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When Richard Halliburton graduated from Princeton, he chose adventure over a career, traveling to far away places. This vivid book, one of many he wrote, tells what happened, from a breakthrough Matterhorn ascent to being jailed for taking forbidden pictures on Gibraltar. "One of the most fascinating books of its kind ever written." (In 1939 the swashbuckler was lost at se When Richard Halliburton graduated from Princeton, he chose adventure over a career, traveling to far away places. This vivid book, one of many he wrote, tells what happened, from a breakthrough Matterhorn ascent to being jailed for taking forbidden pictures on Gibraltar. "One of the most fascinating books of its kind ever written." (In 1939 the swashbuckler was lost at sea in the Pacific).


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When Richard Halliburton graduated from Princeton, he chose adventure over a career, traveling to far away places. This vivid book, one of many he wrote, tells what happened, from a breakthrough Matterhorn ascent to being jailed for taking forbidden pictures on Gibraltar. "One of the most fascinating books of its kind ever written." (In 1939 the swashbuckler was lost at se When Richard Halliburton graduated from Princeton, he chose adventure over a career, traveling to far away places. This vivid book, one of many he wrote, tells what happened, from a breakthrough Matterhorn ascent to being jailed for taking forbidden pictures on Gibraltar. "One of the most fascinating books of its kind ever written." (In 1939 the swashbuckler was lost at sea in the Pacific).

30 review for The Royal Road to Romance: Travelers' Tales Classics

  1. 4 out of 5

    Abby

    This is an incredible book that could make the most stable homebody want to store all their junk and take a long trip. When I turned 16 I didn't know what I wanted for my birthday so I asked all of my relatives to give me a copy of of their favorite book from when they were 16- and the only person that delivered was my grandmother who gave me this book. Halliburton inspired in her a love of travel and adventure that never faded- and it's done the same for me. From sneaking back into the Taj Maha This is an incredible book that could make the most stable homebody want to store all their junk and take a long trip. When I turned 16 I didn't know what I wanted for my birthday so I asked all of my relatives to give me a copy of of their favorite book from when they were 16- and the only person that delivered was my grandmother who gave me this book. Halliburton inspired in her a love of travel and adventure that never faded- and it's done the same for me. From sneaking back into the Taj Mahal at night to swim in the fountain to hiding camera film from the authorities in a rain gutter after taking pictures of Gibraltar at night to climbing Matterhorn with practically no climbing experience, Halliburton was an exciting traveler.

