web site hit counter Red Rosa: A Graphic Biography of Rosa Luxemburg - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Red Rosa: A Graphic Biography of Rosa Luxemburg

Availability: Ready to download

Rosa tells the life story of philosopher, economist, publisher, writer, organizer, political leader and martyr Rosa Luxemburg in full-color, graphic form. The story follows Rosa from her family life in Jewish Poland—where she became the leader of a general strike at age fifteen and was exiled from her homeland at eighteen—to her immersion into the then largest radical part Rosa tells the life story of philosopher, economist, publisher, writer, organizer, political leader and martyr Rosa Luxemburg in full-color, graphic form. The story follows Rosa from her family life in Jewish Poland—where she became the leader of a general strike at age fifteen and was exiled from her homeland at eighteen—to her immersion into the then largest radical party in the world, the German Social Democratic Party, to her founding of the German Communist Party and leadership of the German revolution of 1919. This beautifully drawn graphic life gives “Red Rosa” her due as an iconic radical, but also portrays a fascinating woman with a rich love life, struggles with physical disability and an abiding love of literature and theater. Rosa will contribute to the growing understanding of one of the twentieth century’s greatest revolutionaries.


Compare

Rosa tells the life story of philosopher, economist, publisher, writer, organizer, political leader and martyr Rosa Luxemburg in full-color, graphic form. The story follows Rosa from her family life in Jewish Poland—where she became the leader of a general strike at age fifteen and was exiled from her homeland at eighteen—to her immersion into the then largest radical part Rosa tells the life story of philosopher, economist, publisher, writer, organizer, political leader and martyr Rosa Luxemburg in full-color, graphic form. The story follows Rosa from her family life in Jewish Poland—where she became the leader of a general strike at age fifteen and was exiled from her homeland at eighteen—to her immersion into the then largest radical party in the world, the German Social Democratic Party, to her founding of the German Communist Party and leadership of the German revolution of 1919. This beautifully drawn graphic life gives “Red Rosa” her due as an iconic radical, but also portrays a fascinating woman with a rich love life, struggles with physical disability and an abiding love of literature and theater. Rosa will contribute to the growing understanding of one of the twentieth century’s greatest revolutionaries.

30 review for Red Rosa: A Graphic Biography of Rosa Luxemburg

  1. 4 out of 5

    Greta G

    It was hard getting through this book, especially during the second half. There was just too much text on nearly every page which I think is never good for a graphic novel. The text was too dense and the information too detailed. Rosa Luxemburg was an interesting woman and the author obviously did tons of research but I became bored by this excess of information. In the end, I felt like I was reading a textbook and the art, which consisted mainly of talking heads, got lost in this overload of te It was hard getting through this book, especially during the second half. There was just too much text on nearly every page which I think is never good for a graphic novel. The text was too dense and the information too detailed. Rosa Luxemburg was an interesting woman and the author obviously did tons of research but I became bored by this excess of information. In the end, I felt like I was reading a textbook and the art, which consisted mainly of talking heads, got lost in this overload of text. I’d recommend to read a proper, well-written biography instead.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Always Pouting

    I didn't know anything about Rosa Luxemburg before picking this up and so it was pretty cool learning more about her life. I totally want to read more about her ideas and thoughts in the future. Not a huge fan of the art style though, and I think that's quite a large part of reading a graphic novel. Also the rhythm/transition of things wasn't that great and just didn't work for me. This one's a 3.5 stars for me.

  3. 4 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    "The capitalist state of society is doubtless a historic necessity, but so also is the revolt of the working class against it – the revolt of its gravediggers." (April 1915) Rosa Luxembourg, 1871-1919, was an economist who wrote her doctoral dissertation on Polish industrialization. She was a Marxist theorist, a philosopher, and a revolutionary socialist of Polish-Jewish descent. She became a German citizen and was murdered there by opponents of the revolution she never gave up on. She was a wom "The capitalist state of society is doubtless a historic necessity, but so also is the revolt of the working class against it – the revolt of its gravediggers." (April 1915) Rosa Luxembourg, 1871-1919, was an economist who wrote her doctoral dissertation on Polish industrialization. She was a Marxist theorist, a philosopher, and a revolutionary socialist of Polish-Jewish descent. She became a German citizen and was murdered there by opponents of the revolution she never gave up on. She was a woman of passion, having written many emotional and insightful essays, letters, tracts, and there were also many lovers in her short and full 47 years. She was a member of the Communist Party who troubled Lenin and Trotsky and the Russian Revolution with serious critique. She was one wild woman who made politics and economic justice come alive as possibility. It was Emma Goldman who said "A revolution without dancing is not a revolution worth having," but Red Rosa might just as well have said it. Kate Evens is author and artist extraordinaire in this work of love for Verso Press. She is herself a wonderful writer with obvious political commitments--it's a work maybe best described as a fictionalized biography, since she has to make up dialogue and imagine some interactions, but the work is based on copious research and comes complete with many pages of notes and a bibliography. As seriously political as this comics biography is, there is also in it much poetry and poetic imagery, of which the cover of the volume is one dramatic example. Evens's revolutionary writing also dances, as Emma and Rosa would observe and approve. It has to be one of the most ambitious and very best graphic works in the last year. On my best of the year list, for sure. I highly recommend it to lefties everywhere who maybe once knew her work (she has 14 volumes of collected work, of which The Accumulation of Capital is one volume) and feel they need a refresher course (as I did), or those who have heard her name and need an introduction. Feeling the Bern? Rosa was one of the great intellectuals of socialism/communism/Marxism a century ago. Solidarity forever! Kurt Weill: Red Rosa now has vanished too. She told the poor what life is about, And so the rich have rubbed her out. May she rest in peace.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Will

