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Things are quiet in New York. Unusually quiet. Gabriel – the Ghost – knows that something’s wrong. There’s a heat wave building for a start, and it feels as if the pressure’s getting unbearable. Something’s going to give. When an expedition returns from Cairo to exhibit their finds at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gabriel takes a keen interest. An old friend and lover – a Things are quiet in New York. Unusually quiet. Gabriel – the Ghost – knows that something’s wrong. There’s a heat wave building for a start, and it feels as if the pressure’s getting unbearable. Something’s going to give. When an expedition returns from Cairo to exhibit their finds at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gabriel takes a keen interest. An old friend and lover – a girl called Ginny, who he hasn’t seen for over a year – was part of the expedition. Something’s not right with Ginny, however, and not just the fact she’s still drinking…something happened to her in Cairo, out on the dig. Something that’s related to a strange cult known as The Circle of Thoth, a baboon with a clockwork eye, dust devils on Fifth Avenue, robed assassins, sacrificial rites, a ‘resurrection machine’ and a ghostly figure clad in trailing bandages, seen floating over the rooftops of the city. Ancient forces are stirring, and the Ghost, Ginny and Gabriel’s friend Donovan are caught right in the middle…


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Things are quiet in New York. Unusually quiet. Gabriel – the Ghost – knows that something’s wrong. There’s a heat wave building for a start, and it feels as if the pressure’s getting unbearable. Something’s going to give. When an expedition returns from Cairo to exhibit their finds at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gabriel takes a keen interest. An old friend and lover – a Things are quiet in New York. Unusually quiet. Gabriel – the Ghost – knows that something’s wrong. There’s a heat wave building for a start, and it feels as if the pressure’s getting unbearable. Something’s going to give. When an expedition returns from Cairo to exhibit their finds at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gabriel takes a keen interest. An old friend and lover – a girl called Ginny, who he hasn’t seen for over a year – was part of the expedition. Something’s not right with Ginny, however, and not just the fact she’s still drinking…something happened to her in Cairo, out on the dig. Something that’s related to a strange cult known as The Circle of Thoth, a baboon with a clockwork eye, dust devils on Fifth Avenue, robed assassins, sacrificial rites, a ‘resurrection machine’ and a ghostly figure clad in trailing bandages, seen floating over the rooftops of the city. Ancient forces are stirring, and the Ghost, Ginny and Gabriel’s friend Donovan are caught right in the middle…

30 review for Ghosts of Karnak

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ubiquitousbastard

    I waited for this for five years. Because of that, I am sorely tempted to rate this book two stars. Yes, the previous two books weren't literary masterpieces, but they were fun. This book? Not so much. The plot never really hooked me at all. I mean, it was very easy to figure out what happened, but I was having a hard time wondering why I should care. That's severely disappointing in a book I have wanted to read for half a decade. I would have wanted the writer to delay it further if only the pl I waited for this for five years. Because of that, I am sorely tempted to rate this book two stars. Yes, the previous two books weren't literary masterpieces, but they were fun. This book? Not so much. The plot never really hooked me at all. I mean, it was very easy to figure out what happened, but I was having a hard time wondering why I should care. That's severely disappointing in a book I have wanted to read for half a decade. I would have wanted the writer to delay it further if only the plot could be just a bit better.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Gabriella

    The storyline could have been really good - dead body with Egyptian carvings and supernatural suggestions sounds interesting, right? However the author seems to have had no idea what sort of book he wants to write - from the blurb I expected historical supernatural mystery, but it also somehow managed to be a police-procedural, gangster land, superhero book. Despite all of these elements being included the story somehow managed to be completely predictable. I worked out the entire plotline befor The storyline could have been really good - dead body with Egyptian carvings and supernatural suggestions sounds interesting, right? However the author seems to have had no idea what sort of book he wants to write - from the blurb I expected historical supernatural mystery, but it also somehow managed to be a police-procedural, gangster land, superhero book. Despite all of these elements being included the story somehow managed to be completely predictable. I worked out the entire plotline before I was 25% of the way through. I struggled through the rest just to prove myself right.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Corey

    A missed opportunity on so many levels.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Malcolm

