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Comics visionary Grant Morrison reimagines the unique character of Kid Eternity, a young man who died before his true time and returns to Earth as a ghostly spirit, along with his guardian Mister Keeper.In this 144-page trade paperback, illustrated by Duncan Fegredo, KID ETERNITY follows the terrifying night of aspiring stand-up comedian Jerry Sullivan as he joins Kid Eter Comics visionary Grant Morrison reimagines the unique character of Kid Eternity, a young man who died before his true time and returns to Earth as a ghostly spirit, along with his guardian Mister Keeper.In this 144-page trade paperback, illustrated by Duncan Fegredo, KID ETERNITY follows the terrifying night of aspiring stand-up comedian Jerry Sullivan as he joins Kid Eternity on a quest to free his Keeper from Hell.


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Comics visionary Grant Morrison reimagines the unique character of Kid Eternity, a young man who died before his true time and returns to Earth as a ghostly spirit, along with his guardian Mister Keeper.In this 144-page trade paperback, illustrated by Duncan Fegredo, KID ETERNITY follows the terrifying night of aspiring stand-up comedian Jerry Sullivan as he joins Kid Eter Comics visionary Grant Morrison reimagines the unique character of Kid Eternity, a young man who died before his true time and returns to Earth as a ghostly spirit, along with his guardian Mister Keeper.In this 144-page trade paperback, illustrated by Duncan Fegredo, KID ETERNITY follows the terrifying night of aspiring stand-up comedian Jerry Sullivan as he joins Kid Eternity on a quest to free his Keeper from Hell.

30 review for Kid Eternity Deluxe Edition

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ill D

    There’s a lot of good here. And there’s a lot of the minding as well. I’ll try to break down this curiously overlooked ‘91 gem from everyone’s favorite comic luminary, Grant Morrison. Zeigeist-setting sage or bombastic buffoon (both definitions are equally applicable for this critic) Kid eternity is absolutely something every self-described comic book aficionado should experience. What initially feels akin to an old art school project that has been reexamined under more mature eyes finds itself b There’s a lot of good here. And there’s a lot of the minding as well. I’ll try to break down this curiously overlooked ‘91 gem from everyone’s favorite comic luminary, Grant Morrison. Zeigeist-setting sage or bombastic buffoon (both definitions are equally applicable for this critic) Kid eternity is absolutely something every self-described comic book aficionado should experience. What initially feels akin to an old art school project that has been reexamined under more mature eyes finds itself bound with another degree of externally found work. In this case, the largely forgotten not-so-classic titular Kid has been exhumed from the dusty cobwebs of yesteryear’s comic collection. Yet not content with a mere re-varnishing job, the admixture here is truly fresh, creative and mind-bendingly creative throughout. Sparing not a single scintilla of of the third eye’s intrinsic force, pure imagination becomes only filtered by the turn of the page. Strongly tethered by tastefully applied references from literature, mythology and poetry, recollections from Dante to Charon to Whitman find themselves expertly employed as they effectively manifested in page after page of this maddeningly morphean landscape. The very same nightmare world that bequeathed us the contemporaneous Hellraiser comic series is truly reflected here with a larger degree of cohesiveness yet hardly approaching a degree of significantly transparent narrative. With that as it is, its precisely this alternating current between merely wading and truly trudging through this astral muck that make this journey across ~150 pages all the more worth it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jesse A

