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Why the Weird Wild West? The untamed frontier is a challenge, a test of character, a proving ground for the soul. It's a place where pioneers rewrite their future, or end their days…for better or worse. In the spirit of Bret Maverick, Cat Ballou, Kwai Chang Caine, and James West, The Weird Wild West blends western grit with the magical and mysterious unknown that waits beyo Why the Weird Wild West? The untamed frontier is a challenge, a test of character, a proving ground for the soul. It's a place where pioneers rewrite their future, or end their days…for better or worse. In the spirit of Bret Maverick, Cat Ballou, Kwai Chang Caine, and James West, The Weird Wild West blends western grit with the magical and mysterious unknown that waits beyond the next horizon. With thrilling stories by Jonathan Maberry, Gail Z. Martin, John Hartness, RS Belcher, Diana Pharaoh Francis, Misty Massey, James R. Tuck, Robert E. Waters, David Sherman, Tonia Brown and many more, you've hit the Mother Lode! “Abishag Mary” by Frances Rowat. © 2015 Frances Rowat. “Blood Tellings” by Wendy N. Wagner. © 2015 Wendy N. Wagner. “Ruin Creek” by Gail Z. Martin and Larry N. Martin. © 2015 Gail Z. Martin and Larry N. Martin. “Via Con Diablo” by Bryan C. P. Steele. © 2015 Bryan C. P. Steele. “Rattler” by R. S. (Rod) Belcher. © 2015 R. S. (Rod) Belcher. “Rocky Rolls Gold” by David Sherman. © 2015 David Sherman. “Son of the Devil” by Jonathan Maberry. © 2015 Jonathan Maberry. “Mungo Snead’s Last Stand” by Robert E. Waters. © 2015 Robert E. Waters. “Frank and Earnest” by Tonia Brown. © 2015 Tonia Brown. “From Parts Unknown” by James R. Tuck. © 2015 James R. Tuck. “Sundown” by Liz Colter. © 2015 Liz Colter. “Fifteen Seconds” by Scott C. Hungerford. © 2015 Scott C. Hungerford. “Redemption Song” by John Hartness. © 2015 John Hartness. “Grasping Rainbows” by Diana Pharaoh Francis. © 2015 Diana Pharaoh Francis. “The Faery Wrangler” by Misty Massey. © 2015 Misty Massey. “Haven” by Ken Schrader. © 2015 Ken Schrader. “Eighteen Sixty” by Faith Hunter. © 2015 Faith Hunter.


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Why the Weird Wild West? The untamed frontier is a challenge, a test of character, a proving ground for the soul. It's a place where pioneers rewrite their future, or end their days…for better or worse. In the spirit of Bret Maverick, Cat Ballou, Kwai Chang Caine, and James West, The Weird Wild West blends western grit with the magical and mysterious unknown that waits beyo Why the Weird Wild West? The untamed frontier is a challenge, a test of character, a proving ground for the soul. It's a place where pioneers rewrite their future, or end their days…for better or worse. In the spirit of Bret Maverick, Cat Ballou, Kwai Chang Caine, and James West, The Weird Wild West blends western grit with the magical and mysterious unknown that waits beyond the next horizon. With thrilling stories by Jonathan Maberry, Gail Z. Martin, John Hartness, RS Belcher, Diana Pharaoh Francis, Misty Massey, James R. Tuck, Robert E. Waters, David Sherman, Tonia Brown and many more, you've hit the Mother Lode! “Abishag Mary” by Frances Rowat. © 2015 Frances Rowat. “Blood Tellings” by Wendy N. Wagner. © 2015 Wendy N. Wagner. “Ruin Creek” by Gail Z. Martin and Larry N. Martin. © 2015 Gail Z. Martin and Larry N. Martin. “Via Con Diablo” by Bryan C. P. Steele. © 2015 Bryan C. P. Steele. “Rattler” by R. S. (Rod) Belcher. © 2015 R. S. (Rod) Belcher. “Rocky Rolls Gold” by David Sherman. © 2015 David Sherman. “Son of the Devil” by Jonathan Maberry. © 2015 Jonathan Maberry. “Mungo Snead’s Last Stand” by Robert E. Waters. © 2015 Robert E. Waters. “Frank and Earnest” by Tonia Brown. © 2015 Tonia Brown. “From Parts Unknown” by James R. Tuck. © 2015 James R. Tuck. “Sundown” by Liz Colter. © 2015 Liz Colter. “Fifteen Seconds” by Scott C. Hungerford. © 2015 Scott C. Hungerford. “Redemption Song” by John Hartness. © 2015 John Hartness. “Grasping Rainbows” by Diana Pharaoh Francis. © 2015 Diana Pharaoh Francis. “The Faery Wrangler” by Misty Massey. © 2015 Misty Massey. “Haven” by Ken Schrader. © 2015 Ken Schrader. “Eighteen Sixty” by Faith Hunter. © 2015 Faith Hunter.

