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The Multiversity: Ultra Comics #1

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The penultimate chapter of the greatest adventure in DC’s history is here! The acclaimed FINAL CRISIS team of Grant Morrison and Doug Mahnke reunite for a story so big it could only take place in the real world – that’s right, Earth-33 is back! With the Multiverse under attack, a team of scientists create one final savior to take on the otherworldly threat…and its name is The penultimate chapter of the greatest adventure in DC’s history is here! The acclaimed FINAL CRISIS team of Grant Morrison and Doug Mahnke reunite for a story so big it could only take place in the real world – that’s right, Earth-33 is back! With the Multiverse under attack, a team of scientists create one final savior to take on the otherworldly threat…and its name is Ultra Comics!


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The penultimate chapter of the greatest adventure in DC’s history is here! The acclaimed FINAL CRISIS team of Grant Morrison and Doug Mahnke reunite for a story so big it could only take place in the real world – that’s right, Earth-33 is back! With the Multiverse under attack, a team of scientists create one final savior to take on the otherworldly threat…and its name is The penultimate chapter of the greatest adventure in DC’s history is here! The acclaimed FINAL CRISIS team of Grant Morrison and Doug Mahnke reunite for a story so big it could only take place in the real world – that’s right, Earth-33 is back! With the Multiverse under attack, a team of scientists create one final savior to take on the otherworldly threat…and its name is Ultra Comics!

