web site hit counter Inheritance of Tears: Trusting the Lord of Life When Death Visits the Womb - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Inheritance of Tears: Trusting the Lord of Life When Death Visits the Womb

Availability: Ready to download

Miscarriage: deeply traumatic, tragically common, too often misunderstood. When a woman becomes pregnant, miscarriage is usually the furthest thing from her mind. Such was the case for Jessalyn Hutto when she became pregnant with her first baby. But as is all too common in our post-fall world, the life she carried came to an abrupt end. Death had visited her womb, and the h Miscarriage: deeply traumatic, tragically common, too often misunderstood. When a woman becomes pregnant, miscarriage is usually the furthest thing from her mind. Such was the case for Jessalyn Hutto when she became pregnant with her first baby. But as is all too common in our post-fall world, the life she carried came to an abrupt end. Death had visited her womb, and the horrors of miscarriage had become a part of her life’s story. ••• Ultimately, she would lose two children in the womb, at 6 and 15 weeks gestation. Through these painful losses, a whole new world of suffering opened up to her. It seemed that everywhere she looked women were quietly mourning the loss of their unborn children. Yet this particular type of loss has been grossly overlooked by the church. ••• Couples navigating the unique sorrow of losing a child are often left with little biblical counsel to draw upon. Well-meaning friends and family often offer empty platitudes and Christian clichés. But what these couples truly need is the hope of the gospel. ••• Short, sensitive, and theologically robust, Inheritance of Tears offers hope and comfort to those who are called to walk through the painful trial of miscarriage, and shows pastors and church members how to effectively minister to these parents in their time of need. Endorsed by Russell and Maria Moore, Jen Wilkin, Courtney Reissig, Tom Schreiner, and more.


Compare

Miscarriage: deeply traumatic, tragically common, too often misunderstood. When a woman becomes pregnant, miscarriage is usually the furthest thing from her mind. Such was the case for Jessalyn Hutto when she became pregnant with her first baby. But as is all too common in our post-fall world, the life she carried came to an abrupt end. Death had visited her womb, and the h Miscarriage: deeply traumatic, tragically common, too often misunderstood. When a woman becomes pregnant, miscarriage is usually the furthest thing from her mind. Such was the case for Jessalyn Hutto when she became pregnant with her first baby. But as is all too common in our post-fall world, the life she carried came to an abrupt end. Death had visited her womb, and the horrors of miscarriage had become a part of her life’s story. ••• Ultimately, she would lose two children in the womb, at 6 and 15 weeks gestation. Through these painful losses, a whole new world of suffering opened up to her. It seemed that everywhere she looked women were quietly mourning the loss of their unborn children. Yet this particular type of loss has been grossly overlooked by the church. ••• Couples navigating the unique sorrow of losing a child are often left with little biblical counsel to draw upon. Well-meaning friends and family often offer empty platitudes and Christian clichés. But what these couples truly need is the hope of the gospel. ••• Short, sensitive, and theologically robust, Inheritance of Tears offers hope and comfort to those who are called to walk through the painful trial of miscarriage, and shows pastors and church members how to effectively minister to these parents in their time of need. Endorsed by Russell and Maria Moore, Jen Wilkin, Courtney Reissig, Tom Schreiner, and more.

30 review for Inheritance of Tears: Trusting the Lord of Life When Death Visits the Womb

  1. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Aside from the portion where Hutto argues that all babies who die in the womb are elect, this is an excellent book. Filled with scriptural references and sound teaching, Inheritance of Tears is sure to bring comfort and to point to our heavenly hope. Whether you have experienced a miscarriage or have a friend/family member who has, this small volume is definitely worth your time. Highly recommended.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    This was an excellent treatment of suffering and miscarriage. I thought her section on what happens to babies who die was particularly good. I wouldn't recommend this to women whose grief and pain is fresh, because while the ideas in this book are true, some of them are very difficult truths and might feel harsh to a hurting heart. I would recommend this to people who love women suffering through a miscarriage. This was an excellent treatment of suffering and miscarriage. I thought her section on what happens to babies who die was particularly good. I wouldn't recommend this to women whose grief and pain is fresh, because while the ideas in this book are true, some of them are very difficult truths and might feel harsh to a hurting heart. I would recommend this to people who love women suffering through a miscarriage.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Christine Hoover

