web site hit counter Manual of Christian Doctrine - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Manual of Christian Doctrine

Availability: Ready to download

This concise introduction to the systematized body of Christian doctrine is presented in clear and simple language, which makes it suitable for high school and college students as well as adult study groups. Includes review questions for further study at the end of each chapter.


Compare

This concise introduction to the systematized body of Christian doctrine is presented in clear and simple language, which makes it suitable for high school and college students as well as adult study groups. Includes review questions for further study at the end of each chapter.

30 review for Manual of Christian Doctrine

  1. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    It's kind of dry reading, but it does its job of concisely explaining Christian theology. This was required reading in my High School, which was reformed and very Calvinist. Since it has been a long time since I read it, I cannot recall if it discusses Christian theology outside of a Calvinist perspective, or if it explains and then diminishes all types of Christian theology that is different from Calvinist theology. This would be important to me, since I am not a five point Calvinist, and I hon It's kind of dry reading, but it does its job of concisely explaining Christian theology. This was required reading in my High School, which was reformed and very Calvinist. Since it has been a long time since I read it, I cannot recall if it discusses Christian theology outside of a Calvinist perspective, or if it explains and then diminishes all types of Christian theology that is different from Calvinist theology. This would be important to me, since I am not a five point Calvinist, and I honestly find that Calvinism, with its emphasis on Jesus only dying to save elect people, predestination of the saved and the damned, and an extremely limited atonement, leaves me with a frightening and nihilistic impression. Even though I feel this way, I still have immense respect for the dedicated and caring teachers from my high school.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    Good outline of Reformed doctrine, though he is rather definite on a few things I consider less apparent.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Dry, but decent summary of doctrine.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Michael Kidd

    Clear. Concise. Orthodox. Therefore, beneficial. Every Christian should at least read Berkhof's manual if they are not willing to read his larger Systematic Theology. Clear. Concise. Orthodox. Therefore, beneficial. Every Christian should at least read Berkhof's manual if they are not willing to read his larger Systematic Theology.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Michael A

    I'm not the target audience (agnostic) for this book, so I predictably hated it. Why then am I reading it? The main reason is because my wife attends a Presbyterian church and the preacher gave me this book to read because she told him I wasn't sure about most of these issues. I didn't like the 200 pages or so I read of it because it's an intolerant little book. The author goes so far as to say that the point of the book is the "proper indoctrination" of believers in the preface. He uses Biblical I'm not the target audience (agnostic) for this book, so I predictably hated it. Why then am I reading it? The main reason is because my wife attends a Presbyterian church and the preacher gave me this book to read because she told him I wasn't sure about most of these issues. I didn't like the 200 pages or so I read of it because it's an intolerant little book. The author goes so far as to say that the point of the book is the "proper indoctrination" of believers in the preface. He uses Biblical scripture alone as a reference/support system for making hugely generalized claims in regards to Christianity in general -- just to name a few, a lot of people would disagree with him about the idea of predestination, the Bible as a sacrosanct, divine text, and the idea that we simply have no way out of the idea of original sin. None of this is set in stone. The Reformed Church's take on it is simply one of many that have existed throughout history. Even when I attended an Anglican church with my parents, I would have struggled to wrap my head around the ideas in this book from time to time. I really have to wonder if the author ever thought about the kind of philosophical system that he was propounding to his students. Unconditional obedience to God despite his many contradictions and complexities. The convoluted mental gymnastics needed to justify sin in the world if God had the ability to make a world without any sin. The inability to question and the need to worship out of fear of going to hell and punishment. It reminded me a lot of watching a Bergman film -- that very dour, stark world of Protestant guilt and hell that swallows people alive without any sort of happiness or light. In other words, it's a rather stark worldview and one that I'm not in any way prepared to endorse. There are far better, more modern books to read about Christianity, as well, if you want to learn more about it. The strange thing is, I think I would have given this book 3 stars if he had simply title the book a bit differently -- if, for example, it had been called "Our Version of Reformed Christianity and Why We Think the Way We Do." That would have been fine and much less frustrating for this reader anyway. It's the author's attitude and his claims about it being for Christianity in general that got me so upset.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Allen Haynie

