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Getting the Gospel Right: The Tie That Binds Evangelicals Together

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Now in paper, Getting the Gospel Right calls Christians to greater unity in the gospel. It contains the complete text of The Gospel of Jesus Christ, a statement accepted and signed by Methodist, Presbyterian, Pentecostal, cessationist, Baptist, Lutheran, Anglican, and free church leaders. Along with the statement, Sproul offers readers a thorough, point-by-point discussion Now in paper, Getting the Gospel Right calls Christians to greater unity in the gospel. It contains the complete text of The Gospel of Jesus Christ, a statement accepted and signed by Methodist, Presbyterian, Pentecostal, cessationist, Baptist, Lutheran, Anglican, and free church leaders. Along with the statement, Sproul offers readers a thorough, point-by-point discussion and exposition. "Some of us want to get the gospel right; some of us just want to get it out. With a generous combination of love and conviction, R. C. Sproul helps us all to do both better." -Michael Horton "If you want the gospel, in all its ramifications, made perfectly clear to you, you will find no better source of information than this book by one of America's outstanding Christian theologians." -D. James Kennedy


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Now in paper, Getting the Gospel Right calls Christians to greater unity in the gospel. It contains the complete text of The Gospel of Jesus Christ, a statement accepted and signed by Methodist, Presbyterian, Pentecostal, cessationist, Baptist, Lutheran, Anglican, and free church leaders. Along with the statement, Sproul offers readers a thorough, point-by-point discussion Now in paper, Getting the Gospel Right calls Christians to greater unity in the gospel. It contains the complete text of The Gospel of Jesus Christ, a statement accepted and signed by Methodist, Presbyterian, Pentecostal, cessationist, Baptist, Lutheran, Anglican, and free church leaders. Along with the statement, Sproul offers readers a thorough, point-by-point discussion and exposition. "Some of us want to get the gospel right; some of us just want to get it out. With a generous combination of love and conviction, R. C. Sproul helps us all to do both better." -Michael Horton "If you want the gospel, in all its ramifications, made perfectly clear to you, you will find no better source of information than this book by one of America's outstanding Christian theologians." -D. James Kennedy