    I didn't care for the art at all The story was typical GM weirdness. Not super enjoyable. I didn't care for the art at all The story was typical GM weirdness. Not super enjoyable.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    Not one of Morrison's strongest headtrips, but I still loved being slowly immersed into the world he built around the character of Kid Eternity. I'd never heard of Kid Eternity before, and having read this without doing any research about the character, I had no trouble keeping up with the spiraling, insane hellscape Morrison constructs here. I think what I most appreciated about this book is that it's a somewhat-rare instance of Morrison truly earning the chaos he puts forth. This is a book that Not one of Morrison's strongest headtrips, but I still loved being slowly immersed into the world he built around the character of Kid Eternity. I'd never heard of Kid Eternity before, and having read this without doing any research about the character, I had no trouble keeping up with the spiraling, insane hellscape Morrison constructs here. I think what I most appreciated about this book is that it's a somewhat-rare instance of Morrison truly earning the chaos he puts forth. This is a book that harnesses the flashes that come in the last moments of life, spitting out seemingly disconnected, random scenes that gradually gel to form a character's memories and, eventually, a complete story. It's genuinely satisfying to start figuring out the narrative as you move forward, and realize that Morrison isn't just wasting your time with weirdo Lynchian freakouts. All of this stuff matters this time. Additionally, once the story starts to enter the realms of Hell and the dead, it has an equally earned weirdness and art style that compliment its tale of people existing somewhere between life and death, sanity and insanity. Fegredo's harsh, horrifying art style goes a long way to enhance this experience, leaving you feeling just as disoriented and overwhelmed as the main character. This is an important distinction within Morrison's work: sometimes his characters fully understand everything that's going on, leaving the reader feeling like a confused idiot for not also "getting it." But this time, we're along for the ride, and the fact that Hell is an indescribable nightmare is, obviously, fitting. The only real negative about this book are its instances of exposition. It's strange to read such a trippy, abstract, nontraditional narrative, the story to revealing itself to you in fragments, and then suddenly stop dead to have a character explain in detail who he is and what he's doing. It happens on two occasions in the book, one of them being basically a character explaining the ending to you. I didn't love having my hand held for the final ten steps of a thousand mile journey, but I guess Morrison and/or Vertigo felt the need to guide us over the finish line. Oh well. In any case, this is a great example of Morrison's style, and ever-so-slightly more accessible than his usual fare. It's also short and to the point, leaving no time for meandering detours or wasted scenes. I recommend it!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jake Nap

    Turn. Turn. Turn. Kid Eternity is one of the more abstract Morrison works I’ve read, but it was also his tightest abstract works. Unlike something like Nameless, the hard to follow nature of the story culminates really really well in the end allowing for a satisfying pay off. The writing had a very stream of consciousness aura to it at some parts with Morrison using Hell’s Lords of Chaos to speak about life and it’s meaning. It was very Grant Morrison and I very much enjoyed it. Morrison starts t Turn. Turn. Turn. Kid Eternity is one of the more abstract Morrison works I’ve read, but it was also his tightest abstract works. Unlike something like Nameless, the hard to follow nature of the story culminates really really well in the end allowing for a satisfying pay off. The writing had a very stream of consciousness aura to it at some parts with Morrison using Hell’s Lords of Chaos to speak about life and it’s meaning. It was very Grant Morrison and I very much enjoyed it. Morrison starts the book by telling a few seemingly disconnected stories all at once. It was jarring and a little hard to follow, but being familiar with his work I knew I had to push through to get a grasp on the story he was trying to tell. As I said before, this disconnectedness does eventually pay off in the end in a satisfying way. All of what I expected to be loose ends tied together very cleanly. This was a very high concept Morrison title and there could be no artist that could’ve matched this like Duncan Fegredo. His work in this book was astounding. I’ve never seen him to this painted Dave McKean/Bill Sienkiewicz style before, but he pulls it off very well. His layouts were easy to follow despite the more abstract art style and he conveyed the story clearly in my opinion. Also, props to both Morrison and Fegredo for doing one of the coolest and most engaging renditions of Hell I’ve ever seen. Overall a solid solid Morrison story. Definitely in the lower good upper middle section of his bibliography, but a good pick for Morrison fans to read once you’ve read all his classics. 8/10