30 review for The Weird Wild West

  1. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    Just read the story Eighteen Sixty by Faith Hunter, set in the world of Jane Yellowrock. I really liked the concept, just felt like it needed more fleshing out.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    Anthologies can be difficult to review. Very seldom is a reader happy with every story within. The quality of the writing can be, shall we say, varied from story to story. And in the case of themed collections, the subject matter can get old by the time you've turned the last page. Let me tell you that none of this is the case with The Weird Wild West. This means a lot coming from me. I've edited many anthologies and I cannot help but look at short fiction with an editor's eye. When reading The We Anthologies can be difficult to review. Very seldom is a reader happy with every story within. The quality of the writing can be, shall we say, varied from story to story. And in the case of themed collections, the subject matter can get old by the time you've turned the last page. Let me tell you that none of this is the case with The Weird Wild West. This means a lot coming from me. I've edited many anthologies and I cannot help but look at short fiction with an editor's eye. When reading The Weird Wild West not once did I need to restrain myself from making notes of what should be changed to elevate a particular story. This collection takes the grit and glory that epitomizes the old west and gives it many delightful speculative spins. Do yourself a favor and take my advice...don't just add this book to your to-read shelf, get your hands on a copy and immerse yourself in these tales.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Yzabel Ginsberg

    [I received a copy of this book through Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review.] A fairly decent anthology of western-themed stories with a twist, often of the paranormal or supernatural variety, with a bit of steampunk thrown in. A lot of the “western codes” are followed here. Little towns and farms on the Frontier, homesteaders and professional players, gunslingers and sharpshooters, sheriffs and outlaws, finding themselves dealing with something that one day comes to disturb their life. E [I received a copy of this book through Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review.] A fairly decent anthology of western-themed stories with a twist, often of the paranormal or supernatural variety, with a bit of steampunk thrown in. A lot of the “western codes” are followed here. Little towns and farms on the Frontier, homesteaders and professional players, gunslingers and sharpshooters, sheriffs and outlaws, finding themselves dealing with something that one day comes to disturb their life. Even though having so many stories follow the same “rule”, so to speak, it was still enjoyable. While none of the stories blew my mind, none was truly bad either; I probably wouldn't buy the book, but borrowing it from a friend or the library would be in order here. It would also provide a good introduction to this “weird wild west” genre (because all things said and done, it does feel like a genre to me). The ones I liked best: “Ruin Creek”: a pair of paranormal investigatores go to the little town of Ruin Creek, on board a night train, to investigate the disappearance of another investigator, after the latter reported mysterious occurrences. “Son of the Devil”: or the trappings of a small town where people are so entrenched in their religious beliefs that they fail to apply them to people who're not perfect but could do with some mercy, thus driving them to committing dark deeds. I always tend to find this dichotomy interesting, because it raises the question of who is to blame: the sinners, or the “pure ones” who could have helped but didn't? And were the sinners “bad people” from the beginning, or did they just turn to “evil” because they were alone and desperate? “Mungo Snead's Last Stand”: a brave and desperate tale, with aliens thrown in the middle for good measure. (It is the Weird West, after all!) “Frank and Earnest”: fun and cute, with a bit of slapstick comedy. Two outlaws find themselves looking for a kitten, and stumble upon what could destroy the world. Notes: “Abishag Mary” wasn't my favorite, and it was a bit typical (homesteader trying to keep her land), however I found the twist at the end quite funny. “Rocky Rolls Gold” had an interesting premise, but the way it was told didn't work too well for me, I get that the tone was to be light and funny, but the characters felt too silly to properly work (as if they were meant to be competent at what they did, yet the banter and their reactions made them appear as stupid nonetheless). “Fifteen Seconds”: this one's a bit different, because of its contemporary setting (all the other stories are cleary 19th century Frontier adventures). I also thought it had a bit too much info-dumping. 3.5 stars overall.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ailyn