30 review for Getting the Gospel Right: The Tie That Binds Evangelicals Together

  1. 5 out of 5

    Fran Soto

    I won this book as giveaway. When it comes to understanding the Evangelical religion this is the book you need to read. Getting the Gospel Right by R.C. Sproul will give the clarity all other religions need. IT will also give the best background information for Evangelicals to receiving the best understanding their DNA and uniqueness as an Evangelical in today's society. Every relationship needs clarity and this is the book to clarify Evangelicals and Evangelism. I received a copy for this revie I won this book as giveaway. When it comes to understanding the Evangelical religion this is the book you need to read. Getting the Gospel Right by R.C. Sproul will give the clarity all other religions need. IT will also give the best background information for Evangelicals to receiving the best understanding their DNA and uniqueness as an Evangelical in today's society. Every relationship needs clarity and this is the book to clarify Evangelicals and Evangelism. I received a copy for this review from Baker Books and all opinions are my own.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    Summary: A critical discussion of the Evangelicals and Catholics Together statement “The Gift of Salvation” (1997) centering on what it sees as an inadequate understanding of justification by faith alone, accompanied by a discussion of “The Gospel of Jesus Christ,” a statement by evangelicals in response. “…that they may all be one, just as you, Father, are in me, and I in you, that they also may be in us, so that the world may believe that you have sent me.” (John 17:21) Many Christians, surveyin Summary: A critical discussion of the Evangelicals and Catholics Together statement “The Gift of Salvation” (1997) centering on what it sees as an inadequate understanding of justification by faith alone, accompanied by a discussion of “The Gospel of Jesus Christ,” a statement by evangelicals in response. “…that they may all be one, just as you, Father, are in me, and I in you, that they also may be in us, so that the world may believe that you have sent me.” (John 17:21) Many Christians, surveying the landscape of a church riven through history by schism and division, believe this is a scandal that undermines witness to an unbelieving world. They find support for this idea in the prayer of Jesus for his followers, connecting their oneness to the world believing that the Father sent the Son. And this has moved some to come together with other believers from other parts of the church to see if they might articulate a common basis for a shared witness to the one Lord they believe in. In 1994, Richard John Neuhaus and Charles Colson convened a group of evangelical and Catholic leaders to see if this might be possible. Over the years this group has released a series of statements on various, often controverted, issues including justification, Scripture, the communion of the saints, Mary, the sanctity of life, religious freedom, and in 2015, a statement of marriage. The statements have explored both what might be affirmed in common, and what differences remain, while focusing on common witness to the risen Lord. Needless to say, such efforts have come in for harsh criticism from evangelicals and Catholics alike. R.C. Sproul’s book, recently released in “repackaged” form represents an example of the criticism these statements have faced, focused here around the second of the statements, released in 1997, “The Gift of Salvation,” that addresses the matter of justification and the Reformers’ commitment to sola fide (justification by grace alone through faith alone in Christ alone), a major fault line between the churches of the Reformation and the Roman Catholic church. On its face, Sproul contends that “The Gift of Salvation” appears to be a statement evangelicals could embrace and a breakthrough affirmation by Catholics. In particular the statement affirms: 1. Justification is received through faith, 2. Justification is not earned by good works or merits of our own, 3. Justification is entirely God’s gift, 4. In justification God declares us to be his friends on the basis of Christ’s righteousness alone, and 5. Faith is not mere intellectual assent but an act of the whole person, issuing in a changed life. (Summary quoted from “An Appeal to Evangelicals” but essentially the same as Sproul). Sproul finds that while, in the words of the statement “this agrees with sola fide,” it fails to affirm key ideas of what the Reformers meant by sola fide. In particular, these statements fail to deal with a crucial difference in how Christians are declared righteous friends of God. For Reformed believers, this has involved the believe in imputation–that our sins were imputed to Christ on the Christ and his righteousness imputed to us, apart from any work or merit on our part. The Catholic understands that while we are saved by grace through faith, this is assisted by God’s infusing of a person with a saving righteousness, with which it is important to cooperate in order to be justified. These and other differences are, in fact acknowledged in the statement as matters for further study and dialogue. For Sproul, the lack of agreement at this point undermines common witness, and in fact he contends that these are in fact different gospels. The first part of the book discusses “The Gift of Salvation” with a statement by statement critical review. Sproul concedes the evangelical bona fides of the evangelicals who signed the statement and the good will of the signers but believes that the infelicities (at very least) or worse, the “studied ambiguities” that conveyed an apparent unity through the use of imprecise language that could be understood differently by each party are dangerous because they reflect a dangerous departure from sola fide. The second part of the book begins with a statement drafted in response to “The Gift of Salvation” titled “The Gospel of Jesus Christ.” This statement summarizes a Reformed understanding and also includes a series of affirmations and denials to clearly delineate both what evangelicals do and do not believe. Sproul then expands upon each of these affirmations and denials. Signers of the statement include evangelical signers of “The Gift of Salvation” and evangelicals who disagreed with the statement–an effort to mend the rift within evangelicalism caused by the statement. The book concludes with appendices that contain the complete text of both statements, and lists of their signers. Sproul could have been a great lawyer! Lawyers scrutinize language for any ambiguities that could lead to disagreement between contracting parties. He realizes that fuzziness of ideas or “studied ambiguities” generally end badly through misunderstandings or doctrinal drift. Both Catholic and Evangelical commentators on this statement have noted this concern. Sproul’s concerns and careful work cannot be lightly dismissed in an age that is careless with words and increasingly inured to a culture of deceit. What troubled me was an attitude that seemed satisfied with affirming orthodox evangelical belief and differentiating it from Catholic belief, without any further effort to propose how the divide might be healed. Sproul certainly acknowledges there are genuine Catholic believers, but in contrast to Colson and Neuhaus, does not seem to have any sense of urgency for common witness amid the pressing challenges of our day, nor for efforts to root that witness in a shared theological understanding. Likewise, the book does not address more recent discussions around justification within the evangelical community resulting from New Perspective scholarship. What I find myself wrestling with, while appreciating Sproul’s theological precision, is what seems an unspoken assumption that the Reformed tradition reached a terminus with statements like the Heidelberg Catechism and Westminster Confession, and likewise Catholicism in the Council of Trent. While each of these reflected a developing understanding, albeit contrasting, of the testimony of our shared scriptures, is no advance in understanding possible in our day? Is there no possibility of development of doctrine (such as occurred as the church sought to articulate its understanding of the Trinity and Incarnation in earlier centuries)? Have we concluded that no further understanding is possible of the authoritative testimony of scripture that could lead to agreements that are not exercises in “studied ambiguity”? And is there no value in proximate shared understandings along the way, that honestly acknowledge differences while affirming ways, and bases by which we might stand together in a secularizing age? R. C. Sproul, and the signers of “The Gospel of Jesus Christ” may well have gotten that gospel “right.” I found nothing with which I took exception. Yet my reading left me with questions of how we might be one, not merely “invisibly” as Sproul discusses in the beginning of this book, but in visible ways that the world may see, and thus believe. ____________________________ Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    The name R.C. Sproul is a name that is synonymous with deep theological insights and accessible practicality. Sproul is arguably one of the greatest theologians of this modern day. It therefore goes without saying that any time one of his books is released or released they become an instant must-read. With this in mind Baker books has reissued one of Sproul's most notable works "Getting the Gospel Right: the tie that binds Evangelicals together". This book is the companion arguably Sproul’s great The name R.C. Sproul is a name that is synonymous with deep theological insights and accessible practicality. Sproul is arguably one of the greatest theologians of this modern day. It therefore goes without saying that any time one of his books is released or released they become an instant must-read. With this in mind Baker books has reissued one of Sproul's most notable works "Getting the Gospel Right: the tie that binds Evangelicals together". This book is the companion arguably Sproul’s greatest book "Faith Alone: Evangelical doctrine of justification". For a while faith alone deals with the Protestant doctrine of justification compared to that of the Catholic doctrine of justification, "Getting the gospel right" deals more with a in-depth study of the Protestant doctrine of justification it's self. Why you do not have to read faith alone to understand getting the gospel right they complement each other greatly. Yet I recommend reading getting the gospel right first before reading that of faith alone. I say this with a heavy heart for faith alone has greatly influenced my Christian walk. In the end getting the gospel right is written in simple plain language that anyone can understand yet is not watered down so that every page you were getting a nugget I feel inside along with application I can be directly applied. This book is again a must buy for all Protestant evangelicals who want to have a deeper grasp of the rich doctrine of justification which is the foundation of the Protestant faith. This book was provided to me free of charge from Baker Books in exchange for an unbiased, honest review. Getting the Gospel Right: The Tie that Binds Evangelicals Together © 2017 R.C. Sproul Publisher: Baker Books Page Count: 234 Pages ISBN: 978-0-80101188-7