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nate

    An early Morrison book, and it’s decent. As with most pre-Vertigo Vertigo comics (this was published in 1991, later incorporated into the imprint), he resurrects an obscure character and gives them a modern spin. This is a rather dark book for Morrison. Then again, the character he resurrects is a kid who dies too early and is granted the ability to summon dead people by the Lord of Chaos. The beginning is confusing, but the plot gets rolling soon enough. Pretentious narration inevitably dates t An early Morrison book, and it’s decent. As with most pre-Vertigo Vertigo comics (this was published in 1991, later incorporated into the imprint), he resurrects an obscure character and gives them a modern spin. This is a rather dark book for Morrison. Then again, the character he resurrects is a kid who dies too early and is granted the ability to summon dead people by the Lord of Chaos. The beginning is confusing, but the plot gets rolling soon enough. Pretentious narration inevitably dates the book. On the flip side, Duncan Feguro’s art is awfully pretty. He has a Bill Sienkiewicz/Dave McKean style, capturing well the disturbing supernatural tone of the story. Kid Eternity is certainly minor Morrison, but I’d say it’s worth checking out for a peek at his darker side, a la Arkham Asylum. And I must reiterate how beautiful the book looks.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    One of Morrison's earlier works, and it's entirely terrific. The story is beautifully told, with repetitive tropes crazily cross-cutting. The darkening of Kid Eternity is interesting, and though I could see how some folks might have hated it, Morrison created a very viable modern character. And finally there's the artwork by Duncan Fegredo, a Bill Sienkiewicz-ripoff. It's entirely beautiful (and stops short of the muddiness that sometimes hurt Sienkiewicz's art). It's also very appropriate for t One of Morrison's earlier works, and it's entirely terrific. The story is beautifully told, with repetitive tropes crazily cross-cutting. The darkening of Kid Eternity is interesting, and though I could see how some folks might have hated it, Morrison created a very viable modern character. And finally there's the artwork by Duncan Fegredo, a Bill Sienkiewicz-ripoff. It's entirely beautiful (and stops short of the muddiness that sometimes hurt Sienkiewicz's art). It's also very appropriate for the story and helps to improve it. Yes, this book is a tough read, and may even require a reread, but it's nonetheless spectacular.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rizzie

    This book will NOT be for everyone. It's borderline incoherent. The story is told out of order. The art is ambiguous and challenging. The concepts presented are difficult to grasp. No one would ever blame you for dropping this out of frustration, especially during the first 20 pages or so. But godDAMN I love this book. It's one of my favorite Morrison works without question. The ambition is incredible, and if you put the effort into putting the pieces together, I think it's a really rewarding. B This book will NOT be for everyone. It's borderline incoherent. The story is told out of order. The art is ambiguous and challenging. The concepts presented are difficult to grasp. No one would ever blame you for dropping this out of frustration, especially during the first 20 pages or so. But godDAMN I love this book. It's one of my favorite Morrison works without question. The ambition is incredible, and if you put the effort into putting the pieces together, I think it's a really rewarding. But it will take multiple reads, so if that's not something you're interested in, you might want to skip this one. Then again, the art alone is worth the price of admission.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Fegredo channeling Bill Sienkiewicz. Grant Morrison being pointless. I would have liked to have been given a story I could care about if only so I could spend some more time with the beautiful artwork.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Flores

    I liked this story but it was hard to get into... You have to push thru the first cantos where the storylines disjointed and start putting the pieces together in the second. The art is amazing and it's beautiful. It's a quick read and a slight brain burner. I liked this story but it was hard to get into... You have to push thru the first cantos where the storylines disjointed and start putting the pieces together in the second. The art is amazing and it's beautiful. It's a quick read and a slight brain burner.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jared Conti

    A bit hard to follow, but what of Morrison's isn't? Nice art, and a great steal for $3 at MishMash in Bellefonte. Signed by the author as well? Good deal. A bit hard to follow, but what of Morrison's isn't? Nice art, and a great steal for $3 at MishMash in Bellefonte. Signed by the author as well? Good deal.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    A mess.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    This was okay to me, but like a lot of Morrison's early Vertigo work, it's just a little too weird. The painted art was confusing at times, but this book reminded me of an issue of Marvel's original Hellraiser series. The basic premise is pretty cool, but Morrison uses a lot of stream-of-consciousness writing and that loses me after a while. As some reviewers have said, Morrison's writing is a "head trip." Kid Eternity has the power to call up historical and mythological characters in order to aid This was okay to me, but like a lot of Morrison's early Vertigo work, it's just a little too weird. The painted art was confusing at times, but this book reminded me of an issue of Marvel's original Hellraiser series. The basic premise is pretty cool, but Morrison uses a lot of stream-of-consciousness writing and that loses me after a while. As some reviewers have said, Morrison's writing is a "head trip." Kid Eternity has the power to call up historical and mythological characters in order to aid him, which when you think about it is an awesome power. But he's more of a hipster than a superhero. He escapes from Hell and a stand up comedian ends up caught in the chase when Hell pursues him. As I said earlier, this reads like Hellraiser with a bit of Hellblazer thrown in, but the whole isn't necessarily greater than the sum of its parts. Overall if you like your comics weird (such as Morrison's run on Doom Patrol) you'll probably enjoy this. If you prefer your books more straight forward and less existential, you might what to skip it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    John