    Given to me by the publisher for an early review, Weird Wild West is a mixture of paranormal plus the wild west era, a unique mixture of shamans, spirits and modern cowboys. Another great anthology by eSpecbooks, W3 features a lot of cool stories that revolve around the two themes: weird and wild west. My favorite of the lot is Ruin Creek, a pair of paranormal investigators got called into Ruin Creek. Their adventures were fraught with mystery and danger, and the ending was spectacularly creepy. Given to me by the publisher for an early review, Weird Wild West is a mixture of paranormal plus the wild west era, a unique mixture of shamans, spirits and modern cowboys. Another great anthology by eSpecbooks, W3 features a lot of cool stories that revolve around the two themes: weird and wild west. My favorite of the lot is Ruin Creek, a pair of paranormal investigators got called into Ruin Creek. Their adventures were fraught with mystery and danger, and the ending was spectacularly creepy. Each story have a different sub- theme, but action and adventure seems to be the ones making appearances in this book, as well as a lot of shooting. Not only for those who live this genre, the W3 is a show of skill by the authors who wrote short stories with skill and flair. It takes a lot of effort to cram so many details into so little words. Each world/ story is different, and every one has a different tidbit to offer and entertain; some even aim to creep you out, maybe that’s just me. This book is a bit for a fun read, unless you are looking to write one about the genre yourself, then this book is a guide of sorts. It gives you a hint about how the west should be during those era, and the world building is awesome despite the word limitations. I would recommend it for those who are interested, just because the writing is awesome. Thank you to Publisher for the book =d

  5. 5 out of 5

    Erin Penn

    This Anthology introduced me to some new authors I have since hunted down to read their full-length work, plus reminded me of a lot of favorites. In book appearance order, story titles and authors are: Abishag Mary by Frances Rowat Blood Tellings by Wendy N. Wagner Ruin Creek by Gail Z. Martin and Larry N. Martin Via Con Diablo by Bryan C.P. Steele Rattler by R.S. Belcher Rocky Rolls Gold by David Sherman Son of the Devil by Jonathan Maberry Mungo Snead's Last Stand by Robert E. Waters Frank and Earnest This Anthology introduced me to some new authors I have since hunted down to read their full-length work, plus reminded me of a lot of favorites. In book appearance order, story titles and authors are: Abishag Mary by Frances Rowat Blood Tellings by Wendy N. Wagner Ruin Creek by Gail Z. Martin and Larry N. Martin Via Con Diablo by Bryan C.P. Steele Rattler by R.S. Belcher Rocky Rolls Gold by David Sherman Son of the Devil by Jonathan Maberry Mungo Snead's Last Stand by Robert E. Waters Frank and Earnest by Tonia Brown From Parts Unknown by James R. Tuck Sundown by Liz Colter Fifteen Seconds by Scott Hungerford Redemption Song by John G. Hartness Grasping Rainbows by Diana Pharaoh Francis The Faery Wrangler by Misty Massey Haven by Ken Schrader Eighteen Sixty by Faith Hunter Now to my actual review. A combination of western, fantasy, and steampunk, the Weird Wild West anthology presents the frontier world that may have been. A couple alien stories and several stand-alone stories from established worlds round things out nicely. No clunkers in the mix but no must-read stories either. Some stories star heroes, others ... not-so hero. Some are about people ready to shape the frontier and others had their share of trouble and are ready to return to civilization. Haven by Ken Schrader - My favorite of the lot. I just like the two peace officers recognizing what the other was and helping each other with their jobs, justice trumps jurisdiction and species. Son of the Devil by Jonathan Maberry - An intense cautionary tale. I both loved and hated it. With a very disturbing thought - what happens when Hell fills up. From Parts Unknown by James R Tuck - Wins best title award. Sundown by Liz Colter - I think was the most original ... and felt the most tall-tale authentic. Something which could stand beside a Paul Bunyan or John Henry tale. Redemption Song (John G. Hartness), Eighteen Sixty (Faith Hunter), and Ruin Creek (Gail & Larry Martin) (plus the previously mentioned From Parts Unknown) all use characters the authors have in other anthologies.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Hope Sloper