    George Mann’s pulp fiction, including steampunk in the Newbury & Hobbes series and a mash-up of 1920s science fiction, pulp crime with a hint of supernatural-cum-horror in The Ghost series, is enormously entertaining – made even more so by his recurring golem motif (a favourite of mine), although in this Egyptological adventure the golem has become a motorised attack machine. In this, The Ghost’s third outing, we find ourselves in a tale that centres on the relationship between our hero and his George Mann’s pulp fiction, including steampunk in the Newbury & Hobbes series and a mash-up of 1920s science fiction, pulp crime with a hint of supernatural-cum-horror in The Ghost series, is enormously entertaining – made even more so by his recurring golem motif (a favourite of mine), although in this Egyptological adventure the golem has become a motorised attack machine. In this, The Ghost’s third outing, we find ourselves in a tale that centres on the relationship between our hero and his lover, scarred by the events of The Ghosts of War Ginny Gray had taken time out from NYC but was due to return on a ship also carrying a new exhibition for the Metropolitan Museum of Art dealing with ancient Egypt. She does not disembark, and to all intents and purposes seems not to have been on the ship. Alongside this domestic narrative NYC finds itself having to deal with a series of murders, seemingly invoking ancient Egyptian markings. These coincide with growing open conflict between the forces of organised crime, suggesting a significant power shift in the city. So, we have all the key ingredients of pulp fiction – sex, crime, politics….. and the mysticism of Ancient Egypt (an obsession in the 1920s with tomb robbers stripping Egypt of its ancient artefacts, many of which still fill our major museums). Of course, these all weave together – Ginny’s apparent disappearance, the ancient Egyptian shenanigans and the exhibition and the emerging new forces of mob power, but not quite in the way we might expect – but then this is pulp fiction so expectations be damned. Mann evokes a noir-ish NYC where danger lurks, superhero power is limited by such mundanity as the need to re-arm and The Ghost’s police-pal Donovan, whose nuanced view of the world means he doesn’t see The Ghost as the lawless vigilante most of his co-workers believe him to be, grappling with the need to balance domestic and working life. Mann also does a good line in femmes fatale even their anti-heroic danger is sidelined – this is pulp, not noir. As an adventure story, the narrative is well-paced, Mann builds to a ferocious supernatural climax in part by introducing several of the monstrous (human and otherwise) characters along the way in a manner that anticipates the final confrontation, but also allows for the key characters to remain compromised and morally ambiguous. In respect of Donovan at least we are left balancing a means-ends dilemma. Despite all of that, however, this just didn’t quite grab me in the same way as the previous Ghost outings (and certainly not in the manner of Newbury & Hobbes): that is to say, it was rollicking good fun but for the most part quite predictable. All in all, a crackingly good yearn and delightful way to spend a lazy weekend.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Klobetime

