web site hit counter When Sophie's Feelings are Really, Really Hurt - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

When Sophie's Feelings are Really, Really Hurt

Availability: Ready to download

In a sequel to her bestselling When Sophie Gets Angry..., Caldecott Honor Illustrator Molly Bang asks: What hurts your feelings, and what do you do about it? Everyone's feelings get hurt, and it's especially painful in childhood. In this story, Bang's popular character Sophie is hurt when the other children laugh at her and tell her she's wrong. Sophie's face gets hot, and In a sequel to her bestselling When Sophie Gets Angry..., Caldecott Honor Illustrator Molly Bang asks: What hurts your feelings, and what do you do about it? Everyone's feelings get hurt, and it's especially painful in childhood. In this story, Bang's popular character Sophie is hurt when the other children laugh at her and tell her she's wrong. Sophie's face gets hot, and tears begin to flow. Then she questions herself and the value of the choices she's made.At issue is Sophie's colorful, expressive painting of her favorite tree. Sophie loves it, but her picture is different from the paintings done by the other students. "The sky isn't orange! Trees aren't blue! Your picture is wrong!" they tell her.In addition to the book's subtle art lesson (imagine the skies of Vincent van Gogh, for example), readers have the opportunity to compare and contrast all the paintings done in Sophie's class. In the end, the students learn there are many different ways to interpret the world -- and each other. Here is a simple story that tackles the common issue of hurt feelings as it gently helps us to be more kind.


Compare

In a sequel to her bestselling When Sophie Gets Angry..., Caldecott Honor Illustrator Molly Bang asks: What hurts your feelings, and what do you do about it? Everyone's feelings get hurt, and it's especially painful in childhood. In this story, Bang's popular character Sophie is hurt when the other children laugh at her and tell her she's wrong. Sophie's face gets hot, and In a sequel to her bestselling When Sophie Gets Angry..., Caldecott Honor Illustrator Molly Bang asks: What hurts your feelings, and what do you do about it? Everyone's feelings get hurt, and it's especially painful in childhood. In this story, Bang's popular character Sophie is hurt when the other children laugh at her and tell her she's wrong. Sophie's face gets hot, and tears begin to flow. Then she questions herself and the value of the choices she's made.At issue is Sophie's colorful, expressive painting of her favorite tree. Sophie loves it, but her picture is different from the paintings done by the other students. "The sky isn't orange! Trees aren't blue! Your picture is wrong!" they tell her.In addition to the book's subtle art lesson (imagine the skies of Vincent van Gogh, for example), readers have the opportunity to compare and contrast all the paintings done in Sophie's class. In the end, the students learn there are many different ways to interpret the world -- and each other. Here is a simple story that tackles the common issue of hurt feelings as it gently helps us to be more kind.