    Rosa Luxemburg was a young, poor Jewish girl in Poland who rose to become a titan of leftist thought. As a girl, Luxemburg refused to accept her "place" in life, always questioning injustice and falling into the local socialist society. She was an intellectual powerhouse. But Luxemburg didn't just sit in her room all day, theorizing and writing utopian critiques of capitalism. No, she did. She wasn't allowed to go to university in Poland, so she moved to Zurich, earning a doctorate in economics. Rosa Luxemburg was a young, poor Jewish girl in Poland who rose to become a titan of leftist thought. As a girl, Luxemburg refused to accept her "place" in life, always questioning injustice and falling into the local socialist society. She was an intellectual powerhouse. But Luxemburg didn't just sit in her room all day, theorizing and writing utopian critiques of capitalism. No, she did. She wasn't allowed to go to university in Poland, so she moved to Zurich, earning a doctorate in economics. She fell in love with Leo Jogiches, the son of a capitalist who was dedicated to destroying the system that made him rich. She refused to constrain her sexuality or her desires, beginning and ending relationships when she was unhappy. She spread her message with an incredible fire, swaying beefy German factory workers with her simple, yet persuasive arguments. She outargued the intellectual titans of the German Social Democratic Party, raging against the abandonment of revolution in favor of reformism. She rampaged through central Europe, tirelessly spreading her message of liberation for decades. And somewhere in the middle, she wrote a treatise on the political economy, The Accumulation of Capital, that has only become more popular with age. She spoke out against the foolishness of the First World War, lambasting the socialist-in-name-only deputies that voted for the "inevitable" war. Their decision dumbfounded Rosa. How could socialists, committed to the international liberation of the working classes, declare nationalist war, pitting national working class against national working class? She left the party she had dedicated her life to with disgust. In 1918, after the war destroyed Europe and millions of innocent working class men died because upper class warmongers incinerated their souls to fuel their war industry, Germany erupted into revolution. Rosa refused to play it safe, and she started a newspaper, Die Rote Fahne, and fought constantly to sway public opinion towards revolution. After the new "social democratic" president was placed in power by the defeated German military, her former party turned on her. She was brutally murdered by militiamen, her corpse thrown into the Landwehr Canal in Berlin. Kate Evans' phenomenal graphic autobiography introduces Rosa Luxemburg – the woman, the revolutionary, and her works – to a new generation, one that participated in the 2011 world uprising and which will suffer from precarious employment for life. Evans' work is an experience, both emotional and arresting, beautiful and terrifying. She portrays the raw, the real Rosa. She was by no means perfect, but young people deserve to know Rosa's story. Phenomenal, riveting, inspirational, revolutionary Rosa Luxemburg. Highly recommended.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lea

    This is a fairly introductionary graphic novel biography of Rosa Luxemburg. I didn't know much about her love life before reading this, but those parts were the ones I found the least well-done actually. There's other ways to describe a love life than through the same sex scenes each time. Apart from that, some of the wording was a bit strange. It felt like a book for children at times, because the other seemed to want to sum up Rosa Luxemburg's economic and political theories for newbies, it se This is a fairly introductionary graphic novel biography of Rosa Luxemburg. I didn't know much about her love life before reading this, but those parts were the ones I found the least well-done actually. There's other ways to describe a love life than through the same sex scenes each time. Apart from that, some of the wording was a bit strange. It felt like a book for children at times, because the other seemed to want to sum up Rosa Luxemburg's economic and political theories for newbies, it seemed. I'm not sure if she managed to do that well and I also wonder how many people will read this book who don't already know the basic ideas of marxism and socialism. If I didn't, I'd probably found those part confusing. My last criticism would be that the art is not 100 % my style. I think if I'd been sold on the drawings completely, this would have been a 5 star book despite the other flaws I mentioned. As it stands it's a fairly well-drawn and interesting overview of her life. I appreciate that at the end of the book there's an explanation of things the author changed for narrative reasons and some contextualisation for some of the scenes.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Manybooks