    I purchased this thinking the titular Ghost was the same character from the Batman: The Animated Series episode "Beware the Gray Ghost"—one of my favorites. It was a great story where we find out Batman patterned a lot of his approach to crimefighting from an old TV show, The Gray Ghost. (Even cooler, the Ghost was voiced by Adam West, a nice nod to Batman history.) Sadly, although the art on the cover of Ghosts of Karnak seems to support this, the Ghost from the novel clearly isn't the Grey I purchased this thinking the titular Ghost was the same character from the Batman: The Animated Series episode "Beware the Gray Ghost"—one of my favorites. It was a great story where we find out Batman patterned a lot of his approach to crimefighting from an old TV show, The Gray Ghost. (Even cooler, the Ghost was voiced by Adam West, a nice nod to Batman history.) Sadly, although the art on the cover of Ghosts of Karnak seems to support this, the Ghost from the novel clearly isn't the Grey Ghost I wanted. Set in a steampunk-inspired 1920s New York City the plot finds the Ghost initially fighting mobsters, but they take a back seat when a mystic religion that wants to destroy Manhattan is uncovered. The book is surprisingly violent, with deadly force seemingly the only thing ever used—"Batman doesn't kill" is a mantra not shared by the Ghost. To that end, the Ghost uses explosive rounds in his gun rather than regular bullets, that burst targets "chests like glistening, blooming flowers." Resurrected ancient Egyptian gods, sentient baboons, and living statues feature in the climax; while interesting, they completely pulled me out of the world and story. Overall I found this book to be disjoint and disappointing; but to be fair, I went into it with a very different expectation than what I found. First Sentence:Her name was Autumn and like the season that had invested her with both name and temperament, her apperance heralded the onset of a fall.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Review cross-posted to my blog here: http://www.firstsightsecondthoughts.n... So, this is the third book in a series and I didn’t realize that until I opened the book and saw it on the “other books by this author” page. It wasn’t marked anywhere on the cover, or else I definitely wouldn’t have bought it, given that I haven’t read the first two books. This book sat on my shelf for months, and I figured I might never read it, until last week when I really got the urge to read something pulpy. I pic Review cross-posted to my blog here: http://www.firstsightsecondthoughts.n... So, this is the third book in a series and I didn’t realize that until I opened the book and saw it on the “other books by this author” page. It wasn’t marked anywhere on the cover, or else I definitely wouldn’t have bought it, given that I haven’t read the first two books. This book sat on my shelf for months, and I figured I might never read it, until last week when I really got the urge to read something pulpy. I picked it up and gave it a shot, thinking that if it was incoherent without the first two books, I’d put it down. Turns out, even though the series is sequential, this book was not at all dependent on knowledge of the first two. Ghosts of Karnak is, specifically, the third book in the Ghost series by George Mann. About five pages in, I got the distinct impression that Mann had asked for permission to write a series of Batman novels, been refused, and said, “Fuck you, I’ll make my own Batman!” It actually works out very well. It seems like this allowed Mann to keep his own intellectual property and introduce new elements that might be vetoed by DC, while still being able to rely on a shared cultural knowledge of Batman tropes. I’ve always been an advocate of this method – if you file some serial numbers off of good fanfiction, you basically end up with an original property, which gives you more freedom in terms of publication and copyrights. In this series, Gabriel Cross is a wealthy socialite who returned traumatized from fighting in the Great War – oh, sorry, did I mention that this also takes place in 1920s New York? It does. And of course the way that he deals with this trauma is by dressing up as The Ghost and fighting crime, as one does. His allies include Felix Donovan, a detective for the NYPD, and his partner, Mullins; Astrid, a modern occultist; and Ginny Gray, an intelligent and independent woman who has mysteriously failed to return from a trip to Egypt. The Egyptian elements of this book’s synopsis are actually why I bought it in the first place – I love pulp and I love ancient Egypt, so this was a solid pick for me. I’ve mentioned this book being pulp a few times, and of course, it is a modern book – published in 2016. I suppose it would be more accurate to say that it’s written in the style of pulp, but I think you’ll still get my meaning. For me, it’s always been hard to put my finger on what I like about pulp fiction (…not the movie, though), things done in the style of penny dreadfuls and dime novels. I think it’s the fact that pulp is not and never was intended as high art, and it doesn’t pretend to be. Pulp magazines started as affordable entertainment for the working classes. They’re lurid and dramatic and often larger than life. That, to me, is the key. Pulp doesn’t bother trying to tell small stories. As is fitting for this type of story, Ghosts of Karnak sees the entirety of Manhattan in danger from a revivalist cult of Thoth, which wishes to destroy the “City of Greed”. When Ginny Gray travels to Egypt, she falls in with the charming French “archaeologist” (read: graverobber) Jacques Amaury. When she fails to meet Gabriel at the appointed time on her return to New York, he is suspicious. Of course, this all coincides with the grand opening of a fabulous Ancient Egypt exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the appearance of several Egyptian apparitions around the city. And it could hardly be a noir crime novel without an appearance from the resident mob boss, the Reaper, coming in at just the right moment to make a dangerous offer. Given that I came into the series on book three, the characterization and backstory given in this book is solid. Like I said, I felt no confusion or lack of understanding for not having read the first two – allusions are made to the events of previous books, but enough information is given to make sure you’re following along. I actually really liked all of the main characters, which is not particularly common for me, especially in books with male authors. I don’t know how much of that is because of the writing of this book or because of my familiarity with the archetypes they’re built on, but I’m okay with that. I particularly liked Ginny and Astrid. While Ginny is the one they spend most of the book trying to rescue, you never get the impression that she’s a damsel in distress. She’s intelligent and alert and intrepid – not many young women in the 1920s would be going off to Egypt on their own for an adventure. She manages to quell the spirit of Sekhmet on her own, while retaining it as a part of herself, and I love that – I can’t wait to see how that comes in handy in future books. And Astrid, the modern-day witch and sharpshooter, is just delightful. Her knowledge of the occult comes in handy quite a few times here, as does her down-to-earth advice to Gabriel. I’ve mentioned before that I’ve been rather tired of steampunk for uh… years now. This book does have some steampunk elements to it – Gabriel’s technology as the Ghost, the Reaper’s Enforcers, etc. But it’s either so minimal that it doesn’t bother me, or I’m finally overcoming my mental block about steampunk. It really wasn’t so significant as to be distracting, and trust me, I would’ve noticed. The focus here is on the plot and the characters, not the technology or the world around it. I really enjoyed this book and I’m definitely going to pick up the first two books (Ghosts of Manhattan and Ghosts of War), as well as the next book (Ghosts of Empire) when it comes out later this year. I could always use more pulp in my life, and I can definitely use more Batman takes that don’t piss me off.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Robert D