    Let me begin by saying, I am irrevocably in love with the weird west. This genre absolutely hits a sweet spot for me, and it's heartbreaking that more people aren't spinning tales within this bountiful genre. This anthology offers twelve short stories about the full-on spectacular weird west. But of course, like any anthology, I had my favorites; Ruin Creek by Gail Z. Martin and Larry N. Martin, Rattler by R. S. Belcher, Son of the Devil by Jonathan Maberry, Mungo Snead's Last Stand by Robert E. Let me begin by saying, I am irrevocably in love with the weird west. This genre absolutely hits a sweet spot for me, and it's heartbreaking that more people aren't spinning tales within this bountiful genre. This anthology offers twelve short stories about the full-on spectacular weird west. But of course, like any anthology, I had my favorites; Ruin Creek by Gail Z. Martin and Larry N. Martin, Rattler by R. S. Belcher, Son of the Devil by Jonathan Maberry, Mungo Snead's Last Stand by Robert E. Waters, Redemption Song by John G. Hartness, and Eighteen Sixty by Faith Hunter. I'm intrigued to read more from these authors and plan on hunting them down. A vast majority of these stories are well written and very easy to follow from start to finish, no matter how long or short. There were only a few that did not really hold up to the others. I recommend this book to anyone who is interested in trying the genre. It's the perfect anthology to get your feet wet with. Overall, I'm giving this book three stars. The stories I didn't enjoy were really hard to get into and connect with. Those stories I mentioned above, however, I would have totally given four stars had I been reviewing each short story within the book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Darrell Grizzle