30 review for When Sophie's Feelings are Really, Really Hurt

  1. 4 out of 5

    Richie Partington

    Richie’s Picks: WHEN SOPHIE’S FEELINGS ARE REALLY, REALLY HURT by Molly Bang, Blue Sky Press, September 2015, 40p., ISBN: 978-0-545-78831-1 “No one I think is in my tree I mean it must be high or low” -- John Lennon, “Strawberry Fields Forever” (1967) “But now she has another problem: If the tree is blue, what color is the sky? Sophie paints the sky orange. Now the tree pops right out. The beech looks wonderful--the way it makes her feel. But plain green leaves look too dark. Sophie remembers how each Richie’s Picks: WHEN SOPHIE’S FEELINGS ARE REALLY, REALLY HURT by Molly Bang, Blue Sky Press, September 2015, 40p., ISBN: 978-0-545-78831-1 “No one I think is in my tree I mean it must be high or low” -- John Lennon, “Strawberry Fields Forever” (1967) “But now she has another problem: If the tree is blue, what color is the sky? Sophie paints the sky orange. Now the tree pops right out. The beech looks wonderful--the way it makes her feel. But plain green leaves look too dark. Sophie remembers how each leaf glowed in the sun. She tries yellow and mixes in some green. She even knows this color’s name: chartreuse. YES!” There’s an old Aileen Fisher poem titled “Climbing” that I embraced as a kid. I encourage you to check it out. Back then, I often took pleasure in climbing up into the swaying limbs of trees. In retrospect, I imagine it provided respite from the complications of interacting with kids and from my thoughts about the nightly news which so often scared me. I was high up in a tree just the other day, removing a couple of branches that had fallen victim to California’s drought. The gentle rocking of the boughs and that feeling of escape still provide lots of pleasure. With this sequel to Molly Bang’s award-winning WHEN SOPHIE GETS ANGRY-- REALLY, REALLY ANGRY..., I enjoyed once again following Sophie up into the big old beech tree she loves. In this story, Sophie’s teacher assigns her to carefully observe a tree and then paint it from memory. When Sophie uses her creativity to depict how the beloved beech tree makes her feel, she’s mocked by a classmate. Fortunately, Sophie has a wise and articulate teacher who defuses the tension, facilitates a discussion, and leads the kids to a win-win conclusion. The news still scares me, maybe more than ever. It seems that for every social or environmental problem resolved, a new issue arises. It’s tough having kids and a grandkid and worrying about how the planet and its inhabitants might resolve so many challenges, threats, and conflicts. There’s no question that imaginative thinking must be valued and nurtured. We can only hope that the next generation can dream up strategies to solve the seemingly insolvable. WHEN SOPHIE’S FEELINGS ARE REALLY, REALLY HURT is a story that promotes thinking outside the box. As with the previous Sophie book, which won the Jane Addams Peace Award, this second book does an excellent job of illustrating nonviolent problem solving techniques. This is another notable, must-have picture book by Molly Bang. Richie Partington, MLIS Richie's Picks http://richiespicks.pbworks.com [email protected] https://www.facebook.com/richie.parti... Moderator http://groups.yahoo.com/group/middle_...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    Sophie's class is assigned an art project in which they must paint their favorite tree from memory. Sophie takes her creation a step farther by painting the way it makes her feel in addition to its distinctive features, so when her tree turns out blue instead of a shade of brown her classmates begin to tease her. Thankfully, Sophie's teacher is sympathetic to her artistic approach and uses the situation as a teaching moment. I love the way the Sophie books read. Kid emotions are realistic and trea Sophie's class is assigned an art project in which they must paint their favorite tree from memory. Sophie takes her creation a step farther by painting the way it makes her feel in addition to its distinctive features, so when her tree turns out blue instead of a shade of brown her classmates begin to tease her. Thankfully, Sophie's teacher is sympathetic to her artistic approach and uses the situation as a teaching moment. I love the way the Sophie books read. Kid emotions are realistic and treated with respect. I enjoyed the teachable moment represented in this book, but I also really liked reading Sophie's thought process as she made the artistic decisions that led to a blue tree. PreK-2.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kristina Jean Lareau

    Sophie loves her tree and when she paints it in class, some of the other kids don't like her interpretation. With When Sophie Gets Angry -- Really, Really Angry and Picture This: How Pictures Work being so important to my grad school years studying Children's Literature, I had high hopes for this sequel. While the illustrations are Bang's typical style and technically effective in conveying the necessary emotions, the design of the book feels very, well 1990s. Oftentimes the text blends into the Sophie loves her tree and when she paints it in class, some of the other kids don't like her interpretation. With When Sophie Gets Angry -- Really, Really Angry and Picture This: How Pictures Work being so important to my grad school years studying Children's Literature, I had high hopes for this sequel. While the illustrations are Bang's typical style and technically effective in conveying the necessary emotions, the design of the book feels very, well 1990s. Oftentimes the text blends into the illustrations and the font is just difficult to read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Barb Middleton

    A bit overly didactic but I like the descriptions of Sophie's favorite tree. You could use it for small moments or discuss how others feelings get hurt when they are laughed at by classmates. A bit overly didactic but I like the descriptions of Sophie's favorite tree. You could use it for small moments or discuss how others feelings get hurt when they are laughed at by classmates.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rhonda Puente-Trevino

