web site hit counter George Washington's Journey: The President Forges a New Nation - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

George Washington's Journey: The President Forges a New Nation

Availability: Ready to download

“An absorbing portrait...Breen’s superb chronicle offers glimpses into Washington’s love of his country and its people, and his willingness to meet them on their own terms to secure the unity of the new republic.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review) This is George Washington in the surprising role of political strategist. T.H. Breen introduces us to a George Washington we r “An absorbing portrait...Breen’s superb chronicle offers glimpses into Washington’s love of his country and its people, and his willingness to meet them on their own terms to secure the unity of the new republic.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review) This is George Washington in the surprising role of political strategist. T.H. Breen introduces us to a George Washington we rarely meet. During his first term as president, he decided that the only way to fulfill the Revolution was to take the new federal government directly to the people. He organized an extraordinary journey carrying him to all thirteen states. It transformed American political culture. For Washington, the stakes were high. If the nation fragmented, as it had almost done after the war, it could never become the strong, independent nation for which he had fought. In scores of communities, he communicated a powerful and enduring message—that America was now a nation, not a loose collection of states. And the people responded to his invitation in ways that he could never have predicted.


Compare

“An absorbing portrait...Breen’s superb chronicle offers glimpses into Washington’s love of his country and its people, and his willingness to meet them on their own terms to secure the unity of the new republic.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review) This is George Washington in the surprising role of political strategist. T.H. Breen introduces us to a George Washington we r “An absorbing portrait...Breen’s superb chronicle offers glimpses into Washington’s love of his country and its people, and his willingness to meet them on their own terms to secure the unity of the new republic.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review) This is George Washington in the surprising role of political strategist. T.H. Breen introduces us to a George Washington we rarely meet. During his first term as president, he decided that the only way to fulfill the Revolution was to take the new federal government directly to the people. He organized an extraordinary journey carrying him to all thirteen states. It transformed American political culture. For Washington, the stakes were high. If the nation fragmented, as it had almost done after the war, it could never become the strong, independent nation for which he had fought. In scores of communities, he communicated a powerful and enduring message—that America was now a nation, not a loose collection of states. And the people responded to his invitation in ways that he could never have predicted.

30 review for George Washington's Journey: The President Forges a New Nation

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ionia

    "George Washington's Journey" is not your typical, boring historical account of the life of a president. Instead, it follows closely in the footsteps of a man who had many difficult decisions to make and set out on a course to learn everything he could about the new nation he took command of. I love history, and that is no secret. I'd rather read non-fiction most of the time and tend to get particularly excited over early American history, so when I saw this book I had high expectations for it. "George Washington's Journey" is not your typical, boring historical account of the life of a president. Instead, it follows closely in the footsteps of a man who had many difficult decisions to make and set out on a course to learn everything he could about the new nation he took command of. I love history, and that is no secret. I'd rather read non-fiction most of the time and tend to get particularly excited over early American history, so when I saw this book I had high expectations for it. Truly, it not only met those expectations, but far exceeded them. Everything about this book was exciting for a history lover. Not only did it incorporate careful research and obvious effort from the author for accuracy, but it was written in a conversational tone that made it seem less intimidating for me as a reader. I liked the way the author made an attempt to follow the same roads that the former president had, offering unique insights into the changes that have occurred in these places since Washington's original journeys. If you are interested in the life and times of George Washington, or simply this period of history, this would be an excellent book to add to your collection. Recommended. This review is based on a complimentary copy from the publisher and was provided through Netgalley. All opinions are my own.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Carney-Coston

    I thought the information presented was fascinating. I was sometimes confused by the writing style, however. It was a bit didactic and sometimes repetitive, but I still enjoyed learning about this aspect of George Washington and his vision and hard work to make the role of President and the federal government strong. The book made me appreciate, once again, the enormity of what Washington did--his sacrifices to lead the country inspire awe and make me appreciate how rare that kind of selfless le I thought the information presented was fascinating. I was sometimes confused by the writing style, however. It was a bit didactic and sometimes repetitive, but I still enjoyed learning about this aspect of George Washington and his vision and hard work to make the role of President and the federal government strong. The book made me appreciate, once again, the enormity of what Washington did--his sacrifices to lead the country inspire awe and make me appreciate how rare that kind of selfless leadership is, especially today.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

    Interesting stories of the first years of the Presidency, when the public did not know what to call him, and his various trips throughout the new nation.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Peter Banks

    Excellent book -- gives a good flavor of life in post-Revolutionary America and emphasizes the key role of Washington in the development of the USA.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Knitress