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    RC Sproul does a fabulous job at explaining what the “Gospel” actually is in this book. A lot of professing “Christians” may be surprised when they compare what they believe and what their church teaches concerning this (if anything).

  5. 5 out of 5

    Stacy Moss

    What is the gospel? How can we evangelical Christians work together? RC Sproul tackles these and many more difficult questions.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Victor Chininin

    I really am thankful to God for this book for it doesn't stop at a critique of Roman Catholicism. It gives us a good analysis of a positive declaration of the gospel of Jesus Christ. I really am thankful to God for this book for it doesn't stop at a critique of Roman Catholicism. It gives us a good analysis of a positive declaration of the gospel of Jesus Christ.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    The 1990s saw emphasis on ecumenism and two documents were produced, hoping for greater unity between Roman Catholics and evangelicals. Evangelicals and Catholics Together came out in 1994 and The Gift of Salvation in 1997. The Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals expressed their distress over the latter document in 1998, considering it seriously flawed. Sproul gives careful scrutiny to The Gift of Salvation paragraph by paragraph in the second part of the book. Sproul points out the differences i The 1990s saw emphasis on ecumenism and two documents were produced, hoping for greater unity between Roman Catholics and evangelicals. Evangelicals and Catholics Together came out in 1994 and The Gift of Salvation in 1997. The Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals expressed their distress over the latter document in 1998, considering it seriously flawed. Sproul gives careful scrutiny to The Gift of Salvation paragraph by paragraph in the second part of the book. Sproul points out the differences in belief between Roman Catholics and evangelicals. For example, Roman Catholics and evangelicals agree that justification is based on the righteousness of Christ. Roman Catholics say the righteousness is infused sacramentally while evangelicals say it is imputed to us but is not inherently ours. The Gift of Salvation is vague on the issue, not affirming or denying the imputation. (67-68) He identifies other places where the document is ambiguous and points out “how deeply divided the historical Roman Catholic and evangelical views of salvation really are.” (91) After the publication of those documents, there rose the issue of unity among evangelicals – those signing the documents and those in opposition to them. Evangelicals on both sides came together and created a document about the gospel to restore and strengthen evangelical unity. It is called The Gospel of Jesus Christ: An Evangelical Celebration. Sproul provides the text of the document in the third part of the book and follows with comment. This book is a repackaged edition of Sproul's book that originally came out in 1999. I am not sure of the relevance of the book today, some twenty years after the document in question was issued. Sproul does comment on ecumenism in general and the documents that are produced. He notes that they must be ambiguous and use evasive language, minimizing differences. Sproul is a scholar of Reformed theology and writes like one. He has included much historical background and theological information in this book. Much of the book may be beyond the interest and comprehension of of most lay people. I recommend it to those interested in recent ecumenical documents and a critique from a Reformed theologian. I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher. My comments are an independent and honest review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mary Lou