    This is the third of George Mann's "Ghost" series. While I like the first 2, this one did not have the same panache as the others. The Ghost series takes the concept of steam punk but moves it to 1920's New York. "Ghost" is in essence a vigilante crime fighter, trying to stop the mob and evil villains from completing their plan. In this one though, the story jumps between the 'modern' ghost and the goings on in New York with a new Egyptian exhibit due to open, and his 'girl-friend' in the recent This is the third of George Mann's "Ghost" series. While I like the first 2, this one did not have the same panache as the others. The Ghost series takes the concept of steam punk but moves it to 1920's New York. "Ghost" is in essence a vigilante crime fighter, trying to stop the mob and evil villains from completing their plan. In this one though, the story jumps between the 'modern' ghost and the goings on in New York with a new Egyptian exhibit due to open, and his 'girl-friend' in the recent past as she encountered the archeologist in Egypt. When the two story lines converge the action picks up and things have quickly gone from bad to worse.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mark Muckerman

    Really enjoyable. Not deep. Not overblown. Not a ponderous read too caught up in its own hubris. It is what it is: steampunk-slash-alt universe-slash-noir-slash-period piece-slash fantasy fiction. A fun read. An easy read. A Good Read . . . Good enough that I'm now adding George Mann's list of works to my "Want To Read" list. Enjoy! Really enjoyable. Not deep. Not overblown. Not a ponderous read too caught up in its own hubris. It is what it is: steampunk-slash-alt universe-slash-noir-slash-period piece-slash fantasy fiction. A fun read. An easy read. A Good Read . . . Good enough that I'm now adding George Mann's list of works to my "Want To Read" list. Enjoy!

  9. 5 out of 5

    aem

    Interesting adventures of a vigilante.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Samuel Tyler