    This is a great little resource for moms who are grieving a miscarriage and also friends and family of someone who is.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kacy Robinson

    Theologically heavy, less practical comfort than other books I’ve read. For those whose grief is less fresh and are asking big theological questions about miscarriage and suffering.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Drew

    Without a doubt this book is solid theologically but it was not quite what I was hoping for. Although portions where autobiographical and did address the deep pain of miscarriage, as a whole the book comes across more as academic than pastoral, which surprised me. I was hoping for a resource to be able to give to women as a means of helping to cope with pain, however this is not such a book. I think it would have to be years after a miscarriage before a parent would be able to read this and it b Without a doubt this book is solid theologically but it was not quite what I was hoping for. Although portions where autobiographical and did address the deep pain of miscarriage, as a whole the book comes across more as academic than pastoral, which surprised me. I was hoping for a resource to be able to give to women as a means of helping to cope with pain, however this is not such a book. I think it would have to be years after a miscarriage before a parent would be able to read this and it be helpful rather than hardening. I couldn’t help but compare to Keller’s book “Walking with God through Pain and Suffering” which I read a few years back. There is much overlap between these two books on how suffering relates to the Gospel. I think what makes Keller’s writing unique is that he writes with a pastoral empathy that doesn’t quite come across here. For instance, Keller writes a whole portion on lament, and taking time to process pain. This feels much more “jump to the answers we need to believe.” Yes, ultimately sufferers need to believe the Gospel truths found here, but I don’t feel it teaches how to cope with the overwhelming pain of miscarriage for the everyday person.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Loyd

    Can't recommend enough for mothers after miscarriage Read this book if you need God's truth and His sweet blessed promises to comfort you in the midst of mourning a miscarriage. I had my first miscarriage at 12 weeks. We had already announced the pregnancy. We were staying with my brother's family for Christmas when I started spotting. After I told my husband in a near panic I immediately called my sister in law who had trained as a midwife. She said there was nothing I could do but pray and wait. Can't recommend enough for mothers after miscarriage Read this book if you need God's truth and His sweet blessed promises to comfort you in the midst of mourning a miscarriage. I had my first miscarriage at 12 weeks. We had already announced the pregnancy. We were staying with my brother's family for Christmas when I started spotting. After I told my husband in a near panic I immediately called my sister in law who had trained as a midwife. She said there was nothing I could do but pray and wait. That it might be nothing, many women spot during pregnancy and have normal pregnancies and perfectly healthy babies. I next called my midwife and she asked if there was cramping, I said no and she said we would do an ultrasound after I got back from our visit. I didn't want to ruin anyone's fun over the holiday so I didn't tell anyone else. But I sure prayed. I prayed like I never had before. I wanted to cling to the hope that my baby was still alive. No heartbeat. That's what the ultrasound told us. I stared at the tiny body of my baby on the screen. It looked perfect, like my four precious