    The Lords of Order and Chaos using humans (both living and dead) as pawns in their game to evolve the human race. Retcons to make a cute kids story the features a leering pedophile instead. Kid Eternity is not a bit of a punk aesthetic instead. It's got the great glorious 80s painted art, with bit of dada influence. A cheap version of Dante's Inferno via comicbook ephemera. This is pure 80s Vertigo, that now looks a bit ridiculous but felt so intimate with Swamp Thing, John Constantine, Dream, e The Lords of Order and Chaos using humans (both living and dead) as pawns in their game to evolve the human race. Retcons to make a cute kids story the features a leering pedophile instead. Kid Eternity is not a bit of a punk aesthetic instead. It's got the great glorious 80s painted art, with bit of dada influence. A cheap version of Dante's Inferno via comicbook ephemera. This is pure 80s Vertigo, that now looks a bit ridiculous but felt so intimate with Swamp Thing, John Constantine, Dream, etc.. This is Gullivers Travels meets Clive Barker's Cenobites.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    I usually hate Grant Morrison. This is easily the first of his works that I liked. Didn't love it but I liked it. The story mixed with his signature writing style worked well combined with a trippy and colorful art style. It definitely requires you to slow down and pay very close attention to everything happening. It's a story that delves into the concept of heaven and hell and so on. I would have definitely skipped over it if it wasn't for someone handing me a physical copy and insisting that I I usually hate Grant Morrison. This is easily the first of his works that I liked. Didn't love it but I liked it. The story mixed with his signature writing style worked well combined with a trippy and colorful art style. It definitely requires you to slow down and pay very close attention to everything happening. It's a story that delves into the concept of heaven and hell and so on. I would have definitely skipped over it if it wasn't for someone handing me a physical copy and insisting that I read it.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Briones

    Classic Morrison weirdness, which means it's not for everyone. Fairly interesting story with outstanding art and astonishing visuals. It's also not very long, which helps a bit since the plot can be a bit confusing at times. If you like Morrison's Doom Patrol and Animal Runs, you'll certainly enjoy this. Classic Morrison weirdness, which means it's not for everyone. Fairly interesting story with outstanding art and astonishing visuals. It's also not very long, which helps a bit since the plot can be a bit confusing at times. If you like Morrison's Doom Patrol and Animal Runs, you'll certainly enjoy this.

  16. 5 out of 5

    nick

    Yeah. This wasn't good for me. Not my favorite style of artwork. The storyline was jumpy and chaotic, but not in an enjoyable way. I see what he was going for but it was a huge miss in my opinion. First one star I've given in awhile but people need warned. Yeah. This wasn't good for me. Not my favorite style of artwork. The storyline was jumpy and chaotic, but not in an enjoyable way. I see what he was going for but it was a huge miss in my opinion. First one star I've given in awhile but people need warned.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jessie

    DNF - little too weird for my tastes, and it managed the hit all three of my major triggers in the first twenty pages so I think I'm out for the count on this one unfortunately. Sorry Morrison I tried. DNF - little too weird for my tastes, and it managed the hit all three of my major triggers in the first twenty pages so I think I'm out for the count on this one unfortunately. Sorry Morrison I tried.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Drew Budds

    a complicated story with bad artwork. not a fan

  19. 4 out of 5

    Willian Welbert

    Interesting in its high-paced (kinda confusing) overflow of information

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jacob

    Amazing art. Had no idea what was going on until second Canto. Started to piece things together. May reread to get a more clear picture. Worth pushing through, especially because of the art.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jerry