  2. 4 out of 5

    John Alt

    When I think of Richard Halliburton, I think of a poem, "The Truly Great," by Stephen Spender. Spender writes of those, . . . who in their lives fought for life, Who wore at their hearts the fire’s centre. Born of the sun, they traveled a short while toward the sun And left the vivid air signed with their honour. Halliburton traveled a short while toward the sun before his untimely death at 39, and the air was vivid with his life, leaving on earth his books, a testament to his honor. I think of him When I think of Richard Halliburton, I think of a poem, "The Truly Great," by Stephen Spender. Spender writes of those, . . . who in their lives fought for life, Who wore at their hearts the fire’s centre. Born of the sun, they traveled a short while toward the sun And left the vivid air signed with their honour. Halliburton traveled a short while toward the sun before his untimely death at 39, and the air was vivid with his life, leaving on earth his books, a testament to his honor. I think of him as a remarkable man, one truly blessed with fire, life, and a burning desire to see it all, do it all, before he became dying embers. In our modern age he might be described as blessed with a fine cocktail of DNA but what he saw, what he felt, what he did belonged to him, not his genes. A few facts do not explain him. He was born in 1900. He died in 1939. He grew up in Memphis, Tennessee. He was lost in a Chinese junk halfway between Japan and Midway Island. So much for that. What we have of him are his books, and they tell us about ten men, all of them Richard Halliburton. Ten men, because it would take that many normal people to live his life if fueled by a desire to escape the nine-to-five convention of office walls. Each book is a testament to a way of seeing, a vision of life, that enabled him while others would turn away toward the comfort of the familiar--the neighborhood, the family, the job. The familiar was what he did not want. Instead he wanted his life to become its own art. He did not write poetry. He lived it. He would sign the vivid air with his experiences. We read his signature only because of one book, The Royal Road to Romance, for without its publication his remarkable life might have fallen out of memory. You see, the book almost did not get published. Some editors thought it too adolescent, others regarded its prose as too florid. The difference between its 1925 publication and the obscurity that meets so many other manuscripts is this: Richard Halliburton's dogged determination and great reserve of energy. Not yet twenty-five he had returned from his astounding travels and adventures, enough for a lifetime of many hardy individuals. He knew he had a story, indeed, many stories, and he wanted to make writing his career. But he had not reckoned on the indifference of New York City, where as he put it, life was dog-eat-dog. If not New York, then somewhere else. With pluck and luck he took his energy to Indianapolis and Bobbs-Merrill Publsihers, where the potential of the book was recognized. Farm girls in Iowa, librarians in Ohio, railway conductors in Kentucky bought the book and read it. It said something to them, that the world was a grand place far larger than Iowa, Ohio, or Kentucky, and that it was filled with wonders. It was a book for an America awakening from her isolationist slumbers, a book that lifted horizons, opened vistas readers had not imagined. True, this is a youthful work, and, true, his mature books rely less on flowing description and more on pointed commentary. That aside, this book is a testament of youth. In it we see the world with new eyes as we climb the pyramid of Choeps, spend the night at the Taj Mahal, ascend Mount Fuji, have our ship boarded by Chinese pirates, trek across the Malay Peninsula, ship as an ordinary seaman on a tramp freighter. Having read all this, we have just scratched the surface of his early adventures. It is a fine, wonderful world, the young Halliburton tells us, and waiting for us. Travel writer Paul Theroux has written that Halliburton's travel-adventure books pointed him toward his own vocation. Fictionist, intellectual, and playwright Susan Sontag read Halliburton as a girl and credited his books for openin the wide, wonderful world to her. She learned from him that it was a fine place with much to learn and explore. The Royal Road to Romance has a voice for readers today with its descriptions of far-off places., with its adventures. In it we can trek across the Himalayas, relax on houseboats in Srinigar, meet the American tutoress of the last Chinese empress. We can travel through war-ravaged China, visit White Russians escaped to Siberia, bicycle across a Europe impoverished by the first great war, climb the Matterhorn, one slip away from plunging to death. The book lives on because it has a timeless call to life beyond office walls and small town sidewalks.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    Travel a century ago, to experience the Alhambra, Great Pyramid, Taj Mahal, Angkor Wat alone and tourist-free. Romance, indeed. And how very pleasant to have the concomitant white man's privilege that made it possible; fortunately Halliburton's prose while unconscious of his privilege can convey the experience.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    Richard Halliburton, the grandaddy of adventure tourism, left Princeton in the early 1920s to do the world. With hardly a penny to his name he tramped, mooched, and often stole his way from New Jersey to Europe, then Egypt, India, Indonesia, China, and Japan. Along the way he climbed the Matterhorn, was jailed in Gibraltar, swam the Nile, hunted tigers in Bengal, trekked to Leh, hacked his way through Malaysian jungles, reposed in Bali, lost his clothes to Chinese pirates, and scaled Fujiyama in Richard Halliburton, the grandaddy of adventure tourism, left Princeton in the early 1920s to do the world. With hardly a penny to his name he tramped, mooched, and often stole his way from New Jersey to Europe, then Egypt, India, Indonesia, China, and Japan. Along the way he climbed the Matterhorn, was jailed in Gibraltar, swam the Nile, hunted tigers in Bengal, trekked to Leh, hacked his way through Malaysian jungles, reposed in Bali, lost his clothes to Chinese pirates, and scaled Fujiyama in the dead of winter. The Royal Road to Romance (1925) is his report of his grand adventure, a narrative of some sixteen months of "hobohemism" across the globe. His mother must have been mortified when she read it. It's a jolly tale told with dash in impetuous, flamboyant prose that fully captures the author's youthful energy. And it's very much a piece of its time, a product of the young author's entitled upbringing and waspish attitudes that can make a modern reader squirm almost as much as the hair-raising tales of his reckless escapades. Tuck into it if you're in the mood for a mad, jaunty, and sometimes embarrassing read that scores low on ethnology but off the scales on irrepressible enthusiasm for life.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