    Now while I have certainly found Kate Evans' graphic novel Red Rosa: A Graphic Biography of Rosa Luxemburg for the most part very enlightening and also historically, culturally interesting (if not even totally significant, as especially with regard to English language reading materials, there are in my opinion still far too few accessible to and for interested lay readers books available on the history of Socialism and Communism in Europe and on important and necessary to be familiar with activi Now while I have certainly found Kate Evans' graphic novel Red Rosa: A Graphic Biography of Rosa Luxemburg for the most part very enlightening and also historically, culturally interesting (if not even totally significant, as especially with regard to English language reading materials, there are in my opinion still far too few accessible to and for interested lay readers books available on the history of Socialism and Communism in Europe and on important and necessary to be familiar with activists such as Rosa Luxemburg), I also think that for a graphic novel Red Rosa: A Graphic Biography of Rosa Luxemburg actually tends to be a trifle too wordy and often almost annoyingly textbook like in scope and feel. But that having been said and yes, because I am indeed quite massively interested in the topic and in Rosa Luxemburg as a person, I was still and always engaged enough with Red Rosa: A Graphic Biography of Rosa Luxemburg to continue reading until the end, even though I do certainly and strongly believe that Kate Evans' featured text is truly a bit physically and emotionally exhausting to peruse at times, and yes, also with too small a letter font for my ageing eyes, not to mention that I also do think that the artwork for Red Rosa: A Graphic Biography of Rosa Luxemburg is much too caricature like for my aesthetic tastes (and with in particular most human figures, including Rosa Luxemburg herself, generally appearing as being depicted by Kate Evans in an uncomfortably exaggerated manner). And indeed, I would also say that Red Rosa: A Graphic Biography of Rosa Luxemburg is definitely NOT a book for younger children (and has probably been geared primarily towards adults). However, Kate Evans' text as well as her accompanying comic book like illustrations are in my opinion and certainly still more than suitable for interested and engaged teenaged readers above the age of thirteen or so (and perhaps even above the age of twelve), although I do have to leave the necessary caveat that from where I am standing, Red Rosa: A Graphic Biography of Rosa Luxemburg is also pretty thoroughly pro-Socialism and Communism (even though also not really overly extremist or radical), even if Red Rosa: A Graphic Biography of Rosa Luxemburg does definitely feature a very good and informative general introduction to Rosa Luxemburg, to her life, to her achievements, to how she was callously and brutally murdered (but also showing and demonstrating how Rosa Luxemburg was one of the very few left wingers always staunchly opposed to WWI and that she, that Rosa Luxemburg also relentlessly strived and fought for women's education and basic gender equality, basic human rights for ALL, including women). Finally, I certainly and also do wish that when we were studying political systems as well as WWI and WWII in grade 12 social studies (in the early 1980s), there had been a book such as Kate Evans' Red Rosa: A Graphic Biography of Rosa Luxemburg available for our teacher to use in class with us. For Red Rosa: A Graphic Biography of Rosa Luxemburg definitely does give a much more engaging, interesting and also a much easier to understand portrait of Rosa Luxemburg than the rather bone dry and generally tediously boring textbook we were using in class, where, and even though the portrait of Rosa Luxemburg was actually and thankfully politically balanced (neither too positive nor too negative), both Rosa Luxemburg and Karl Liebknecht were basically still just dealt with in a few short and unimaginative, not very detailed sentences.

  7. 5 out of 5

    kasia

    A charming biography with some lovely artwork. It takes awhile to get going, and feels slightly imbalanced (occasional narratorial intrusions or jumps in time are not unpleasant but they do seem somewhat arbitrarily scattered), but when at its peak, it is quite touching and beautifully conveys a sense of Luxemburg's personality. I especially loved the various nude scenes, hairy legs and all -- a really excellent example of how graphic novels can portray a woman's body in a way that feels intimat A charming biography with some lovely artwork. It takes awhile to get going, and feels slightly imbalanced (occasional narratorial intrusions or jumps in time are not unpleasant but they do seem somewhat arbitrarily scattered), but when at its peak, it is quite touching and beautifully conveys a sense of Luxemburg's personality. I especially loved the various nude scenes, hairy legs and all -- a really excellent example of how graphic novels can portray a woman's body in a way that feels intimate without being objectifying or prurient. It might not be the most effective introduction to Luxemburg's work -- it's a little hard to get a grasp on her ideas, or more specifically, what her particular innovations or disagreements with others were. But the book offers plenty of quotes from her writings and certainly gives you a good sense of her overall beliefs. Her life story proceeds in a fairly typical step-by-step fashion: Evans clearly has no compunctions about zooming past the less eventful bits. But there isn't much in the way of intellectual biography here: you don't really see where her ideas are coming from, or how her life experiences influence them. Although there is a nice moment where Evans steps in to say that she will depart from the convention of defining women's lives through their relationships to men, this doesn't seem like a radically new form of biography. Overall though, a very pleasant, and often quite beautiful (in various ways) book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    This is the "graphic biography" of a person of deep political conviction and passion, living through one of the most turbulent periods in history, and treats its subject with respect, depth and gravity. So it was with some surprise that I found Evans deftly weaving humour and romance into her story. Rosa emerges as a fully rounded person, her faults and inconsistencies shown alongside her humanity and fortitude. Evans packs in a lot of information, both into the main work and into the notes, whic This is the "graphic biography" of a person of deep political conviction and passion, living through one of the most turbulent periods in history, and treats its subject with respect, depth and gravity. So it was with some surprise that I found Evans deftly weaving humour and romance into her story. Rosa emerges as a fully rounded person, her faults and inconsistencies shown alongside her humanity and fortitude. Evans packs in a lot of information, both into the main work and into the notes, which to me is a great strength of the book: I read this because I want to know! The depiction of Rosa's assassination, and the brutal curtailing of her life and work, moved me to tears. Unequivocally 5🌟

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dee

    An engaging and moving biography of an incredible woman, and a nice intro to Marxist thought.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Paige

