web site hit counter Speculative Fiction 2014: The Year’s Best Online Reviews, Essays and Commentary - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Speculative Fiction 2014: The Year’s Best Online Reviews, Essays and Commentary

Availability: Ready to download

What exactly is fanfiction? How are women "destroying" science fiction? Why are we Sansa Stark? Why is Nick Fury the Tyranny of Evil Men? The Internet has the answers. Speculative Fiction 2014 collects over fifty of the best reviews, essays and media commentary from all facets of SFF. From insightful deconstruction of major blockbuster films, to considered arguments for d What exactly is fanfiction? How are women "destroying" science fiction? Why are we Sansa Stark? Why is Nick Fury the Tyranny of Evil Men? The Internet has the answers. Speculative Fiction 2014 collects over fifty of the best reviews, essays and media commentary from all facets of SFF. From insightful deconstruction of major blockbuster films, to considered arguments for diversity and inclusivity in science fiction and fantasy, this edition highlights many of the most complex, fraught, and important events in speculative fiction fandom from 2014. Contributors include: Abigail Nussbaum, Adam Roberts, Aidan Moher, Aja Romano, Alex Dally MacFarlane, Amal El-Mohtar, Ana Grilo, Andrew Lapin, Annalee Newitz, Anne C. Perry, Bertha Chin, Betty, Charles Tan, Chinelo Onwualu, Clare McBride, Corinne Duyvis, Daniel José Older, Deborah Pless, Ebony Elizabeth Thomas, Erika Jelinek, Foz Meadows, Gavia Baker-Whitelaw, Joe Sherry, Jonathan McCalmont, Juliet Kahn, Justin Landon, Kameron Hurley, Kari Sperring, Ken Neth, Mahvesh Murad, Martin Petto, Matthew Cheney, Memory Scarlett, Mieneke van der Salm, N.K. Jemisin, Natalie Luhrs, Ng Suat Tong, Nina Allan, Olivia Waite, Paul Weimer, Rachael Acks, Rebecca Pahle, Renay, Rose Lemberg, Saathi Press, Sara L. Sumpter, Shaun Duke, Tade Thompson, Tasha Robinson, The G, thingswithwings, and Vandana Singh. With a foreword by Kate Elliott and cover by Kenda Montgomery.


Compare

What exactly is fanfiction? How are women "destroying" science fiction? Why are we Sansa Stark? Why is Nick Fury the Tyranny of Evil Men? The Internet has the answers. Speculative Fiction 2014 collects over fifty of the best reviews, essays and media commentary from all facets of SFF. From insightful deconstruction of major blockbuster films, to considered arguments for d What exactly is fanfiction? How are women "destroying" science fiction? Why are we Sansa Stark? Why is Nick Fury the Tyranny of Evil Men? The Internet has the answers. Speculative Fiction 2014 collects over fifty of the best reviews, essays and media commentary from all facets of SFF. From insightful deconstruction of major blockbuster films, to considered arguments for diversity and inclusivity in science fiction and fantasy, this edition highlights many of the most complex, fraught, and important events in speculative fiction fandom from 2014. Contributors include: Abigail Nussbaum, Adam Roberts, Aidan Moher, Aja Romano, Alex Dally MacFarlane, Amal El-Mohtar, Ana Grilo, Andrew Lapin, Annalee Newitz, Anne C. Perry, Bertha Chin, Betty, Charles Tan, Chinelo Onwualu, Clare McBride, Corinne Duyvis, Daniel José Older, Deborah Pless, Ebony Elizabeth Thomas, Erika Jelinek, Foz Meadows, Gavia Baker-Whitelaw, Joe Sherry, Jonathan McCalmont, Juliet Kahn, Justin Landon, Kameron Hurley, Kari Sperring, Ken Neth, Mahvesh Murad, Martin Petto, Matthew Cheney, Memory Scarlett, Mieneke van der Salm, N.K. Jemisin, Natalie Luhrs, Ng Suat Tong, Nina Allan, Olivia Waite, Paul Weimer, Rachael Acks, Rebecca Pahle, Renay, Rose Lemberg, Saathi Press, Sara L. Sumpter, Shaun Duke, Tade Thompson, Tasha Robinson, The G, thingswithwings, and Vandana Singh. With a foreword by Kate Elliott and cover by Kenda Montgomery.