    Review: Most people in the world from the major world religions of Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism and Judaism focus their faith in one of 5 common areas: 1. Doctrinal – a concern for doctrinal purity and a robust defense of the tenets of their faith system, 2. Bhakti, a predominance of worship and devotion in religious practice through music and dances, meditation on sacred text, prayer, fasting and other spiritual disciples, 3. Morality or law – an ethical emphasis on what is legal or “ Review: Most people in the world from the major world religions of Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism and Judaism focus their faith in one of 5 common areas: 1. Doctrinal – a concern for doctrinal purity and a robust defense of the tenets of their faith system, 2. Bhakti, a predominance of worship and devotion in religious practice through music and dances, meditation on sacred text, prayer, fasting and other spiritual disciples, 3. Morality or law – an ethical emphasis on what is legal or “proper” behavior as defined in a generic understanding of right and wrong, 4. Social action – a commitment to the well-being of the planet and the betterment of people’s lives and 5. Mysticism – a willingness to connect with the supernatural aspect of their faith in supra-rational ways. Within that broad framework are the many subcategories which unite or separate peoples. Depending on one’s orientation, there can be a pursuit of common interests and working relationships among diverse religious groups, or a separation and close-mindedness that can lead to inter-group animosity and distrust. R.C. Sproul writes from the doctrinal perspective. In the 1990’s three documents were generated to articulate the basis for unity between evangelicals and Roman Catholics and then within the evangelical community itself: Evangelicals and Catholics Together, The Gift of Salvation and The Gospel of Jesus Christ: An Evangelical Celebration. R.C. Sproul’s book Getting the Gospel Right is a detailed defense and explanation of the pros and cons of each of those three documents. It describes the nuances and evolution of various religious terms – like evangelical, faith, and salvation. Sproul writes articulately as a Biblical scholar committed to a historical evangelical perspective of Protestant reformation theology. For those who follow these religious on-going debates and discussions closely, his book clarifies the issues at hand. 4 stars. M.L. Codman-Wilson, Ph.D., 6/15/2017

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michael Harshman

    In 1994, a group of Evangelicals and Catholics came together to create a document entitled "Evangelicals and Catholics Together" (ECT) in an attempt to create more unity between the two separated groups.  This caused some sharp critiques and then in 1997, the created a secondary document entitled "The Gift of Salvation" (GOS) with the idea of addressing some of those criticisms, but still there were some that criticized the wording and how it affected an understanding of the Gospel.   R.C. Sprou In 1994, a group of Evangelicals and Catholics came together to create a document entitled "Evangelicals and Catholics Together" (ECT) in an attempt to create more unity between the two separated groups.  This caused some sharp critiques and then in 1997, the created a secondary document entitled "The Gift of Salvation" (GOS) with the idea of addressing some of those criticisms, but still there were some that criticized the wording and how it affected an understanding of the Gospel.   R.C. Sproul wrote "Getting the Gospel Right: The Tie That Binds Evangelicals Together" to address his concerns of these two documents due to a growing concern of the direction the unity within Evangelicals has taken due to many things including these two documents. Part One of this book is where the author introduces general concepts and history that led to these documents and starts to faithfully do an exposition on the ECT document by citing what is correct and what is incorrect. Continuing into Part Two of this book, Sproul does the same thing for the GOS and expounds on where agreement is correct between Evangelicals and Catholics within this document, but effectively points out the errant portions. Part Three details a subsequent rebuttal document entitled "The Gospel of Jesus Christ: An Evangelical Celebration".  This document addresses the concerns about how the Gospel is portrayed in the ECT and GOS.   It was drafted by many well-known and respected Evangelicals such as R.C. Sproul (the author of this book), J.I. Packer, D.A. Carson and many others.  It as then confirmed and endorsed by well over 100 very well-known Evangelicals. This book is a very interesting read and actually has a very important message about making sure that we get and understand the Gospel correctly, which is absolutely fundamental for us to understand right now... and for eternity. I received a copy of this book in exchange for this review from Baker Books and all opinions are my own.