    Super interesting, gave me a different perspective on a period I thought I knew well.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Martin Lowery

    Supplemental reading on Washington, covering his two tours to visit all the original 13 colonies. Most of the book is a retelling of what led up to the journeys Washington took, along with bringing up common themes the first President found along the way. Only a small portion of the book is actually devoted to the journeys themselves, found within the last two chapters.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Carter

    This is a very well-written account of Washington's first years in Office. T.H. Breen does a very good job of outlining the problems encountered on his travels throughout the young United States. From the sectional differences, to the feelings of small town vs. big cities. This is a very well-written account of Washington's first years in Office. T.H. Breen does a very good job of outlining the problems encountered on his travels throughout the young United States. From the sectional differences, to the feelings of small town vs. big cities.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    Interesting analysis of Washington's efforts to shape the presidency. Interesting analysis of Washington's efforts to shape the presidency.

  9. 4 out of 5

    James Bechtel

    4.5 stars.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    An interesting story and well written, but the book doesn't end up saying a whole lot. An interesting story and well written, but the book doesn't end up saying a whole lot.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Moynihan

    Great book providing in-depth coverage of Washington’s journey around the country. Highlights some of the key differences between and the politics within each state. Very informative.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Austin

    Not a bad story - I learned a few things of Washington that were interesting.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

    I'll admit it - I am a fiction reader. I like characters and dialogue and settings and costumes... Therefore I found this a bit of a slog. It wasn't my choice; I read it for a book club. I'll admit it - I am a fiction reader. I like characters and dialogue and settings and costumes... Therefore I found this a bit of a slog. It wasn't my choice; I read it for a book club.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    When I was young, I saw the movie 1776. It appealed to my love of history and my love of musicals and I was taken by the main character, John Adams. A few years later, my dad bought a new book by author David McCullough about our second President and I was once again fascinated by this man who was so instrumental to the American Revolution but is so often overshadowed by his compatriots. So, let's just say I have a soft spot for Adams. T.H. Breen does not have a soft spot for Adams and makes it When I was young, I saw the movie 1776. It appealed to my love of history and my love of musicals and I was taken by the main character, John Adams. A few years later, my dad bought a new book by author David McCullough about our second President and I was once again fascinated by this man who was so instrumental to the American Revolution but is so often overshadowed by his compatriots. So, let's just say I have a soft spot for Adams. T.H. Breen does not have a soft spot for Adams and makes it very clear exactly what he thinks of him every time he mentions him. Honestly, I wouldn't even say that he is wrong in his character assessment (Adams is a brash and often unlikeable character, it is one of the reasons he is so often overlooked), but from page 16, John Adams was under attack in this book. That was strike one for me. Strike two, was the pedantic tone. Nonfiction books for me walk a narrow line. Obviously, they shouldn't be making up conversations and situations but I also don't like to feel like I am reading a textbook. For me, this book felt exactly like my history texts did in high school. Complete with "as we will discover later in this chapter..." and "we will examine in greater detail in another chapter..." On page 112 I started counting all the times phrases like this were used and there were five more times in the last 144 pages. The author is a college professor and I predicted that before reading his mini biography on the back flap, because this book felt exactly like a college lecture. Strike three was my general confusion about what the book was about. I thought this book was going to be about Washington's trips to visit all thirteen states, something I knew very little about. Instead, it was more a summary of the political climate during this time. I understood why a summary of the reasons Washington decided to go on a progress was included, but when it comes right down to it, we get to the visit of the southern states in the very last chapter. And, then, most of that chapter ends up being about Washington's cook Hercules and a problem involving him and Washington's other slaves at home and then John Adams and Jefferson's disagreement over the French Revolution. Not that we didn't learn anything about the trips, we learn that he was feted in every town he came to and that there was consistently a parade, a speech in his honor and then a dinner with toasts every night. Something I am sure became monotonous for him, probably as monotonous as it would have been reading about it, so the book wanders off onto other subjects regularly. Thus we learn about everything else going on in the time period that could be even remotely related to Washington's journey. I think this book definitely has an audience, I just don't think I am it. If you love nonfiction and read it regularly (I like certain authors and was looking to branch out) or if you are obsessed with Washington history, then you should try it. If you are more of a casual reader of nonfiction, then maybe choose something different. I received this book for free from a Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Chris Jaffe

