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The Sherlock Holmes Illustrated Omnibus: The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, the Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, the Hound of the Baskervilles, the Return of Sherlock Holmes: A Facsimile of the

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A Scandal in Bohemia The Red-Headed League A Case of Identity The Boscombe Valley Mystery The Five Orange Pips The Man with the Twisted Lip The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle The Adventure of the Speckled Band The Adventure of the Engineer's Thumb The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet The Adventure of the Copper Beeches The Adventure of Si A Scandal in Bohemia The Red-Headed League A Case of Identity The Boscombe Valley Mystery The Five Orange Pips The Man with the Twisted Lip The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle The Adventure of the Speckled Band The Adventure of the Engineer's Thumb The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet The Adventure of the Copper Beeches The Adventure of Silver Blaze The Adventure of the Cardboard Box The Adventure of The Yellow Face The Adventure of The Stock-Broker's Clerk The Adventure of The “Gloria Scott” The Adventure of The Musgrave Ritual The Adventure of The Reigate Squires The Adventure of The Crooked Man The Adventure of The Resident Patient The Adventure of The Greek Interpreter The Adventure of The Naval Treaty The Adventure of The Final Problem The Adventure of the Empty House The Adventure of the Norwood Builder The Adventure of the Dancing Men The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist The Adventure of the Priory School The Adventure of Black Peter The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton The Adventure of the Six Napoleons The Adventure of the Three Students The Adventure of the Golden Pince-Nez The Adventure of the Missing Three-Quarter The Adventure of the Abbey Grange The Adventure of the Second Stain The Hound of the Baskervilles


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A Scandal in Bohemia The Red-Headed League A Case of Identity The Boscombe Valley Mystery The Five Orange Pips The Man with the Twisted Lip The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle The Adventure of the Speckled Band The Adventure of the Engineer's Thumb The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet The Adventure of the Copper Beeches The Adventure of Si A Scandal in Bohemia The Red-Headed League A Case of Identity The Boscombe Valley Mystery The Five Orange Pips The Man with the Twisted Lip The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle The Adventure of the Speckled Band The Adventure of the Engineer's Thumb The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet The Adventure of the Copper Beeches The Adventure of Silver Blaze The Adventure of the Cardboard Box The Adventure of The Yellow Face The Adventure of The Stock-Broker's Clerk The Adventure of The “Gloria Scott” The Adventure of The Musgrave Ritual The Adventure of The Reigate Squires The Adventure of The Crooked Man The Adventure of The Resident Patient The Adventure of The Greek Interpreter The Adventure of The Naval Treaty The Adventure of The Final Problem The Adventure of the Empty House The Adventure of the Norwood Builder The Adventure of the Dancing Men The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist The Adventure of the Priory School The Adventure of Black Peter The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton The Adventure of the Six Napoleons The Adventure of the Three Students The Adventure of the Golden Pince-Nez The Adventure of the Missing Three-Quarter The Adventure of the Abbey Grange The Adventure of the Second Stain The Hound of the Baskervilles

30 review for The Sherlock Holmes Illustrated Omnibus: The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, the Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, the Hound of the Baskervilles, the Return of Sherlock Holmes: A Facsimile of the

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rita

    No matter how many times I read the Sherlock Holmes stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, they remain fresh and entertaining. This book includes the original illustrations by Sidney Paget from when the stories were published in the Strand Magazine. The only one of the longer stories included is The Hound of the Baskervilles. I first read Sherlock Holmes when I was about 9 or 10. From these stories I fell in love with the English mystery genre and proceeded on to Agatha Christie. I remember watching B No matter how many times I read the Sherlock Holmes stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, they remain fresh and entertaining. This book includes the original illustrations by Sidney Paget from when the stories were published in the Strand Magazine. The only one of the longer stories included is The Hound of the Baskervilles. I first read Sherlock Holmes when I was about 9 or 10. From these stories I fell in love with the English mystery genre and proceeded on to Agatha Christie. I remember watching Basil Rathbone movies on TV as he portrayed Sherlock Holmes. These movies often strayed into World War II anti Nazi propaganda and Dr Watson was portrayed as an absolute idiot. To me Jeremy Brett is the ideal Sherlock Holmes and I own the DVD Complete Set. I fell in love with Benedict Cumberbatch as the modern day Sherlock. I also own the Complete Audible Sherlock Holmes series, which I am looking forward to hearing. I will never tire of these stories.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    Finally finished this a few months ago. I'd been reading it since Christmas 1976. Thirty-two years. I loved reading a story or three every now and then. Always comforting. Finally decided to press forward and went through a dozen or so in a short period, which gave me a whole new appreciation for Doyle as an artist. He was an excellent writer, with a kind of magic that's hard to puzzle out. These stories exert a hold that seems greater than the sum of the parts.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Trevor