  10. 5 out of 5

    David Steele

    There are many things in life that we “get wrong.” Some of the things we get wrong may cause temporary pain or inconvenience but usually do not pose a significant challenge to our daily lives. But getting the gospel right has eternal implications. R.C. Sproul addresses this matter in his book, Getting the Gospel Right. Originally published in 1999, Baker Books has repackaged this timely book for a new audience that probably never had the chance to read the original work. The book includes three p There are many things in life that we “get wrong.” Some of the things we get wrong may cause temporary pain or inconvenience but usually do not pose a significant challenge to our daily lives. But getting the gospel right has eternal implications. R.C. Sproul addresses this matter in his book, Getting the Gospel Right. Originally published in 1999, Baker Books has repackaged this timely book for a new audience that probably never had the chance to read the original work. The book includes three parts. Part One discusses the Controversy Concerning the Gospel. The debate reaches back to the sixteenth century when Luther boldly challenged the doctrinal underpinnings of the Roman Catholic church. Dr. Sproul helps readers determine the marks of a true church which is distinguished by the faithful proclamation of the gospel, the administration of the sacraments (or ordinances for Baptist readers), and church discipline. Since the Roman Catholic church has jettisoned the gospel by abandoning sola fide, which is essential to the biblical gospel, one would rightly consider Rome to be an apostate church. To assign such a label to the Roman Catholic church does not automatically mean that certain individuals have not experienced personal salvation; it merely demonstrates how Rome has abandoned the biblical gospel. The author adds, “When an essential truth of the gospel is condemned, the gospel itself is condemned with it, and without the gospel, an institution is not a Christian church.” The author presents the historical debate between evangelicals and Rome by clearly identifying the meaning of the term, evangelical. The term means “the gospel.” Sproul continues, “The Reformers used the term evangelical to define their movement as it related to the central theological issue of the day, the doctrine of justification by faith alone … the Reformers believed that sola fide is essential to the gospel, that without sola fide one does not have the gospel.” Sproul continues by explaining the rise of liberalism and the ECT (Evangelicals and Catholics Together) document that “heralded another subtle but significant shift in the contribution of sola fide to evangelical unity.” Part Two includes a critical analysis of The Gift of Salvation, the joint statement by Roman Catholics and evangelicals in October 1997. Sproul’s comments and critiques are straightforward and gracious. He affirms the points of agreement between Rome and evangelicals but he also identifies several doctrinal deficiencies. These deficiencies who prevent most evangelicals from endorsing such a document. Part Three includes a detailed exposition of The Gospel of Jesus Christ: An Evangelical Celebration, a document that was drafted by notable evangelicals including D.A. Carson, J.I. Packer, R.C. Sproul, and others. The document includes a series of affirmations and denials and is essentially an exposition of the document, which includes safeguards and doctrinal sideboards which help preserve the very essence and purity of the gospel. We may get things many things wrong in life. Such decisions may prove painful in the short run, but in the final analysis, such decisions have little effect upon our lives. Failing to get the gospel right, however, has eternal implications.Getting the Gospel Right reminds readers of the importance maintaining our allegiance to the truth of God’s Word. Trifling with the gospel is simply not an option for followers of Jesus Christ.