    The superhero market is crowded and sometimes a little boring. Who cares about what a God like person can do when the rest of us are scrambling around trying to avoid papercuts, never mind trying to repel a rogue asteroid. The best heroes are those that are just normal blokes or ladies dressed up in some fancy outfit. When it comes down to it Batman or The Shadow are just men, but it is their vulnerability that makes them ace to read about. Add to like George Mann’s The Ghost, a troubled World W The superhero market is crowded and sometimes a little boring. Who cares about what a God like person can do when the rest of us are scrambling around trying to avoid papercuts, never mind trying to repel a rogue asteroid. The best heroes are those that are just normal blokes or ladies dressed up in some fancy outfit. When it comes down to it Batman or The Shadow are just men, but it is their vulnerability that makes them ace to read about. Add to like George Mann’s The Ghost, a troubled World War 1 veteran who returns to New York and can longer watch as the criminals take control. To add spice, this is not our own 1920s New York, but an alternative reality that has more of the supernatural and Steam Punk to it. The Ghost becomes embroiled in a new case when a ship arrives from Egypt that contains the artefacts of a God, but also the baggage of an entire Cult. Can our rocket propelled hero fight off ancient evil whilst nursing a set of broken ribs? ‘‘Ghosts of Karnak’’ by George Mann is the third in a series starring Gabriel Cross i.e. The Ghost, but you do not need to have read earlier outings as this is fast paced fun science fiction that is more about the action than the in-depth characters. There is more than a hint of Batman, The Shadow, and Rocketeer etc. in the book, but by adding a veneer of Steam Punk to proceedings, Mann is able to chisel out enough of a market to make the book stand out on its own. The book flips between the story of Gabriel fighting reanimated statues and the story of is on again, off again lover Ginner as she travelled around Egypt some months earlier. Any reader will be able to tell straight away that the two elements are very closely connected, but seeing what is coming does not actually detract from the story and, in fact, adds to it. This is quality camp sci fi that is all about the reader enjoying themselves. The set pieces are great fun, as long as you suspend your disbelief. The Ghost is able to use rockets in his shoes to boost around the scene, this make fighting and escapes dynamic, but underneath it all he is just a man. Mann is just able to balance the level of damage that Gabriel takes – anymore and you would think he himself is superhuman. The story rockets along at a great pace and the 1920s setting is evocative. Throw in the Egyptian curses and you have a clichéd, but entertaining story. A couple of elements left me questioning once or twice; Gabriel fights as he does because of psychological damage caused during the war, yet he dishes out death to many people without a second thought. This is the same with the police in the book as they come across cultists and open fire – even if the cult was violent last time, surely the police would have to ask them to surrender the next? As the New York represented here is not our own and neither is the history, some leeway can be given, but at times the gore is a little much from the ‘good’ guys. Where the book excels is not only in pace, but also world design; gangsters and the supernatural just work well together. For fans of breezy pulp sci fi, they will gain a lot of joy from ‘‘Ghosts’’, but those looking for something more cerebral, best look elsewhere. Original review on bookbag.co.uk

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    First off, I should say that I was halfway through this book before I realized that it is the third book in a series. However, that didn't seem to make much difference other than perhaps I know less detail about the Ghost and his origins. This was a very quick read. Overall, I would have to say I was indifferent. "Ghosts of Karnak" struck me as neither particularly good nor particularly bad. It was enjoyable enough but I doubt I'll go in search of the other Ghost books. The plot was simple but a First off, I should say that I was halfway through this book before I realized that it is the third book in a series. However, that didn't seem to make much difference other than perhaps I know less detail about the Ghost and his origins. This was a very quick read. Overall, I would have to say I was indifferent. "Ghosts of Karnak" struck me as neither particularly good nor particularly bad. It was enjoyable enough but I doubt I'll go in search of the other Ghost books. The plot was simple but all too familiar, with ancient Egyptian gods being raised, mobsters fighting cultists, and a police detective working with a mechanically enhanced vigilante. As far as I can tell, there is some degree of steampunk and alternative history to these books. Having read several steampunk novels, I'd have to say this is better than most in that it doesn't attempt too much. By keeping those elements simple and clear, it feels much more realistic than such novels usually do. The writing was good for the most part, with the occasional clunky line or overwrought simile. I actually was wishing it was a bit more noir because I felt that would have fit the story very well. If you like your mysteries with a dash of steampunk and pulp, you might enjoy this.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dale