babies before, who were now thriving children. It was too small to tell if it was a boy or girl. It was only measuring 8-9 weeks so probably had died weeks earlier without fanfare, without me knowing I would never get to hold my baby on this earth. The grief didn't hit me til I was home in bed. The horror of knowing my baby was dead. Still inside my tummy. Not knowing when the more awful day would come when, without any conscious decision my body would take over and expel the little dead body into full view. A few days later I delivered. The little body was delivered within a blood clot inside its tiny placenta. I didn't even get to see my baby, one more time. We named him (as I came to think of my baby) Layne Jordan and buried him in a small decorated wooden box under a beautiful tree out in the pasture. My grief really swallowed my soul. I didn't want to get out of bed, eat, and sleep came all too little. My husband had literally not said a single word (even after I begged him to) at the graveside, hadn't shed a single tear, had said no comforting words to me since we heard the bad news. I didn't know if he feared saying the wrong thing too much to talk but to me he seemed heartless and didn't care about our loss or that my soul was broken and bleeding. My sister in law told me that it wasn't good to grieve so much and that Jesus said, "Let the dead bury the dead." Meaning, move on with your life and let your dead baby go. Well, I couldn't. My friends and family were little help, the nicest ones just said "sorry for your loss" or "trust God. " There were the comments that, at least you have four healthy children already. Or, at least you can have more. Some also said that it was a mercy God took my baby, it might have had a deformity, disability, or disease. Or it could have grown up to be a wicked person. My younger sister, with whom I already had a strained relationship, told me plainly that she thought my miscarriage was caused by my diet, through eating "too much chocolate." Apparantly any at all was "too much." All these words didn't comfort me, some added to my pain. I wanted to know where my baby was and why God had allowed my baby to die. I was very new to Reformed Christian theology, coming out of charismatic Word of Faith teachings only a year or so earlier. I didn't feel I knew my pastor well enough to call him with something so personal, so I turned to more impersonal Reformed Christian Groups on FB. It shocked and angered me how some self confessed Christians were so cruel, so unloving just to try to win a point in a theological argument. I told them up front I had just had a miscarriage and was trying to work through some things Biblically. Some told me I can't know where my baby is, I should just trust God. Others would tell me, a grieving mother, that unborn babies were not saved, couldn't be saved because they couldn't have heard and understood the gospel. I stopped talking on these groups and just tried to get through the pain on my own. Slowly, slowly the pain faded. I did get pregnant again in a few months. A normal pregnancy. A happy healthy girl. Since then I've had two more miscarriages. Both times I lost one of a pair of twins. I finally happened upon this book. With great Biblical insight and integrity it laid out in detail with clarity and thoughtfulness what the Spirit had led me to believe God said about the reasons and purposes for suffering, the salvation of the unborn, etc. Now I've given this book away to other grieving moms and it has helped them. Now I can say with confidence: "Blessed be your name, on the road marked with suffering, though there's pain in the offering, blessed be your name. You give and take away, you give and take away, but I will choose to say, Lord, blessed be your name"