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I've added a review of The Return to the bottom of this... The Memoirs continues the Adventures of Sherlock Holmes – and this review will be one long spoiler – so if you don’t know, don’t read on. I showed the daughters the BBC production of these a few years ago and when we got to the episode in which Holmes and Moriarty topple into the waterfall, well, there were tears and an agony of disbelief. But reading this now it seems to me that Doyle was leaving himself open to bringing Holmes back to li I've added a review of The Return to the bottom of this... The Memoirs continues the Adventures of Sherlock Holmes – and this review will be one long spoiler – so if you don’t know, don’t read on. I showed the daughters the BBC production of these a few years ago and when we got to the episode in which Holmes and Moriarty topple into the waterfall, well, there were tears and an agony of disbelief. But reading this now it seems to me that Doyle was leaving himself open to bringing Holmes back to life all along. The fact no one actually sees what happens is very telling, if you ask me. These stories are good clean fun. I have enjoyed them very much. I am also particularly fond of Mycroft, Holmes’ older and smarter brother. It is amusing that he entirely locks himself away in the Diogenes Club in which any human contact is not only frowned upon, but grounds for being kicked out. The fact that the original Diogenes, the philosopher of Greek persuasion, used to masturbate in public possibly has some deeper meaning it is best not to speculate on concerning Doyle’s feelings for Holmes in what was supposed to have been his second last story concerning the great detective. As annoying as Holmes may have become to Doyle, we have many reasons to be glad that he was resurrected. The Return Imagine you were forced to go back to writing stories based on the life of a character you had thought you had killed off about a decade earlier – what would those stories be like? This book also ends with Holmes in retirement, with Watson under strict orders not to write any more tales. I found it fascinating how many of the stories begin with the narration in the past tense – almost as if Holmes is dead and Watson wrote these in memoriam. Holmes has also become increasingly frustrated with Watson, both as his Boswell and as any sort of thinker at all. It even seems a bit sarcastic at the end of one story when Holmes refers to Watson as the perfect representative of the British Jury and has Watson playing along. Which is the other thing Holmes seems to do more in these stories now he has been brought back to life – play with the other characters. He seems much more contemptuous of those around him. I kept thinking of that horror story The Monkey’s Paw where one does need to be careful what one wishes for and if you do bring someone back from the dead they might not be quite what you had hoped. In fact, now I of it, it is remarkable how often that idea returns in literature in one form or another. Even in Carey's Bliss I’ve been thinking of Doyle’s spiritualism lately and what Holmes would have made of it all. I can’t help feeling that there might have been words between the two of them and tuts and the slow shaking of the head. That is, I sometimes wonder if Holmes, the character, was more necessary, in a sense, than Doyle the writer. I know that sounds like a silly thing to say, but I think it might be at least a little true too. One of the things Holmes recommends in his rationally imaginative process of detective work is to gauge the intelligence of the person who commits the crime and then work out what someone of that level of intelligence would be likely to do at any given point. Well, we are repeatedly told that Watson is as dull as dishwater – memorably in one case Holmes says that this is not a case for Watson as it requires brains. We are told this repeatedly, and yet we trust him completely as he tells us these stories. Watson's wife snuffs it at some stage between these two books - something so painful for Watson that the only reference to it is that Holmes never mentions it so as to spare Watson's feelings. If a character is unnecessary best to kill them off, I guess.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jen3n