    A few of the stories in this anthology of Weird Westerns are clunkers, but overall most of them are very good. Two exceptionally good ones are “Son of the Devil” by Jonathan Maberry (a horror story that haunted me for days after I read it) and “From Parts Unknown” by James R. Tuck (truly a “Weird Tale” in the best sense of that phrase; I hope we see more stories featuring Truett McCall). Those two novelettes alone are well worth the price of the book, but there are also great stories by R. S. Be A few of the stories in this anthology of Weird Westerns are clunkers, but overall most of them are very good. Two exceptionally good ones are “Son of the Devil” by Jonathan Maberry (a horror story that haunted me for days after I read it) and “From Parts Unknown” by James R. Tuck (truly a “Weird Tale” in the best sense of that phrase; I hope we see more stories featuring Truett McCall). Those two novelettes alone are well worth the price of the book, but there are also great stories by R. S. Belcher, John G. Hartness, Misty Massey, and Faith Hunter. Highly recommended.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    3.5 stars overall, individual stories vary -- This is an interesting collection of stories to introduce yourself to the genre and/or to give yourself a taste of some authors you might not know. Overall, I liked it, but as with most anthologies of short stories that I've read, it's hard for me to be completely thrilled by it. Take that last statement with a grain of salt though. Fair warning: I'm not a short-story junkie. They just aren't long enough to give me what I crave with any sort of consi 3.5 stars overall, individual stories vary -- This is an interesting collection of stories to introduce yourself to the genre and/or to give yourself a taste of some authors you might not know. Overall, I liked it, but as with most anthologies of short stories that I've read, it's hard for me to be completely thrilled by it. Take that last statement with a grain of salt though. Fair warning: I'm not a short-story junkie. They just aren't long enough to give me what I crave with any sort of consistency, so I'm typically not ready to be done reading after just one. Thus, I have to wipe the mental notes clean before I can continue on to the next story, something that makes me feel the story was disposable whether I enjoyed it or not. It's a concept that makes me cringe even when applying it to the awful ones. And so it is that whenever I decide to read an anthology, I start with a bit of anxiety. It's rare for one to contain more than a story or two that I truly enjoy, that I even remember much after I've reached the end of the collection. So yeah, I'm a hard sell. As far as this one goes, The Weird Wild West is a collection of seventeen speculative-fiction short stories thematically tied together by their setting in the lore of the American Old West. Dusty trails, saloons, gunslingers, Indians, mines? Yep, there are plenty to be found here. Alien artifacts, undead things, supernatural and fantastic creatures and happenings? Yep, this has that covered too. Of the stories here, only one fell completely flat for me. That fact alone means this anthology is worth checking out if you're at all interested in the genre or curious about the theme. I'm not going to say which one, because I don't want to prejudice future readers. On the other hand, there were four stories that I call "stoppers." By this, I mean that I was unable to continue right on to the next story, because I needed some time to think and/or just enjoy the satisfaction of a story well told. Keep in mind what I said earlier to give this the proper context: FOUR! Yes! If I had to pick a favorite, it would be Gail Z. Martin and Larry N. Martin's tale of "Ruin Creek," though James R. Tuck's "From Parts Unknown" isn't far behind. If I had to rate the stories individually, just the one as 1 star, a couple of 2's, and four as either 4 or 4.5 stars. Not a bad record for an anthology. One of the things that really bothers me about spec-fic anthologies in particular is that they usually contain bunches of stories that feel like introductory chapters of novels that have yet to be written. That irks me; I truly hate a tease. Fortunately, I only got that impression a couple times in this one. Certainly, many of these stories could easily slip into more developed works if the authors chose to do so. For some of the stories here, I think there's a lot of potential. But the ones I liked best for this, they still worked simply as short stories. I can't ask for more than that, considering my mindset on short stories in general. Overall, this ranks up in the top two or three anthologies I've read. Would I read it again? Probably not, but I would definitely read more works (particularly novels) by several of these authors. Now go pick up a copy! Note: I was a backer for the Kickstarter project -- I'm listed second in the "Stakeholders" section *woot* -- and for full disclosure, one of the book's editors is a friend of mine, though I don't hold that against her, just like I didn't let that cloud my judgment of the work as a whole.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alysa H.

    This is a great collection of stories, even though not all readers will like all entries. It's just thematically That Good. All set in the Old West, or some fantastical versions thereof, they share many trappings of the genre, and variously add all sorts of supernatural creatures or occurrences. A small handful tie in with their respective authors' other work, but it's not necessary to have read that work beforehand. Among the completely stand-alone tales, many feel like they could be part of lar This is a great collection of stories, even though not all readers will like all entries. It's just thematically That Good. All set in the Old West, or some fantastical versions thereof, they share many trappings of the genre, and variously add all sorts of supernatural creatures or occurrences. A small handful tie in with their respective authors' other work, but it's not necessary to have read that work beforehand. Among the completely stand-alone tales, many feel like they could be part of larger frameworks -- some in a good way (i.e., worldbuilding feels thorough and I'd love to read more) and some in a bad way (i.e., worldbuilding is inadequate and I feel as though I've been dropped into the middle of something I don't understand). But if you like your westerns with a dash of the supernatural, or vice versa, you will definitely enjoy this. ** I received a Review Copy of this book via NetGalley **