    This is a good book, but not a great book. It was a bit of a disappointment, really. The book’s focus is on a series of trips Pres. George Washington took during to his administration that took him to each state in the union. The purpose of the trips was to increase the sense of nationality and union among the people. The new nation was still fragile, and Washington wanted people to think of their nation above their individual states – which isn’t how most of them saw things. Breen notes that Wa This is a good book, but not a great book. It was a bit of a disappointment, really. The book’s focus is on a series of trips Pres. George Washington took during to his administration that took him to each state in the union. The purpose of the trips was to increase the sense of nationality and union among the people. The new nation was still fragile, and Washington wanted people to think of their nation above their individual states – which isn’t how most of them saw things. Breen notes that Washington was a practical mind more than a great philosopher. He was better at building national loyalty through actions – like these trips – than through any grand statements. (However, grand lofty statements are often better remembered, so something like these journeys are often overlooked). Washington recognized that political legitimacy was a process of negotiation, and he did this as part of his negotiation with the people. Some in his administration opposed it. He’d earlier tried a series of informal talks with average citizens, but these had backfired as Washington was terrible at being informal. Vice President John Adams refused to go on the trip to New England. This was a major political failure on the part of that prickly personality. One problem with the book is that it’s 160 pages of talks about why Washington wanted to go on his journeys followed by 90 pages of the journeys. It feels like a prologue that takes up two-thirds of the material. The best part is the chapter discussing the trips to New England. Most notably, Massachusetts’s Gov. John Hancock tried to pull rank on Pres. Washington – hoping to get his position be seen as superior to Washington inside his state. This failed badly. (Hancock always had too much on an ego for his own good and this was part of that). Also of note was also Washington’s interest in manufacturing during this trip. Finally, he visited Rhode Island, long the holdout from recognizing the Constitution. The weakest part is the final chapter on Washington’s southern trips. Breen builds it up as a trip that disappointed Washington, revealing the dangers the Union face. Yeah, well, nothing in the trip did that. Oh, there were problems – but they were entirely unrelated to the trip. Washington had a slave in Philadelphia (formerly the nation’s capital) run off, bringing embarrassment over the dangerous issue of slavery. Also, a partisan battle heated up between Thomas Jefferson and John Adams over the French Revolution. True, that happened – and true it happened while Washington toured the South. But it’s happened had nothing to do with the tour. Breen’s build up made it sound like something in the tour itself caused signs of concern. No, it didn’t.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    "George Washington's Journey" described President Washington's efforts to unite the 13 states into a nation by personally visiting each state. Washington realized that winning a war for freedom doesn't guarantee the formation a stable and prosperous nation. Americans were thinking in terms of state and local interests, but they needed to think of national interests if the new government was going to succeed. Washington visited each of the original 13 states in an effort to unite the people behin "George Washington's Journey" described President Washington's efforts to unite the 13 states into a nation by personally visiting each state. Washington realized that winning a war for freedom doesn't guarantee the formation a stable and prosperous nation. Americans were thinking in terms of state and local interests, but they needed to think of national interests if the new government was going to succeed. Washington visited each of the original 13 states in an effort to unite the people behind a strong federal government and to hear their concerns. The author described Washington's inaugural journey (from home to the capital) and his tour of the states. Washington toured the northern states in 1789 and the southern states in 1791. The author didn't give a day-by-day description of the travels but instead grouped similar incidents and analyzed what was going on. He described various things that Washington and the people did that helped define how the president should be addressed, treated, and how he should interact with the people who elected him. There were many quotes from Washington's diary, various letters, and newspaper accounts. These quotes helped to show how people at the time viewed the events. The author also gave the context of what was happening so we could understand Washington's motives or the significance of various interactions. The author did a good job of showing events within the context of the time period rather than purely through hindsight. I found the book to be an interesting, easy read that brought that period in history alive for me. I'd recommend this book to those who enjoy learning about early American history. I received an ebook review copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Deb

    I loved the conversational tone of this historic book, and the interesting details of early America. Informative insight into the views of leaders and citizens when America was a new nation. I loved the historic detail and insights to what life was really like in the late 1700s. The author brought forward a great feel for the people who were getting accustomed to political independence and their challenge to reach economic independence from Great Britain. Without sounding pedantic, the author re I loved the conversational tone of this historic book, and the interesting details of early America. Informative insight into the views of leaders and citizens when America was a new nation. I loved the historic detail and insights to what life was really like in the late 1700s. The author brought forward a great feel for the people who were getting accustomed to political independence and their challenge to reach economic independence from Great Britain. Without sounding pedantic, the author reinforced the early issues of federalism, antifederalism, republicanism, states rights vs. a strong federal govt, slavery and anti-slavery realities. I learned many new and interesting facts about our first president and the roles of other players in creating and keeping the union together. I loved learning that Washington took the new federal government directly to the people. He organized an extraordinary journey carrying him to all thirteen states. No wonder there are so many "Washington slept here" sights! Washington was the impetus behind continuing the break with Great Britain and overturning the fundamental conventions of an aristocratic world. In contrast to the European aristocratic base, the newly independent Americans were ambitious, commercial, and according to Great Britain a little vulgar! Yea for us! To quote the author, "Washington's greatest insight was seeing the need to perform his office on a new national stage. That is his legacy.” I thoroughly enjoyed reading the details of HOW he did that!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Gayle