  11. 5 out of 5

    C.J. Moore

    Sproul has definitely done better, but this is still a good work on what makes evangelicals evangelical - that is, the gospel. He deals thoroughly with a controversy of the 90s, where many evangelicals sought to remedy situations with Catholics by creating a statement of faith that both could sign. Sproul critiques it and offers a better one, that good Catholics will likely never seen (one can only hope though, right?). Unsurprisingly, the argument is still primarily focused on the means of salv Sproul has definitely done better, but this is still a good work on what makes evangelicals evangelical - that is, the gospel. He deals thoroughly with a controversy of the 90s, where many evangelicals sought to remedy situations with Catholics by creating a statement of faith that both could sign. Sproul critiques it and offers a better one, that good Catholics will likely never seen (one can only hope though, right?). Unsurprisingly, the argument is still primarily focused on the means of salvation - faith alone in Christ alone. Catholics believe this to some degree. That is, if you take out the "alone" part, which is pretty significant seeing that it started a protest that created the many Protestant denominations that we see today. Overal, this is a good book. Read it in two days with no problems. Flows smoothly.

  12. 5 out of 5

    James Fields

    Have you ever wondered what the difference between a Catholic and an Evangelical Christian is? This is a fitting question as just last year, Evangelicals acknowledged Reformation Day - the 500th anniversary of when a monk named Martin Luther nailed his 95 Theses to the door of the Wittenburg Castle with every intent of starting a lively scholarly debate about the unbiblical issues and traditions of the Holy Roman Catholic Church. He posted them in Latin as was scholarly tradition, but his points Have you ever wondered what the difference between a Catholic and an Evangelical Christian is? This is a fitting question as just last year, Evangelicals acknowledged Reformation Day - the 500th anniversary of when a monk named Martin Luther nailed his 95 Theses to the door of the Wittenburg Castle with every intent of starting a lively scholarly debate about the unbiblical issues and traditions of the Holy Roman Catholic Church. He posted them in Latin as was scholarly tradition, but his points were so provocative that they quickly went viral - being translated into German and spread all around the country. Consider theses 82: "Such as: 'Why does not the pope empty purgatory for the sake of holy love and the dire need of the souls that are there if he redeems an infinite number of souls for the sake of miserable money with which to build a church?' The former reason would be most just; the latter is most trivial." ~ Martin Luther's 95 Theses Luther claims the pope is not loving, but only interested in money. How provocative is that?!? Each these was just as provocative in its own way. Many poke at the pope and his authority, thus pointing at issues with the authority of the Holy Roman Catholic Church. This simple act of nailing 95 discussion points to the public debate forum for scholars to debate ultimately resulted in the church splitting. Many of the same issues Luther posted about are the same ones that Evangelicals and Catholics disagree on today. In the 500 years since, the Catholic Church as recanted some (but not all) of the beliefs that they had way back then. The progress that's been made has caused some on both sides of the divide to come together and try to reconcile their differences. In 1994 some Catholics and Evangelicals gathered together and framed a document that has been labelled Evangelicals and Catholics Together (ECT). This document sprouted controversy in the Evangelical Church as many began to wonder if the Catholics had abandoned their view of justification by works and embraced the reformation view or if the Evangelicals had abandoned sola fide - the belief that justification for sins comes by faith in Jesus alone (not by any amount of good works a person does). As people on both sides of the divide began investigating this they found that neither side had capitulated, but they both mistakenly thought they had come to an agreement. In 1997 a group of Catholics and Evangelicals gathered together again to see if an agreement could be made regarding the most important theological issues (ie. salvation). What resulted is what is known as The Gift of Salvation. Since many of the people at this gathering were also in attendance at the signing of ECT, this document became colloquially known as ECT II. One must ask the same questions here that were asked after the signing of the original ECT, did either side change or abandon its views? It is with this document and this very question that Sproul addresses the majority of his book. He takes the lengthy document they produced and dissects it paragraph by paragraph pointing out the pros and cons of what they had to say. In the end he concludes that Catholics and Evangelicals are still divided on the belief of what is takes to save a person from hell. The document glosses over some vital issues calling them "needlessly divisive disputes" and saying that both sides needed to spend more time talking about them. He goes into great depth as he breaks down each point and the reader will find themselves full of rich knowledge about the Evangelical position on salvation. Overall Sproul does a great job dissecting the documents and presenting clear Biblical truth. One of the most striking things he said was: "Some churches require their pastors to take a sacred vow to work for the peace, purity, and unity of the church. But if the church becomes impure in its doctrine or its practice and the pastor earnestly seeks to purify the church, he is almost always accused of disturbing the church's peace and unity." ~ Page 23 This strikes a cord for me with how true it is. Consider Luther 500 years ago, nailing his theses to the door of the castle, the response from the Roman Church was to try and burn him alive. They would have none of his correction for their impure practices. Today is not much different. Sure we don't try to burn our pastors alive anymore, but in many churches today if a pastor calls sin sin, he risks his congregation going on a hunt for a new pastor while they do away with him. This instinct to attack or dismiss that which is different from what you believe is so present in our age (inside and outside the church) that you can find it readily all over facebook and every day conversations. We as Americans are unwilling to sit down and talk with those whose views differ from our own and try to understand. Instead we gather to the people who agree with us and in essence become an echo chamber to ourselves (2 Tim 4:3). When we are willing to humbly admit that we can be wrong and have healthy discussions with those that disagree with us, we are in the best place possible to learn from each other and grow into more perfect individuals. In this kind of open mindedness we are able to seek out and challenge one another to grow and strengthen our hearts and minds with solid, unbreakable truth. I pray we all would find the humility to be humble and admit that our knowledge is not perfect and likely never will be in this life. To see more reviews check out my blog: This Sporadic Life