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    Take 17 authors, plop them down and have them write short stories. The only requirement is that the tale needs to be a Western. And thus was born The Weird Wild West anthology. There are horror westerns, a alien landing in the Old West, magic in the Old West and plenty of interesting stories. So if you hanker to ride alongside your favorite fantasy creature in the old west, read this volume and you might be in luck! Happy reading!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Heare Watts

    I won a copy of this book during a Goodreads giveaway. I am under no obligation to leave a review or rating and do so voluntarily. So that others may also enjoy this book, I am paying it forward by donating it a local library.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra Christian

    So I'm an author and I wanted to read a lot of weird west before I wrote one. So I picked this up and I have to tell ya-- it's a fantastic variety of authors and gives a great overview of the genre. I would highly recommend it! So I'm an author and I wanted to read a lot of weird west before I wrote one. So I picked this up and I have to tell ya-- it's a fantastic variety of authors and gives a great overview of the genre. I would highly recommend it!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    A mixed bag anthology, some good, some so so, and some questionable. On the whole it was worth reading for at least the Faith Hunter, Gail Z Martin, Ken Schrader, Scott Hungerford stories, to name a few of my favorites.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Scott wachter

    Like any anthology, here's a mixed bag. The theme of 'a western, but with an genre element to make it weird' provides a pretty broad a array of stories for a reader to latch on to. There aren't any true stinkers in the volume, but there's plenty of middle of the road fare. Lots of just we are cowboys who also hunt monster with bonus steampunk. The best one was a piece about two bandits who pick up a job finding a lost cat only to discover a mad scientist trying to use static electricity to power Like any anthology, here's a mixed bag. The theme of 'a western, but with an genre element to make it weird' provides a pretty broad a array of stories for a reader to latch on to. There aren't any true stinkers in the volume, but there's plenty of middle of the road fare. Lots of just we are cowboys who also hunt monster with bonus steampunk. The best one was a piece about two bandits who pick up a job finding a lost cat only to discover a mad scientist trying to use static electricity to power an earthquake machine. Verdict: Skip it. the few standouts aren't worth the price of admission and wading through generic steampunkery.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Joe Slavinsky

    A very worthwhile read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Davis

    Eighteen Sixty (Jane Yellowrock #0.3)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia A Harries

    Cool stories Love reading and stories of the Wild West fantastic read. Will look for other stories. If that particular type. Loved it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Julie Bozza

    I enjoyed this anthology very much, with only a few small reservations. Overall, the quality of the writing and editing is excellent, and there are some very funky illustrations included for some (most?) stories. I understand this is the result of a crowdfunding campaign, and perhaps that is the reason why it feels as if the project had a great deal of time, thought and effort put into it. One of my small reservations is that in a few (very few) stories, I wasn't entirely sure I understood what I enjoyed this anthology very much, with only a few small reservations. Overall, the quality of the writing and editing is excellent, and there are some very funky illustrations included for some (most?) stories. I understand this is the result of a crowdfunding campaign, and perhaps that is the reason why it feels as if the project had a great deal of time, thought and effort put into it. One of my small reservations is that in a few (very few) stories, I wasn't entirely sure I understood what was going on. However, given the settings in time and place, and given the nature of the plots, perhaps that is inevitable, as the main characters don't always understand what's going on either. I really loved the first story, "Abishag Mary" by Frances Rowat, which was very evocative. It was one where I didn't feel I grasped everything, but that's not necessarily a bad thing. This was one of only two stories which included a character with queer inclinations, so I was always going to be on board. I loved all the sea-based imagery, and how that's brought so far inland. There was a twist or two I didn't see coming. Anyway! A strong start to the volume. Another story I want to mention specifically is "Frank and Earnest" by Tonia Brown. This was very well written, with some absolutely brilliant exchanges of dialogue that made me LOL more than once. It also included a nice take on a more modern-day villain translated back into earlier times, where he is met with incomprehension (on his own terms, that is). Frank, the main character, understands the fundamentals, if not the details, and manages to respond accordingly. I liked that the stories weren't all set in the 19thC West that we're so familiar with. "Fifteen Seconds" by Scott Hungerford featured (what seemed to me) a late-20thC West along with invading aliens, and that was very effective. Overall, if you're inclined towards a Weird West blend of Westerns and speculative fiction, I think you'll find many things in here to enjoy.