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Vique

    A short book that serves as an excellent resource for anyone who has experienced the loss of life in the womb. I highly recommend it for anyone who is walking or walking alongside someone suffering through the pain of miscarriage.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Hope Wiseman

    First read in 2015. Read again in 2018. A tremendous & approachable book for anyone touched by miscarriage or stillbirth. Compassionate & filled with truth. Highly recommend for those grieving a loss & those caring for those who are walking through loss.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nicole L Reid

    Helpful and Hopeful It’s well written and provides a needed message that restored me. The idea of upward focus and taking refuge in Christ is healing.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Emily M

    Read in 2017

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Baker

    Fantastic book! I cried my way through every chapter because there is real hope in Jesus. I would highly recommend this to anyone who has lost a child through miscarriage.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Taryn

    Gospel truth for the hurting heart! An encouragement to exalt the Lord of Life in trust while continuing to grapple with the realities of present death.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Van Vlear

    This was excellent. It had a good theological foundation and was helpful for me in thinking things through after I had a stillbirth.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    Such a grace-filled little book that will point you to Christ and help shape a biblical theology of suffering.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    A solid little book, written for moms who have experienced miscarriage and stillbirth, that offers gospel-centered hope and encouragement in the midst of grief.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michael Boling

    Why do bad things happen? Perhaps the sting of pain is most distinctly felt in the loss of a child, particularly the loss of a child through miscarriage. The cessation of that unborn life before there was the chance to break forth from the womb and for the parents to enjoy raising up their child assuredly is a heart-wrenching and devastating event. Is there good to be found in such tragedy? Is God still in control in the midst of such sorrow and grief? Jessalyn Hutto, in her powerful new book In Why do bad things happen? Perhaps the sting of pain is most distinctly felt in the loss of a child, particularly the loss of a child through miscarriage. The cessation of that unborn life before there was the chance to break forth from the womb and for the parents to enjoy raising up their child assuredly is a heart-wrenching and devastating event. Is there good to be found in such tragedy? Is God still in control in the midst of such sorrow and grief? Jessalyn Hutto, in her powerful new book Inheritance of Tears: Trusting the Lord of Life When Death Visits the Womb, shares her experience with miscarriages and how she came to realize that in the midst of life’s storms, God is always there and remains sovereign. The pain of miscarriage is quite evident and Jessalyn shares quite vividly the pain she experienced. I can only imagine what it must be like to have lost a child in such an early stage of pregnancy and what it must be like to come back to a church setting where it seems every other woman in the building is experiencing the joy of their baby boy or girl. This topic is something I have heard little spoken about in church, perhaps because as Jessalyn notes, most people do not know how to respond to someone who has gone through the pain of miscarriage. Perhaps this is because most do not have a good grasp on the sovereignty of God. It is that very topic and how Jessalyn unpacks that important theological subject against the background of her own experiences that makes this book so powerful and important. Even if dealing with a miscarriage is not something you have experienced or are currently experiencing, the fact of the matter is at some point in life, you will face tragedy. Whether that is the loss of a loved one either expectedly or unexpectedly, the loss of your job, financial woes, health issues, or any number of problems, in this life we will have trouble. Scripture makes it quite clear that in a world dealing with the problem of sin, we will all come face to face with tragedy and sorrow. How we handle such situations is key. Jessalyn aptly notes “Our holy God not only knows each and every event that will occur in our lives before it happens, he actually plans our lives down to the smallest detail – again, for our good and his glory.” Many will balk at such a statement, claiming that makes us robots or declaring that means God causes evil. Jessalyn recognizes the difficulty for a finite creation (humanity) to understand the ways of an infinitely holy, just, and righteous God who is our creator and sustainer. In response to those who take issue with her previous statement, she saliently comments, “What we must struggle to understand, of course, is how his goodness can also be expressed through the suffering he allows to enter our lives…we must assume that even something as horrible as miscarriage can be considered good as it passes through the Lord’s sovereign hand for his good purposes.” Jessalyn also reminds the reader that we serve a Savior who is acquainted with grief. He came to earth and died on the cross for us. He experienced rejection. He shed tears of blood. Through that sacrifice, he has provided a solution to this sin and death problem. It is that glorious future that Jessalyn concludes her book with, reminding the reader that the “suffering we face presently will be overshadowed by the glorious inheritance yet to come. This is a battle we fight through faith. And as we fight, experiencing glimmers of our eternal reality along the way, our souls will be happy in Jesus.” This is a book I highly recommend for anyone dealing with pain and sorrow in their life or who has questions about God’s sovereignty. Jessalyn Hutto does an excellent job of orienting the conversation to what God tells in His Word about His sovereignty and His plans for us. She shares these truths from the perspective of one who has gone through the midst of trial and who has been able to see God’s sovereignty work in her own life, even in the midst of the sorrow of miscarriage. I received this book for free from Cruciform Press for this review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  17. 4 out of 5

    Hichelle Håkedal

    This is book written for the perspective of experience and packaged of full of heart-soothing biblical truth.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Travis