    At first I got a little bored of this book. That's probably why it took me three or four months to read but that is neither here nor there. What is of significance is that I picked it up last week and finished reading the 2'nd half of the book. And I finished it in enjoyment. My complaint against the beginning of "Royal Road to Romance" was that Halliburton’s lofty speech got to me, in an annoying way. I found his writing to be overdone yet I kept reading because although he can give too many de At first I got a little bored of this book. That's probably why it took me three or four months to read but that is neither here nor there. What is of significance is that I picked it up last week and finished reading the 2'nd half of the book. And I finished it in enjoyment. My complaint against the beginning of "Royal Road to Romance" was that Halliburton’s lofty speech got to me, in an annoying way. I found his writing to be overdone yet I kept reading because although he can give too many details at times, sometimes he can write very eloquently. Plus his adventures were interesting and at times captivating. I found his journeys through Asia to be the most entertaining. Halliburton also was kind of bad-ass. His attempt and completion of Mt. Fuji was pretty ballsy. He comes across as stubborn, full of life, admittedly arrogant, prejudice and extremely passionate. All in all I would recommend this book to anyone who loves too travel and wants to read about a time in the world when traveling as an adventurer was vanishing but had not vanished. And I would give it a 3.75 out of 5 stars.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    I might say 2.5 stars. It was better than just "okay," but I didn't "like" it wholeheartedly, either. A lot of the accounts of what Halliburton did and the places he saw are pretty interesting, though some I had moral objections to, and some chapters weren't that interesting to me. The book is good for gaining a better understanding of the places discussed, as well as the time period (written 1925). While I appreciate Richard Halliburton's writing and stories in some ways, he isn't my favorite ch I might say 2.5 stars. It was better than just "okay," but I didn't "like" it wholeheartedly, either. A lot of the accounts of what Halliburton did and the places he saw are pretty interesting, though some I had moral objections to, and some chapters weren't that interesting to me. The book is good for gaining a better understanding of the places discussed, as well as the time period (written 1925). While I appreciate Richard Halliburton's writing and stories in some ways, he isn't my favorite character. I had previously read parts of a book he'd written for children, and didn't remember him coming across the same way, so maybe he made himself more presentable in children's books or I didn't read enough to get a good feel. In this book, he is completely reckless, seems to have little to no respect for almost anyone besides himself, goes about breaking all the rules he can, and just generally has an attitude toward life I don’t much care for. Nor is he much of a role model. Morally, he is not a great example. To top it off, while his view of and treatment of people aside from Americans or Europeans may have been pretty typical for the time period, it makes me cringe. I think if I have teens who are interested they can read this book with discussion, but it’s not a book I’m super excited to share, and it contains several things I would want to discuss with them. It does have some value, though, and not everyone may find his manner as irritating as I did. Some of my dislike may just be that I’m not the type who would want to go gallivanting around the world taking unnecessary risks for basically no reason but novelty, on barely any funds, and without any plan whatsoever much of the time. But if they read it, it might be good to discuss risk-taking behaviors in this context, because Halliburton seems to have been an extreme thrill-seeker, and that seems to be becoming more and more in vogue these days. It isn’t surprising to know that he died at a relatively young age as a consequence of his risk-taking lifestyle.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    Undoubtedly one of my favorite travel writers / authors ever since I stumbled upon my first Halliburton adventure in a book shop in Norway last summer. We join our intrepid and bold explorer once again as he globe trots from Princeton to Germany, the first stop on yet another "glorious adventure;" and ultimately to the heights of Fujiyama in Japan; and stopping along the way at the most romantic places on earth; albeit romance holds many a meaning as we follow Halliburton on his journey. "The Ro Undoubtedly one of my favorite travel writers / authors ever since I stumbled upon my first Halliburton adventure in a book shop in Norway last summer. We join our intrepid and bold explorer once again as he globe trots from Princeton to Germany, the first stop on yet another "glorious adventure;" and ultimately to the heights of Fujiyama in Japan; and stopping along the way at the most romantic places on earth; albeit romance holds many a meaning as we follow Halliburton on his journey. "The Royal Road to Romance" is another fine tribute to his brilliant poetic, and oftentimes quite humorous prose of his adventures and expeditions from lands afar. Revel in the stunning beauty of the sights, the landscapes, and cheer for him as he narrowly escapes from the authorities; it's an endless pursuit of the visual romance of the places he visits despite any obstacle or interdict that stands between him and his destiny. Not only will you too soar to the top of the Matterhorn, spend a forbidden night at the Taj Mahal, thrill in the games of chance in Monaco, cheer for his release from the prisons of Gibraltar, perch atop the icy slopes of Mount Fuji; you'll revel in each step of his road to romance, and laugh a lot too! This is my second Halliburton book after "The Glorious Adventure" and I loved this one just as much. It's hard to fathom that these books were written almost 100 years ago, 1920s actually, however, his writing is just as relevant, exciting and full of adventure as any modern-day travelogue.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Erin O'Connor {If The Review Fits}