    This collection is the second, third, and fourth sets of Holmes stories, plus The Hound of the Baskervilles. While it IS missing my favorite collection of stories, the first set which runs from A Study in Scarlet through The Sign of Four; and it DOES have the terrible, horrible, no good, very bad fourth set entitled "The Return of Sherlock Holmes" (the series should have ended at The Final Problem), this book gets four stars because the good stories are excellent and the bad stories are made-up- This collection is the second, third, and fourth sets of Holmes stories, plus The Hound of the Baskervilles. While it IS missing my favorite collection of stories, the first set which runs from A Study in Scarlet through The Sign of Four; and it DOES have the terrible, horrible, no good, very bad fourth set entitled "The Return of Sherlock Holmes" (the series should have ended at The Final Problem), this book gets four stars because the good stories are excellent and the bad stories are made-up-for by the original artwork that accompanies all the adventures. This book is also set up so that it appears in the same fashion (layout, typeface, etcetera) as it did when the stories first appeared in The Strand. More points in its favor. So, recommended. I suppose. If you are already a fan and have an interest in late 19th century art work. Naw: just "recommended" in general. Everyone should read the adventures of Sherlock Holmes.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    Book Review: The Original Illustrated Sherlock Holmes By Sir Arthur Conan Doyle It’s amazing how one good book can truly open your eyes. The Original Illustrated Sherlock Holmes, a collection of short stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, did just that. I have learned to make more observations and observe detail better, and soon you can too! Sherlock Holmes is a detective who lived in the late 1800s to early 1900s in London. He offers his deductive powers to whoever needs them, yet always keeps a low pr Book Review: The Original Illustrated Sherlock Holmes By Sir Arthur Conan Doyle It’s amazing how one good book can truly open your eyes. The Original Illustrated Sherlock Holmes, a collection of short stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, did just that. I have learned to make more observations and observe detail better, and soon you can too! Sherlock Holmes is a detective who lived in the late 1800s to early 1900s in London. He offers his deductive powers to whoever needs them, yet always keeps a low profile. The story is chronicled through the perspective of Dr. John Watson, Holmes’ accomplice and friend. There are several conflicts in the story; Holmes is against Professor Moriarty, potential assassins, and organized crime. Holmes is an intriguing man, who was partially based off of Conan Doyle’s university teacher, Joseph Bell. Holmes is known to constantly baffle Watson with his keen eye for detail and his extraordinary methods of deduction. He only interests himself in complicated cases, and is occasionally mocked by the police for having “unconventional methods”. The characters in the story are very realistic, and always interesting. The story is completely original, and different from most books that you will find published today. Interestingly enough, Conan Doyle had many troubles even getting someone to publish his works. He has written other stories, but is mostly famous for his creation of Sherlock Holmes. A statue of this most famous detective has been erected near to one of Conan Doyle’s houses. The language of this book is not what I am used to, and it did prove to be quite fun researching some of the references. It contains occasional humor, but is a mostly serious mystery-themed read. The book has 636 pages, though there are other Sherlock Holmes stories that were not included. Conan Doyle includes a few things from his personal life in the stories. His father was an alcoholic, and the characters in his stories that have drinking problems are usually portrayed in a bad light. He has a strong mind for justice and law, which is evident in his stories. The author allows you to visualize the settings with great detail, and the fast tempo keeps the book going. I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants a little intellectual challenge, or a change of pace from today’s mystery stories. The book is long and packed with information, so it takes a while to get through the whole thing. After reading the first story, I was absolutely hooked, and I know that you will be too.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tom Gonzalez

