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Early in the twentieth century, it was possible for Latter-day Saints to have lifelong associations with businesses managed by their leaders or owned and controlled by the church itself. For example, one could purchase engagement rings from Daynes Jewelry, honeymoon at the Hotel Utah, and venture off on the Union Pacific Railroad, all partially owned and run by church apos Early in the twentieth century, it was possible for Latter-day Saints to have lifelong associations with businesses managed by their leaders or owned and controlled by the church itself. For example, one could purchase engagement rings from Daynes Jewelry, honeymoon at the Hotel Utah, and venture off on the Union Pacific Railroad, all partially owned and run by church apostles. Families could buy clothes at Knight Woolen Mills. The husband might work at Big Indian Copper or Bullion-Beck, Gold Chain, or Iron King mining companies. The wife could shop at Utah Cereal Food and buy sugar supplied by Amalgamated or U and I Sugar, beef from Nevada Land and Livestock, and vegetables from the Growers Market. They might take their groceries home in parcels from Utah Bag Co. They probably read the Deseret News at home under a lamp plugged into a Utah Power and Light circuit. They could take out a loan from Zion’s Co-operative and insurance from Utah Home and Fire. The apostles had a long history of community involvement in financial enterprises to the benefit of the general membership and their own economic advantage. This volume is the result of the author’s years of research into LDS financial dominance from 1830 to 2010. D. Michael QuinnD. Michael Quinn (Ph.D., Yale University) might be characterized as the elder statesman of Mormon history. He is the author of several seminal books and articles that have received awards from the American Historical Association, John Whitmer Historical Association, and Mormon History Association.


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Early in the twentieth century, it was possible for Latter-day Saints to have lifelong associations with businesses managed by their leaders or owned and controlled by the church itself. For example, one could purchase engagement rings from Daynes Jewelry, honeymoon at the Hotel Utah, and venture off on the Union Pacific Railroad, all partially owned and run by church apos Early in the twentieth century, it was possible for Latter-day Saints to have lifelong associations with businesses managed by their leaders or owned and controlled by the church itself. For example, one could purchase engagement rings from Daynes Jewelry, honeymoon at the Hotel Utah, and venture off on the Union Pacific Railroad, all partially owned and run by church apostles. Families could buy clothes at Knight Woolen Mills. The husband might work at Big Indian Copper or Bullion-Beck, Gold Chain, or Iron King mining companies. The wife could shop at Utah Cereal Food and buy sugar supplied by Amalgamated or U and I Sugar, beef from Nevada Land and Livestock, and vegetables from the Growers Market. They might take their groceries home in parcels from Utah Bag Co. They probably read the Deseret News at home under a lamp plugged into a Utah Power and Light circuit. They could take out a loan from Zion’s Co-operative and insurance from Utah Home and Fire. The apostles had a long history of community involvement in financial enterprises to the benefit of the general membership and their own economic advantage. This volume is the result of the author’s years of research into LDS financial dominance from 1830 to 2010. D. Michael QuinnD. Michael Quinn (Ph.D., Yale University) might be characterized as the elder statesman of Mormon history. He is the author of several seminal books and articles that have received awards from the American Historical Association, John Whitmer Historical Association, and Mormon History Association.

30 review for The Mormon Hierarchy: Wealth and Corporate Power

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    In Quinn's typical style, this is an exceptionally detailed and comprehensive study. The main text is divided into three chapters (Personal Wealth [of past LDS leaders], Corporate Mormonism, and Church Finances), each with extensive endnotes. This portion of the book ends on page 157. Pages 158-538 are dedicated to appendices giving detailed financial information on a variety of topics (e.g., net worth of LDS leaders at time of death, reproduced text of financial statements filed by Church units In Quinn's typical style, this is an exceptionally detailed and comprehensive study. The main text is divided into three chapters (Personal Wealth [of past LDS leaders], Corporate Mormonism, and Church Finances), each with extensive endnotes. This portion of the book ends on page 157. Pages 158-538 are dedicated to appendices giving detailed financial information on a variety of topics (e.g., net worth of LDS leaders at time of death, reproduced text of financial statements filed by Church units internationally, etc.). Since much of the Church's current financial information is not publicized, Quinn makes extrapolations or calculations based on available data. In such instances, he is careful to describe and justify the assumptions made and data used. On the whole, Quinn seems to conclude that the Church's business ventures exist to support the religious, philanthropic, and humanitarian missions of the Church, and that its paid leadership are not unreasonably compensated. Quinn's approach seems unbiased; he seems to express both admiration and criticism on various points across the financial past and present of the Church. I sometimes get the impression that Quinn attributes slightly too much significance to some facts–for example, the association of various general authorities with given business concerns. A careful reader (of the type likely to be reading this work in the first place) will be cognizant of such instances and judge for themselves in the context of Quinn's expertise informed by his thorough research. On the whole, he is conscientious about his methods, and in his calculations he appears tend toward conservative, well-supported assumptions.

  2. 5 out of 5

    David Cook

  3. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Smith

  4. 5 out of 5

    Guyzen

  5. 5 out of 5

    Anne

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    Jason

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    Sarah

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    Abram

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    Walt

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jimmy

  11. 5 out of 5

    Chase Norton

  12. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  13. 5 out of 5

    RodOlson

  14. 5 out of 5

    C. Douglas Tebbs

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jake

  16. 5 out of 5

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    Paul

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    John Shaw

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chance Bentley

  22. 5 out of 5

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    Lyman Forsythe

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brad Hart

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dennis Kelsch

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    Jeremy Hunt

  27. 5 out of 5

    Steven Garff

  28. 4 out of 5

    Frank Abagnale

  29. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  30. 5 out of 5

    Devin

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