    Back in the Time Before Internet, people used to put magazine holders in their guest rooms, usually in the basement, and fill them with old magazines. At one relative’s house, it held an old Batman in which Robin takes a test and aces it, and an issue of the Quality Kid Eternity series. Kid Eternity was pretty weird right from the start, so when I saw that Grant Morrison was resurrecting him, I thought it a perfect fit. The problem for me with this series, though, is that it took everything that Back in the Time Before Internet, people used to put magazine holders in their guest rooms, usually in the basement, and fill them with old magazines. At one relative’s house, it held an old Batman in which Robin takes a test and aces it, and an issue of the Quality Kid Eternity series. Kid Eternity was pretty weird right from the start, so when I saw that Grant Morrison was resurrecting him, I thought it a perfect fit. The problem for me with this series, though, is that it took everything that was interesting about Kid Eternity—the malleability of time, the benign bureaucracy of heaven, delving into historical characters—and made them a sideline to the Kid’s real mission, the erection of Chaospheres for the Lords of Chaos. The second problem is that the erection of Chaospheres and the conflict between the Lords of Chaos and the Lords of Order was itself a sideline to a bad Jerry Seinfeld-style comedian and an urban legend researcher. As a fourth sideline, the story explains the entire DC Universe. And then nothing really happens with any of them. Even the weirdness that Morrison adds doesn’t go anywhere. Every story doesn’t have to be the center of the universe; but if it is, it ought to actually do something with it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michael J

    Grant Morrison is one of my favorite writers, but I would consider this lesser Morrison. He updates the 1940's characters of Kid Eternity and Mr. Keeper well, but there is too much unnecessary effort to make Kid Eternity's origin edgy by adding details such as Kid Eternity being sexually molested by the Captain of the boat he was on before it blew up, and he received his powers. This is also one of those stories where you have no idea what is going on until near the end of the book. I'd recommen Grant Morrison is one of my favorite writers, but I would consider this lesser Morrison. He updates the 1940's characters of Kid Eternity and Mr. Keeper well, but there is too much unnecessary effort to make Kid Eternity's origin edgy by adding details such as Kid Eternity being sexually molested by the Captain of the boat he was on before it blew up, and he received his powers. This is also one of those stories where you have no idea what is going on until near the end of the book. I'd recommend it for fans of old 40's comic characters, but it's not one of Morrison's works I'd consider an absolute necessity.

  23. 5 out of 5

    a.g.e. montagner

    By now I've learned that Grant Morrison is positively out of his mind*. A chaos magician unwinding deadpan on his allucinations, how they affected his comics, and how comics affected both his life and his hangouts with the gods. All this in a heavy Scottish accent, dig it. Apparently this miniseries from the early nineties is more personal than the superhero stuff. This is Morrison's own Death miniseries, well before Gaiman ever started writing Sandman. In fact this is Vertigo before Vertigo, si By now I've learned that Grant Morrison is positively out of his mind*. A chaos magician unwinding deadpan on his allucinations, how they affected his comics, and how comics affected both his life and his hangouts with the gods. All this in a heavy Scottish accent, dig it. Apparently this miniseries from the early nineties is more personal than the superhero stuff. This is Morrison's own Death miniseries, well before Gaiman ever started writing Sandman. In fact this is Vertigo before Vertigo, since it was published by DC Comics in 1991, two years before the launching of the Vertigo imprint. Morrison's story is the kind of plot whose pieces fit into place at the end. Book One is a total mess in nonchronological order... and yet very intriguing. Wiki also mentions continuity, which I'm totally unaware of. Most importantly however, this is just brilliant. Very personal as I said: a cosmic vision of heaven and hell, death and the afterlife, chaos and order, predestination and free will; and of why binary opposites are shite. Quite literate, as usual with Morrison. As when Kid mentions in passing, while flipping The Divine Comedy: "You know, hell's nothing like this!" (looking particularly at Doré's Charon). And Morrison also loves to quote a pop song. The trip to Hell looks actually like a black heavy psychedelic hallucinated jam gone awry... (and I'm not spoiling anything you haven't read on the backcover). Accompanying the writer is Duncan Fegredo, whose drawings are amazing; often they're organized as double panels, and they jump out of the page--or rather suck you in. Vivid, nervous, acid, majestic, always inventive, always equal to the task. €9 I'm very happy of having spent. "A crazy, mixed-up bonsai wants to live forever". "That's shit. That's total shit". * http://bit.ly/9NPXk7