48 review for Speculative Fiction 2014: The Year’s Best Online Reviews, Essays and Commentary

  1. 5 out of 5

    TheBookSmugglers

    This is totally amazeballs. Proud to be publishing this amazing collection of the creme-de-la-creme of online SFF conversations.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Renay

    Hello, book I helped make! :D

  3. 5 out of 5

    Melina

    Recently I’ve spent a lot more time reading anthologies of one type of another. When you read enough of these, you develop a real admiration for good editing in them, the way an editor has selected works, fitted them to the work, moved them around until they’re in the right place and created a cohesive feel to a work made up of many very individual pieces. Good editing highlights the absolute best works, while allowing every work to shine. Good editing also removes that which does not belong. I w Recently I’ve spent a lot more time reading anthologies of one type of another. When you read enough of these, you develop a real admiration for good editing in them, the way an editor has selected works, fitted them to the work, moved them around until they’re in the right place and created a cohesive feel to a work made up of many very individual pieces. Good editing highlights the absolute best works, while allowing every work to shine. Good editing also removes that which does not belong. I was really looking forward to reading Speculative Fiction 2014 – there’s brilliant work being published on blogs and online magazines across the internet and a collection is a great way to enjoy them. However, when you’re essentially curating essays which are free to read, and then charging people for it, you’ve got to get the selection and arranging part of editing right. Speculative Fiction 2014 failed to do this. There’s an immediate feel of whiplash in this book from the introduction which talks about reaching out into a growing and diverse community to the very first piece of work, A Guide to Fanfiction for People Who Can’t Stop Getting It Wrong by Gavia Baker-Whitelaw and Aja Romano which scolds and disparages people who don’t approach fanfiction (never fan fiction, according to their rules, if you use fan fiction you’re not ‘one of us’) in the same way they do. It might have been constructed as a funny piece of writing, but in the context of the book – and particularly occupying that opening, setting the scene, place, it comes across as a nasty, generalised and divisive piece of writing, which leaves a bad taste in the mouth for the entirety of the book. This was followed by a number of articles which were so removed from context (there are links, but you’ve got to care enough to follow them – after the opening piece, I simply didn’t care) that it was hard to figure out why they mattered. Several of the pieces go on way beyond the initial point or completely off on some unrelated and uninteresting tangent – completely normal for blog posts, but really uncomfortable within a book. Some of the selections felt really unbalanced too. If you only read this book, you might be left with the impression that LonCon (and World Cons by connection) was an uncomfortable experience based on one included essay (with completely valid points, but only one point of view) – this didn’t feel like a complete story compared to other things I read and heard, but nothing else was included about LonCon. Meanwhile, there were rebutting essays to whether authors should talk about their award eligible works and a rebuttal essay on whether or not How To Train Your Dragon 2 was feminist or not. Rebuttal essays are fine (though they can be kind of boring), but there are other ways to express different points of view, or to expand on points of view and those rebuttals don’t always need to be included when curating. There were extreme highlights, of course N. K. Jemisin’s Wiscon Guest of Honour Speech is still magnificent as is Chinelo Onwualu’s The Unbearable Solitude of Being an African Fan Girl. These works are examples of why Years Bests are important – beautifully written, incredibly powerful and they retain their power even when read out of immediate context (I’m reminded of Julia Gillard’s Misogyny speech which retains the same out of context power). There were also less well known, but equally well written and interesting pieces which stood out and it’s a pity that they were overwhelmed by rambling or poorly chosen pieces or by a general feeling of ‘ugh’ over the entire work after the first piece of writing. This is an important series of work, and with different editors, each year will look and feel different. I can only hope that the 2015 editors approach their role as curators, including the amazing pieces which are already being written this year, making thoughtful choices about when to leave things balanced or unbalanced and how things go together to make a cohesive picture of the conversations of a wide and diverse community. Originally reviewed at Subversive Reader