30 review for The Multiversity: Ultra Comics #1

  1. 4 out of 5

    mark monday

    Ultra Comics is the lodestone of Morrison's absorbing Multiversity meta-epic. on the narrative level, we discover the reasons behind the various attacks on various dimensions. on the thematic level, we have a fascinating examination of "cannibalism" in all of its forms - from the constant devouring & regurgitation & devouring again of comic book tropes and icons to the cannibalistic relationship between art & critic & audience to, well, actual cannibalism (very cleverly literalized as superh Ultra Comics is the lodestone of Morrison's absorbing Multiversity meta-epic. on the narrative level, we discover the reasons behind the various attacks on various dimensions. on the thematic level, we have a fascinating examination of "cannibalism" in all of its forms - from the constant devouring & regurgitation & devouring again of comic book tropes and icons to the cannibalistic relationship between art & critic & audience to, well, actual cannibalism (very cleverly literalized as superheroes consuming other superheroes). on the ¡GRANT MORRISON MAGICK! level, we have a comic book as transcendent sigil, enticing comic book readers to come together and create something beyond panel and page with er the power of their imagination. the art by Doug Mahnke is fine, sorta Frank Quitely light. and the rather large team of inkers and colorists certainly did a good job - everything really popped. the writing is smart, sardonic, and clearly energized by finally being able to spell things out to the audience and get to the heart of what makes The Multiversity tick. Morrison hits his targets perfectly. too perfectly. on the nose x infinity. it was all pretty interesting to contemplate and there were many moments that amused and entertained, but overall it was less than compelling to actually experience. I like to read the text in search of the subtext; it turns out I'm not too big a fan of the subtext being front and center. sadly, it appears I can only take so much meta in my fiction. (view spoiler)[which is hugely hypocritical of me because so many of my reviews have so much meta in them. like this "spoiler" that you are reading right now. mark monday: hypocrite! (hide spoiler)] that is the hero of Earth 33 - "Earth Prime" i.e. our world. this hero's name is literally Ultra Comics. he is talking to you, dear reader. to you and to me and to all the comic book readers of the world. unfortunately it wasn't my favorite sort of conversation. a bit cringey, to be honest.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Hey - hey, you! Yes, you! The one reading this review right now. Isn’t it weird to meet like this? My voice - or maybe your voice, or what you think my voice sounds like - is in your head right now. Right. Now. Inside your head. The most personal space there is. And even though I wrote this before you’re reading this now - maybe you’re reading this the same day, maybe a few days later, months, whatever - it’s like we’re talking across time, right here, right now. Scroll down to the next paragrap Hey - hey, you! Yes, you! The one reading this review right now. Isn’t it weird to meet like this? My voice - or maybe your voice, or what you think my voice sounds like - is in your head right now. Right. Now. Inside your head. The most personal space there is. And even though I wrote this before you’re reading this now - maybe you’re reading this the same day, maybe a few days later, months, whatever - it’s like we’re talking across time, right here, right now. Scroll down to the next paragraph. Is this sounding a bit weird? A bit irritating, a bit smug? Yeah I’m starting to hear it now too. But that’s what this entire comic is: one long fourth-wall-breaking dialogue between Grant Morrison/Ultra Comics (which is a character, the comic, and YOU!) and the reader. Y’know, I remember a time when Morrison didn’t need to rely on gimmicks for his comics... The Multiversity: Ultra Comics #1 is the penultimate issue to the series and the big bad is about ready to invade Earth Prime. The question is whether the audience is fed up at this point or still interested. Me, I’m pretty much in the former, glad to see the end of this overlong ride. I’ll give Morrison this: it is attention-grabbing to have a character, even one as paper-thin (pun intended) as Ultra Comics, talking to you directly. But the format works against it, even though it’s reliant upon it. I expect it’ll work better in the collected edition but in this single issue there are ads for other DC properties dropped in at the most inappropriate times. For example: one of the early pages after the prologue introduces the main story with “Activate Ultra Comics’ debut adventure! A nakedly allegorical tale we just hadda call…” and then you turn the page… to an ad for “The official prequel to the upcoming video game - Batman: Arkham Knight written by Peter J Tomasi, etc…” and then on the next page you get the second half of that sentence: “... Out of His Box!” It really takes you out of the story and shatters the effect Morrison’s trying to create. But a lot of the captions addressing the reader - “Don’t Read This Comic!”, “Don’t Turn The Page!” - present the reader with a false sense of control that Morrison is pretending to give them. If you’ve read this far in the series, what, you’re not going to read this issue? You bought the comic but you’re not going to turn the page? And if you don’t, will that mean the next issue won’t come out because you’ll have saved the world? It’s like button prompts in games - you have to press “x” to continue the game or you won’t get any further, so why have the button prompt at all? The illusion of control. Furthering the meta-narration, Morrison has the audiences’ opinions (mostly negative, so he’s self-aware at least) written into Ultra Comics’ thought-stream. “That’s it, I’m OUT.” and “This guy’s raped my wallet WAY too many times!” are just a couple of the comments but they carry on in that vein. Didn’t see any that reflected my thoughts: “Lame gimmickry never made for good comics, Grant. Don’t think I’m mistaking any of this shallow nonsense as fresh, ground-breaking or brilliant - this is disappointing stuff from a writer as gifted as you. You wrote All-Star Superman, dude, how did you get from that to this!?” And that’s Ultra Comics - another weak addition to Multiversity, though the end is thankfully near. Still reading this review? Ok, I’ll end it in a similar self-satisfied tone Morrison does this issue. Stop reading this review… now.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rick Goodman

    There are so many layers to this short comic. You are always, in a sense, the hero in the stories you read; but in this you are literally the titular hero...and so is anyone else who reads it. You are Ultra Comics. I am Ultra Comics. We are Ultra Comics. If you're feeling skeptical at all, fear not, Grant has included all of your criticisms, frame for frame, throughout the story as he demonstrates their silliness. Go ahead, open this one up, you may just learn a thing or two about yourself :).

