highlight. This book has so much excellent stuff in it, but I wasn't as impressed as I thought I would be. Every pastor and Christian leader should read it, still. Dever's contribution is a highlight.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay Kennedy

    Extremely helpful on understanding the atonement and the penal substitution view in particular. Also includes a great list of recommended books.

  27. 4 out of 5

    High Pointe Baptist Church

    Collection of articles on the nature of Christ's atonement; useful if you want to dig deeper into the doctrine Collection of articles on the nature of Christ's atonement; useful if you want to dig deeper into the doctrine

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kent

    I very much enjoyed the Packer work on Penal Substitionary Atonement. However, the rest of the hyper Calvinism stuff was poorly conceived, a bit arrogant, and unhelpful.

  29. 5 out of 5

    David

    An important little book that points to the work of the Lord jesus Christ upon the Cross as our only hope.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Roberts

    In this book Packer comments that John Owen requires multiple reads because of the depth well the same is true for Packer. But this book was awesome!! Highly recommended!

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