    Jessalyn Hutto. Inheritance of Tears: Trusting the Lord of Life When Death Visits the Womb. Adelphi, MD: Cruciform Press, 2015. 108 pp. $9.99. The loss of a child through miscarriage is a tragic and deeply emotional event in the lives of parents. Those who have experienced such sorrow often struggle to know how to think it through biblically. Those who have not been visited with such heartbreak often struggle to know what to say or how to help someone who has. It is a blessing to the church tha Jessalyn Hutto. Inheritance of Tears: Trusting the Lord of Life When Death Visits the Womb. Adelphi, MD: Cruciform Press, 2015. 108 pp. $9.99. The loss of a child through miscarriage is a tragic and deeply emotional event in the lives of parents. Those who have experienced such sorrow often struggle to know how to think it through biblically. Those who have not been visited with such heartbreak often struggle to know what to say or how to help someone who has. It is a blessing to the church that Jessalyn Hutto chose to pen Inheritance of Tears. This short, clear, and helpful book offers God-honoring and timeless counsel for those who are walking through the valley of the shadow of the loss of an unborn child. Hutto is a woman who has experienced miscarriage in her life and who has a beautiful grasp of the character, sovereignty, and glory of God. She has found a great way to counsel others from the word of God with a heart of genuine understanding and compassion. This book has multiple strengths. Hutto writes with a wonderfully biblical worldview. While she does not pretend to understand all of the reasons why God might have allowed sorrow to enter the life of a family, she continually focuses her readers on the things we do know: God is good, God is glorious, and God has not left us or failed us. She demonstrates from biblical and personal examples how believers have had to walk through great hardships in the past, and how God has never forsaken his own. One great strength of the book is its final chapter. Hutton writes a very simple, biblical, and clear defense of the understanding that the unborn who are lost to miscarriage are souls who are rescued by Christ and whom we will meet at the resurrection. Her argument is not one that I had not heard before. However, her presentation is wonderfully simple, sweet, and to the point. I would recommend this book without reservation to any believers who are struggling with the issue of the loss of a child, especially through miscarriage. I would also recommend this book to pastors, church elders, and teachers who know of others who have walked down this difficult path. We can all learn from Jessalyn Hutto to better help others who are facing tragic circumstances, whether we have ever faced them ourselves or not.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    The Bible says, "...man is born to trouble as the sparks fly upward" (Job 5:7). There isn't a person living who hasn't experienced trouble. For many couples, miscarriage is one such trouble. In the midst of suffering, we are faced with hard questions: Who is in control in the midst of trials and suffering? Is God good? Can I really trust Him? Why do babies die? Is it because of something that we do? Does anyone understand my suffering? What purpose, if any, does my pain serve? What happens to ba The Bible says, "...man is born to trouble as the sparks fly upward" (Job 5:7). There isn't a person living who hasn't experienced trouble. For many couples, miscarriage is one such trouble. In the midst of suffering, we are faced with hard questions: Who is in control in the midst of trials and suffering? Is God good? Can I really trust Him? Why do babies die? Is it because of something that we do? Does anyone understand my suffering? What purpose, if any, does my pain serve? What happens to babies that die? Jessalyn Hutto knows the pain of miscarriage. In her book, Inheritance of Tears, she answers these questions, as well as, others and seeks to comfort couples with the comfort with which she has been comforted by God (2 Corinthians 1:4). She points others to the rock-solid truth of God's character as revealed in His Word and to the hope that we can have in Jesus Christ. While miscarriage is the specific context to which Jessalyn speaks, her words can easily be more generally applied to suffering and trials. Unlike Jessalyn, I have not experienced miscarriage first hand. However, when my friends and family have faced miscarriage, my attempts to comfort them have seemed woefully inadequate. I came to this book desperately wanting to learn how to be a better friend and care more effectively. God used this book to remind me that the most helpful comforter is the one who points the sufferer back to God. He wants His children to draw comfort from Him. As Jessalyn writes: "Indeed, even the feelings of isolation can be a great blessing, for isolation from all worldly comforts forces us to draw comfort from the Lord himself" (pg. 55) and "Trials sanctify us and draw us into closer fellowship with God, which inevitably leads to genuine, eternal happiness" (pg. 72). Inheritance of Tears is a Biblically faithful primer on suffering. Jessalyn writes honestly about the questions that miscarriage raises. I pray that God will use this book to comfort many couples in the face of loss and to equip many more to be Gospel-centered comforters. *Many thanks to Jessalyn Hutto and Cruciform Press for providing me with a complimentary copy of Inheritance of Tears in exchange for my honest opinion!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    “Inheritance of Tears: Trusting the Lord of Life When Death Visits the Womb” This is a well written, theologically sound, book written by a Christian woman who has endured two miscarriages. She speaks from experience but offers information & answers squarely founded on the truths found in the word of God. The author, Jessalyn Hutto writes a book not filled with quick, pat answers, but one that bravely addresses the many questions that surface when a parent experiences the loss of a child. I apprec “Inheritance of Tears: Trusting the Lord of Life When Death Visits the Womb” This is a well written, theologically sound, book written by a Christian woman who has endured two miscarriages. She speaks from experience but offers information & answers squarely founded on the truths found in the word of God. The author, Jessalyn Hutto writes a book not filled with quick, pat answers, but one that bravely addresses the many questions that surface when a parent experiences the loss of a child. I appreciated that the author did not shy away from difficult questions that put a knot in one’s stomach– Is God really in control of all things? Is God really good? Why me–why our child? What happens to babies who die? How can God use this in my life? I really liked the section where she discusses “five ways that our loving God may use your miscarriage for your spiritual good.” That section is simply fabulous, practical, & profitable. Here is a great quote from the book; “The key is not to escape the grief that miscarriage brings, but to drive our souls into the shelter of Jesus’ gospel during that sorrow…”