  4. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

    The cover for Ultra Comics is seen throughout from the first issue, so I was surprised at how meta this one was. Probably the most meta out of the lot. The connections also start to become more clear at this point as we head towards the end.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rattoni

    Wo, What the hell is this? Big Bat EGG! Big Bad Crisis! Boring new characters! and more in UltraSenseless comics I liked how this issue started, the whole meta thing was interesting, and this story had been referenced to so much in the other previous comics that I had good hopes for this book, but after the first third of the book the whole meta connection is totally lost, and the only link that this seems to have with the other books is the Big Bat Egg, which was probably the lowest point in any Wo, What the hell is this? Big Bat EGG! Big Bad Crisis! Boring new characters! and more in UltraSenseless comics I liked how this issue started, the whole meta thing was interesting, and this story had been referenced to so much in the other previous comics that I had good hopes for this book, but after the first third of the book the whole meta connection is totally lost, and the only link that this seems to have with the other books is the Big Bat Egg, which was probably the lowest point in any of the other stories that it appeared in. I read almost all of the other stories involved in Multiversity, and the whole thing is a big mess of nonsense. Really, what was this whole thing about? Nothing! new characters and new takes on old characters that speak like robots ( well, the little justice league seem to be robots after all) and all of them are so disconnected from any real feelings that they end up being the means of a senseless, uneventful trip. In each of their books all of the turn into this mechanical things after the first third of the book that I couldn´t care less for. Pax Americana was the most interesting piece of the whole Multiversity thing, and it may be bacause it´s the one that doesn´t even try to connect with the other ones. In order to like Gran Morrison you have to keep repeating to yourself that there is something really interesting interwoven in his writing , otherwise this stuff is really charmless and strange. ( I think that Sam Quixote stated something similar). I like books that have several interpretation layers, but here the main reading is so ambiguous and so senseless that every attempt to decipher other layers will be pure free interpretation of the reader. Morrison just throws pieces of several jigsaws pretending to have some link among them. I would love to read the story that proves me wrong, and that settles the connections that don´t seem to exist.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jedi JC Daquis

    So... we are infected with a virus that disguises itself as a comic book or something like that? I mean it tells you something, the issue interacts with you, but not to the point that it will hypnotize you and make you kill or something like that. I was hooked after reading the first three pages as Morrison tries to convey the thesis that we are part of this, part of the actual Multiverse. Yet after that, everything went downhill and just became a generic mash of weirdness.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jillian

    I liked the concept behind this. Really liked the art. Felt a little more on the trying-too-hard side than the this-is-really-thought-provoking one, buuuuut... Honestly, it was kind of reminiscent of the superhero rides at Universal's IoA. You're a "part" of the rides, in that all of the videos while waiting in line sort of address you as participants in an experiment or other endeavor, and then you're THAT group of people being attacked by the villain. I liked that parallel, because, apart from I liked the concept behind this. Really liked the art. Felt a little more on the trying-too-hard side than the this-is-really-thought-provoking one, buuuuut... Honestly, it was kind of reminiscent of the superhero rides at Universal's IoA. You're a "part" of the rides, in that all of the videos while waiting in line sort of address you as participants in an experiment or other endeavor, and then you're THAT group of people being attacked by the villain. I liked that parallel, because, apart from really digging roller coasters, I've always enjoyed that more inclusive side to the IoA rides. This comic fell into that same vein, and, even if you wouldn't normally pick up something so blatantly fourth wall-breaking, it's still worth the quick, fun read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    Wow. What the hell was that? Sadly, this Multiversity run has had more down than ups and Ultra Comics is really scraping the bottom of an already well-scraped barrel. I mentioned in some earlier reviews of this arc that maybe Morrison was being too clever. Not sure this even applies anymore. Pax Americana was the high point for me and one or two other interesting issues. This however took a completely utter and nonsensical turn for the worst. Even by Grant Morrison standards this is a weird book Wow. What the hell was that? Sadly, this Multiversity run has had more down than ups and Ultra Comics is really scraping the bottom of an already well-scraped barrel. I mentioned in some earlier reviews of this arc that maybe Morrison was being too clever. Not sure this even applies anymore. Pax Americana was the high point for me and one or two other interesting issues. This however took a completely utter and nonsensical turn for the worst. Even by Grant Morrison standards this is a weird book. Tried to be existential and ended up a hot mess. How Multiversity can be considered a story arc is beyond me. Maybe I'm too obtuse for Morrison now or maybe I'm right on the money. Either way I've no clue as to what just happened, what was supposed to happen, and if I even enjoy his work anymore.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rubin Carpenter

