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The New Flesh: 21st Century Horror Films A-Z, Volume 1

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From ‘Hostel’ to ‘August Underground’ … ‘The Orphanage’ to ‘Inside’ … ‘I Saw The Devil’ to ‘Gutterballs’ … Whether it be the extreme terrors of the French New Wave, Spain’s love for a good old-fashioned ghost story, or the influx of no-budget “found footage” pseudo-documentaries released throughout the world, psychotronic movie output in the 21st Century has been more pro From ‘Hostel’ to ‘August Underground’ … ‘The Orphanage’ to ‘Inside’ … ‘I Saw The Devil’ to ‘Gutterballs’ … Whether it be the extreme terrors of the French New Wave, Spain’s love for a good old-fashioned ghost story, or the influx of no-budget “found footage” pseudo-documentaries released throughout the world, psychotronic movie output in the 21st Century has been more prolific, and arguably more challenging, than ever before. Author Stuart Willis examines the many trends and sub-genres that have contributed to horror cinema over the last fifteen years. The New Flesh - over the course of an ongoing series of tomes, collectively and over time - is designed to provide a definitive reference guide to the seemingly bottomless pit of movies striving to keep the flames burning in recent times. The New Flesh: Volume 1 embraces a selection of sub-genres, as well as covering a small number of those non-horror features that fans owe it to themselves to check out. The globe is traversed, and the small-time directors toiling independently are given equal exposure to both old hands such as George A Romero and Dario Argento continuing to ply their trade and the studio-produced bigger affairs. From torture-porn through European Gothics, treading through the murky waters of the remake phenomenon and even taking in a spot of animation here and there, three hundred films are covered. All reviews are new and exclusive to this book. Each review offers a brief synopsis, full critique of the film in question, and titbits of trivia - along with nods to the films of old that provide their influence, examining the legacy of onscreen brutality that has been embraced by contemporary filmmakers while placing their own works in a modern cultural context. Stuart Willis has spent the best part of two decades writing extensively about horror films, modern and old, for the acclaimed SexGoreMutants website, as well as having reviews published in the likes of Deranged fanzine and Chas Balun's legendary Deep Red magazine. The New Flesh: Volume 1 includes a detailed introduction, full appendix of titles and forewords by cult filmmaker Jason Figgis and horror community legend/festival programmer Alan Simpson. 300 film reviews, 300 pages, over 100,000 words. A first volume that embraces the diversity of today's shocking horror cinema, daring to investigate far deeper than the mainstream wants you to see, while acknowledging the enduring influence of all that has come before it: a book that has been written by a hardcore fan for likeminded souls ... Long Live The New Flesh!


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From ‘Hostel’ to ‘August Underground’ … ‘The Orphanage’ to ‘Inside’ … ‘I Saw The Devil’ to ‘Gutterballs’ … Whether it be the extreme terrors of the French New Wave, Spain’s love for a good old-fashioned ghost story, or the influx of no-budget “found footage” pseudo-documentaries released throughout the world, psychotronic movie output in the 21st Century has been more pro From ‘Hostel’ to ‘August Underground’ … ‘The Orphanage’ to ‘Inside’ … ‘I Saw The Devil’ to ‘Gutterballs’ … Whether it be the extreme terrors of the French New Wave, Spain’s love for a good old-fashioned ghost story, or the influx of no-budget “found footage” pseudo-documentaries released throughout the world, psychotronic movie output in the 21st Century has been more prolific, and arguably more challenging, than ever before. Author Stuart Willis examines the many trends and sub-genres that have contributed to horror cinema over the last fifteen years. The New Flesh - over the course of an ongoing series of tomes, collectively and over time - is designed to provide a definitive reference guide to the seemingly bottomless pit of movies striving to keep the flames burning in recent times. The New Flesh: Volume 1 embraces a selection of sub-genres, as well as covering a small number of those non-horror features that fans owe it to themselves to check out. The globe is traversed, and the small-time directors toiling independently are given equal exposure to both old hands such as George A Romero and Dario Argento continuing to ply their trade and the studio-produced bigger affairs. From torture-porn through European Gothics, treading through the murky waters of the remake phenomenon and even taking in a spot of animation here and there, three hundred films are covered. All reviews are new and exclusive to this book. Each review offers a brief synopsis, full critique of the film in question, and titbits of trivia - along with nods to the films of old that provide their influence, examining the legacy of onscreen brutality that has been embraced by contemporary filmmakers while placing their own works in a modern cultural context. Stuart Willis has spent the best part of two decades writing extensively about horror films, modern and old, for the acclaimed SexGoreMutants website, as well as having reviews published in the likes of Deranged fanzine and Chas Balun's legendary Deep Red magazine. The New Flesh: Volume 1 includes a detailed introduction, full appendix of titles and forewords by cult filmmaker Jason Figgis and horror community legend/festival programmer Alan Simpson. 300 film reviews, 300 pages, over 100,000 words. A first volume that embraces the diversity of today's shocking horror cinema, daring to investigate far deeper than the mainstream wants you to see, while acknowledging the enduring influence of all that has come before it: a book that has been written by a hardcore fan for likeminded souls ... Long Live The New Flesh!

