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In paris's pere-lachaise cemetery, jim morrison's graffiti-scrawled tombstone is a place of pilgrimage for local devotees, adolescent hedonists and wayward backpackers alike. Found dead in his bathtub aged only 27 having achieved worldwide stardom as lead singer of the doors, morrison was quickly immortalised amongst the rock and roll deity such as hendrix and joplin. In d In paris's pere-lachaise cemetery, jim morrison's graffiti-scrawled tombstone is a place of pilgrimage for local devotees, adolescent hedonists and wayward backpackers alike. Found dead in his bathtub aged only 27 having achieved worldwide stardom as lead singer of the doors, morrison was quickly immortalised amongst the rock and roll deity such as hendrix and joplin. In death, however, this debauched 'rock poet' remained more stubbornly enigmatic than ever.


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In paris's pere-lachaise cemetery, jim morrison's graffiti-scrawled tombstone is a place of pilgrimage for local devotees, adolescent hedonists and wayward backpackers alike. Found dead in his bathtub aged only 27 having achieved worldwide stardom as lead singer of the doors, morrison was quickly immortalised amongst the rock and roll deity such as hendrix and joplin. In d In paris's pere-lachaise cemetery, jim morrison's graffiti-scrawled tombstone is a place of pilgrimage for local devotees, adolescent hedonists and wayward backpackers alike. Found dead in his bathtub aged only 27 having achieved worldwide stardom as lead singer of the doors, morrison was quickly immortalised amongst the rock and roll deity such as hendrix and joplin. In death, however, this debauched 'rock poet' remained more stubbornly enigmatic than ever.

30 review for Mr Mojo: A Biography of Jim Morrison

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jim Cherry

    Dylan Jones’ new biography of Jim Morrison isn’t as sensational as his first attempt at a Morrison biography, 1990‘s “Jim Morrison: Dark Star”, but that isn’t necessarily an improvement. It seems Jones ditched the sensational for just recounting the highlights of a life. “Jim Morrison: Mr. Mojo” which promises it “strips bare the skin-tight leather suit of Jim Morrison's Lizard King persona, and offers a frank and honest appraisal of a much beloved and often-romanticised counter-cultural icon.” r Dylan Jones’ new biography of Jim Morrison isn’t as sensational as his first attempt at a Morrison biography, 1990‘s “Jim Morrison: Dark Star”, but that isn’t necessarily an improvement. It seems Jones ditched the sensational for just recounting the highlights of a life. “Jim Morrison: Mr. Mojo” which promises it “strips bare the skin-tight leather suit of Jim Morrison's Lizard King persona, and offers a frank and honest appraisal of a much beloved and often-romanticised counter-cultural icon.” reads more like a synopsis of a biography. A lot is glossed over in the name of brevity in order to fit the whole of Morrison’s biography into this short volume. If you’re looking for a new perspective or insight into Jim Morrison, you won’t find it, there’s just not enough room. “Mr. Mojo” also suffers from the dual problems of bad information and poor interpretation. In the realm of bad information in relating where Jim Morrison came up with the idea of wearing full leathers, Jones has him coping the look from Gerard Malanga at Andy Warhol’s show The Exploding Plastic Inevitable played in L.A. Jones has Malanga in the audience and not onstage. Jones also seems to vacillate on whether Morrison exposed himself in Miami, and leaves information out to meet his ideas of Morrison’s life. In the area of poor interpretation, Jones asserts Morrison’s film “HWY” is “almost a sequel to his college film”, or that during the Oedipal section of “The End“ at the Hollywood Bowl Morrison covered his face and laughed “not wanting the crowd to see how silly he thinks it all is.” “Celebration of the Lizard” that appeared on “Absolutely Live” was “mostly unmistakable” and it justified the decision to not include it on The Doors’ third album. It seems Morrison’s British biographers (Jones, Mick Wall) are putting very little effort into fact checking or doing original research (count Stephen Davis in this too) and rely on other books as sources. Although Jones, in his text, does say he interviewed thirty people for this book, his two main sources seem to be Elektra publicist Danny Fields (who has been getting a lot of exposure as a mentor to The Ramones) who seems to put forth an even handed picture of Morrison based on his recollections. The other main source is Patricia Kennealy. Jones is very friendly to her point of view while she espouses some incredibly self-serving ideas about Jim Morrison, their relationship and his relationship with Pam Courson. The final example of Jones’ lackadaisical attitude toward this biography is the final chapter “Pere-Lachaise Redux” is cut and pasted from “Darkstar.” In it he mentions photographer Michelle Campbell as being in her mid-30’s and without blowing her cover she would have been in her mid-30’s in the late 80’s or early 1990 when Jones was writing “Jim Morrison: Darkstar”. Unless of course there is another Michelle Campbell living in Paris and photographing Morrison’s grave and the people who visit it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Stewart Sternberg