    A autobiography of my favorite explorer Richard Halliburton. What wonderful stories and experiences!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Carel

    One of my all time favorites! Halliburton made his living by LIVING and then writing about all his fantastic adventures. He did what I can only dream about. He was a fun character; positive & happy and relays this in his writings. One of my all time favorites! Halliburton made his living by LIVING and then writing about all his fantastic adventures. He did what I can only dream about. He was a fun character; positive & happy and relays this in his writings.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    One of the best travelogues I have read. This book should be standard reading when it comes to the travelogue genre. From breaking into the Taj Mahal, the Alhambra, being arrested in Gibraltar you cant help but be captivated by Haliburton's adventure.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Josh Kienzle

    This is amazing book about the beauty of adventure. I am a huge traveler and this book inspires that part of me!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Randy

    Recommended to me many years ago by my good friend Paul -- a famously prolific reader. I've finally read and enjoyed this 1920s true life adventure tale. My takeaways are ... Adventure and beauty exist all over this planet, and daring curiosity is a good way to find it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Brad Blakey

    This guy travelled around the world immediately following his graduation from Princeton, logging over 40,000 miles by ship, train and bicycle, and living only on the money he made along the way publishing his writing. What amazes me is that he accomplished this in the 1920's, prior to the days of a real commercial tourism/travel industry. I think part of what makes his stories good - or more interesting than the occurances of ordinary tourist - is that he would put himself "in harms way" for the This guy travelled around the world immediately following his graduation from Princeton, logging over 40,000 miles by ship, train and bicycle, and living only on the money he made along the way publishing his writing. What amazes me is that he accomplished this in the 1920's, prior to the days of a real commercial tourism/travel industry. I think part of what makes his stories good - or more interesting than the occurances of ordinary tourist - is that he would put himself "in harms way" for the sake of the story - and it paid off because he did have some better-than-average stories to tell. For example he was jailed in Gibralter, assulted and almost bitten by a viper in Cambodian jungle, and summiting Mt Fujiyama in the heart of winter all alone. And, of course, the list goes on. The combination of good content, Halliburton's knack for writing and witty storytelling, made for a quality read. If you don't like travel, adventure, or good literature, then I wouldn't recommend The Royal Road.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    Still an enjoyable book by Halliburton but not my favorite. Some of the stories in here are retold in Halliburton's Book of Marvels but they do not always match. This has lead me to the conclusion that Halliburton embellishes some or maybe all of his stories in order to sell them. I am very disappointed by this conclusion but will still continue to enjoy the poetical prose of his writings in his other books.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mitch Albom

    I read this as a boy, and it is a hard book to find, but Haliburton was a privileged kid who chucked it all in favor of adventure, and to hear it told in his 1930's voice transports you to a time when you had to actually go places to see things.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    A classic of adventure travel. You won't realize just how much Halliburton defined the modern adventure traveller. He is the forefather of an industry.

  17. 4 out of 5

    CarlyQ

    I read this book every year! It reminds me that there is a big world out there to explore and that where there is a will there is a way.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Catdogtamara

    I read this book back when I was in high school and it is just as enjoyable now!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    reading with Grace for school