  21. 4 out of 5

    Victor Chininin

    I wish I had this resource available to us when we lost our son. We read John MacArthur's Safe In The Arms of God, and it was helpful. However, this book Inheritance of Tears has a number of strengths over the other book that I found are uniquely helpful: short format (very helpful in times when reading a paragraph may be even too much emotionally), saturated with the gospel, addressed key concerns (why, salvation, God must have known something would be wrong with the baby kind of responses), po I wish I had this resource available to us when we lost our son. We read John MacArthur's Safe In The Arms of God, and it was helpful. However, this book Inheritance of Tears has a number of strengths over the other book that I found are uniquely helpful: short format (very helpful in times when reading a paragraph may be even too much emotionally), saturated with the gospel, addressed key concerns (why, salvation, God must have known something would be wrong with the baby kind of responses), pointed our eyes forward, took us back to suffering saints from history, and very sensitive in preaching the gospel with a holistic care for the suffering person (the prayers at the end of each chapter were very good). Thank God for this wonderful resource.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay Welsh

    Truth-saturated, sincere & helpful. Easy read. I like how Jen Wilkin reviewed it and can say the same: "Equally important for those who have suffered miscarriage and those who have not... deeply personal and brave." Favorite quotes "Tears May and must come; but if they gather in eyes that are constantly looking up to God and heaven, they will glisten with the brightness of the coming glory." -Susannah Spurgeon "No sorrow we encounter in this life can be so great as to shake the surety of our future Truth-saturated, sincere & helpful. Easy read. I like how Jen Wilkin reviewed it and can say the same: "Equally important for those who have suffered miscarriage and those who have not... deeply personal and brave." Favorite quotes "Tears May and must come; but if they gather in eyes that are constantly looking up to God and heaven, they will glisten with the brightness of the coming glory." -Susannah Spurgeon "No sorrow we encounter in this life can be so great as to shake the surety of our future joy, for it is held firm in the grip of our triumphant, risen King." "God's blood-bought children can rest assured that he has not, nor will he ever, allow a single thing to come into your lives that hasn't first been sifted through his loving hands." (Rom 8:28-29)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Calvin Sun

    Having gone through miscarriages as a couple this past year, we realize how personal and often unspoken the pain of miscarriages is within our faith community. Not to mention wisdom in such time is hard to find in such a state. Holding on in faith and knowing that Jesus is the only one that can wipe the tears away because He had overcome death once and for all, gives hope that goes beyond wishful thinking, it is a reality. This tiny book was written for women going through this trauma, but it is Having gone through miscarriages as a couple this past year, we realize how personal and often unspoken the pain of miscarriages is within our faith community. Not to mention wisdom in such time is hard to find in such a state. Holding on in faith and knowing that Jesus is the only one that can wipe the tears away because He had overcome death once and for all, gives hope that goes beyond wishful thinking, it is a reality. This tiny book was written for women going through this trauma, but it is also meant to be read as a couple as you mourn and walk through this season of life together. Would highly recommend it for families going through such a time.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Josiah

    What this book really is is a Christian view of dealing with suffering in general applied to the specific tragedy of miscarriage. As a result, it contains a lot of truths that are applicable to a plethora of contexts, as well as having really sharp and compassionate insights to those dealing with the pain of miscarriage. The theological foundation for a Christian view of suffering is great, and the book contains raw truths about the reality of miscarriage. Great book for those who have gone thro What this book really is is a Christian view of dealing with suffering in general applied to the specific tragedy of miscarriage. As a result, it contains a lot of truths that are applicable to a plethora of contexts, as well as having really sharp and compassionate insights to those dealing with the pain of miscarriage. The theological foundation for a Christian view of suffering is great, and the book contains raw truths about the reality of miscarriage. Great book for those who have gone through this tragic time, or for those who are walking beside those who have. Rating: 4-4.5 Stars (Very Good).

  25. 5 out of 5

    MJ Hancock

    She does not just share a personal story. She applies the bright truths of the gospel into the darkness of losing a child. I thank God for the precious truths in this book that are life and peace for those of us who are called to walk through the dark valley of losing a child.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Re-read 2020

  27. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Decker

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hilary

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dixie-anna

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...