    Oh what a joy it was to read this book! I grew up wanting to be Sherlock Holmes after I read "The Hound of Baskervilles". Holmes was ahead of his time with his chemical and physiology expertise, he was the original CSI master. I wanted to solve mysteries and command that infallible logic that made Holmes so perfect. As I returned to this character, as an adult, I found him to be even more amazing, if not more complex, due to the human qualities and vices he contained. He was certainly an edgy ch Oh what a joy it was to read this book! I grew up wanting to be Sherlock Holmes after I read "The Hound of Baskervilles". Holmes was ahead of his time with his chemical and physiology expertise, he was the original CSI master. I wanted to solve mysteries and command that infallible logic that made Holmes so perfect. As I returned to this character, as an adult, I found him to be even more amazing, if not more complex, due to the human qualities and vices he contained. He was certainly an edgy character for the Victorian age, for he was plagued with either bipolar or manic depression, drug use in the form of self medication, and the caustic Anglo-pomp personality which was a manifestation of his genius. No doubt he would be on pharmaceuticals today. In this beautiful collection, there are 37 stories neatly compiled and illustrated expertly by the great Sidney Paget. This is a classic that will be enjoyed by all thinking men, women and children with a curious imagination.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Emily Casella

    It seems fitting that I would finish this three year endevour of finishing this book on the same day I am finishing my three years of working at my library job. I got this collection book from my grandparents' attic after they died and we were clearing the house. It has taken since May 15, 2015 to finish this. But I finally did it! I have to say I liked everything that came after Reichbach Falls. The return of Sherlock stories were more entertaining then the earlier stories. I finally got in the It seems fitting that I would finish this three year endevour of finishing this book on the same day I am finishing my three years of working at my library job. I got this collection book from my grandparents' attic after they died and we were clearing the house. It has taken since May 15, 2015 to finish this. But I finally did it! I have to say I liked everything that came after Reichbach Falls. The return of Sherlock stories were more entertaining then the earlier stories. I finally got in the swing of reading them. Even though they were not made too long ago, the English is a bit different and the newspaper styled format feels like it takes forever to read each story. But nonetheless I finally finished! Hazaah!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ben Goodridge

    I've been reading this doorstop off and on for a little over a year now, with the advantage of having read "Hound of the Baskervilles" some years ago and a handful of other stories here and there. Sherlock Holmes is one of those ideas that's been so relentlessly adapted that our public consciousness has more to do with the adaptations than the stories, which has brought readers searching for originalism to the Granada series starring Jeremy Brett. Visitors from other adaptations might be surpris I've been reading this doorstop off and on for a little over a year now, with the advantage of having read "Hound of the Baskervilles" some years ago and a handful of other stories here and there. Sherlock Holmes is one of those ideas that's been so relentlessly adapted that our public consciousness has more to do with the adaptations than the stories, which has brought readers searching for originalism to the Granada series starring Jeremy Brett. Visitors from other adaptations might be surprised to see Holmes smoking cigarettes instead of an ornate Meerschaum, Moriarty as the villain of one particular piece rather than an ever-persistent nemesis, and a competent, insightful Watson. The role these days tends to devote itself to his crippling psychological shortcomings, resulting in a string of drug-fueled, obsessive-compulsive Holmeses played by people like Robert Downey Jr. and Benedict Cumberbatch, spun from the same cloth as Hugh Laurie's Gregory House. Visualize the reaction of a modern fan come late to the source material, who finds Holmes's drug use subdued and eventually terminated, his interpersonal relationships healthy and continuing, a police department that holds him in admiration, and nary a deerstalker in sight. (Wonder also at Holmes occasionally slipping into pseudoscience, such as trying to uncover personality traits through handwriting analysis.) An audiobook version of "The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes" helped me wrap this up, read precisely by Derek Jacobi, who possibly provides the definitive portrayal, many apologies to Cumberbatch et al. Originalism is about letting go of the cultural baggage later generations attach to an idea, and nothing comes closer to the source material than a Shakespearian actor reading the actual source material. Meanwhile, I wonder if there are going to be any Sherlock Holmes jokes when Iron Man meets Dr. Strange in "Avengers: Infinity War?"