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jimmy Lee

    When this book was published, racial equality was unknown as even an option, let alone attainable, in many places of the world. And Richard Halliburton was a very young man, filled with the thrill of being young, healthy and able to travel, with no idea of his own mortality or the contribution he could make just by trying to understand humanity in some of the countries he visited. I had to keep this in mind as, for what seemed like the sixth or seventh time, he found the smell and discomfort of h When this book was published, racial equality was unknown as even an option, let alone attainable, in many places of the world. And Richard Halliburton was a very young man, filled with the thrill of being young, healthy and able to travel, with no idea of his own mortality or the contribution he could make just by trying to understand humanity in some of the countries he visited. I had to keep this in mind as, for what seemed like the sixth or seventh time, he found the smell and discomfort of his purchased third class accommodations abhorrent and wandered up to first class on the train, refusing to move when confronted by the native conductors. Or jumped a train with no money instead of earning the required cash on the spot. Or ate a meal that he couldn't pay for. Or gleefully got forbidden pictures at Fort Gibraltar, by sneaking past military guards. He was unimpressed by the Tibetan's practice of Buddhism or the Balinese Funeral rituals, scorning these and other native practices. Richard clearly liked to travel and see the sights - he just didn't like natives, or following the rules. With that said, once you get past his attitude that the rules didn't apply to him and his feeling that the countries would be a lot cleaner without the natives - his stories are interesting, his bravery downright foolhardy, and he takes you to the most interesting places with the most interesting methods of travel, while you enjoy his mishaps and the fruits of his inappropriate behavior. He describes his own reactions more than he describes what he sees - but again, he's a very young traveler starting out, and his descriptions give you a good idea of what's going on. If I see another Halliburton, I'll pick it up and see how he matured back when the world was much bigger, pictures were black and white, and and world traveling was cutting edge.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Vance

    Mixed emotions. Being a big travel fan, I had been seeking ANYTHING by Richard Halliburton for more than ten years (only casually) after coming across accolades about his life, adventures and writing. Several years ago I settled on a biography, which left me more intrigued to unearth his actual writing (everything is out of print and ridiculously priced). Although I admire Halliburton's adventurous spirit and poetical writing style, several things diminished my regard: most notably his self-cente Mixed emotions. Being a big travel fan, I had been seeking ANYTHING by Richard Halliburton for more than ten years (only casually) after coming across accolades about his life, adventures and writing. Several years ago I settled on a biography, which left me more intrigued to unearth his actual writing (everything is out of print and ridiculously priced). Although I admire Halliburton's adventurous spirit and poetical writing style, several things diminished my regard: most notably his self-centered knack of stealing whatever he felt he needed and his subtle contempt for other (i.e., non-white) races. Neither is a bullet-proof indictment. Although I am no adherent to respecting authority without question, Richard's motivation was purely selfish and injured innocents (I think he actually punched a train conductor once when that humble attendant was merely trying to compel Richard to leave first-class since he had no right to be there). Perhaps his unenlightened views on racial equality were simply a sign of the times, but I fail to grant him a pass. For me, travel's allure has always been people as much as places, wonderfully revealing how we are all truly equal. Richard was only about conquering places, never dwelling upon the magnificence of the people who constructed the grandeur (e.g., he disdains sharing space with 'coolies' while traveling in Cambodia, remarking upon the brilliance of Angkor Wat without recognizing it was raised by their predecessors). And trampling upon the Great Pyramid without contemplating that he was ruing the legacy for those after him? Regardless, a remarkable life, a wild spirit and a solid writer. As much as I enjoyed his escapades and how he painted them...I came away not liking him so much as a human being.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie

    HA! --- What a crazy traveler was Richard Halliburton! Quick read book about his around-the-world route from Princeton, NJ through Switzerland, Greece, Khyber Pass, Bali, Tokyo, Seattle and then after 17 months and many countries not already mentioned, finally home to Tennessee using as little money as possible -- really! Trip taken and book written in 1925. Halliburton died just over a decade later drowning while trying to sail a Chinese junk from Hong Kong to San Francisco. It was fun to count HA! --- What a crazy traveler was Richard Halliburton! Quick read book about his around-the-world route from Princeton, NJ through Switzerland, Greece, Khyber Pass, Bali, Tokyo, Seattle and then after 17 months and many countries not already mentioned, finally home to Tennessee using as little money as possible -- really! Trip taken and book written in 1925. Halliburton died just over a decade later drowning while trying to sail a Chinese junk from Hong Kong to San Francisco. It was fun to count how many countries I had been on my travels - however, never sneaking in and out of cabins or trying to climb Mt Fuji in the winter! (btw, of the countries mentioned, I counted 11 to his 37 - ha!)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sherry Hession