  4. 5 out of 5

    Megan Leigh

    This review originally appeared on Pop Verse. This collection of critical writing on SF taps into the SF community and the debates happening around what we all love best: speculative fiction. This doesn’t just mean SF writing (though this is where the bulk of the essays are focused), but also covers films, TV, and comics. As a whole, the collection provides a neat insight into the previous year’s SF works, controversies, and media, though at times it gets bogged down in certain issues while prese This review originally appeared on Pop Verse. This collection of critical writing on SF taps into the SF community and the debates happening around what we all love best: speculative fiction. This doesn’t just mean SF writing (though this is where the bulk of the essays are focused), but also covers films, TV, and comics. As a whole, the collection provides a neat insight into the previous year’s SF works, controversies, and media, though at times it gets bogged down in certain issues while presenting only one side of the argument. Speculative Fiction 2014 is split into three sections: Fandom: Essays and Criticism, Media Commentary, and Reviews. While they are all intrinsically linked and certainly focused on SF as a whole, it makes for fairly disjointed reading. The essay and media commentaries are easier to gorge yourself on than a stack of reviews, one after the other. I can’t say I’ve ever thought about reading a collection of reviews, and having waded through the collection provided, my opinion hasn’t changed. Reviews are great when you want to find something new or interested in what others think of something before giving it a go yourself – but for mass consumption? No thanks. Fandom: Essays and Criticism Being an SF fan, I’ve seen the underbelly of it all. I know the vitriolic attacks that some writers and fans receive first hand. While I see the issues at hand and know that they ought to be discussed – certainly over being swept under the rug – I wonder if it is where we need to be expending all our energy. The entire first third of Speculative Fiction 2014 is dedicated to essays; and almost all of them focus on the nastier aspects of the community. I get it, the community’s been overrun by BS misogyny and prejudice, but is it so much to ask to have essays dedicated to what makes us a community? Where’s the commentary on interesting trends in recently published SF, or looking at where things have been going well in the community? Trust me, I’m not usually a glass half full kind of person, but by the end of this section of constant downers, I had to wonder where the positivity had gone. If things are really this unrelentingly bad, should I bother continuing to be a part of this community? Of course! At its core, no matter what is going on in terms of assholes being assholes, we are all here because we love SF. No one can take that away from us. As a result, the essay that spoke to me most also happened to be the essay that opened the collection: ‘A guide to fanfiction for people who can’t stop getting it wrong’ by Gavia Baker-Whitelaw and Aja Romano. Tackling misunderstandings of the fandom and community from the outside world is a great place to start. While I love SF, I have to admit that fanfic is an area I’ve been on the outs with since I was a teenager. I used to gorge myself on it from sun up to sun down, but I’ve not kept up with what’s been happening in that world at all. So to get an insight into the world of fanfic as it stands today was great, and the positive set-up of clearing up the murky waters for people not in the know was a great way to tackle the issues. Media Commentary This is the strongest section of the collection. While the first third of the book suffers from a slightly heavy handed agenda when it comes to the inclusion of certain essays, there’s a refreshing amount of balance in the second act. Having said that, there is an obvious leftist POV to the content, focusing on gender and inclusion issues that have plagued the genre for years. However, even these issues have multiple facets with different people interpreting the content in different ways, and that’s where Speculative Fiction 2014 finds its strength. Where one opinion is presented, an opposing one is often served up directly afterwards – and is often the rebuttal for the very piece we just read. Here. We get far more pieces looking at what makes speculative fiction great and why fans grow giddy at all the wonderful discussions the content can spark. What’s particular enjoyable about this section is the variety of voices that all have one thing in common: they are passionate about what they are arguing. Whether they are arguing for the brilliance of Teen Wolf or Sailor Moon, vehemently arguing against the media’s representation of Black Widow, or discussing how feminist How To Train Your Dragon 2 really was, every commentator believes in their position entirely. And that makes for some really entertaining and persuasive reading – also slightly worrying when you find yourself agreeing with two sides of the arguments while consumed by a particular article. There’s much food for thought here; something to keep you mulling over for a few days. Reviews I feel like I’m on some kind of endless meta spiral… reviewing a collection of critical work. To make things even more ‘down the rabbit hole’, why not have this very review make it into next year’s collection. That would really screw with people’s minds. When it came to the final section of the collection, I had to wonder why… Surely there are a lot more essays and commentaries that could be included over piles of reviews? I would have preferred a list of sites to go to for great SF-related reviews than a giant pile of reviews, to be honest. I’m still not sure why anyone would want to consume SF reviews in this way, but if it does interest you, there are plenty of well written and diverse reviews here. I just couldn’t get to grips with why anyone would want to consume them in this collected format. Verdict: If you want to get a snapshot of what’s been going on in the SF community recently but won’t to stay away from getting sucked into the Internet’s wily ways, Speculative Fiction 2014 will give you a nice taster. While it is very liberal in its agenda – an agenda I happen to agree very much with – it might not be what you want if you’re looking for something that encapsulates all sides of the pervasive arguments in the SF community. Speculative Fiction 2014 is edited by Renee Williams and Shaun Duke. Foreword by Kate Elliott. Afterword by Foz Meadows and Mark Oshiro. Published by Book Smugglers Publishing.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Timo