  9. 4 out of 5

    Howie Rosen

    Two firsts here. Writing a review before I've reached even halfway to the finish line. And reading short stories are nearly as far down my list of pleasures as cracking open a book of poetry. Doyle's adventures make a quick start out of the blocks, so going from one to the other is effortless. These stories in their day rivaled the popularity of a new Harry Potter book--and no wonder that--each plot is so deliciously different. The greatest joy is to pay careful attention to the details in order Two firsts here. Writing a review before I've reached even halfway to the finish line. And reading short stories are nearly as far down my list of pleasures as cracking open a book of poetry. Doyle's adventures make a quick start out of the blocks, so going from one to the other is effortless. These stories in their day rivaled the popularity of a new Harry Potter book--and no wonder that--each plot is so deliciously different. The greatest joy is to pay careful attention to the details in order to predict the outcome. I'm batting an All Star's average so far! The mark of a classic work is that it never seems to show its age no matter its age. The original Sidney Paget illustrations transport you to a London of long ago nearly as well as a Masterpiece Theater Production. Not to be missed by any mystery buff.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    The short stories are best; they are almost too perfectly concise and structured. The reader is kept in a delicate balance of awe and active sleuthing. Unlike what has been said of the film version, Watson is no comic character but the perfect foil to Sherlock's cold, inhuman exterior. W/o Watson, you wouldn't have a story unless it were Sherlock's stream of consciousness followed by boredom. Read a great article about how Doyle created Sherlock at exactly the perfect time in history - the age of The short stories are best; they are almost too perfectly concise and structured. The reader is kept in a delicate balance of awe and active sleuthing. Unlike what has been said of the film version, Watson is no comic character but the perfect foil to Sherlock's cold, inhuman exterior. W/o Watson, you wouldn't have a story unless it were Sherlock's stream of consciousness followed by boredom. Read a great article about how Doyle created Sherlock at exactly the perfect time in history - the age of science and technology was touching more lives than ever, and people were afraid of losing their sense of wonder. In walks Sherlock, who makes scuff marks interesting and scientific. I can see why this is required reading for school children.

  11. 4 out of 5

    ☠ Daniel

    Leí toda la obra de Doyle sobre Sherlock Holmes en español. Un día vi de lejos este libro y llamó mi atención la portada, me aproximé a él y vi que era un facsímil de las historias tal y como fueron publicadas en The Strand Magazine, incluso, desde luego, con las ilustraciones originales de Sidney Paget. No tuve más remedio que comprarlo aunado al hecho de que su precio era una ganga. Aunque solo contiene 37 relatos y el Sabueso de los Baskerville vale la pena por las ilustraciones.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jorge Rosas

    I really loved this edition, I could follow Sherlock from the early years to the zombie time, and so the different way the pair encounter, solve and how they’re written. The format and the pictures do look like an old magazine which makes it quite lovely. Because of the length it’s really hard to write a proper review but I can say that Sherlock had a god impact on my life and I enjoyed most of the ride.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    Read this years ago. Loved the illustrations!

  14. 5 out of 5

    gabbyisreadingnow

    How can you go wrong with Sherlock Holmes? It took me awhile to read this because this volume is extra thick, and we all know how wordy sherlock is.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Steven Peterson

    "A Scandal in Bohemia," "The Red-Headed League," "The Hound of the Baskervilles," "The Return of Sherlock Holmes," and so on. As the Introduction notes, "Here--reproduced in complete facsimile--are the original Sherlock Holmes detective stories by Arthur Conan Doyle as they first appeared in the famed British magazine 'The Strand.'" The original art work and printing adds an interesting element to this volume. But, in the end, it is the tales of Holmes that make this book attractive. A nice compil "A Scandal in Bohemia," "The Red-Headed League," "The Hound of the Baskervilles," "The Return of Sherlock Holmes," and so on. As the Introduction notes, "Here--reproduced in complete facsimile--are the original Sherlock Holmes detective stories by Arthur Conan Doyle as they first appeared in the famed British magazine 'The Strand.'" The original art work and printing adds an interesting element to this volume. But, in the end, it is the tales of Holmes that make this book attractive. A nice compilation for Holmes' afficianados.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mary Holm