    This was a depressing, bitter work written by someone who comes across as not liking Morrison. Obviously the man was mentally ill, but the author waves that off with the alcoholic baton. Nor does the author explore Morrisons body of work. This is a slap dash effort. Sorry.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ridzuan Rosli

    Ray Manzarek, always Morrison’s most fervent defender, remained convinced of the singer’s integrity: “ Jim’s contribution to music was that he was real onstage. He was not a performer, he was not an entertainer, he was not a showman... He was possessed by a vision, by a madness, by a rage to live, by an all consuming fire to... make art.” — Dylan Jones, Mr. Mojo: A Biography of Jim Morrison, 2015. I started to know Jim Morrison when I was in university. The Doors songs are kind of dark, mysteriou Ray Manzarek, always Morrison’s most fervent defender, remained convinced of the singer’s integrity: “ Jim’s contribution to music was that he was real onstage. He was not a performer, he was not an entertainer, he was not a showman... He was possessed by a vision, by a madness, by a rage to live, by an all consuming fire to... make art.” — Dylan Jones, Mr. Mojo: A Biography of Jim Morrison, 2015. I started to know Jim Morrison when I was in university. The Doors songs are kind of dark, mysterious and poetic. But the Doors was nothing without Jim Morrison. The Door cannot be the Doors with Iggy Pop. It was always 3 plus 1, with the Lizard King, Jim Morrison. This is a genuinely depressed written by Dylan Jones of the other side of James Douglas Morrison. From Paris’s Père-Lachaise cemetery to infamous Los Angeles 60s. Morrison had an ambitious visionary towards the world and it was always beyond what he had. He was a pompous rock star. The first 4 albums were successful. In 1967, the Doors achieved its popularity more than the Beatles and the Rolling Stones. Since then Jim started to change his enthusiastic into film and poetry. The Lords and The New Creatures was published in 1970. The volume of poetry explored society's dark side: drugs, sex, fame, and death. It was literally depressed (I read once). The film somehow was a failure business for him. As he overindulged, he moved to Paris and died there with a few mysterious theories which were never exposed. But Jones did not emphasize how importance the death was. But, he viewed as the glorious killed him instead. Jim hardly coped his own glorious day that led him into self-destruction. Elektra records studio hardly to work with him. Including the band itself, Andy Warhol and some more. He reflected himself as a sex symbol like Elvis Presley and a self-importance like Bob Dylan so a philosopher like Friedrich Nietzsche. Literally rock n roll philosophy: sex, drugs and rock n roll. Personally, I view Jones writing quite disturbed. I cannot imagine Jim in real life. Overall this book highlighted some important notes which the reader probably never know about it. A light reading to know Lizard King.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dave Schwensen

    I’ll admit falling for the glorified versions of Morrison portrayed in the decades old (supposed) close friend narrative “No One Here Gets Out Alive” and the Oliver Stone flick “The Doors.” But I also felt they were too fictional and watered down for mass consumption (box office). This account isn’t. And if there’s one message that comes through to shut down his perceived rock god status it’s that Jim Morrison had a disease. He was an alcoholic and this book pulls no punches in making that clear I’ll admit falling for the glorified versions of Morrison portrayed in the decades old (supposed) close friend narrative “No One Here Gets Out Alive” and the Oliver Stone flick “The Doors.” But I also felt they were too fictional and watered down for mass consumption (box office). This account isn’t. And if there’s one message that comes through to shut down his perceived rock god status it’s that Jim Morrison had a disease. He was an alcoholic and this book pulls no punches in making that clear. * The author tells it like it was. If more had been known about alcoholism, recreational drubs and rehab during the swinging ‘60s and if his band members and record company hadn’t viewed him as a money and fame machine, therefore not disrupting his “creative process” by helping him dry out, Morrison might be alive today. Then again, some people still think he is. * Since his life was so short and doesn’t allow for the deeper research longer living rock legends provide, a good portion of his story continues after Morrison’s demise. Though it doesn’t follow a trail of possibilities he’s making music in Africa with an also still alive Elvis, his most dedicated fans treat his Paris grave as a spiritual shrine. * If you prefer your JM legend to be a good looking Adonis staring down on you from half-century-old photos or plastered on t-shirts, you might not want to read this one. It’s a story of self-destruction, mental and physical illness run rampant and the ultimate “die young and…” well, he didn’t leave a good-looking corpse. Sorry. With the knowledge we have now about the disease and the perils of sudden fame, quite possibly this rock star and a few of the others wouldn’t be members of the famous “27 Club.”