    Sophie's feelings are hurt after classmates make fun of her creativity that is expressed in her turquois tree and blue sky painting. When Sophie's Feelings Are Really, Really Hurt tells a story that did not happen but could happen. Find out how Sophie expresses her hurt feelings? This story is a contemporary realistic fiction when a story is possible in real life. Books by Molly Bang are familiar. When you can see yourself in the story. "She experiences the same disappointments and hopes, rejec Sophie's feelings are hurt after classmates make fun of her creativity that is expressed in her turquois tree and blue sky painting. When Sophie's Feelings Are Really, Really Hurt tells a story that did not happen but could happen. Find out how Sophie expresses her hurt feelings? This story is a contemporary realistic fiction when a story is possible in real life. Books by Molly Bang are familiar. When you can see yourself in the story. "She experiences the same disappointments and hopes, rejections and joys as the reader, who can be amazed and thrilled to find someone who sees the world through similar glasses (Young,pg.162)." Recommend for grades K-3. This book was a gift to my son when he was in Kinder from his grandparents. I enjoyed the beautiful illustrations and creative way Sophie conveys her feeling through her unique and creative drawings. Applauds to (Ms. Mulry) the teacher in the story who uses the opportunity as a teachable moment to help students understand our differences that make us each unique such as Sophie's unique drawing. I personally would like to use this book as a read out loud in the classroom for discussion and help convey emotions. I would also recommend When Sophie Gets Angry -- Really, Really Angry.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alexis Stafford

    ‘When Sophie’s Feelings are Really, Really Hurt’ written by Molly Bang is included in the series of ‘When Sophie Gets Angry—Really, Really Angry’. In this story though, Sophie is asked by her teacher to go home and find her favorite tree so she can draw it the next day in class, she is excited about this project because Sophie already has her favorite breech tree in her mind. That day she goes to visit that breech tree, admires its beauty, mesmerizes every detail and even climbs it, but the next ‘When Sophie’s Feelings are Really, Really Hurt’ written by Molly Bang is included in the series of ‘When Sophie Gets Angry—Really, Really Angry’. In this story though, Sophie is asked by her teacher to go home and find her favorite tree so she can draw it the next day in class, she is excited about this project because Sophie already has her favorite breech tree in her mind. That day she goes to visit that breech tree, admires its beauty, mesmerizes every detail and even climbs it, but the next day does not go as planned for her. As Sophie is drawing her tree in class, she is using different colors such as blue for the tree trunk and orange for the sky. When one of her classmates Andrew looks over and sees her drawing he begins to make fun of it and tell Sophie that her drawing is not real and “trees can’t be orange,” this makes her very sad and so sad she begins to cry. That’s when the teacher, Ms. Mulry comes over and addresses the situation, she tells Sophie to explain her picture and once she does, Ms. Mulry begins to explain to the class that the colors Sophie uses express her feelings and emotions about the tree and that it is okay that her picture is different and not everyone’s will be the same. Ms. Mulry makes sure that all her students realize that it is not okay to make fun of someone else and hurt their feelings because we are all different in the way we interrupt things and the way we express them. In this story Bang does a great job in expressing how different is okay and different is normal. With so much emotion added into this book for children, they can connect with how it feels to be so excited about something only to realize that others don’t feel the same as you or see things the same way as you but that doesn’t mean they are any different from you or should be teased about it. Using the approach Ms. Mulry did in this story doesn’t just seclude Sophie and make her feel like now the teacher is pointing her out for being sad but it includes the rest of the class and she takes this moment to teach the class about being different. I think teachers being able to find moments of hardships from students and turning them into teachable moments for the whole class is extremely important especially when dealing with younger children and Ms. Mulry does a great job in doing so. When children are younger we often find ourselves telling them not to be sad or not to be angry but this book displays that feelings are okay to have but as parents or teachers we have to make sure that these feelings are not caused by others. Bang does a great job showing that it is okay to express your feelings and to share them with your friends, teachers or anybody you feel comfortable talking to.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