    I watched the PBS series SHERLOCK and fell in love. I'd never read any Sherlock Holmes stories before, (I claim not to like mysteries) but the series prompted me to check out some of the original stories. My husband reminded me that we had this book stored in our garage. So we pulled it out and I started reading. Currently reading the Hound of the Baskervilles. By the way, if you haven't seen SHERLOCK, do yourself a favor and run, don't walk, to rent or buy the DVD. Or you can watch some of the I watched the PBS series SHERLOCK and fell in love. I'd never read any Sherlock Holmes stories before, (I claim not to like mysteries) but the series prompted me to check out some of the original stories. My husband reminded me that we had this book stored in our garage. So we pulled it out and I started reading. Currently reading the Hound of the Baskervilles. By the way, if you haven't seen SHERLOCK, do yourself a favor and run, don't walk, to rent or buy the DVD. Or you can watch some of the episodes on the PBS website.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Gerald

    Inspired to take up this volume again by fervor surrounding the new Sherlock Holmes movie to be released in December of 2009. The edition that I am reading was published in 1976. It is handsomely bound in the manner of a book intended to look impressive on a shelf without having the desired effect. The stories are quite good, though. Finished this very recently. Nothing like a book full of Sherlock Holmes to instill in oneself the desire to take up smoking a pipe, and logically deduce what's been g Inspired to take up this volume again by fervor surrounding the new Sherlock Holmes movie to be released in December of 2009. The edition that I am reading was published in 1976. It is handsomely bound in the manner of a book intended to look impressive on a shelf without having the desired effect. The stories are quite good, though. Finished this very recently. Nothing like a book full of Sherlock Holmes to instill in oneself the desire to take up smoking a pipe, and logically deduce what's been going on in one's apartment based on trifling physical evidence.

  18. 4 out of 5

    P.M. Pevato

    My comfort food.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

    I've only read seven of them.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie

    Master of the mystery. Always fun.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Richard Dominguez

    I really enjoyed reading this edition as the stories are printed as they first appeared in the "Strand" (I believe) ... A great way to catch up on all of Doyle's Holmes stories ...