  5. 4 out of 5

    Marie Cope

    I know it's taken me a while to read this book, but that's the trouble with biographies. Although I am fascinated by different people, I really have to be in the mood to read about them! I have read a few biographies on Jim Morrision over the years, have seen the Oliver Stone film with Val Kilmer, have bought the music, and have even added Pere-Lachaise to my bucket list. After reading Dylan Jones' version, however, I am not so sure. The Jim Morrison I was introduced to and fell in love with, my h I know it's taken me a while to read this book, but that's the trouble with biographies. Although I am fascinated by different people, I really have to be in the mood to read about them! I have read a few biographies on Jim Morrision over the years, have seen the Oliver Stone film with Val Kilmer, have bought the music, and have even added Pere-Lachaise to my bucket list. After reading Dylan Jones' version, however, I am not so sure. The Jim Morrison I was introduced to and fell in love with, my heart aching at the tragedy of his life, does not appear to be the "real" Jim Morrison. Yes, Morrison was a genius, yes, he was beautiful, and yes, he could write lyrics that reached into your soul, but sexy?? From what I've just read, the answer would be no. For me, there is nothing sexy about an unwashed, self indulgent alcoholic who slept with anyone and everyone, and verbally abused the fans who made him the star he was, and still is. Yes, the Jim Morrison money machine is still earning, probably more than it did whilst he was alive. What is missing from this biography, if I am honest, is the "real" impact his abhorrent behaviour had on his band mates, his family, his girlfriend(s) and his friends (if he had any). Although it is touched upon, there is no real detail behind it. Why? Probably because all people are interested in is Morrison. This biography has opened my eyes to the reality of Jim Morrison, against the fantasy the media (and others) would prefer him to be. As to how true it is, well, it's as true as the biographer wants it to be...as with all his other biographies.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Blosser

    The critical mirror to the hagiographical "No One Here Gets Out Alive" by Jerry Hopkins and Danny Sugerman (which I devoured in college as a then-infatuated Doors fan, raised on The Doors by my father in the 80's and later as a teenager enraptured by Oliver Stone's 90's cinematic tribute). Dylan focuses less on the music (of which he seems appreciative, to some extent) and more on Morrison "the first rock and roll method actor", the petulant narcissist, "pseudo-intellectual in a snakeskin suit", The critical mirror to the hagiographical "No One Here Gets Out Alive" by Jerry Hopkins and Danny Sugerman (which I devoured in college as a then-infatuated Doors fan, raised on The Doors by my father in the 80's and later as a teenager enraptured by Oliver Stone's 90's cinematic tribute). Dylan focuses less on the music (of which he seems appreciative, to some extent) and more on Morrison "the first rock and roll method actor", the petulant narcissist, "pseudo-intellectual in a snakeskin suit", "a man trapped inside his own image", the "self-obsessed drunk whose ridiculous good looks and rich baritone contributed unduly to an archetype that would define both him and every copycat that came in his wake" -- "a hero dead before his time. A hero who got out just in time." Morrison fans are bound to hate this book, but that's not to say Morrison -- the man, the myth, the franchise -- deserves to be taken down a notch. (And yes, one can be critical of Morrison and still appreciate the music).

  7. 4 out of 5

    Arindam

    I expected more on Jim Morrison's life. I expected this book to tell me what inspired Morisson to make his music, compose the songs, know more about what inspired him to become the cult figure he became. Instead, I got a whole chapter dedicated to Morisson's grave, multiple paragraphs on Morisson's junk, arguments for Morisson's drunk and vulgar acts. Deeply disappointed! I expected more on Jim Morrison's life. I expected this book to tell me what inspired Morisson to make his music, compose the songs, know more about what inspired him to become the cult figure he became. Instead, I got a whole chapter dedicated to Morisson's grave, multiple paragraphs on Morisson's junk, arguments for Morisson's drunk and vulgar acts. Deeply disappointed!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Julianna

    Poorly written biography. The writing was lackluster. Overall it was not a very informative or enjoyable book.

  9. 5 out of 5

    minnie

    Audiobook

  10. 5 out of 5

    Erica

    The author's contempt for Jim Morrison colored the entire book. His dislike came through on every page. It made it difficult to know what to believe. The author's contempt for Jim Morrison colored the entire book. His dislike came through on every page. It made it difficult to know what to believe.