    This is a very interesting and informative book. George Washington felt that to make the union work he had to go to the people and meet with them to see how they felt about the new government and how they thought things should be handled. During Washington's travels he stated that he did not want to stay with any family because he did not want to put them out and cause any expense to them. He stayed in public rooms without any guards around him. He learned a lot of how others lives were affected This is a very interesting and informative book. George Washington felt that to make the union work he had to go to the people and meet with them to see how they felt about the new government and how they thought things should be handled. During Washington's travels he stated that he did not want to stay with any family because he did not want to put them out and cause any expense to them. He stayed in public rooms without any guards around him. He learned a lot of how others lives were affected by their local governments and how that was causing problems with trying to become a national government. Washington had a job to do as first President and he set out to learn from the people and the land what would be a good direction to go to achieve a unified country. I got this for free in a Goodreads Giveaway drawing.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alger Smythe-Hopkins

    This is the kind of history book that makes people hate reading history. That may sound harsher than I mean, but this is the kind of reading only a person truly dedicated to the topic could love; and a book that is largely about George's reasons for wanting to go on these journeys but wants to be a book about those journeys...well..... I find no fault with the topic, which is very much a milestone event in the creation of these United States. I do find fault with the slow build to the actual event This is the kind of history book that makes people hate reading history. That may sound harsher than I mean, but this is the kind of reading only a person truly dedicated to the topic could love; and a book that is largely about George's reasons for wanting to go on these journeys but wants to be a book about those journeys...well..... I find no fault with the topic, which is very much a milestone event in the creation of these United States. I do find fault with the slow build to the actual events. The opening chapters introduce Washington's chosen companions, and his horses, and his carriage, but not the better carriage, that is described later, and this companion was not a close friend...

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Autry

    This is a very informative book that is broken down in segments that make it an easier read then other historical nonfiction I have read. However, it did not deliver a story type format that I had seen mentioned by other reviewers. I fell like I learned a lot from the book and would recommend it to anyone who has a love of history and historical nonfiction. I prefer fiction or story format non-fiction like Unbreakable. I can only imagine the amount of time and research that T.H. Breen put into t This is a very informative book that is broken down in segments that make it an easier read then other historical nonfiction I have read. However, it did not deliver a story type format that I had seen mentioned by other reviewers. I fell like I learned a lot from the book and would recommend it to anyone who has a love of history and historical nonfiction. I prefer fiction or story format non-fiction like Unbreakable. I can only imagine the amount of time and research that T.H. Breen put into this. I wish I loved it more.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Paul Criscuolo

    It's a pleasant read. It's more a review of the affairs of the time and a bit light on the journey's actual events. Nice review for the "history.light" reader. I was hoping for a bit more. The book did support a major theme: the reason for the journey as an example of Washington's dream for America. One more defined than his counterparts. It's a pleasant read. It's more a review of the affairs of the time and a bit light on the journey's actual events. Nice review for the "history.light" reader. I was hoping for a bit more. The book did support a major theme: the reason for the journey as an example of Washington's dream for America. One more defined than his counterparts.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ed

    Good historical information about George during his Presidential years but little on the journey, I understood it to be on his two trips to North and South. More on his learning of what to do to be a president.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Howard Lambka

    Interesting stories of Washingtons travels immediately following the election. Fascinating to read of localities that went all out in their colonial ways to welcome the great man.

  24. 5 out of 5

    John Morrison

    I won this book through the giveaways. It is a great read to learn a lot about George Washington. Recommended for history buffs.

  25. 5 out of 5

    John

    Did not find it to be very well done. Actually very little time spent on the actual journee she made. Mostly a bunch of preamble which I already knew.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mary Metcalf

    Light read. Learn many new and interesting facts about our first president and the roles of other players in creating and keeping the union

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Pulignani

  28. 4 out of 5

    Greg

  29. 5 out of 5

    Richard

  30. 4 out of 5

    George Putnam

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.