27 review for The New Flesh: 21st Century Horror Films A-Z, Volume 1

  1. 5 out of 5

    Paul Bryant

    What a lot of guides to horror movies there are to be sure and hardly any for such popular genres as romcoms or cartoons. And why is this? Two reasons – first, because horror is the one genre that needs to justify itself all the time. As in the persistent question why do you want to put yourself through the ordeal of watching these movies? followed up by are you some kind of sick pervert bastard? And second because there are so many many many horror films made. When two film school graduates and What a lot of guides to horror movies there are to be sure and hardly any for such popular genres as romcoms or cartoons. And why is this? Two reasons – first, because horror is the one genre that needs to justify itself all the time. As in the persistent question why do you want to put yourself through the ordeal of watching these movies? followed up by are you some kind of sick pervert bastard? And second because there are so many many many horror films made. When two film school graduates and their stoned cousin meet up and decide to make an ultra low budget movie they never make a romcom or a cartoon. They make Dead Hooker in a Trunk or I Spill your Guts or Slow Torture Puke Chamber. This guide gives us pretty good capsule reviews of around 300 recent movies, from mainstream hits like The Babadook and Hannibal and Let the Right One In to foreign arthouse madness like [REC] or Martyrs and Irreversible to American and British indie stuff like You’re Next and Eden Lake and The Devil’s Rejects all the way down down down to the ultralow budget shockers like The Manson Family and Twink and the August Underground trilogy. Concerning which, Mr Willis reports that it …left me feeling squalid for even having viewed it Now and again these degraded no-limits-to-what-we-will-show hardcore horror movies provoke Mr Willis into mini-rants: Valentine’s film affords him the opportunity to indulge in his own hardened fetish for all things vomit-related. …. The “vomit gore” films do lay down their gauntlets: for the mainstream, they provide “proof” that horror films are evil… for the seasoned seeker of the sick and twisted, their cod psychology and pop video shallowness will prove to be a test of even the most ardent fiend’s patience. And this does naturally take us back to the question why anyone would want to see some of these movies – say, Tumbling Doll of Flesh or Murder Set-Pieces or American Guinea Pig – given that their constant faithful theme is the explicit chopping up of young women. He never quite explains it. He distances himself from the true “gorehounds” who just simply love the sadism. He does draw the line somewhere. But it wouldn’t be a line recognised by the late Roger Ebert. We can see this when we compare their views of the Australian movie Wolf Creek (2005). This is Roger: There is a line and this movie crosses it. I don’t know where the line is, but it’s way north of Wolf Creek. There is a role for violence in film, but what the hell is the purpose of this sadistic celebration of pain and cruelty? This is a riposte by Mr Willis: Yes, Wolf Creek does get ugly. Once Jarratt has his victims trapped, it’s time for prolonged scenes of torment and violence. Some of these are delilivered with a level of sadistic glee that had critics such as Roger Ebert dancing around the word “misogynistic” in reviews. Is McLean’s film anti-women? I doubt it; it’s simply itching for commercial acceptance and is not above revelling in torture porn excesses if that’s what the masses demand. Gotta say that that does seem like a shrug to me, a moral bankruptcy. Yeah well, maybe it is misogynistic, I’m not a philosopher, but it sure packed them in, and that’s really what it’s all about, ain’t it. Is that not what Mr Willis is saying? I think so. So given all of that I have to knock off a fourth star; but it’s a very useful book. You just have to remember He who sups with the Devil should use a long spoon

  2. 4 out of 5

    Gregg

  3. 4 out of 5

    David Curson

  4. 5 out of 5

    John Grain

  5. 4 out of 5

    Frederic Van Laere

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Nevermind

  7. 5 out of 5

    Robert Evans

  8. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Shultz

  9. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Sipila

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mark Pidgeon

  11. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Wiles

  12. 4 out of 5

    Conan Tan

  13. 5 out of 5

    Therese Mainville-celso

  14. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  15. 5 out of 5

    Conrad Barrington

  16. 4 out of 5

    Janeka

  17. 5 out of 5

    Daniel S Ramsey

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nadia Parbo

  19. 5 out of 5

    scott carlson

  20. 4 out of 5

    Diane in Australia

  21. 4 out of 5

    Oedipa

  22. 5 out of 5

    Keith A. Gibson

  23. 4 out of 5

    Meghan2714

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mark D.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Linscheid

  26. 5 out of 5

    Yves Vervenne

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sean Leonard

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