    So this has definitely been my favorite book of 2016. I discovered it on Goodreads and soon after requested it through the interlibrary loan request of my university (and it was fulfilled by Fordham University, ~3,000 miles away--thanks so much, libraries, you're the greatest!). And soon as I finished it, I got online to buy a copy for myself so I could share it with my friends and family. To be clear, this is the first book I have bought for myself in rather a long time, I think in over a year- So this has definitely been my favorite book of 2016. I discovered it on Goodreads and soon after requested it through the interlibrary loan request of my university (and it was fulfilled by Fordham University, ~3,000 miles away--thanks so much, libraries, you're the greatest!). And soon as I finished it, I got online to buy a copy for myself so I could share it with my friends and family. To be clear, this is the first book I have bought for myself in rather a long time, I think in over a year--usually I check books out, get them from the many little free libraries around town, get them at thrift stores or buy deeply discounted used copies (I also have an extensive backlog of books I bought years ago or were gifts). I just had to own it, because it's beautiful. The first person I loaned it to was my social theory professor, and she wants to scan part of it to share with her classical theory classes. Okay, so what's it about? Rosa Luxemburg! Who is Rosa Luxemburg, you ask? She was an theorist, philosopher, and revolutionary in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. I had never heard of her--but when I told my parents I was reading a book about her, both of them were like "Ohh Rosa Luxemburg, so cool!" I felt like I did that time I decided to check out a VHS called Cosmos and discovered Carl Sagan's wonderful program about our universe, called them up to gush about it, and they were like "oh yeah I remember that show." Well why didn't you share it with me, guys?? Why didn't you tell about Rosa Luxemburg! Because she is rad. And not only is Rosa great, but this book is too. Remember when I gave 2.5 stars to the graphic biography of Emma Goldman and cited "the format" as what the issue was? Yeah, well, this is the same "format" but has none of those issues. This book actually covers Rosa's politics--including an excellent section where Marxist theory is covered as Rosa explains it to her brothers at the dinner table. But the fact that we get great information on Rosa's politics, opinions, and political projects does not come at the cost of her biography as a person, either. Various relationships are depicted, including good friends, lovers, family, political allies and adversaries, and my favorite--her pet cat, Mimi (Mimi is so adorable, too). Her letters are quoted extensively so we get a great idea of what was going on in her mind. This book also didn't run into that choppiness I've come across in other graphic biographies, where characters and situations are suddenly introduced only to be just as suddenly vanished without explanation. It flows really nicely. And and and!! There are tons of notes in the back! It's amazing! For almost every single page, Kate Evans has multiple notes that tell you where she is pulling quotes and events from, and if the "real life" version differs at all from the story in the book, or if she's speculating and what that's based on. It's fantastic. It was so cool to be able to wonder "did that really happen??" and be able to turn to the back (which I did very often) to see that, yes, it did, or information on where the author got her information. She's pretty meticulous too--there's a note saying that in the graphic biography, she has Rosa cut her hair in a different year than she cut it in real life. I really appreciate this aspect of the book; it's thorough and well cited and I know exactly where to find more information should I want it. Oh and it made me cry too. Anyway I am so glad I discovered this book and I heartily recommend it. Rosa is an inspiration and her life story is fascinating, remarkable, and touching. I can't come up with a single complaint about this book which, if you read my reviews often, you will know is quite rare. ;)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Xian Xian

    Received from Netgalley for an honest review I don’t really read a lot of historical fiction or historical non-fiction books about the World Wars anymore. But what lead me into reading this graphic novel was the cover. Long hair with a trail of tanks and soldiers marching and exploding, almost forming some sort of loose braid, there is a style like this but I can’t name it, I will put a link to a picture here. I wondered what was this was about and who is Rosa Luxemburg. She was a charismatic and Received from Netgalley for an honest review I don’t really read a lot of historical fiction or historical non-fiction books about the World Wars anymore. But what lead me into reading this graphic novel was the cover. Long hair with a trail of tanks and soldiers marching and exploding, almost forming some sort of loose braid, there is a style like this but I can’t name it, I will put a link to a picture here. I wondered what was this was about and who is Rosa Luxemburg. She was a charismatic and brilliant woman who wanted to dismantle the system of capitalism that oppressed her people and other minorities, during the early 1900s, when World War I and World War II would bring about a destruction that would take her with it. She led the German Revolution and was part of a Communist party. She was a communist leader that set her foot out in an arena that would soon persecute her for her Jewish background. I will admit that I still didn’t understand the whole concept of socialism, so I guess I should pick up that Karl Marx book if I ever get interested in it for whatever reason. But the whole graphic novel was built around her teaching and conceptions of capitalism, how it controls the universe, and how it brings about poverty and societal restrictions due to the poverty. The funny thing is that socialism and capitalism have their pros and cons, despite that one might sound better than the other, there’s always some sort of oppressive con that will make people change their minds. Like, for example, look at China. I don’t really like to talk about this because I don’t know much, I only know from articles and blog posts written by Chinese people who live there and know better than someone like me and most Americans. A lot of the Western media’s protrayel of China is kind of influenced by Yellow Peril and the racist idea of “All communist countries are opressed desert wastelands that must be saved by me White saviour.” No I’m not denying that these things happen, a lot of screwed up things happen there, it’s a communist, imperialist country, much like us, except we’re not communist. But China is a perfect example of communism gone wrong. Which is why I say that there is a pro and a con to communism and it shouldn’t be romanticized. It’s a saddening how after Rosa Luxemburg died, the communism that she was trying to build turned out to be something worse, as the people who took over became dictators and inflicted just as much harm than the government before them. But her influence has lived on, her outspoken actions and feisty attitude definitely lives on in many of today’s feminist activists. Yes, I actually consider her a feminist figure since what she had done was rare for a woman at that time, especially since Jewish people were constantly in hiding from persecution. I wasn’t a fan of the artwork I will admit, some of it was beautiful in its accurately bleak and sort of scratched in look, I don’t know how to explain art, but anything looks better than Attack on Titan. The flow of the story was a little odd sometimes, the way the scenes ended and then changed were a bit abrupt to me. But the writing was engaging, the tale of her life, switching from her political side to her dysfunctional love life, was utilized in a way to portray a political figure in their highest and lowest. Rosa’s writings were also melded into the text to form two narratives, the personal and the outer. I recommend this as a light read for those who like to read World War I and II non-fictions. Rating: 3.5/5 Entire post at Notes on the shore

