web site hit counter Garments Against Women - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Garments Against Women

Availability: Ready to download

Garments Against Women is a book of mostly lyric prose about the conditions that make literature almost impossible. It holds a life story without a life, a lie spread across low-rent apartment complexes, dreamscapes, and information networks, tangled in chronology, landing in a heap of the future impossible. Available forms—like garments and literature—are made of the mate Garments Against Women is a book of mostly lyric prose about the conditions that make literature almost impossible. It holds a life story without a life, a lie spread across low-rent apartment complexes, dreamscapes, and information networks, tangled in chronology, landing in a heap of the future impossible. Available forms—like garments and literature—are made of the materials of history, of the hours of women’s and children’s lives, but they are mostly inadequate to the dimension, motion, and irregularity of what they contain. It’s a book about seeking to find the forms in which to think the thoughts necessary to survival, then about seeking to find the forms necessary to survive survival and survival’s requisite thoughts. “Here Anne Boyer accounts for a form of life—form of life of a woman in this century living in Kansas City apartment complexes or duplexes with names like The Kingman or Colonial Gardens, form of life of a low-rent, cake-baking intellectual parenting a Socratic daughter, form of life of a person whose body refuses to become information or pornography, which are the same. These are the confessions of Anne Boyer, a political thinker who takes notes and invents movements, social and prosodic. Ta gueule, Rousseau.” —Lisa Robertson Anne Boyer Artist Statement: I read a lot, old works and new ones, but there were so many books that I couldn’t find. These were the books that should have contained an answer to the problem—how do we survive our survival? If a work of literature approached an answer, the answer was bent, asemic, obscured, distorted into sentimental accounts, melodrama, or pornography by literary convention established to make knowing what we needed to impossible. . Sometimes the answer was deformed by the failure of survival itself—there were texts severed by their author’s severed lives, by madness, by social isolation, by early death or a long life passed always wanting it. Literature, like garments, had so often been against so many of us, enforcing and sustaining the hostilities of a world with the unequal distribution of resources and the corresponding unequal distribution of suffering. . The libraries I needed were full of works written by ghosts of the dead so common their graves lacked stones, the literature of those humans whose names were never their own, whose names were mostly said aloud so that someone might make a command of them, whose names were never used as the mark of their own property—what was it they had known? How did the great human majority—women and girls, those without property, the poor and the workers and enslaved people—resist? In what forms, what languages, what codes were their poems? What possibilities inhabited their thinking, their philosophies, their politics? What names would they be called if they could choose their own? During much of the time Garments Against Women was being written, I wanted to stop writing. I wanted to stop wanting and needing to write. This was so that my daughter and I could better survive; this was also because of my disappointment with literature. . But Garments Against Women exists because I failed. I failed to find the literature I needed, so I had to try to write it down. I failed, also, at refusal, failed at failing, failed at self-negating, failed at being ruined despite all that would ruin us, failed at keeping survival bare, failed at obeying history’s prohibitions, failed at being intimidated by the centuries of hostile traditions. What I failed at was not writing despite all the conditions that had been relentlessly calibrated to keep not writing sustained. . Some of us write because there are problems to be solved. My life is different than it was when I wrote Garments Against Women, but there’s still a problem: the world as we know it remains the world.