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kit

    I'm not sure exactly how much of myself I would be willing to sell or barter to get Morrison back to this phase, but I can comfortably say it would likely be a lethal amount. Kid Eternity is one of those strange tomes of kaleidoscopic beauty that Vertigo used to gift us with when they had some sense of desire in pushing real boundaries with the medium. Although I can probably point out at least a baker's dozen titles from Vertigo around this period that follow an obsession with hell, beasties fr I'm not sure exactly how much of myself I would be willing to sell or barter to get Morrison back to this phase, but I can comfortably say it would likely be a lethal amount. Kid Eternity is one of those strange tomes of kaleidoscopic beauty that Vertigo used to gift us with when they had some sense of desire in pushing real boundaries with the medium. Although I can probably point out at least a baker's dozen titles from Vertigo around this period that follow an obsession with hell, beasties from the dark places, Old Gods™, hamfisted or navel-gazing attempts at psychoanalysis, and generally fuzzy and undefined senses of self in a postmodern world, I have to say that the experience among many stands out as well as envelops me as a reader. I am returning to many of my old books to see who will stay on the shelf and what still bears meaning to me at least a decade and a half of my life later, and Kid Eternity will live up to the title. Vertigo's casting of the Everyman in these worlds of strangeness and wonder is a purposeful trope, as the common nature of any Vertigo hero is crucial to juxtapose them against the strangeness that surrounds us, making the bridge created between the two through the character's experience all the more intriguing and compelling to me as a reader. The best Vertigo books always leave me wondering if what I have consumed or enjoyed isn't perhaps something that may arrive howling at my door someday to take me by the hand and pull me into depths of wildness I've always repressed expressing the desire to explore. Maybe it says more about me as a person than the book itself, but for my experiences with the imprint, that's all I ever want from a good story: to be included and taken away.

  25. 5 out of 5

    D.M.

    Okay, I'm cheating a bit here, since I read this in the original issues and not a collection, but I'm sure the review applies either way. This may well have been my first conscious exposure to Grant Morrison, figuring this came out about the time I got out of the service, just as my comics collection was about to go completely out of control. It was certainly a sound place to start, and even then he was exposing the bizarre belief system which serves as the groundwork for so much of his output. Mo Okay, I'm cheating a bit here, since I read this in the original issues and not a collection, but I'm sure the review applies either way. This may well have been my first conscious exposure to Grant Morrison, figuring this came out about the time I got out of the service, just as my comics collection was about to go completely out of control. It was certainly a sound place to start, and even then he was exposing the bizarre belief system which serves as the groundwork for so much of his output. Morrison was certainly not the reason I'd have gotten this, though. That honour almost definitely goes to Duncan Fegredo's dark, lush painted artwork. He was pretty clearly owing a big debt to Sienkiewicz (and maybe McKean, though it may have been too early for that tribute) in his handling of a page, though he favours bigger, clearer images. His painting is somewhere between comic-book standard and more realistic, which suits the subject well enough. This is a fun book, and very readable (except for Canto V, which lapses into some dreadful exposition for most of its length). The jumping from place to place, both geographically and temporally, may be jarring for some less-experienced readers, but anyone familiar with Morrison will trust him to bring it all together by the end somehow. He does just that, if not with the most satisfying results. If I were a Morrison collector, I'd put this closer to the end of seeking out than to the beginning, but that's not a reflection on the quality of the work. He's just done much better, and very little worse.