    Sophie and her class at school are given an assignment to paint a tree from real life. Sophie has a favorite tree, the big beech tree where she goes when she is feeling sad. When she visits it, she sees how it glows in the sun, how its branches are formed. But when she tries to paint it, she realizes that its gray trunk actually looks sad in the painting, it’s the opposite of how she feels about the tree. So she changes the bark color to a vivid blue, the sky is orange and the leaves are chartre Sophie and her class at school are given an assignment to paint a tree from real life. Sophie has a favorite tree, the big beech tree where she goes when she is feeling sad. When she visits it, she sees how it glows in the sun, how its branches are formed. But when she tries to paint it, she realizes that its gray trunk actually looks sad in the painting, it’s the opposite of how she feels about the tree. So she changes the bark color to a vivid blue, the sky is orange and the leaves are chartreuse and ringed in yellow to make them glow. Sophie is very happy with her painting until the other children start to tease her about it not being realistic at all. Sophie’s feelings get very hurt until her teacher comes over and they talk about what Sophie was showing in her painting of the tree. Sophie also gets the chance to see the trees that everyone in the class painted and to see how they conveyed what they were feeling too. This second book about Sophie follows the very popular When Sophie Gets Angry – Really, Really Angry, which received a Caldecott Honor. This book focuses on feelings and emotions once again and wisely takes on emotions through the lens of art. Bang makes sure to explain exactly how Sophie is feeling throughout the book, focusing on the emotions from how the tree makes her feel to the way that the teasing at school feels down to her physical reactions as well. These clear looks at emotions will allow a discussion of feelings that is manageable and one that can embrace art as well. Bang’s illustrations are exceptional. They glow with a light from within. The beech tree is fabulous and one can immediately see the connection between Bang’s art and Sophie’s. Both are playful, colorful and show deep emotion. I particularly love the image when Sophie is upset that looks at her gazing down at her feet, so that the reader is almost seeing things from Sophie’s perspective. It captures the feeling of self-doubt and even shame that teasing can create. The entire book has moments like this. Another winning title from Molly Bang, this second Sophie book deserves to be in every library right alongside the first. Appropriate for ages 4-6.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cullen Howard

    Summary: The book "When Sophie’s Feelings Are Really, Really, Hurt” begins with an art class being assigned a task. They are to choose a tree they like and paint it. Sophie knows just the one, a beech tree near her house where she goes when she is feeling melancholy or angry. When she goes to paint the tree the colors look off so she experiments with other colors, making the trunk blue, the sky orange, and leaves chartreuse. Her classmate Andrew says she did the assignment wrong because it doesn Summary: The book "When Sophie’s Feelings Are Really, Really, Hurt” begins with an art class being assigned a task. They are to choose a tree they like and paint it. Sophie knows just the one, a beech tree near her house where she goes when she is feeling melancholy or angry. When she goes to paint the tree the colors look off so she experiments with other colors, making the trunk blue, the sky orange, and leaves chartreuse. Her classmate Andrew says she did the assignment wrong because it doesn’t look like a real tree, which makes Sophie cry and feel embarrassed. The teacher interjects and says that her painting reflects more than just the tree; it also reflects her feelings. Sophie gets a chance to explain her work and feels happy. Characteristics That Support the Genre: This book falls into both contemporary realistic fiction and picture book categories. The book takes place is a realistic setting (art class) and consists of a very realistic story with authentic human reactions (Sophie getting her feelings hurt by a peer). Additionally, the text is accompanied by vivid drawings that capture the artwork being discussed throughout the book. Mentor Writing Traits: (1) Idea – The central topic of the book is universal and captured well, which would provide students with a model of how to capture readers through subject matter (2) Conventions – Much of the story is written as conversations, so readers can study how quotations and other punctuation should be used to properly capture discussions between characters. (3) Presentation – Vivid and colorful artwork is carried throughout the book and captures the text details. Classroom Integration: This book would prove to be a great mentor text for a lesson focused on capturing readers through universal experiences or feelings. Additionally, it could be used to scaffold students writing of dialogue. Other Suggestions: I would suggest this book as being appropriate for readers in approximately second grade. As an additional idea for integration in the classroom, I think it could provide the basis for a grand conversation centered on the importance of mutual respect and how feelings can be hurt.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ed