Compare

Garments Against Women is a book of mostly lyric prose about the conditions that make literature almost impossible. It holds a life story without a life, a lie spread across low-rent apartment complexes, dreamscapes, and information networks, tangled in chronology, landing in a heap of the future impossible. Available forms—like garments and literature—are made of the mate Garments Against Women is a book of mostly lyric prose about the conditions that make literature almost impossible. It holds a life story without a life, a lie spread across low-rent apartment complexes, dreamscapes, and information networks, tangled in chronology, landing in a heap of the future impossible. Available forms—like garments and literature—are made of the materials of history, of the hours of women’s and children’s lives, but they are mostly inadequate to the dimension, motion, and irregularity of what they contain. It’s a book about seeking to find the forms in which to think the thoughts necessary to survival, then about seeking to find the forms necessary to survive survival and survival’s requisite thoughts. “Here Anne Boyer accounts for a form of life—form of life of a woman in this century living in Kansas City apartment complexes or duplexes with names like The Kingman or Colonial Gardens, form of life of a low-rent, cake-baking intellectual parenting a Socratic daughter, form of life of a person whose body refuses to become information or pornography, which are the same. These are the confessions of Anne Boyer, a political thinker who takes notes and invents movements, social and prosodic. Ta gueule, Rousseau.” —Lisa Robertson Anne Boyer Artist Statement: I read a lot, old works and new ones, but there were so many books that I couldn’t find. These were the books that should have contained an answer to the problem—how do we survive our survival? If a work of literature approached an answer, the answer was bent, asemic, obscured, distorted into sentimental accounts, melodrama, or pornography by literary convention established to make knowing what we needed to impossible. . Sometimes the answer was deformed by the failure of survival itself—there were texts severed by their author’s severed lives, by madness, by social isolation, by early death or a long life passed always wanting it. Literature, like garments, had so often been against so many of us, enforcing and sustaining the hostilities of a world with the unequal distribution of resources and the corresponding unequal distribution of suffering. . The libraries I needed were full of works written by ghosts of the dead so common their graves lacked stones, the literature of those humans whose names were never their own, whose names were mostly said aloud so that someone might make a command of them, whose names were never used as the mark of their own property—what was it they had known? How did the great human majority—women and girls, those without property, the poor and the workers and enslaved people—resist? In what forms, what languages, what codes were their poems? What possibilities inhabited their thinking, their philosophies, their politics? What names would they be called if they could choose their own? During much of the time Garments Against Women was being written, I wanted to stop writing. I wanted to stop wanting and needing to write. This was so that my daughter and I could better survive; this was also because of my disappointment with literature. . But Garments Against Women exists because I failed. I failed to find the literature I needed, so I had to try to write it down. I failed, also, at refusal, failed at failing, failed at self-negating, failed at being ruined despite all that would ruin us, failed at keeping survival bare, failed at obeying history’s prohibitions, failed at being intimidated by the centuries of hostile traditions. What I failed at was not writing despite all the conditions that had been relentlessly calibrated to keep not writing sustained. . Some of us write because there are problems to be solved. My life is different than it was when I wrote Garments Against Women, but there’s still a problem: the world as we know it remains the world.

30 review for Garments Against Women

  1. 4 out of 5

    Taylor

    2/26/18: This just grows more and more important to me every time I read it. -------- At Least Two Types of People by Anne Boyer There are at least two types of people, the first for whom the ordinary worldliness is easy. The regular social routines and material cares are nothing too external to them and easily absorbed. They are not alien from the creation and maintenance of the world, the world does not treat them as alien. And also, from them, the efforts toward the world, and to them, the fulfi 2/26/18: This just grows more and more important to me every time I read it. -------- At Least Two Types of People by Anne Boyer There are at least two types of people, the first for whom the ordinary worldliness is easy. The regular social routines and material cares are nothing too external to them and easily absorbed. They are not alien from the creation and maintenance of the world, the world does not treat them as alien. And also, from them, the efforts toward the world, and to them, the fulfillment of the world's moderate desires, flow. They are effortless at eating, moving, arranging their arms as they sit or stand, being hired, being paid, cleaning up, spending, playing, mating. They are in an ease and comfort. The world is for the world and for them. Then there are those over whom the events and opportunities of the everyday world wash over. There is rarely, in this second type, any easy kind of absorption. There is only a visible evidence of having been made of a difference substance, one that repels. Also, from them, it is almost impossible to give to the world what it will welcome or reward. For how does this second type hold their arms? Across their chest? Behind their back? And how do they find food to eat and then prepare this food? And how do they receive a check or endorse it? And what also of the difficulties of love or being loved, its expansiveness, the way it is used for markets and indentured moods? And what is this second substance? And how does it come to have as one of its qualities the resistance to the world as it is? And also, what is the person made of the second substance? Is this a human or more or less than one? Where is the true impermeable community of the second human whose arms do not easily arrange themselves and for whom the salaries and weddings and garages do not come? These are, perhaps, not two sorts of persons, but two kinds of fortune. The first is soft and regular. The second is a baffled kind, and magnetic only to the second substance, and made itself out of a different, second, substance, and having, at its end, a second, and almost blank-faced, reward. ___ Please, please read this collection. Will try and write about it, but I think I have too much to say to organize any of it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Maddie