    Louis Berkhof’s Manual of Christian Doctrine is written from a Reformed theology perspective. The book is in outline form and Berkhof presents each doctrine in a clear and concise manner. At the end of each chapter there are review questions for further study along with references for further study. He frequently shows the errors of Roman Catholic, Lutheran and Arminian theology. On some of the more controversial doctrines he states the common objections made by some and then gives a Biblical an Louis Berkhof’s Manual of Christian Doctrine is written from a Reformed theology perspective. The book is in outline form and Berkhof presents each doctrine in a clear and concise manner. At the end of each chapter there are review questions for further study along with references for further study. He frequently shows the errors of Roman Catholic, Lutheran and Arminian theology. On some of the more controversial doctrines he states the common objections made by some and then gives a Biblical and reasoned answer to those objections. I found the discussion on the Doctrine of the Application of the Work of Redemption, which consists of calling, regeneration, conversion, faith, justification, sanctification and perseverance to be excellent. There are a couple of things that I disagree with in Berkhof’s theology and one of them is infant baptism and the other is his amillennial position in eschatology, but these in no way stopped me from reading the book numerous times since 1987. I don’t remember how I came to buy this book in particular, but it was my introduction to doctrine and it has shaped my theology ever since. I highly recommend this book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rock Rockwell

    Berkhoff tates his voluminous Systematic Theology book (written for the college level) and breaks it down to digestable outlined chunks so that the High School student can read and understand clearly. Berkhoff writes from a reformed/covenantal theology/viewpoint. This is the one of the best books to have handy in your small group, discipleship class, coffee table, or bookbag to reference quickly and easily.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Great introduction to systematic theology from a Reformed perspective. Berkof follows Herman Bavinck and Gerhardus Vos much of the way. He is amillennial. Staunchly orthodox. And presents Christian doctrine in an accessible way. Read this book along with John Frame's Salvation Belongs to the Lord for a well balanced introduction to systematic theology that will prepare you to take on the big boys. Great introduction to systematic theology from a Reformed perspective. Berkof follows Herman Bavinck and Gerhardus Vos much of the way. He is amillennial. Staunchly orthodox. And presents Christian doctrine in an accessible way. Read this book along with John Frame's Salvation Belongs to the Lord for a well balanced introduction to systematic theology that will prepare you to take on the big boys.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Evan Staehle

    While I have yet to read Systematic Theology, I'm currently devouring this condensed, easier to follow, college-level version. It beautifully captures some of the main, foundational doctrines of the Christian faith from a Reformed perspective (which is nice). Reading it has blown my mind about God. The awe-inspiring, soul-stirring truths in this book will reorient your eyes toward heaven, while your jaw hits the floor in wonder (or at least, that's what it did for me). While I have yet to read Systematic Theology, I'm currently devouring this condensed, easier to follow, college-level version. It beautifully captures some of the main, foundational doctrines of the Christian faith from a Reformed perspective (which is nice). Reading it has blown my mind about God. The awe-inspiring, soul-stirring truths in this book will reorient your eyes toward heaven, while your jaw hits the floor in wonder (or at least, that's what it did for me).

  10. 4 out of 5

    Peter Bringe

    An excellent, clear, and simple explanation of Reformed doctrine. The chapter "The Offices of Christ" is my favorite. I've read most of it twice. An excellent, clear, and simple explanation of Reformed doctrine. The chapter "The Offices of Christ" is my favorite. I've read most of it twice.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sean McGowan

    Good.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rachelskirts

    (Textbook from junior year of high school. Used in conjunction with R.C. Sproul's Essential Truths of the Christian Faith.) Very informative. Verrry tedious. (Textbook from junior year of high school. Used in conjunction with R.C. Sproul's Essential Truths of the Christian Faith.) Very informative. Verrry tedious.

  13. 5 out of 5

    G.M. Burrow

    It was probably good, as far as systematic theology goes. Don't remember it. It was probably good, as far as systematic theology goes. Don't remember it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tonya

  15. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Noel

  16. 5 out of 5

    Byung Kyu Park

  17. 5 out of 5

    Andy

  18. 4 out of 5

    Gage

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nik Wight

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Cook

  21. 5 out of 5

    José Abraham

  22. 5 out of 5

    Eduardo

  23. 5 out of 5

    Carly Pinch

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ronald

  25. 4 out of 5

    Deke

  26. 5 out of 5

    John Paul

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jane Gregga

  28. 4 out of 5

    Oleg Bokov

  29. 4 out of 5

    Michael Philliber

  30. 5 out of 5

    Billy Schiel

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.