  11. 5 out of 5

    EA Solinas

    Jim Morrison is one of those figures who, despite a brief life, people can't stop writing about. Books about him range from the sublime ("Break on Through") to the ridiculous ("Strange Days," Wild Child"). And Dylan Jones introduces a new kind of book: the Cliffs Notes guide to Jim Morrison. Rather than a full-length biography of the rock star, "Mr. Mojo: A Biography of Jim Morrison" is more of a skim-over of his career with the Doors and his tumultuous personal life.It's like a very long school Jim Morrison is one of those figures who, despite a brief life, people can't stop writing about. Books about him range from the sublime ("Break on Through") to the ridiculous ("Strange Days," Wild Child"). And Dylan Jones introduces a new kind of book: the Cliffs Notes guide to Jim Morrison. Rather than a full-length biography of the rock star, "Mr. Mojo: A Biography of Jim Morrison" is more of a skim-over of his career with the Doors and his tumultuous personal life.It's like a very long school essay that hits on most of the major points and contains most of the important information, but doesn't have the rhythms and depth of a proper biography. For those who don't know who Jim Morrison is, he was a Navy brat who openly rejected the conservative safety of his father's lifestyle, and instead embraced a life of excess, art and rock'n'roll. He was the lead singer and creative nucleus of the Doors, a quartet who produced some of the most underrated music of the era, and despite his long-term relationship with his beautiful lover Pamela Courson, he also went wild with many a lady. However, his behavior often leaned on the self-destructive (Jones touches on him walking over a fatal drop, merely to demonstrate to Nico that life was meaningless), and his creative impulses were strongly linked to his love of drugs and alcohol (an account of Morrison becoming drunk and violently ill, immediately after writing "The Unknown Soldier"). As a result, Morrison's public behavior often bordered on the obscene, and contributed to his early death. It wouldn't shock me if "Mr. Mojo" was actually Dylan Jones' senior dissertation on pop culture or rock music or something, and it was well-written enough that he decided to publish it. Honestly, it feels like a dissertation. While he does touch on the conservative upbringing and education of Morrison (including that whole Indian-died-by-the-side-of-the-road story that has been told to death), Jones spends most of his time analyzing the cultural context and public touchstones of Morrison's career. As a result, Jones doesn't go too in-depth into any one subject -- his relationship with Pamela Courson, his work with the Doors, his experiences as a rock star, or anything else. Well, he does seem rather fixated on Morrison's penis, to be fair. Uncomfortably so. As in, we're informed with a little too much graphic, down-to-the-finger-action detail that Morrison liked to masturbate onstage. Instead, Jones skims swiftly over the course of Morrison's career, peppering it with various bits of trivia that are interesting but not terribly insightful (such as the origins and nature of his famous leather pants) and the occasional outburst of wackiness when exploring his charismatic, primally-charged performances ("All hail Morrison! He is here to cure our ills, to feed our poor and fill our souls. All hail the King! Oh lordy, the drunk King!"). Furthermore, it lacks the gradual quality of a typical biography, the analysis of a person's evolution through all stages of their life, and their interactions with all important people they met. It's like reading a Wikipedia entry of a movie's plot and themes -- you get the idea of what it's about, but without the nuance and complexities of the characters. Were this not about such a notoriously dissolute rock star, it would make a good children's biography. It's the right length, actually. He also lacks a certain measure of objectivity expected in professional biographies, mostly in his depiction of the notorious Patricia Kennealy -- despite conflicting reports from all others who knew Morrison (including the other Doors and her former friend Janet Erwin) and her own past interviews on the subject of Morrison (see "Rock Wives," which he cites but does not seem to have read in full), he seems to believe her infamously self-serving contradictory image as the strong, non-nonsense neopagan angel who was saving him from himself. Why? Because she was nice to him. Oddly, he does not cite her actual book in the bibliography. For those who want a brief overview of Morrison's career, or who are just finding out about him, "Mr. Mojo" is a fairly good Cliffs Notes for Morrison's life -- but those who want more than the shallow, rather seedy angle shown here would be better off finding one of the thicker books.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tom Stamper

    This short biography has the conversational style of a longer magazine piece, one of those where the pursuit of the subject is part of the story. That approach has been done to death, but it still occasionally works if handled with deftness and I think Dylan Jones succeeds for the most part. Looking back it plays as a romp through Jim's life with tidbits of information like the flower power culture considered alcohol a redneck drug, but Jim liked it because he could get it easily and legally any This short biography has the conversational style of a longer magazine piece, one of those where the pursuit of the subject is part of the story. That approach has been done to death, but it still occasionally works if handled with deftness and I think Dylan Jones succeeds for the most part. Looking back it plays as a romp through Jim's life with tidbits of information like the flower power culture considered alcohol a redneck drug, but Jim liked it because he could get it easily and legally anywhere without having to ingratiate himself with people. There is not much on the origins of each song or backgrounds on the other members of the Doors. We get to know what the critics liked and disliked, but not much else. We get a feel for what the doors were like in concert and a description of the infamous Miami appearance where Jim was arrested for indecency. If you have never read a book about Morrison you will probably enjoy Dylan Jones talent as a writer and come away with an idea of how it was to be in the company of Mojo.