    A collection of essays on science fiction which were published last year somewhere on Internet. The subject matters are very varied and include option pieces, critical evaluations and more ordinary reviews. Some were pretty interesting eq. "A Guide to Fanfiction" and N. K Jemisin’s Guest of Honor speech from Wiscon. Some were less interesting like a pages and pages long analysis of Captain America – The Winter Soldier. It was an OK movie, but I not so much into the Marvel universe that I would h A collection of essays on science fiction which were published last year somewhere on Internet. The subject matters are very varied and include option pieces, critical evaluations and more ordinary reviews. Some were pretty interesting eq. "A Guide to Fanfiction" and N. K Jemisin’s Guest of Honor speech from Wiscon. Some were less interesting like a pages and pages long analysis of Captain America – The Winter Soldier. It was an OK movie, but I not so much into the Marvel universe that I would have such an interest on it. Also some reviews of things I hadn’t even heard of were something I mostly skimmed. As a whole an interesting collection, which did get my nomination for a Hugo.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tyrannosaurus regina

    I read most of this book when it came out, then decided I wasn't going to read the reviews section until I'd read as many of the books reviewed as I could get my hands on (I'd read about half already, and most of the rest were in my reading queue). While I was familiar with the conversations as a whole when it came to a lot of the prime topics of 2014, there was a lot in this compilation that I hadn't read yet and I'm grateful to it for broadening my perspective. I read most of this book when it came out, then decided I wasn't going to read the reviews section until I'd read as many of the books reviewed as I could get my hands on (I'd read about half already, and most of the rest were in my reading queue). While I was familiar with the conversations as a whole when it came to a lot of the prime topics of 2014, there was a lot in this compilation that I hadn't read yet and I'm grateful to it for broadening my perspective.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    DAT COVER.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jessa

  9. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  10. 4 out of 5

    nks

  11. 4 out of 5

    ellenbutnotdegeneres

  12. 4 out of 5

    Aidan

  13. 5 out of 5

    Cecilia Dunbar Hernandez

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kaylie

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kerri

  16. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  17. 5 out of 5

    Paul K. Hattori

  18. 4 out of 5

    MWesley

  19. 4 out of 5

    Forestofglory

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sorcharei

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

  22. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  23. 4 out of 5

    celuran

  24. 5 out of 5

    Taissa Reis

  25. 4 out of 5

    Linguana

  26. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

  27. 4 out of 5

    Belle

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

  29. 4 out of 5

    Meghan

  30. 5 out of 5

    Corinne

  31. 4 out of 5

    Jeeps

  32. 5 out of 5

    Artemisia

  33. 4 out of 5

    LoudVal

  34. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

  35. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Hill

  36. 5 out of 5

    Niall Alexander

  37. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Cotterill

  38. 4 out of 5

    Is

  39. 5 out of 5

    Jared Shurin

  40. 4 out of 5

    Paul Weimer

  41. 4 out of 5

    Shana DuBois

  42. 5 out of 5

    Saumya

  43. 5 out of 5

    Akshay

  44. 5 out of 5

    Louise

  45. 5 out of 5

    Micielle

  46. 4 out of 5

    Cristina Riquelme

  47. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Gunning

  48. 4 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.