  12. 4 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Yes and no for this effort. Yes for the biographical detail, no for the Marxism 101 lessons. Yes for the airbrush-and-ink landscapes and buildings, no for the scratchy, ugly characterisations that sit in those. Yes for the way real quotes are highlighted ready for the student, no for the way the narrative voice becomes equally as polemical, and breaks into inventing a non-existent 'us'. Yes for the gloss of the narator's font, no for the again scratchy and ungainly speech bubble design. There's Yes and no for this effort. Yes for the biographical detail, no for the Marxism 101 lessons. Yes for the airbrush-and-ink landscapes and buildings, no for the scratchy, ugly characterisations that sit in those. Yes for the way real quotes are highlighted ready for the student, no for the way the narrative voice becomes equally as polemical, and breaks into inventing a non-existent 'us'. Yes for the gloss of the narator's font, no for the again scratchy and ungainly speech bubble design. There's a gloss to some of this, and a lot of intelligence in the design and writing, which will imbue it with qualities those few remaining non-graphic novel readers will accept, but I did get left with the impression that much like its subject it wanted things it couldn't have, and broke from its basic tenet in order to get them.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dale

    A personal and political biography of Rosa Luxemburg, from her childhood in Poland, through her early activism in Switzerland, to her revolutionary activity in Germany before, during, and after the war, and her eventual murder by the police under the socialist (in name only) government of Friedrich Ebert in 1919. This is a really good book. You get a real sense of Luxemburg's brilliant mind and unfailing courage. She was a revolutionary's revolutionary, during a time when erstwhile revolutionary A personal and political biography of Rosa Luxemburg, from her childhood in Poland, through her early activism in Switzerland, to her revolutionary activity in Germany before, during, and after the war, and her eventual murder by the police under the socialist (in name only) government of Friedrich Ebert in 1919. This is a really good book. You get a real sense of Luxemburg's brilliant mind and unfailing courage. She was a revolutionary's revolutionary, during a time when erstwhile revolutionary socialists were all too eager to give their support to an imperialist war. Luxemburg consistently opposed the war, and was jailed for a year for attempting to organize resistance to it, and again in 1916 for over two years. Germany was ripe for revolution in 1918, and a successful revolution there would likely have changed the course of the 20th century. But, thanks in large part to incompetence on the part of the new German communist party, and self-serving decisions on the part of the Soviet government, as well as quick, violent, and decisive action on the part of the German government, the revolution was an uncoordinated disaster, and had failed by the time of Luxemburg's murder. Sadly, many of Luxemburg's manuscripts were destroyed by looting soldiers following her death. Much of the surviving work can be found at The Rosa Luxemburg Library.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Shannan

    4.5 stars I enjoy learning new things about historical figures. I had heard Rosa Luxembourg’s name,but knew virtually nothing about her. Her strength, intelligence, gumption, wit and passion were inspirational - especially at a time women were little more than “furniture” to look nice and sit quietly at the turn of the 20th century. Katie Evans showed that Rosa was outspoken and brave, while still being a lover, daughter, friend, cat-lover and champion for the underdogs in politics. Evans drawin 4.5 stars I enjoy learning new things about historical figures. I had heard Rosa Luxembourg’s name,but knew virtually nothing about her. Her strength, intelligence, gumption, wit and passion were inspirational - especially at a time women were little more than “furniture” to look nice and sit quietly at the turn of the 20th century. Katie Evans showed that Rosa was outspoken and brave, while still being a lover, daughter, friend, cat-lover and champion for the underdogs in politics. Evans drawings are intriguing and true to life, and her subtle artist appearances added to the enjoyment of this graphic novel.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dov Zeller

    A wonderful graphic biography of Rosa Luxemburg. Uneven at times, and it took me a little while to really feel engaged with the text, but by the end I was immersed in the times and places this book represents and I could appreciate what a powerful, passionate, brave, complex, challenging, imperfect, stunningly vibrant person Luxemburg was. Here are two wonderful GR reviews that discuss the book in more depth. https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... A wonderful graphic biography of Rosa Luxemburg. Uneven at times, and it took me a little while to really feel engaged with the text, but by the end I was immersed in the times and places this book represents and I could appreciate what a powerful, passionate, brave, complex, challenging, imperfect, stunningly vibrant person Luxemburg was. Here are two wonderful GR reviews that discuss the book in more depth. https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Thelonia Saunders