  22. 5 out of 5

    Haribo451

    For many years I have wanted to read more of Sherlock Holmes other than ‘Hound of the Baskervilles’, one of my favourite books. This particular anthology, containing ‘the adventures of...’, ‘the memoirs of....’ and ‘the return of Sherlock Holmes’, felt like a good starting point. For further enjoyment, these were all facsimiles from the original Strand Magazine publications, featuring Sidney Paiget’s iconic illustrations which are just as strong in character as Conan Doyle’s masterful descriptio For many years I have wanted to read more of Sherlock Holmes other than ‘Hound of the Baskervilles’, one of my favourite books. This particular anthology, containing ‘the adventures of...’, ‘the memoirs of....’ and ‘the return of Sherlock Holmes’, felt like a good starting point. For further enjoyment, these were all facsimiles from the original Strand Magazine publications, featuring Sidney Paiget’s iconic illustrations which are just as strong in character as Conan Doyle’s masterful descriptions. The flavour of these stories was that of a dry, marbled steak wrapped in tea leaves. In other words, they are sophisticated and meaty with a quirky, nostalgic flavour. Each story is a little window into life and society at the turn of the twentieth century. As detailed as each story is, there still remained a formidable energy coursing through the whole collection. This was mostly supplied by Doyle’s enthusiastic protagonist Mr Holmes himself, who always made fascinating reading even if his methods and mannerisms were repetitive. As well as the intelligence, quirks and heroism of the man, there was also his good nature and good will to people he cared for. I feel like the sociopathic depictions of Holmes by such modern performers as Cumberbatch and Downey Jr. may have presented the detective in a harsher light than in the books. I feel Doyle could have given more credit to Watson, however. Not only does he always depict Watson as being deliberately clueless but Watson is always intensely forgiving of his partner’s negative behaviour. Despite being left in the dark for every case, Watson remains ridiculously loyal and the times when he shows any annoyance towards his friend can be counted on one hand. One of Watson’s most alarming displays of his devotion to Holmes is when he agrees to give up his practice and move back in with Holmes after he returns from the dead. I’m not sure what the financial prospects of being Sherlock’s full-time sidekick are but they can’t be great. The more exasperated version of Watson presented by Jude Law starts to feel more realistic. The only other complaints I have about the stories are typical complaints of writing of this period. There are times when Doyle could have written less than he needed to but his writing became more streamlined over time. Some of the sexist and racist attitudes of the period rear their ugly heads, though mildly. Nearly every female character is a fragile angel (one is described as ‘intensely womanly’) and persons with darker skins or from anywhere outside England tend to have wilder personalities and less control over their impulses. However, these are balanced by some of Doyle’s surprisingly progressive attitudes. For example, the ending of ‘The Adventure of the Yellow Face’ is especially touching, when a woman’s fears of her husband rejecting her black child prove unfounded. Doyle also had a sensitivity and his own sense of justice when depicting the dark subject of domestic abuse. Holmes is happy to let culprits off Scott free if it turns out they were avenging some wrong done to someone they loved. As endearing as this is, Holmes’ self appointment as judge of his cases could be alarming, as well as his frequent refusals to accept payment. If there’s a classic case of an artist suffering from overpayment of ‘exposure’, it would be Holmes. The author’s attitude to his own character is also fascinating. While I enjoyed ‘the adventure of the Final Problem’, I did get the sense that Doyle went for some overly sensational way to end his protagonist. Out of the story collections, I think I enjoyed ‘adventures’ most, since some of the stories there were most entertaining and Gothic in flavour. The stories do get a bit formulaic as you go on, but as mysteries they mostly remained unpredictable and I am still eager to read more of Holmes and Watson’s adventures. It was a delight to read ‘Hound of the Baskervilles’ again, since I hadn’t read it since I was at school. I still believe it is the superior of the Sherlock canon for atmosphere and suspense. Watson also really comes into his own as a character. The only warning I would give for this particular edition is that some of the darker illustrations were re-printed badly, especially for ‘Hound of the Baskervilles’. However, the quality of the stories more than makes up for this, with their thrills, colourful characters and humour. The humour is supplied by Holmes’s wit and by Doyle’s exaggerated depiction of emotion, with characters often swooning or pulling at their hair. There are even some excessive outbursts from our coldly logical detective: ‘Holmes shook his clenched fists in the air. “Incredible imbecility!” he cried’. Nevertheless, despite or because of this unintended silliness, I’m sad I’ve finished this. It feels like saying goodbye to a friend. But the beauty of books, of course, is that I can always pick it up again.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    ANAZING. First of all this edition was great because the original illustrations are right next to the stories, and if you do a bit of research the art itself is actually very cool- it includes, for example the first ever portrayal of Holmes in the flap hat. I recommend this site (http://dickens.stanford.edu/sherlockh...) for help with Victorian language, etc. Besides being a great collector piece and plain beautiful, the Sherlock Holmes stories are immensely entertaining. Mystery fans I am sure ANAZING. First of all this edition was great because the original illustrations are right next to the stories, and if you do a bit of research the art itself is actually very cool- it includes, for example the first ever portrayal of Holmes in the flap hat. I recommend this site (http://dickens.stanford.edu/sherlockh...) for help with Victorian language, etc. Besides being a great collector piece and plain beautiful, the Sherlock Holmes stories are immensely entertaining. Mystery fans I am sure would like if simply to see where it all got started because (again fun fact) many of Holmes' tricks were brand new both literally and forensically. But I'm not even a huge mystery fan, and I still loved it. It has that TV series kind of feel with characters that are very robust and play off of each other meeting characters new to the gig, and it can sometimes just be a fun little misadventure. There are plenty of surprises and nuances to Watson's and Holmes' relationship and history. I also love the fact that (spoiler) Holmes doesn't always succeed. The series can be very realistic. When it wants to that is. Some details are very disenfranchising and flat out unrealistic. And typical of Victorian lit., women are downplayed so much, also the natives in Britain's colonies. This is majorly disappointing, and at times extremely offensive but the beauty of the work is only slightly marred. So, if you need a read this is a great book. Each story, with the exception of the book in the middle is a stand-alone ten to fifteen minute read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    আহ়মেদ আতিফ আবরার