  26. 5 out of 5

    J.D. Estrada

    Don't think that 3 stars is a bad rating. Sincerely consider this a middle of the road rating for a peculiar graphic novel that might or might not appeal to you. Pretty ambiguous suggestion huh? But hear me out. The storyline demands that you put attention to detail and to take each page and soak it up in its entirety. This might or might not be a good thing for some people, but seeing as I really enjoyed the artistic sense of the novel, I consider it a pro rather than a con. Kid Eternity is a w Don't think that 3 stars is a bad rating. Sincerely consider this a middle of the road rating for a peculiar graphic novel that might or might not appeal to you. Pretty ambiguous suggestion huh? But hear me out. The storyline demands that you put attention to detail and to take each page and soak it up in its entirety. This might or might not be a good thing for some people, but seeing as I really enjoyed the artistic sense of the novel, I consider it a pro rather than a con. Kid Eternity is a weird title, no doubt about it. But guess what, there are people out there who love weird titles. I'm a big David Lynch fan and it might seem moronic to love works of film I don't fully understand, but I just try to take an experience and inspiration with it, and Kid Eternity, like Lynch, offer a lot of material to mull over and think about. It's not as surreal, polished or beautiful as the Sandman series, but it is thought provoking and I enjoyed it enough to know I'll re-read it. The 3 star rating focuses on the story arc because it feels jumpy and maybe that's what the author was going for, but at times you can't help but need to go back two pages to re-read something just to be sure. In general, a good title for anyone into fantastic noir motif literature with a unique and darkly beautiful artistic style.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Billy

    a little confusing, but I guess we should expect that from Grant Morrison. This is one of his lesser-works, but is still pretty interesting. Looking at it over 15 years after it came out though, I can't help but think that it was just an exercise in turning a once-bright and cheerful character into a grim-and-gritty anti-hero. If I had any affection for the character prior to reading this, I'd probably be pretty pissed, but the only Kid Eternity I really knew was the one that was always the dark a little confusing, but I guess we should expect that from Grant Morrison. This is one of his lesser-works, but is still pretty interesting. Looking at it over 15 years after it came out though, I can't help but think that it was just an exercise in turning a once-bright and cheerful character into a grim-and-gritty anti-hero. If I had any affection for the character prior to reading this, I'd probably be pretty pissed, but the only Kid Eternity I really knew was the one that was always the dark agent of Chaos. Others may disagree. It's still a well written work that is very interesting and thought provoking. I enjoyed it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Newt cox

    I know I read this mini series years ago right after it came out. And I remember enjoying it. And since I normally love it when Grant Morrison takes an almost forgotten hero and reinvents them I requested that my local library get a copy. Well I get a call telling me that they had got a copy in for me. I got it and rushed home all excited to read it. Well this time reading it the story made no sense at all. I get a feeling this was written during the period when Morrison was doing lots of LSD an I know I read this mini series years ago right after it came out. And I remember enjoying it. And since I normally love it when Grant Morrison takes an almost forgotten hero and reinvents them I requested that my local library get a copy. Well I get a call telling me that they had got a copy in for me. I got it and rushed home all excited to read it. Well this time reading it the story made no sense at all. I get a feeling this was written during the period when Morrison was doing lots of LSD and mushrooms. Avoid at all costs.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Schwarz

    Two and a half stars. The artwork is gorgeous, five stars, and made this worth looking at (especially since I borrowed it from the library and didn't have to lay out any cash). The story started out strong, if maybe just a bit confusing, but at around the half way point instead of picking up speed and/or building to a dramatic climax there was a lot of confusing explanations about the mechanizations of the twisted worlds of the afterlife. Maybe it was just too much world building crammed into a Two and a half stars. The artwork is gorgeous, five stars, and made this worth looking at (especially since I borrowed it from the library and didn't have to lay out any cash). The story started out strong, if maybe just a bit confusing, but at around the half way point instead of picking up speed and/or building to a dramatic climax there was a lot of confusing explanations about the mechanizations of the twisted worlds of the afterlife. Maybe it was just too much world building crammed into a relatively small container (this is a pretty short graphic novel).

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jarrodtrainque

    Comics visionary Grant Morrison reimagines the unique character of Kid Eternity, a young man who died before his true time and returns to Earth as a ghostly spirit, along with his guardian Mister Keeper.In this 144-page trade paperback, illustrated by Duncan Fegredo, KID ETERNITY follows the terrifying night of aspiring stand-up comedian Jerry Sullivan as he joins Kid Eternity on a quest to free his Keeper from Hell.

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