    I was VERY surprised that I enjoyed this book as much as I did, since I had very low expectations going in. I generally hate sequels, since with a few exceptions (most notably Madeline's Rescue and Knuffle Bunny Too: A Case of Mistaken Identity), sequels seem to just be an author trying to make more money off the same characters, and usually lack the charm and originality of the previous book. To make matter even worse, even though I like Molly Bang's work in general, I did not really enjoy Whe I was VERY surprised that I enjoyed this book as much as I did, since I had very low expectations going in. I generally hate sequels, since with a few exceptions (most notably Madeline's Rescue and Knuffle Bunny Too: A Case of Mistaken Identity), sequels seem to just be an author trying to make more money off the same characters, and usually lack the charm and originality of the previous book. To make matter even worse, even though I like Molly Bang's work in general, I did not really enjoy When Sophie Gets Angry -- Really, Really Angry all that much, and her painting style didn't appeal to me. That is probably why this book was so impressive to me, since not only did she use the same style, but she actually explains her style in the book, and it really made me change my mind about both these books. I'm not sure if anyone else, or the Caldecott committee will feel the same way, but I really think that this book should get some serious consideration this year. The artwork is fantastic, and I think if you read the Caldecott criteria below, it meets all the requirements for making it "distinguished", (especially d and e): • In identifying a “distinguished American picture book for children,” defined as illustration, committee members need to consider: a. Excellence of execution in the artistic technique employed; b. Excellence of pictorial interpretation of story, theme, or concept; c. Appropriateness of style of illustration to the story, theme or concept; d. Delineation of plot, theme, characters, setting, mood or information through the pictures; e. Excellence of presentation in recognition of a child audience.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Albert Lee

    When Sophie’s Feelings Are Really, Really Hurt is a simple, colorful, fiction about a girl who has emotional issues. The story is about when the class was assigned to paint a tree from real life and they must paint it based on their memory. Sophie decided on a specific tree because it is the tree she goes to when she feels angry or sad because it makes her feel better once she gets there and her anger and sadness “melt away.” This would be interesting to children especially for those who would n When Sophie’s Feelings Are Really, Really Hurt is a simple, colorful, fiction about a girl who has emotional issues. The story is about when the class was assigned to paint a tree from real life and they must paint it based on their memory. Sophie decided on a specific tree because it is the tree she goes to when she feels angry or sad because it makes her feel better once she gets there and her anger and sadness “melt away.” This would be interesting to children especially for those who would not admit to their emotional issues or have a hard time explaining what they are feeling. The metaphorical meaning when her emotions “melts away” is a good description for children to understand on what they feel after they have calmed down. For Sophie she did something different from the other children because she painted the tree based on meaning and emotions of the tree. The other classmates shamed her for not doing the assignment correctly which is a common situation in a classroom because students will always try to point a mistake. However, the teacher gave a closer look and gave Sophie a chance to voice her reason for the different colors of the tree. By the end the students understood that the way they interpret and paint a tree is based on their emotions and it is okay to do something different. Although the story may be broad and plain, the colors were welcoming and it complimented with the idea of the story. Colors can be a powerful meaning to the story. I found the book to be too simple and they were a variety of cultural groups, and the book did a good job of not having negative stereotypes. Overall, the book is a good conversation starter to talk about emotions and how we feel because some students are shy or mumbles about it, but once an adult guides the student and point out the positive intent, then the student would gain confidence and use their voice to express themselves directly just like Sophie.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    In the same way that she learns how to deal with her feelings of anger in When Sophie Gets Angry--Really, Really Angry..., Sophie figures out how to deal with having her feelings hurt in this picture book. After the class's art teacher, Ms. Mulry suggests that all her students spend time with their favorite tree, Sophie luxuriates in the leafy branches of her favorite beech tree. When she comes to class and starts to paint the tree, though, she realizes that being true to life and painting its t In the same way that she learns how to deal with her feelings of anger in When Sophie Gets Angry--Really, Really Angry..., Sophie figures out how to deal with having her feelings hurt in this picture book. After the class's art teacher, Ms. Mulry suggests that all her students spend time with their favorite tree, Sophie luxuriates in the leafy branches of her favorite beech tree. When she comes to class and starts to paint the tree, though, she realizes that being true to life and painting its trunk gray doesn't express the way she feels about the tree. After her classmates ridicule her since the tree isn't realistic, her teacher points out that the tree represents how Sophie feels about the tree just as another classmate's depiction of a pine tree clinging to the ground expresses his feelings. Undoubtedly, all of us have experienced Sophie's embarrassment and frustration at having our artwork or creative projects misunderstood or misinterpreted. Clearly, this picture book would be ideal for sharing with youngsters before encouraging them to express themselves freely or as a reminder that talking about art or music might reveal the reasons for certain artistic choices. I enjoyed the message, the patience of the teacher, and the brightly-hued illustrations that seem to pulse with life. I also liked having a tree seen as a place of sanctuary and a place for restoring one's energy. Like Sophie, I've always found solace in being surrounded by trees. While I might not need or want to climb up into their limbs, I simply cannot abide living in a place without trees. They heal me. Today's generation might need a reminder of their capacity to do just that.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    Just as "When Sophie gets really really Angry", Bang does an excellent job discussing how easily young children, Toddlers through 2nd grade, get their feelings hurt. In this case Bang doesn't consider the situation so much as bullying, but as creating an understanding of difference. This is a difficult concept to learn, as this age children, are becoming more integrated in social situations outside home and immediate family structures and belief sets. This socialization often presents in Child A Just as "When Sophie gets really really Angry", Bang does an excellent job discussing how easily young children, Toddlers through 2nd grade, get their feelings hurt. In this case Bang doesn't consider the situation so much as bullying, but as creating an understanding of difference. This is a difficult concept to learn, as this age children, are becoming more integrated in social situations outside home and immediate family structures and belief sets. This socialization often presents in Child A telling Child B that the way they are doing something is wrong or silly. This struggle of reconciling MY family belief system with Your family belief system is a real issue for this age. Its not just a kum-ba-yah, we all play nicely moment (which is a good lesson to teach) but it goes to the core of the struggle for this age of reconciling different belief systems. My one and only concern with the book, (and is is slight) is that the pictures that all the children paint are much better pictures than anyone the target age has skill sets to create. the illustrations are wonderful and important to the point of the story, but a little less professional look to the pictures would also help with this age's self-acceptance and self-esteem.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dione Basseri