    This was not an easy book to penetrate. Boyer's writing is ellusive and almost academic but not in the clear, informative way; and it wasn't supposed to be, I don't think: these are the jumbled thoughts about poverty, feminism, and writing. It was hard to connect to it for the reasons stated above; however, when I was able to peel the foggyness behind the words and get a clear idea, Anne Boyer is genius. She just makes you work for it. This was not an easy book to penetrate. Boyer's writing is ellusive and almost academic but not in the clear, informative way; and it wasn't supposed to be, I don't think: these are the jumbled thoughts about poverty, feminism, and writing. It was hard to connect to it for the reasons stated above; however, when I was able to peel the foggyness behind the words and get a clear idea, Anne Boyer is genius. She just makes you work for it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Liz Howard

    "I was at the edge of cities. I was at the edge of economies. In those days some even accused me of googling my dreams. I ignored the ordinary digital manners of those times." "I was at the edge of cities. I was at the edge of economies. In those days some even accused me of googling my dreams. I ignored the ordinary digital manners of those times."

  4. 5 out of 5

    But_i_thought_

    a catalogue of whales that is a catalogue of whale bones inside a catalogue of garments against women that could never be a novel itself. Challenging and avant-garde.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Larissa

    Anne Boyer's writing is #goals. I feel very understood right now. Anne Boyer's writing is #goals. I feel very understood right now.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jeanne

    This little book is so hard to characterize...is it poetry? A lyrical essay? Definitely a musing on life, the condition of being a woman and an artist/thinker who works and does not work...I just know that I found myself at times laughing at loud and other times resonating deeply with the confusion, pain and loveliness of her language. Not like anything else I've ever read, which for me was part of the fun. This little book is so hard to characterize...is it poetry? A lyrical essay? Definitely a musing on life, the condition of being a woman and an artist/thinker who works and does not work...I just know that I found myself at times laughing at loud and other times resonating deeply with the confusion, pain and loveliness of her language. Not like anything else I've ever read, which for me was part of the fun.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    "I filled up the bathtub with water boiled on the stove, and the windows went opaque with steam. The coffee went cold in a minute. My daughter and I put all the blankets and clothes we owned over us. I decided I would be a poet so that I could complain publicly of this." More poets who write honestly about poverty. More poets who write incisively about labor & capital. "I filled up the bathtub with water boiled on the stove, and the windows went opaque with steam. The coffee went cold in a minute. My daughter and I put all the blankets and clothes we owned over us. I decided I would be a poet so that I could complain publicly of this." More poets who write honestly about poverty. More poets who write incisively about labor & capital.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Lakly

    This slim and lovely book of poetry challenges what poetry is while examining how we make our lives. I especially loved the poem "What I'm Not Writing" all about the things she is not writing when she is not writing. Sounds like a great writing exercise! This slim and lovely book of poetry challenges what poetry is while examining how we make our lives. I especially loved the poem "What I'm Not Writing" all about the things she is not writing when she is not writing. Sounds like a great writing exercise!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    Beautifully written!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rose Gowen

    It was amazing. I saw Anne Boyer read, and it was amazing. Her book is amazing. I want to read it again.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kylie