    A strange and wonderful read This was one Tripping ride !!! clever & inventive story telling comic books the way they should be A strange and wonderful read This was one Tripping ride !!! clever & inventive story telling comic books the way they should be

  10. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    Again, this series is flawed, but full of so many good ideas that you hope DC is smart enough to capitalize on all these new toys Grant has given them. The whole meta-bit was all over the place, from interesting, to pretentious but seeing this gimmick used, not as a gag, but as an actual narrative structure kept me reading. The main story thread still never feels solid, still feels like something slapped on just so Grant can do all these one shots, but when it takes the spotlight all you can think Again, this series is flawed, but full of so many good ideas that you hope DC is smart enough to capitalize on all these new toys Grant has given them. The whole meta-bit was all over the place, from interesting, to pretentious but seeing this gimmick used, not as a gag, but as an actual narrative structure kept me reading. The main story thread still never feels solid, still feels like something slapped on just so Grant can do all these one shots, but when it takes the spotlight all you can think is Grant is ripping himself off. Or if you're me, you keep wondering when the yellow aliens from Animal man are going to show up? As a comic geek, the group shot of all of DC's Ultra characters was enough to get me to forgive some of the flaws. Not perfect, still feels like just a set of ideas, rather than a solid story, but it's Grant so it at least feels that it's worth the ride.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Daken Howlett

    Questo volume, contrariamente a quanto comunicato sulla copertina, deve essere letto assolutamente da ogni fan del medium fumetto, essendo, ad oggi, una delle espressioni del meta-fumetto più complesse e riuscite di sempre. Nonostante gli straordinari livelli di Hype generati dalla presenza di questo stesso fumetto all'interno di ogni altro numero della serie, Morrison riesce a non deludere ancora una volta.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Milena

    This was my first Multiversity book and it confused the hell out of me. Intentionally, I think. As the reader, you get directly addressed and take part in the story in a wonderfully unique way. It's confusing and weird and absolutely brilliant. My brain is basically twisting in itself trying to figure out what just happened but it's so worth it. Must-read!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tony

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. +19 Multiversity; +14 Injustice: Gods Among Us Year Four; +2 Robin War #2; GLC: Edge of Oblivion #1; +2 Superman: American Alien #2-3; GL #48; Red Hood / Arsenal #7; We Are Robin #7; Robin - Son of Batman #7; Teen Titans #15; Swamp Thing #1

  14. 4 out of 5

    Brent

    This is ok, but demands rereading together with the rest of the Multiversity books. I confess to more interest in DC's Multiversity than DC's Convergence series... but writer Morisson is always interesting. Doug Mahnke's art and Todd Klein's letters are great too. Recommended.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    Yes, as the author himself points out, this has been done before. But read this comic (twice, as a necessity) and it'll be clear how fun that meta-textual trickery can get.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Fugo Feedback

    Historieta con trampa. Trampa en la que caí, no entendí, reví, y sé que terminaré releyendo de corrido cuando me le anime a una lectura íntegra y ordenada de Multiversity.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Emilio José Miras Balaguer

    Sencillamente genial.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ron Chilcutt

    Morrison-y to the max. I believe Grant Morrison tries too hard to make his comics cerebral. He crosses that border into pretentiousness, sucking the joy out of the story.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Phil Bova

    Normally I'm a fan of Grant Morrison's work, but this particular issue just failed on every level for me. The artwork was noteworthy, but the story just didn't grab my attention.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Hector

    Ay Dios. ¿qué es esto?

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kaleb Goldbeck

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rob

  23. 4 out of 5

    Javar Graham

  24. 5 out of 5

    Edo Millacaris

  25. 5 out of 5

    Luigi

  26. 4 out of 5

    Adam Miller

  27. 5 out of 5

    Otávio Barboza

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mustafa Ergür

  29. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  30. 4 out of 5

    Paul Milligan

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