    I was actually quite surprised to see this book! I read the original Sophie book back in 2004, and even then it was five years old! It's been seventeen years since publication, and now we get a sequel! Goodness, Sophie should be old enough to drink, by now! Of course, she's still a kid, here. No worries, parents! We elarn again about how to handle negative emotions, and again use Sophie's tree for this lesson. Sophie's class is told to draw a tree, but Sophie's first try doesn't look right. So sh I was actually quite surprised to see this book! I read the original Sophie book back in 2004, and even then it was five years old! It's been seventeen years since publication, and now we get a sequel! Goodness, Sophie should be old enough to drink, by now! Of course, she's still a kid, here. No worries, parents! We elarn again about how to handle negative emotions, and again use Sophie's tree for this lesson. Sophie's class is told to draw a tree, but Sophie's first try doesn't look right. So she draws how it makes her FEEL, but that brings ridicule from the class. Luckily, her teacher understand what Sophie is trying to do, and she teaches the class not only about artistic expression, but also about being unique, how to not hurt feelings, and how to forgive. That woman deserves a raise. It's a pretty satisfying sequel! I don't see it winning any awards for artwork, simply because it's a repeat of the original book, but this could certainly get some recommendations from child development workers looking to help kids express themselves and work through conflict.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ariel

    Molly Bang wowed me years ago with "When Sophie Gets Angry" and this one continues Sophie's voyage into emotional maturity with beautiful drawings and nonviolent ways of dealing with feelings. This time instead of climbing her special tree, Sophie draws the happy way it makes her feel--with the colors that express her happiness. When her classmate makes fun of her turquoise tree and orange sky, what will Sophie do? Molly Bang wowed me years ago with "When Sophie Gets Angry" and this one continues Sophie's voyage into emotional maturity with beautiful drawings and nonviolent ways of dealing with feelings. This time instead of climbing her special tree, Sophie draws the happy way it makes her feel--with the colors that express her happiness. When her classmate makes fun of her turquoise tree and orange sky, what will Sophie do?

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    Text to Teaching Connection This book is illustrated with bold colorful drawings and the colors used by the author/illustrator reflect the mood of the book. When Sophie is walking in the woods, the author/illustrator Molly Bang uses calm greens and blues. Sophie's painting is criticized by a classmate, and her feelings are hurt. The teacher calmly explains that the colors she uses reflects Sophie's feelings. This book teaches empathy to young readers. I would read this book to a class and have th Text to Teaching Connection This book is illustrated with bold colorful drawings and the colors used by the author/illustrator reflect the mood of the book. When Sophie is walking in the woods, the author/illustrator Molly Bang uses calm greens and blues. Sophie's painting is criticized by a classmate, and her feelings are hurt. The teacher calmly explains that the colors she uses reflects Sophie's feelings. This book teaches empathy to young readers. I would read this book to a class and have them discuss art. I would bring in posters of trees and I would encourage the children to critique the artwork and use positive statements. Using phrases like I like the way the artist used this color... or I like the way the artist painted the tree from a different perspective... They could compare oil paintings and water colors and mosaics.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Christine Turner