    YES!!!!!!!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nevena

    Some sections in here really stand out and I'm still thinking about them, but there are also other sections. Many, many other sections. I liked the philosophers, except when they bored me. 👀👀 This collection seems to be written without a determining tendency. Lots of thoughts jumbled up together to the point I started questioning my ability to understand the English language and my reading comprehension in general. There absolutely are simpler ways to say so many of those complicated sentences, w Some sections in here really stand out and I'm still thinking about them, but there are also other sections. Many, many other sections. I liked the philosophers, except when they bored me. 👀👀 This collection seems to be written without a determining tendency. Lots of thoughts jumbled up together to the point I started questioning my ability to understand the English language and my reading comprehension in general. There absolutely are simpler ways to say so many of those complicated sentences, which is why it bothered me so much. I don't like it when the thoughts and feelings get so wraped up under "difficult words". Makes it awfully hard for me to connect. Is this really her authentic stream of consciousness or is Anne Boyer just being a pretentious smart-ass? Possibly both.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    asjklflaskfjs AHHHHHHHHH I think mostly about clothes, sex, food, and seasonal variations. I have done so much to be ordinary and made a record of this: first I was born, next I was a child, then I learned things and did things and loved and had those who loved me and often felt alone. My body was sometimes well, then sometimes unwell. I got nearer to death, as did you.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Maud

    million percent wowzers and I don't even like poetry anymore; I sent snippets from different poems to a few different people and I wish someone would send some to me million percent wowzers and I don't even like poetry anymore; I sent snippets from different poems to a few different people and I wish someone would send some to me

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Probably too dumb to get the parts I perceived as mishmosh but the best parts I am certain are the best parts: 'At Least Two Types of People' and 'What Is "Not Writing"?' and 'A Woman Shopping' Probably too dumb to get the parts I perceived as mishmosh but the best parts I am certain are the best parts: 'At Least Two Types of People' and 'What Is "Not Writing"?' and 'A Woman Shopping'

  16. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    I appreciated Boyer's syntactical play, but it was a collection I could only be read in short bursts. She has constructed a house that has no doors, only windows, and Boyer herself can only be seen through those windows as she goes from room to room with a faulty flashlight. There are great, honest bursts of light, though: "I believed that if one came to poetry for solace one was fucked. I believed things would go on like this." It is a good read, a dense read, a read that probably needs a re-read I appreciated Boyer's syntactical play, but it was a collection I could only be read in short bursts. She has constructed a house that has no doors, only windows, and Boyer herself can only be seen through those windows as she goes from room to room with a faulty flashlight. There are great, honest bursts of light, though: "I believed that if one came to poetry for solace one was fucked. I believed things would go on like this." It is a good read, a dense read, a read that probably needs a re-read, at least for me.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mina-Louise

    I started reading this to procrastinate washing my hair (washing my hair- a procrastination for something else) “Maynard Shelley wrote something about how life without sufficient constraints produces aimlessness, alienation, and boredom. So it is that the constrainingly unconstrained literature of Capital produced aimlessness, alienation, and boredom in me when I try to read it. I am now constrained to abundance, “happiness” to its absence / infirmity.” “I get spam from Versailles. It seems like I started reading this to procrastinate washing my hair (washing my hair- a procrastination for something else) “Maynard Shelley wrote something about how life without sufficient constraints produces aimlessness, alienation, and boredom. So it is that the constrainingly unconstrained literature of Capital produced aimlessness, alienation, and boredom in me when I try to read it. I am now constrained to abundance, “happiness” to its absence / infirmity.” “I get spam from Versailles. It seems like all my life I have gotten images of hard-ons in the mail. What is the difference between happiness and pornography? I mean what is the difference between literature and photography? It would be easy at first to confuse that which makes us happy and that which makes us aroused. [...]” “I am the dog who can never be happy because I am imagining the unhappiness of other dogs.” I don’t sew, except to reattach the belt hoops back to my jeans (I will never learn to not use them to pull my jeans on). Or the occasional invisible button to make a shirt or dress less provocative and more work appropriate. I’ve sewn up holes in pants of someone I once thought I would love, the seam was so good we couldn't find it, and I never managed to love him. Friends of mine are sewing masks, and I was thinking of following, but all I have is half a hotel sewing kit and a hundred miscellaneous buttons (I think I’d like that mask). “The sewing book says the quality of one’s seam is really the measure of one’s character.” I stopped taking notes and started sprinting to the finish line, not because the book wasn’t (?sad, it mostly made me sad) but my hair was clean and I couldn’t stand to procrastinate any longer.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shreya Vikram