  13. 5 out of 5

    David

    Christian controversy My understanding of the Epistle of James is that we're not to fellowship with anyone or any organization that believes & teaches a different gospel. However, It is necessary to know & understand the difference between the reformed doctrines & teachings & the many other doctrines & teachings. This is what this book is about. This book explains very clearly the reformed doctrines & teachings, so you can better evaluate when you hear the other gospel Paul & James warns us to r Christian controversy My understanding of the Epistle of James is that we're not to fellowship with anyone or any organization that believes & teaches a different gospel. However, It is necessary to know & understand the difference between the reformed doctrines & teachings & the many other doctrines & teachings. This is what this book is about. This book explains very clearly the reformed doctrines & teachings, so you can better evaluate when you hear the other gospel Paul & James warns us to reject & not to associate with them.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    I won a copy of this from Goodreads. That said, I feel like I came in on the middle of an argument, that being the fors and againsts of two documents written by Protestants and Catholics together. Somehow I missed the whole arguments as they were happening, so the book wasn't as interesting to me. On the other hand, it did cover the important basics of Christianity, which was interesting. I won a copy of this from Goodreads. That said, I feel like I came in on the middle of an argument, that being the fors and againsts of two documents written by Protestants and Catholics together. Somehow I missed the whole arguments as they were happening, so the book wasn't as interesting to me. On the other hand, it did cover the important basics of Christianity, which was interesting.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tim Franks

    It is a good look at the problems facing unity amongst Protestants and Catholics. This was an issue 20 years ago with the two documents discussed here, but continues to be an issue today. The sola fide argument of imputation is so key to salvation, which makes this an issue that will never be bring honest unity among the belief systems.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Meghan Smith

    This isn’t for a lay person unless they have a super strong interest in the history of theology. This was very dry, but the information was solid.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Doug Payne

    Excellent book explaining the two “evangelical and Catholics together” documents. The second half of the book is a primer on reformed soteriology. RC Sproul was a great Christian intellectual.

  18. 5 out of 5

    M.

    I enjoyed the perspective of this book. Makes you really think about the meaning of the gospel.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Joe Cox

    True to its description, Sproul is brilliant.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Clara Roberts

    "The Gospel of Jesus Christ is news, good news..." "This gospel declares the only way to know God... is through the reconciling death of Jesus Christ the risen Lord." "The Gospel of Jesus Christ is news, good news..." "This gospel declares the only way to know God... is through the reconciling death of Jesus Christ the risen Lord."

  21. 5 out of 5

    Harrison

    500 years out of touch, and wrong anyway.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Review coming soon...

  23. 4 out of 5

    Billy Schiel

  24. 5 out of 5

    Roby F

  25. 5 out of 5

    Frank Cave

  26. 5 out of 5

    Robert C Faircloth

  27. 4 out of 5

    Joe Greene

  28. 4 out of 5

    Chris Dunn

  29. 5 out of 5

    Will

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bobby Sumner

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