    The Ghost Volume Three This novel is the third starring Gabriel Cross, secretly the vigilante known as the Ghost. The Ghost inhabits a post-steampunk world, specifically 1920’s era New York City, especially Manhattan. As the Ghost, Gabriel Cross is very much in the vein of old pulp heroes the Shadow and the Spider. He wears a slouch black hat and trench-coat, his eyes hidden behind red goggles. These use infrared to see in the darkness and the lenses can be manipulated to give him telescopic visi The Ghost Volume Three This novel is the third starring Gabriel Cross, secretly the vigilante known as the Ghost. The Ghost inhabits a post-steampunk world, specifically 1920’s era New York City, especially Manhattan. As the Ghost, Gabriel Cross is very much in the vein of old pulp heroes the Shadow and the Spider. He wears a slouch black hat and trench-coat, his eyes hidden behind red goggles. These use infrared to see in the darkness and the lenses can be manipulated to give him telescopic vision as well. He has booster rockets on his boots which enable him to fly. His main weapon is a flechette gun that is fastened to his right arm. In this story, the Reaper is still active and his enforcers—men who have been fitted with exoskeletons that make them almost undefeatable—still patrol the city and the Ghost has been badly injured. But another threat is on its way, one even the Reaper will come to fear. Gabriel’s girlfriend Ginny Gray has been in Egypt visiting an archeological dig, but is due home on the ship Luxor. However, the boat discharges all passengers and Ginny isn’t among them. Investigating, he discovers a strange box in the hold that appears to be a prison, and he thinks he detects Ginny’s perfume… The story barrels along at breakneck speed, yet great attention are given to detail. The story develops nicely, as each chapter interlocks to build like puzzle pieces until the final picture is revealed. The Ghost has fought evil in many forms but this is an ancient evil that has waited centuries to return. It has carefully set in place the right combination of events which will culminate in a return of an old god to rule the earth. But not if the Ghost and his allies can stop it… I give the book five stars! Quoth the Raven…

  13. 4 out of 5

    Martin

    Yeah, the people who keep talking about this being "steampunk", no not really. It uses a couple steam punk ideas, like holo tubes for phones, blimps being in everyday use and certain tech being 100 years more advanced than the date, while running around in the 1920s. It would be like calling The Shadow "steampunk" or even Golden Age Batman. The story is very simple, and the characters are barely 2 dimensional. After I finished it, I truly felt like I had read the pilot for new Amazon series. All Yeah, the people who keep talking about this being "steampunk", no not really. It uses a couple steam punk ideas, like holo tubes for phones, blimps being in everyday use and certain tech being 100 years more advanced than the date, while running around in the 1920s. It would be like calling The Shadow "steampunk" or even Golden Age Batman. The story is very simple, and the characters are barely 2 dimensional. After I finished it, I truly felt like I had read the pilot for new Amazon series. All it was missing was an ad page at the end saying "Brought to you by the producers of Man in the High Castle!" Sadly, what it needed to be was more like Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow. It's not silly or pulpy enough to be great fun, and it's not dramatic enough with well rounded characters to be serious drama. It never committed to being enough about anything, so in the end was never anything more than an airplane or sitting around waiting at the doctors office, type of book. It's light, fast, and easy to read and that's about it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Blake

    -Spoiler Free Review- Ghosts of Karnak is a fun pulp noir, sci-fi, steam punk thriller taking elements from everything from Batman, the Spirit, HP Lovecraft, and Egyptian lore. This is the third book in the Ghost series and I want to up front and say I have not read any of the others. That being said this book really kept my interest. You do not need to read any of the other books to understand this one. While Mann casually references the other books, giving some characters background information -Spoiler Free Review- Ghosts of Karnak is a fun pulp noir, sci-fi, steam punk thriller taking elements from everything from Batman, the Spirit, HP Lovecraft, and Egyptian lore. This is the third book in the Ghost series and I want to up front and say I have not read any of the others. That being said this book really kept my interest. You do not need to read any of the other books to understand this one. While Mann casually references the other books, giving some characters background information it does not take away anything from this story. Donovan and the Ghost (Gabriel) partnership rivals that of Jim Gordon and Batman. While the book sometimes has a slow pace I very rarely found myself losing interest. Ghost of Karnak is a fun read and I will definitely be reading the earlier books in the series. 6/10

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mandy Wultsch

    This is a hard book to classify. It is science fiction, but also a detective novel set in the futuristic 1920's. The hero and villains are bigger than life superheroes and supervillains, complete with masks and named alter egos. There is an element of romance, too. The action in this books starts right in the beginning and does not stop until the very end. This makes for a very quick read, since I did not want to put it down. Although this is the third book in the series, it can be read and enjoye This is a hard book to classify. It is science fiction, but also a detective novel set in the futuristic 1920's. The hero and villains are bigger than life superheroes and supervillains, complete with masks and named alter egos. There is an element of romance, too. The action in this books starts right in the beginning and does not stop until the very end. This makes for a very quick read, since I did not want to put it down. Although this is the third book in the series, it can be read and enjoyed without having read either of the previous books. However, the other books are worth reading, as they are good stories in themselves and not just for setting up this story. I received this book through the Goodreads Giveaway program. Thank you to the author.