    How can a person write such fascinating accounts so consistently, even I jettison the few uninteresting of them? While finishing it in parts, I wrote down few points as follow: • Bit similar to stage drama. Holmes accepted that he liked to be dramatic; and this has influenced Satyajit Ray's Feluda. • Infamous snobbery towards the Asians retained. Especially the way Sidney Paget drew the Indians. • But loved the part Conan Doyle depicted the African baby. • Unlike Feluda's Topshe, Watson was more a How can a person write such fascinating accounts so consistently, even I jettison the few uninteresting of them? While finishing it in parts, I wrote down few points as follow: • Bit similar to stage drama. Holmes accepted that he liked to be dramatic; and this has influenced Satyajit Ray's Feluda. • Infamous snobbery towards the Asians retained. Especially the way Sidney Paget drew the Indians. • But loved the part Conan Doyle depicted the African baby. • Unlike Feluda's Topshe, Watson was more active in deduction and seemed to develop the habit during his friendship with Sherlock. It gives the stories a natural flow. • I have learnt how to articulate sentences in a good English which would have been impossible if I read the Bengali translation. And this English can hardly be found in today's American version of English, not sure if it is in British English now. So-called globalization has affected thus harshly the varieties of languages. Already movements for localisation has started. It is Sherlock alias Conan Doyle who has taught me to read monographs and journals of academic significance in broader range than novels and stories. Holmes interdisciplinary interest independent of academic gain. It has strongly pitched me to rummage through the monographs and journals after my interest. I owe you Sir Arthur!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chris Lund

    If you're a fan of Sherlock Holmes it doesn't get much better than this set. The stories are all obviously solid, but the real value here for me is the presentation, with the inclusion of all the original illustrations and the formatting of the initial Strand Magazine printing. With the exception of the novel, these stories pretty much all run about 12-15 pages each, so this is a perfect lunch break read type of collection. One or two stories at lunch each day and this will provide for a few mon If you're a fan of Sherlock Holmes it doesn't get much better than this set. The stories are all obviously solid, but the real value here for me is the presentation, with the inclusion of all the original illustrations and the formatting of the initial Strand Magazine printing. With the exception of the novel, these stories pretty much all run about 12-15 pages each, so this is a perfect lunch break read type of collection. One or two stories at lunch each day and this will provide for a few months of engaging entertainment.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Doug Bradley

    Current events and attitudes cause me to notice different things in this second reading of this edition and more that that of each story. Social norms of that time period were different. If these were published new today, there would be several points that would not be politically acceptable. Amazing how small the world Holmes moved in was that he could have such an indepth knowledge of things like tobacco and dirt.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dr.Kerrie,PhD

    I have to admit that I always thought Sherlock had been a real person in history. In reading Doyle's book, I discovered not only was Sherlock a character of fiction but that he'd also been stolen between England and America. Even back then there was IP infringement. My favorite line is how Watson describes the writing and publishing of the adventures: a little bit of this, that, and the other. I have to reread to find the quote and get it right. Sorry about that.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jenna

    Not only did I enjoy Conan Doyle's inventive crime scenarios, but I also really liked the physical copy of this book. It's pleather bound with gilded edges and it also features (for lack of a better word) photocopies of the original text and illustrations of these stories from "The Strand" magazine. A great read as well as a great reading experience.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brian Hamacher

    The stories are timeless. I won’t drone on about how brilliant the Sherlock Holmes series is, since everyone already is aware. One thing I have observed in reading and re-reading The collection is that the Holmes-Watson relationship is more interesting than most of their cases, an aspect which I actually think was captured well in the recent Robert Downey Jr.-Jude Law films.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Gary

    This is a book I've kept on my shelves for many years. I just love the illustrations, and how it was produced as the stories originally appeared in the Strand. It really feels like you're picking up a piece of history. This format adds to the flavor of the great stories in this volume.

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