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Remember All Their Faces: A Deeper Look at Character, Gender and the Prison World of Orange Is The New Black

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Orange Is The New Black offers much that no show ever has. First, it slams us inside an unseen world – not just a women’s prison but its toilet stalls and secret storerooms. While our guide is the blonde yuppie Piper, we expand to meet Black women, Latina women, a Haitian, lesbians, a transvestite, the poor, and the elderly – all minorities generally sidelined. Now Remembe Orange Is The New Black offers much that no show ever has. First, it slams us inside an unseen world – not just a women’s prison but its toilet stalls and secret storerooms. While our guide is the blonde yuppie Piper, we expand to meet Black women, Latina women, a Haitian, lesbians, a transvestite, the poor, and the elderly – all minorities generally sidelined. Now Remember All their Faces offers a guide, not just to characters, but to each one’s deeper significance as we meet Flaca the flirt, Soso the hapless activist, and Janae, who’s learned to keep her head down. The book also analyzes themes from community and corruption to the series’ poignant cry for reform. It unfolds the real facts of federal prison to show where the program exaggerates and where it offers the utter truth.


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Orange Is The New Black offers much that no show ever has. First, it slams us inside an unseen world – not just a women’s prison but its toilet stalls and secret storerooms. While our guide is the blonde yuppie Piper, we expand to meet Black women, Latina women, a Haitian, lesbians, a transvestite, the poor, and the elderly – all minorities generally sidelined. Now Remembe Orange Is The New Black offers much that no show ever has. First, it slams us inside an unseen world – not just a women’s prison but its toilet stalls and secret storerooms. While our guide is the blonde yuppie Piper, we expand to meet Black women, Latina women, a Haitian, lesbians, a transvestite, the poor, and the elderly – all minorities generally sidelined. Now Remember All their Faces offers a guide, not just to characters, but to each one’s deeper significance as we meet Flaca the flirt, Soso the hapless activist, and Janae, who’s learned to keep her head down. The book also analyzes themes from community and corruption to the series’ poignant cry for reform. It unfolds the real facts of federal prison to show where the program exaggerates and where it offers the utter truth.

39 review for Remember All Their Faces: A Deeper Look at Character, Gender and the Prison World of Orange Is The New Black

  1. 4 out of 5

    Priscilla Herrington

    I am a fan of Orange Is the New Black. When I finished binge-watching Season 3, I searched for OITNB-related books and found Frankel's book. Remember All their Faces SHOULD have been a good read, one that seriously looked at the characters and issues introduced during the first two seasons. I was disappointed to say the least. I have been somewhat used to the generally poor quality of editing in new books. I am accustomed to spelling and grammatical errors that a good editor should have caught. B I am a fan of Orange Is the New Black. When I finished binge-watching Season 3, I searched for OITNB-related books and found Frankel's book. Remember All their Faces SHOULD have been a good read, one that seriously looked at the characters and issues introduced during the first two seasons. I was disappointed to say the least. I have been somewhat used to the generally poor quality of editing in new books. I am accustomed to spelling and grammatical errors that a good editor should have caught. But the errors in this book go beyond mere typos, although I would venture to say I have NEVER seen a book with this many typos. There were numerous missing words and incorrect prepositions, both in the text and within some of the quoted material. In listing characters, there is an odd inconsistency: some characters are listed by the on-screen name, and some also have the name of the actor in parentheses. There seemed to be no rhyme or reason to this. Worse than that, however, in at least one case a character was mis-named; Suzanne Warren is referred to as Suzanne Watson. Suzanne Warren does not appear in the index, nor does Suzanne "Watson." There is a character named Watson - Janae Watson, who is indexed. Further, in a book about a show with this large a cast, it was disconcerting that there was no consistency in referring to characters in the text; sometimes the first name was used, other times the last, and especially with characters in lesser roles, it was difficult to keep track of them. I was amazed to note that the book on which the Netflix series is based (Kerman, Piper. Orange Is the New Black: My Year in a Women's Prison. New York: Speigel & Grau, 2010) was not included in the Bibliography, although it appears that Frankel may have quoted from the book. [Disclaimer: I am an historian and do not use MLA formatting. Historians generally prefer Turabian as it permits more accurate citation of material used.] Most of the quotes attributed to Kerman seem to have come from an online interview. Another book Frankel mentions more than once is noted only as "the cookbook;" this, too, does not appear in the Bibliography. Apparently she means Orange Is the New Black Presents the Cookbook: Bites, Booze, Secrets and Stories from the Big House, by Jenji Koham, Tara Hermann, Hartley Voss and Alex Regnery (New York: Abrams Image, 2014). As for the book itself, I found it was primarily a rehashing of online articles about the show. I was not looking for groundbreaking scholarship here; I realize that this book was rushed into print to satisfy an audience hungry for material during the year we must wait until Season Four is released. However, other popular phenomena have been far better served through intelligent and thought-provoking work, such as the multitude of serious Harry Potter scholarship. I was so disappointed by this book that I would not recommend it to anyone.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Emma

  3. 4 out of 5

    Meg☽

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lee Jensen

  5. 4 out of 5

    Cecilia Dunbar Hernandez

  6. 5 out of 5

    Valerie

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kari Retherford

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Helena Theodora

  9. 5 out of 5

    Clara Stevenson

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Toon

  11. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tammy Pooser

  13. 5 out of 5

    Brandy

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dr. Cole Marie Mckinnon

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Shearer Colean

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rumeur

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer OKC

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kara

  19. 4 out of 5

    Izabela

  20. 5 out of 5

    Misty

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

  22. 4 out of 5

    Pam

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kay Butz

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lizzy

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kenneth

  26. 4 out of 5

    mad mags

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kayly Newcomer

  29. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  31. 5 out of 5

    Diana

  32. 4 out of 5

    Craig Dean

  33. 5 out of 5

    Kelley

  34. 4 out of 5

    Dawn Obrien

  35. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl Bradley

  36. 5 out of 5

    Matt

  37. 4 out of 5

    Christina

  38. 5 out of 5

    Miles

  39. 5 out of 5

    Nora

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