    I come from a family of French socialists, and have had a lifelong interest in strong female figures throughout history, so it seems strange that I'd never heard of Rosa Luxemburg before today, but I can think of no better introduction to learning about her life than Kate Evan's graphic novel Red Rosa. Told mostly through Rosa's own words combined with Ms. Evan's really very lovely art, Red Rosa recounts the life of Rosa Luxemburg, a Polish-Jewish socialist theorist, and goes through both the per I come from a family of French socialists, and have had a lifelong interest in strong female figures throughout history, so it seems strange that I'd never heard of Rosa Luxemburg before today, but I can think of no better introduction to learning about her life than Kate Evan's graphic novel Red Rosa. Told mostly through Rosa's own words combined with Ms. Evan's really very lovely art, Red Rosa recounts the life of Rosa Luxemburg, a Polish-Jewish socialist theorist, and goes through both the personal and political sides of her life and how the two relate to each other. Though some minor events in Rosa's life have been changed for the purpose of simplification (as well as good old dramatic effect), they are small enough to not detract from the overarching narrative as well as the examination of revolutionary socialism and Marxist theory. These more theoretical aspects of her life, particularly those relating to economic systems that remain in place today, are not only presented in their original historical context (though when they are, they are told very clearly and succinctly so I've actually understood more so than I ever did in class), but also as how it relates to today's socialist and capitalist economic systems. The art is charming, with a simplicity that allows for a lot of character expression, as well as some really beautiful full page spreads as World War I, doubled with Rosa's eventual imprisonment, is retold in a mostly visual montage of war and pain that is just compositionally exquisite and emotionally charged. All in all, I'd definitely recommend this book to anyone engaged in social activism, especially as it relates to economic struggles, as well as to anyone who is interested in history and the interesting women we seldom hear about otherwise. I'll definitely be sure to check the artist out in the future.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Siina

    It took me ages to read this. Red Rosa isn't the worst comic out there and as a biography it surely is interesting - the problem is that the format and structure of the comic is hideous. There's no rhythm whatsoever and the transitions don't work at all. The structure of the panels is heavy and there's basically too much text in the panels. The panels are stuffed and never ever use so many different fonts! The hand written texts are hard to read and unsteady. They look smudgy and cheap. The font It took me ages to read this. Red Rosa isn't the worst comic out there and as a biography it surely is interesting - the problem is that the format and structure of the comic is hideous. There's no rhythm whatsoever and the transitions don't work at all. The structure of the panels is heavy and there's basically too much text in the panels. The panels are stuffed and never ever use so many different fonts! The hand written texts are hard to read and unsteady. They look smudgy and cheap. The font doesn't fit with the basic fonts (like Times New Roman) that feel detached as a comparison. It's really hard to grasp Rosa's life as nothing is explained and it wasn't the best decision to just recite Rosa's writings. There's no need to write everything just the way she did, just telling it with less words would've made wonders. Also, the comic is mostly talking heads, which is quite boring. The artwork is tenuous at best. The heads are out of proportion and the line work is smudgy. The digital coloring doesn't fit and looks cheap - black and white is OK, but the lack of tones makes the comic look half made. Basically Evans isn't good enough to pull this through. The comic lacks in every aspect and the only good thing is the cover. I didn't really get a picture of Rosa or what she did, and I think most people will think the same. The topic is interesting and we do need more comics about strong women, especially those that have actually existed. The structure would need a lot of work as well as the art not to forget the fonts. In a way this isn't so bad, but for the fact that it messes all the things that make it a comic, I'll only give one star.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mateen Mahboubi

    Oh Rosa, how disappointed would you be with the state of the world today? Where are our modern leftist heroes? This is a fairly basic introductory text on Rosa Luxembourg but includes enough of her texts to give readers the opportunity to find additional texts that cover this period of history and Rosa’s life.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sonja Bates

    I have finally finished. Rosa's legacy is deep and vast and the book painted a basic picture but at times, jumped over gaps that the author assumed you had in your background knowledge of Rosa. I had to read up a lot to fully understand dialogues and jumps in the narrative. Kate Evan' best work is towards the end of the novel when Rosa's tragic end is portrayed. Evans' drawings are bleak and she does a great job of using visuals to haunt the reader of this tragic and murderous end of woman who w I have finally finished. Rosa's legacy is deep and vast and the book painted a basic picture but at times, jumped over gaps that the author assumed you had in your background knowledge of Rosa. I had to read up a lot to fully understand dialogues and jumps in the narrative. Kate Evan' best work is towards the end of the novel when Rosa's tragic end is portrayed. Evans' drawings are bleak and she does a great job of using visuals to haunt the reader of this tragic and murderous end of woman who was anincredible advocate for the workers, and common people. Page 168 onward are incredible. I suspect Evans' wrote this book to eventually get to these last 10 pages. Haunting and emotional visualisations . Evans' also does a great job of linking Rosa's final words to the global uprisings that have since played out: pg 179 we see the Hong Kong uprising, the Arab spring and other indigenous peoples standing up to reclaim what was taken from them over the centuries of Imperialism. Erotic images were also lovingly drawn and imprinted a softness in the woman who was such a fighter. She was also a lover and vulnerable in her relationships. The body language depicted were voyeuristic and very intimate. In other pages, empowering, huge buildings loomed over the already physically small Rosa. Evans does a great job here - illustrating the great forces that worked against Rosa and her revolutionary ideas. I think Rosa would have liked this book. I only felt it was not the best book to start in learning about Rosa. But that is behind me now. I will visiting her grave this weekend, and honouring a powerful woman who left a mark on our thinking and whose hopes and dreams are still relevant today. "Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein". And so her memory lives on.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ellen Lancelot