  16. 4 out of 5

    John

    Mann captures the feel and flow of the pulps superbly. Set in a post-steampunk world of 1920s Manhattan this novel (and its predecessors) follow the adventures of Gabriel Cross as he confronts the crime lords and cults that threaten his city. Mann does an excellent job of breathing life into his characters--they feel like real people confronting unusual events. I'm impressed with how well the characters that populate this world drive the story forward. If you are hungry for super-heroic action th Mann captures the feel and flow of the pulps superbly. Set in a post-steampunk world of 1920s Manhattan this novel (and its predecessors) follow the adventures of Gabriel Cross as he confronts the crime lords and cults that threaten his city. Mann does an excellent job of breathing life into his characters--they feel like real people confronting unusual events. I'm impressed with how well the characters that populate this world drive the story forward. If you are hungry for super-heroic action that is true to the genre, then give this book (series) a try. It's free of all the "anti-genre" twists that so many novels about "supers" seem to have these days and assumes the reader came to witness heroes doing heroic things. We need more novels of this vein in my opinion. Bravo Mr. Mann!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Fredrik

    The Ghost strikes again! And again, and again, and again..... There's lot's and lot's of great action in these books, and Ghosts of Karnak ain't no different than the previous 2 Ghost novels. Again, great story and tons of great action, alongside some great characters. I'm pretty bummed out that I have to wait more than a year for the forth novel in this series. So, if you haven't read any of Mann's Ghost novels....... Do it now! The Ghost strikes again! And again, and again, and again..... There's lot's and lot's of great action in these books, and Ghosts of Karnak ain't no different than the previous 2 Ghost novels. Again, great story and tons of great action, alongside some great characters. I'm pretty bummed out that I have to wait more than a year for the forth novel in this series. So, if you haven't read any of Mann's Ghost novels....... Do it now!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This is the first book I've read by George Mann and possibly not the best one to start with but having said that I did enjoy it. It was a good story, easy to read and with some great characters. There were a few references to the earlier books in the series which made me think I should've started at the beginning and not jumped in with the latest. It's not my usual genre but I really enjoyed it and am now looking at going back to the start and reading the earlier books! This is the first book I've read by George Mann and possibly not the best one to start with but having said that I did enjoy it. It was a good story, easy to read and with some great characters. There were a few references to the earlier books in the series which made me think I should've started at the beginning and not jumped in with the latest. It's not my usual genre but I really enjoyed it and am now looking at going back to the start and reading the earlier books!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Fred Hughes

    Another great story from George Mann. The "Ghost" (our super hero) is fighting a battle on the streets to keep New York safe. But now the gangs have cranked up the action with enforcers which are humans augmented with hydraulic powered limbs. On top of that the Ghosts girlfriend has disappeared and there seems to be a new more ephemeral sets of ne'er do wells in town. A great action story with plenty of character development and twists A GREAT READ Another great story from George Mann. The "Ghost" (our super hero) is fighting a battle on the streets to keep New York safe. But now the gangs have cranked up the action with enforcers which are humans augmented with hydraulic powered limbs. On top of that the Ghosts girlfriend has disappeared and there seems to be a new more ephemeral sets of ne'er do wells in town. A great action story with plenty of character development and twists A GREAT READ

  20. 5 out of 5

    Josie Boyce

    Another ripping yarn from George Mann, this series is more pulpy than steampunk, and lighter and more fun for it. Strong women, smart cops, creepy bad guys. A fun adventure tale with a great cast of characters.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Gregor

    Starts off great. Nice world-building details throughout. But got a bit predictable and tedious for me around the mid-section.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Seema Rao

    Probably not the series to start in the middle though i have always wondered if Sekhmet in the galleries could secretly move.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tim Thomas

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bill

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sam | Inbetweenthebookends

  26. 4 out of 5

    Howard

  27. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    yet another i am keeping for my holiday reading in September

  28. 5 out of 5

    Karen

  29. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey Hale

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