    The author decides, upon graduating from Princeton, that he wants adventure. He travels the world with very little money. Some of the places and people he meets are way outside the typical tourist experience because he deliberately seeks out the unusual, little seen or known peoples of the world. The author takes terrible risks, like climbing mountains even though all of the experts in the area say it's too late in the season to climb and refuse to act as his guide, and somehow succeeds in his e The author decides, upon graduating from Princeton, that he wants adventure. He travels the world with very little money. Some of the places and people he meets are way outside the typical tourist experience because he deliberately seeks out the unusual, little seen or known peoples of the world. The author takes terrible risks, like climbing mountains even though all of the experts in the area say it's too late in the season to climb and refuse to act as his guide, and somehow succeeds in his endeavours. He also takes advantage of transportation systems by trying to sneak on trains and avoid conductors so he doesn't have to pay to travel even though it sounds like his family is fairly wealthy and could give him money to pay for this travel.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Neeta

    The wonderful adventure of Richard Halliburton, a 21 year old Princeton grad who decided to travel the world in the early 1900s and became known for articles and lectures regarding his travels. He embarked with no money but rather stowed away or worked as a seaman on ships to pay his way, traveled third class or snuck onto trains when he was out of money, tricked or dodged border control, and sometimes encountered generous benefactors in the countries he visited and lived like a king for a few w The wonderful adventure of Richard Halliburton, a 21 year old Princeton grad who decided to travel the world in the early 1900s and became known for articles and lectures regarding his travels. He embarked with no money but rather stowed away or worked as a seaman on ships to pay his way, traveled third class or snuck onto trains when he was out of money, tricked or dodged border control, and sometimes encountered generous benefactors in the countries he visited and lived like a king for a few weeks. He climbs mountains, braves blizzards, encounters pirates, sneaks around the grounds of Taj Mahal, among many other escapades. His travelogue is amusing and exotic, an interesting look at the world in that era through a middle class American white man’s eyes.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sherry

    I enjoyed the last half of the book better than the first. However, All his adventures were interesting and his writing is very good. He took me along in my minds eye especially when he was awed at some of the things he was seeing. He disappointed me when he cheated others because he ran out of money. Those adventures I did not like but his other discriptions made me google many of the places he was seeing. He is a great travel writer and certainly a brave adventurer and lover of life and seeker I enjoyed the last half of the book better than the first. However, All his adventures were interesting and his writing is very good. He took me along in my minds eye especially when he was awed at some of the things he was seeing. He disappointed me when he cheated others because he ran out of money. Those adventures I did not like but his other discriptions made me google many of the places he was seeing. He is a great travel writer and certainly a brave adventurer and lover of life and seeker of beauty.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    I cannot tell you how much I loved this book and how highly I recommend it. It was a genuinely fun read and I had such a hard time putting it down. The copy that I read was an older version titled "The Romantic World of Richard Halliburton," but appears to be the same book as named above. The second half included tales from his adventure around Italy to retrace the steps of Odysseus in The Odyssey. I absolutely LOVED this book. It was so well written and immersive. I felt like I was there- I cou I cannot tell you how much I loved this book and how highly I recommend it. It was a genuinely fun read and I had such a hard time putting it down. The copy that I read was an older version titled "The Romantic World of Richard Halliburton," but appears to be the same book as named above. The second half included tales from his adventure around Italy to retrace the steps of Odysseus in The Odyssey. I absolutely LOVED this book. It was so well written and immersive. I felt like I was there- I could feel the joy and anxiety in every page. If I could give it 10 stars, I would!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jeanine Malarsky

    Loved Halliburton's adventures. He was a young, impetuous, well-educated man who put his money where his mouth was. He did what he set out to do, roaming the globe, and wrote of his experiences for us to enjoy. I'm not sure which book I loved more, this one or "Seven League Boots". I read them back in the sixties but keep them in my library hoping others will enjoy them as much as I did.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michele

    Excellent! - highly recommend for anyone with wanderlust!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Friday

    Highly readable and very entertaining travelogue. Fun to see the world at that time through his very descriptive dispatches from abroad.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    This book was essentially a travel log. It was interesting to learn about the different places, but you kind of felt like the author wrote a literary version of a “selfie.”

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