    I loved reading about Rosa, and learning about her ideas. It was cool to follow her developing her thinking, as history played out around her. The art was good, and some of the ideas for the illustration really cool. The way her thinking was told together with the development in europe gave a sense of urgency, and brought feeling to the story. It did really touch me. But the book neither goes deep into her personal life, nor goes deep into her thinking. In trying to cover everything, not much is I loved reading about Rosa, and learning about her ideas. It was cool to follow her developing her thinking, as history played out around her. The art was good, and some of the ideas for the illustration really cool. The way her thinking was told together with the development in europe gave a sense of urgency, and brought feeling to the story. It did really touch me. But the book neither goes deep into her personal life, nor goes deep into her thinking. In trying to cover everything, not much is said about anything. For a beginner, it moves through ideas to fast, for someone knowledgeable, it is all to shallow. I think the book would have benefited, narratively and ideationally, from stretching the story a bit; adding more pictures and scenes to explain the same ideas.

  21. 5 out of 5

    James

    This is a brilliant and accessible graphic novel that explains both Rosa Luxemburg's life but also her ideas. She was a brilliant writer, speaker, and organizer within German socialist circles. She explicitly linked militarism and capitalism in her writings during the Great War. Her writings have become very important as a possible path of socialism from below, as opposed to the socialism through elections or socialism by small cadre. The book spares no detail from her life as a poor Jewish girl This is a brilliant and accessible graphic novel that explains both Rosa Luxemburg's life but also her ideas. She was a brilliant writer, speaker, and organizer within German socialist circles. She explicitly linked militarism and capitalism in her writings during the Great War. Her writings have become very important as a possible path of socialism from below, as opposed to the socialism through elections or socialism by small cadre. The book spares no detail from her life as a poor Jewish girl in Czarist Poland to living internationally with a lively intellectual life and love life, before becoming an activist in the SPD, often butting heads with its more moderate leaders. Definitely give this a read!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Will

    Not sure a graphic novel was the best way to get this information

  23. 4 out of 5

    Subashini

    I had a bit of an issue with the "conflation" of characters, as the author put it, in which words someone else said had were put in someone else's mouth or someone was made to be a composite of several other historical figures in order to maintain narrative flow. This is clarified in the notes at the end of the book. But precisely because the narrative flows very well, unless you stop at every page to turn to the notes to see where the conflation or changes were, you might well miss it and readi I had a bit of an issue with the "conflation" of characters, as the author put it, in which words someone else said had were put in someone else's mouth or someone was made to be a composite of several other historical figures in order to maintain narrative flow. This is clarified in the notes at the end of the book. But precisely because the narrative flows very well, unless you stop at every page to turn to the notes to see where the conflation or changes were, you might well miss it and reading the notes at the end, after reading the story, means that you might not catch it. So it's a bit odd, as it were, the "creative" nonfiction part of the whole thing, even if the author is upfront about it. I also didn't quite get why in some instances the faces and figures were rendered with broad, crude lines that looked unfinished or rushed while the landscape and the background were always illustrated with clean, delicate lines. I was trying to see if the change in art corresponded to a particular moment of tension or change or emphasis in the narrative, but no--it seemed pretty arbitrary. Otherwise a riveting and inspiring read and people complaining about the "Marx lessons" in this--well, it's the best part.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Grig O'

    Wonderful depiction of Rosa Luxemburg's life and times, from Rosa's personal and intellectual history to the tumult, violence and sadism of German society which would boil over in the decades after her death. I have to admit I was slightly skeptical of the format in the beginning, but the book's praise turned out to be well-deserved: after the predictable opening pages featuring Rosa's childhood and youth, Kate Evans doesn't shy away from any aspect of her protagonist's radical life. The graphica Wonderful depiction of Rosa Luxemburg's life and times, from Rosa's personal and intellectual history to the tumult, violence and sadism of German society which would boil over in the decades after her death. I have to admit I was slightly skeptical of the format in the beginning, but the book's praise turned out to be well-deserved: after the predictable opening pages featuring Rosa's childhood and youth, Kate Evans doesn't shy away from any aspect of her protagonist's radical life. The graphical story is thoroughly annotated with biographical and theoretical sources, many being Rosa's own writings. My knowledge of R.L. was limited to the Wikipedia article, plus a couple of online texts. Red Rosa has given me a quick but potent insight into her contributions and relevance today, and a motivation to read more of her political/economical stuff and to try and live up to 1% of her clarity and courage.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    This was too dense, the font choices were especially hard on the eyes, and ultimately I still didn't understand ALL that Rosa Luxemburg did for her nation. I was into it enough to get that she was a slight of a girl who also had a disabled leg that made her stand out (including her hair). She wanted to learn and challenge and that made her stand out even more. She was also Jewish when it wasn't safe to be Jewish. She challenged the ideals and status quo, had sexual relationships that were much-d This was too dense, the font choices were especially hard on the eyes, and ultimately I still didn't understand ALL that Rosa Luxemburg did for her nation. I was into it enough to get that she was a slight of a girl who also had a disabled leg that made her stand out (including her hair). She wanted to learn and challenge and that made her stand out even more. She was also Jewish when it wasn't safe to be Jewish. She challenged the ideals and status quo, had sexual relationships that were much-discussed to have been included in somewhat graphic detail since it was part of her essence, and she was a force. But all of the intricate details were lost on me in trying to maneuver through this graphic novel. Too much detail and not enough feeling about her power when they chose this format to tell her story.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Katbyrdie