    There are certain books that make you want to like them simply because it seems as if, having read the book, everyone must feel the way you're feeling right now, and if everyone's throwing around five-stars, maybe that's the only appropriate response for such a feeling, even if you usually don't respond with praise for such a feeling with other books (and maybe you should?), even if the feeling is more like a headache that circles your temple like a shadow of an object that doesn't exist—the pro There are certain books that make you want to like them simply because it seems as if, having read the book, everyone must feel the way you're feeling right now, and if everyone's throwing around five-stars, maybe that's the only appropriate response for such a feeling, even if you usually don't respond with praise for such a feeling with other books (and maybe you should?), even if the feeling is more like a headache that circles your temple like a shadow of an object that doesn't exist—the problem is in figuring out exactly what you're feeling which is not so much a problem but a question that answered itself in advance, so yes, you are writing this in response to what you are about to write, which is probably not very nice, which is similar to Fuck you, Anne Boyer. Just

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kasia

    This book was different than what I was expected. I wanted more of a theoretical text about clothing/garments and how they have been used to restrict and control women. There is some great imagery and sections that I enjoyed - but I wouldn't likely read it again. This book was different than what I was expected. I wanted more of a theoretical text about clothing/garments and how they have been used to restrict and control women. There is some great imagery and sections that I enjoyed - but I wouldn't likely read it again.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    "The flaneur is a poet is an agent free of purses, but a woman is not a woman without a strap over her shoulder or a clutch in her hand." "The flaneur is a poet is an agent free of purses, but a woman is not a woman without a strap over her shoulder or a clutch in her hand."

  21. 5 out of 5

    Clara

    Reread recently, as powerful as before

  22. 5 out of 5

    Pablo Uribe

    there are some really incisive, brilliant, thought + feeling provoking poems and sections of this book. sometimes the thought-circuit breaks for me and i felt lag, i mostly read on, but flowed more second time through (years later). I'm guessing it would reward me for the next few times still. there are some really incisive, brilliant, thought + feeling provoking poems and sections of this book. sometimes the thought-circuit breaks for me and i felt lag, i mostly read on, but flowed more second time through (years later). I'm guessing it would reward me for the next few times still.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alonzo Vereen

    I had quite a few troubling thoughts while reading this book. “I really don’t know how to read” was the first. The second — “For real for real, bro, you not as smart as you think you are.” By the time I got to the end, though, neither thought held up. What began as my inability to comprehend Anne Boyer’s sentences and phrases soon shifted into an unwillingness to comprehend them, and neither of these experiences, I soon concluded, had anything to do with my ability to comprehend what she wrote. B I had quite a few troubling thoughts while reading this book. “I really don’t know how to read” was the first. The second — “For real for real, bro, you not as smart as you think you are.” By the time I got to the end, though, neither thought held up. What began as my inability to comprehend Anne Boyer’s sentences and phrases soon shifted into an unwillingness to comprehend them, and neither of these experiences, I soon concluded, had anything to do with my ability to comprehend what she wrote. Boyer, at least for the bulk of this book, was just being lazy when she composed it. Check out these three passages and let me know if you disagree (I promise, they do not contain typos): “Having no interest in realism suddenly I had an interest in realism”; “The country forcing language to speak straight was very different from my own”; “Sometimes when you look at smoothly joining at least two different-sized pieces of flat but pliable material so that these pieces might correctly encase an eternally irregular, perspiring and breathing three-dimensional . . .” Real talk, most of the time, I didn’t know what was going on, so I definitely can’t tell you what this book is about. But I’ll give you one more quote from it to sum up my reading experience. When using garments as a metaphor for her writings, Boyer composes this line, “I think of some future for the garment, inspected in the thrift store where it will someday rest: this was not an attentive sewist, the future shopper thinks, and wrinkles her nose or whatever, shrugs.” Not an attentive sewist at all.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jerrod