  19. 5 out of 5

    THOMAS RYASKO

    first good review night for motorcycling on the Troy dorchester suprise If there was a physcian on the howard hughes lot if his name was once the GNR Ill need to Know if a fellow visits that passed on within 4 months ago Sound of a LImp in him the meal TexAS OUTPOST OF CHICKEN AND GRAVY WAS FOUIND WITH REGARD TO HIS SAFETY IF TRUE THE DATE IN THE 1990 OR VERY LATE 1980S GOT TOLET OUT SOME MAYBE ALL OF THE BIG CATS TO HAVE AN OUTDOOR STEAK BARBECUE WITH PACKED LUNCHES TUNA FISH PEANUT BUTTER AND first good review night for motorcycling on the Troy dorchester suprise If there was a physcian on the howard hughes lot if his name was once the GNR Ill need to Know if a fellow visits that passed on within 4 months ago Sound of a LImp in him the meal TexAS OUTPOST OF CHICKEN AND GRAVY WAS FOUIND WITH REGARD TO HIS SAFETY IF TRUE THE DATE IN THE 1990 OR VERY LATE 1980S GOT TOLET OUT SOME MAYBE ALL OF THE BIG CATS TO HAVE AN OUTDOOR STEAK BARBECUE WITH PACKED LUNCHES TUNA FISH PEANUT BUTTER AND JELLY OR JUST BUTTER BALOGNA AND LETTUCE OF COURSE TO MAKE A GIANT WESTCLOCK ALARM CLOCK JUST LIKE THE ONE FOR THE 1960S AND 1970S PAPER ROUTES FOR PICKING UP AT CLARK FUEL STATION ON 10 MILE ROAD AND ORCHARD LAKE BFOR ON THE ROOFTOP LOOKOUTS TO MAKE REFRENCE TO AS BUILDING 3 TO 4 MILES TOWARDS PAHRUMP IS COMING UP ALSO THE 4 EXTRA HANDS ON EACH SIDE OF THE 31749 DINING ROOM CABINET ARCHITECTURE THE PATENT WOODWORKING DESIGN DRAWING TO BE PUT UNDER A TENT IN A ROLLED UP TUBE IS FINE DRAWING OF LAMINATED TABLES FOR THE KITCHEN AT 31749 ALSO TO BE ROLLED UP IN A DIFFERENT TENT MUSTARD KETCHUP CONDOMINTS AND BECKY ON I-10 JOHN LODGE I COULD FEEL A ROD AT THE ACCELERATOR AS HOWARD HUGHES LEFT OPTI DEPARTED WITH TERRY BRADFIELD AND THE BECKY GAL WAS DEFINETLY THERE ON THAT FATEFULL DAY

  20. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    I can't say I cared for most of this. I only bought it for the Faith Hunter story and the only one I really enjoyed besides that was the new to me author Diana Pharaoh Francis = Grasping Rainbows. That was a great story and I went right to the internet to see if she had written more about it. Sadly, I don't see anything. I would love a whole book from that. I can't say I cared for most of this. I only bought it for the Faith Hunter story and the only one I really enjoyed besides that was the new to me author Diana Pharaoh Francis = Grasping Rainbows. That was a great story and I went right to the internet to see if she had written more about it. Sadly, I don't see anything. I would love a whole book from that.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ruth E

    I bought it for Ayas Firewind’s story. It was a great story

  22. 5 out of 5

    Erik Van

  23. 4 out of 5

    Shadow Gossling

  24. 4 out of 5

    Pat

  25. 5 out of 5

    Louise

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ken

  27. 5 out of 5

    Robin

  28. 5 out of 5

    Matt Rancourt

  29. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

  30. 4 out of 5

    Pam Roth

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