    Why take an inspirational story and make it a history lesson? The author wanted to tell the story of a fighter, a woman doing something very unique at the time for someone her gender and religious affiliation, but instead she chose to focus on Marx details. It felt like I was being recruited more than learning about Rosa, which is frustrating because I really wanted to learn about her. Yes, Marx beliefs are obviously important to her, but it doesn't mean you need to give a Marx lesson to tell he Why take an inspirational story and make it a history lesson? The author wanted to tell the story of a fighter, a woman doing something very unique at the time for someone her gender and religious affiliation, but instead she chose to focus on Marx details. It felt like I was being recruited more than learning about Rosa, which is frustrating because I really wanted to learn about her. Yes, Marx beliefs are obviously important to her, but it doesn't mean you need to give a Marx lesson to tell her story. Also, I did not expect to see tits and dick. There goes the idea of using this for high school students. Another issue, was the illustrations. While the bodies were great (I LOVED that Rosa looked lumpy and real) the faces looked all kinds of fraked. This novel needs work.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Alexander

    A passionate, engaging, thoughtful, and very informative graphic novel. Red Rosa offers a rich biography of Rosa Luxemburg, smoothly combining her personal life with her political career as activist, Marxist theorist, journalist, and revolutionary. Kate Evans ambitiously includes a generous amount of dialectical thinking - indeed, this book could serve nicely in a course on leftist political theory. Yet the novel is also emotionally powerful. The art is very good, emphasizing the physicality of b A passionate, engaging, thoughtful, and very informative graphic novel. Red Rosa offers a rich biography of Rosa Luxemburg, smoothly combining her personal life with her political career as activist, Marxist theorist, journalist, and revolutionary. Kate Evans ambitiously includes a generous amount of dialectical thinking - indeed, this book could serve nicely in a course on leftist political theory. Yet the novel is also emotionally powerful. The art is very good, emphasizing the physicality of bodies and historical specificity, with expressionist touches and inventive page layout. Strongly recommended.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jarrah

    An absolutely stunning and moving graphic biography of influential socialist theorist and activist Rosa Luxemburg. Kate Evans not only outlines Luxemburg's contributions to socialist thought and role in socialist politics, she creates a fully-rounded portrait of Luxemburg's identity, including her romances, friendships, attitudes and desires. Evans also uses narration and even breaks the fourth wall when necessary to add detail and to help a modern audience see how we can still draw lessons from An absolutely stunning and moving graphic biography of influential socialist theorist and activist Rosa Luxemburg. Kate Evans not only outlines Luxemburg's contributions to socialist thought and role in socialist politics, she creates a fully-rounded portrait of Luxemburg's identity, including her romances, friendships, attitudes and desires. Evans also uses narration and even breaks the fourth wall when necessary to add detail and to help a modern audience see how we can still draw lessons from Luxemburg's life and writings to apply to modern struggles.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    As a work of non-fiction, I enjoyed this quite a bit. However, as a comic, I had some reservations. The art was really not to my taste: people were drawn oddly deformed, with bulbous heads that were way too big for their bodies. Dialogue text looked hand-drawn, but anything from the "narrator" was simply typed in Times New Roman and laid on the images. It all looked kind of strange and unpolished. However, all in all, I appreciated reading about a woman who seems to have been largely written out As a work of non-fiction, I enjoyed this quite a bit. However, as a comic, I had some reservations. The art was really not to my taste: people were drawn oddly deformed, with bulbous heads that were way too big for their bodies. Dialogue text looked hand-drawn, but anything from the "narrator" was simply typed in Times New Roman and laid on the images. It all looked kind of strange and unpolished. However, all in all, I appreciated reading about a woman who seems to have been largely written out of history (at least, there doesn't appear to be a lot written about Luxemburg in English).

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    I knew nothing about Rosa Luxemburg and now I know a fair bit, thanks to this pretty hefty graphic biography of her life and activism in the early 20th-century. I am so inspired by the women in history who refused to conform to social convention and restrictions, and instead lived by, fought for, and acted on their beliefs to the great benefit of society...and the detriment of their own life, at least in Rosa Luxemburg's case. (There is also a lot of information about capitalism, socialism, hist I knew nothing about Rosa Luxemburg and now I know a fair bit, thanks to this pretty hefty graphic biography of her life and activism in the early 20th-century. I am so inspired by the women in history who refused to conform to social convention and restrictions, and instead lived by, fought for, and acted on their beliefs to the great benefit of society...and the detriment of their own life, at least in Rosa Luxemburg's case. (There is also a lot of information about capitalism, socialism, history, etc. that I found overwhelming at times and fascinating at others.)

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.