    "The world of things so often barely perceptible. It's a condition. It can be diagnosed. To be precise, it is a condition called an entire city built on a city built on a city built on a city built on a city built on a city built on a city. It is a condition called "infinite sedimentary monument not to cities but to sediment itself." But it is a condition: that is, it is a set of unstable foundations, holes, tunnels, passageways from one strata to the next. And in the strata, not ruin, but the w "The world of things so often barely perceptible. It's a condition. It can be diagnosed. To be precise, it is a condition called an entire city built on a city built on a city built on a city built on a city built on a city built on a city. It is a condition called "infinite sedimentary monument not to cities but to sediment itself." But it is a condition: that is, it is a set of unstable foundations, holes, tunnels, passageways from one strata to the next. And in the strata, not ruin, but the war before it. And every movement is a movement upward rathe than the settling. What moves up?" Life is Stockholm (Syndrome). It is the product of infinitely recursive conditions. Work is what happens in these conditions. Not-work is what happens in these conditions. Boyer shows how we fear imagination not because of its impotence, but because of its power. To acknowledge the conditions, to give them language, is to feel (the conditions) What is parenthetical are the realities, the instructions for acknowledging we are trapped. A great book about how avoiding thinking about constraint in its material & immaterial dimensions (which are inextricable) is the avoidance of conversing to power and the abnegation of (not justice) responsibility to our selves We are (not) information Labor Labor Labor

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sierra Hunt

    I really, really wanted to love this book, but I just didn't. I went to a reading that Anne Boyer did and when she was reading her work, I thought it sounded lyrical and pleasant to the ears. But when I was reading it myself, it just didn't make any sense to me. I kind of got the feeling that if I could just figure out what she was saying it would have been some kind of beautiful commentary on the state of things in the world, but honestly most of it just sounded like rambling nonsense to me. Th I really, really wanted to love this book, but I just didn't. I went to a reading that Anne Boyer did and when she was reading her work, I thought it sounded lyrical and pleasant to the ears. But when I was reading it myself, it just didn't make any sense to me. I kind of got the feeling that if I could just figure out what she was saying it would have been some kind of beautiful commentary on the state of things in the world, but honestly most of it just sounded like rambling nonsense to me. There were some quotes and some sections that I did like, but most of it I just couldn't understand. Anne Boyer is such a great person and I really wanted to like her book, but I just didn't.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jaredjosephjaredjoseph harveyharvey

    This book would be a book also about the history of literature and literature’s uses against women, also against literature and for it, also against shopping and for it[...]But who would publish this book and who, also, would shop for it? And how could it be literature if it is not coyly against literature, but sincerely against it, as it is also against ourselves?

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jasmin

    Ahhhhhhhhh so beautifully written and engages beautifully peripherally around inhabiting a body, and what surrounds our bodies, and the tension between that. Reading it caused me to sigh so much. Will reread again and again.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    This first poem is so very good. http://thenewinquiry.com/essays/the-a... I want to read more writing like this. This first poem is so very good. http://thenewinquiry.com/essays/the-a... I want to read more writing like this.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Felicity

    zow!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Leonard

    A witty and original collection of writings that is quite interesting. Read the review in the New York Times for some more praise.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.