  13. 5 out of 5

    SmokingMirror

    This was a detour on my reading path I didn't need to take. If it had been a dissection of Doors--or specifically Morrison--fans, showing up at Pere Lachaise out of a sense of duty, dismayed at the grubbiness of it all, it would have been more interesting to me. The first and last chapter pointed the way to that sort of thing, not that you could go far on that concept alone. But to follow it where it leads would have provided a new viewpoint instead of this unnecessary mini-bio. I won't go so far This was a detour on my reading path I didn't need to take. If it had been a dissection of Doors--or specifically Morrison--fans, showing up at Pere Lachaise out of a sense of duty, dismayed at the grubbiness of it all, it would have been more interesting to me. The first and last chapter pointed the way to that sort of thing, not that you could go far on that concept alone. But to follow it where it leads would have provided a new viewpoint instead of this unnecessary mini-bio. I won't go so far as to call it "flyweight" as Jones refers to the three non-Morrison Doors, but I would say it is lightweight. (I'm kind of glad he said it, but I would have said they were "not informed by creative passion." They were skilled musicians, though unfocused when not led by a strong vision.) Also, there are many niggly errors of fact or spelling--sometimes it's not clear which.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Claudette

    (Audiobook) Jim Morrison died the year I was born. I had an interest in this book because later in life I enjoyed some of his songs. However while listening to this book all I heard was a man who was in deep deep pain (which was very sad to hear), that he had to medicate himself constantly. I can only assume he must've had a painful childhood that he had to also distant himself from his family. I wouldn't be surprised if he also had some type of physiological disorder, if that was induced by alc (Audiobook) Jim Morrison died the year I was born. I had an interest in this book because later in life I enjoyed some of his songs. However while listening to this book all I heard was a man who was in deep deep pain (which was very sad to hear), that he had to medicate himself constantly. I can only assume he must've had a painful childhood that he had to also distant himself from his family. I wouldn't be surprised if he also had some type of physiological disorder, if that was induced by alcoholism/drugs or not.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nadja

    Why write about a man that you loathe? This author mixed up all sorts of facts and added things that were rumored and obviously impossible. Such as, he did this and that to these people ...when history shows otherwise from multiple sources. Never read a biography where the author hated the subject though.. sooo... that was different.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Isabel Murillo-ordoñez

  17. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    As a kid, Jim Morrison captivated me with his mystique and lyrics. I still like hearing the doors now and again, but man, what a sad train-wreck of a human! Grotesque, mean, immature and reckless! This is a quick, honest, somewhat engaging biography.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jodie Warner

    I'd give this 2.5 stars but there's no "half" option. I must have known more about The Doors than I thought as it wasn't a particularly insightful read. I didn't realize Morrison was SO unlikeable. Gorgeous, but unlikeable. I'd give this 2.5 stars but there's no "half" option. I must have known more about The Doors than I thought as it wasn't a particularly insightful read. I didn't realize Morrison was SO unlikeable. Gorgeous, but unlikeable.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Julie_ian_curtis

    Travesty. Insult. Fucking outrageous. I can't believe this p o shit got published. I cannot stress enough how fucking insulting this is. Author describes jim poetry as shit. Fuck you asshole. Do not waste yr time with this utter crap. Travesty. Insult. Fucking outrageous. I can't believe this p o shit got published. I cannot stress enough how fucking insulting this is. Author describes jim poetry as shit. Fuck you asshole. Do not waste yr time with this utter crap.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Francis

    Jim Morrison was basically a bit of a shit, wasn't he? I blame him for my penchant for the more complicated boys/girls... Jim Morrison was basically a bit of a shit, wasn't he? I blame him for my penchant for the more complicated boys/girls...

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mr Shahabi

    Third Mojo biography in a week, I think I know Jim better than most people now lol "come on baby take a chance with us.." Third Mojo biography in a week, I think I know Jim better than most people now lol "come on baby take a chance with us.."

  22. 4 out of 5

    Deb

    Oh dear.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Liam

  24. 4 out of 5

    Stuart Hill

  25. 4 out of 5

    Linda Telnock

  26. 5 out of 5

    Toby McKinnon

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ashwina Jha

  28. 5 out of 5

    Meteoro

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elaine

  30. 4 out of 5

    Joe Ryan Farrell

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