    Everyone's feelings get hurt, and it's especially painful in childhood. In this story, Bang's popular character Sophie is hurt when the other children laugh at her and tell her she's wrong. At issue is Sophie's colorful, expressive painting of her favorite tree. Sophie loves it, but her picture is different from the paintings done by the other students. "The sky isn't orange! Trees aren't blue! Your picture is wrong!" they tell her. In the end, the students learn there are many different ways to Everyone's feelings get hurt, and it's especially painful in childhood. In this story, Bang's popular character Sophie is hurt when the other children laugh at her and tell her she's wrong. At issue is Sophie's colorful, expressive painting of her favorite tree. Sophie loves it, but her picture is different from the paintings done by the other students. "The sky isn't orange! Trees aren't blue! Your picture is wrong!" they tell her. In the end, the students learn there are many different ways to interpret the world, and each other. Here is a simple story that tackles the common issue of hurt feelings as it gently helps us to be more kind. Subject: Emotions -- Juvenile fiction. Human behavior -- Juvenile fiction. Elementary schools -- Juvenile fiction. Painting -- Juvenile fiction.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Esutterlin

    Great for art and story. However, unlike with the angry book, I don't get a sense of the emotion as well, or how Sophie felt or responded. I could not see if Sophie learned or saw any way she could have dealt with her own feelings of feeling hurt when the other children criticized her painting. It is only after the teacher steps in and validates how Sophie drew the tree that she begins to pull herself back together. I still liked reading the story though; I am just not sure that this will help c Great for art and story. However, unlike with the angry book, I don't get a sense of the emotion as well, or how Sophie felt or responded. I could not see if Sophie learned or saw any way she could have dealt with her own feelings of feeling hurt when the other children criticized her painting. It is only after the teacher steps in and validates how Sophie drew the tree that she begins to pull herself back together. I still liked reading the story though; I am just not sure that this will help children deal with having their feelings hurt.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Stven

    The artwork is what really makes this story good, and that's appropriate since this is a story about art. When I opened it up the first picture of Sophie's classroom held me mesmerized for some time. The style is broad and plain but the colors are welcoming and the compositions are strong. It reminded me how, when reading with a child, it's common to pause and talk about all the things there are to be seen in the pictures. There are lots of points of focus here. I felt the effect as calming and The artwork is what really makes this story good, and that's appropriate since this is a story about art. When I opened it up the first picture of Sophie's classroom held me mesmerized for some time. The style is broad and plain but the colors are welcoming and the compositions are strong. It reminded me how, when reading with a child, it's common to pause and talk about all the things there are to be seen in the pictures. There are lots of points of focus here. I felt the effect as calming and strengthening and imaginative.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    This is another book by Molly Bang, author of When Sophie Gets Angry- Really, Really Angry, wherein Sophie learns how to express her feelings in a productive way. She also learns how to deal with other kids who tease her about her tree painting. Sophie manages, with the help of her watchful and caring teacher, to talk about her feelings and to appreciate others' unique insights in their tree art. A good follow-up to Molly Bang's first book. I can see lots of discussion around this in a preschool This is another book by Molly Bang, author of When Sophie Gets Angry- Really, Really Angry, wherein Sophie learns how to express her feelings in a productive way. She also learns how to deal with other kids who tease her about her tree painting. Sophie manages, with the help of her watchful and caring teacher, to talk about her feelings and to appreciate others' unique insights in their tree art. A good follow-up to Molly Bang's first book. I can see lots of discussion around this in a preschool through 2nd grade classrooms.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jillian

    I liked it for the discussion of using colours to convey feeling, and using different emotional representations in art. But that's WAY, way above the target audience. (As were the paintings the kids made, let's be honest...) I really *disliked* the art style of the book itself; it actually gave me a headache. But of course, the whole point of the book is not to criticize art for being "wrong," so now I feel bad! I liked it for the discussion of using colours to convey feeling, and using different emotional representations in art. But that's WAY, way above the target audience. (As were the paintings the kids made, let's be honest...) I really *disliked* the art style of the book itself; it actually gave me a headache. But of course, the whole point of the book is not to criticize art for being "wrong," so now I feel bad!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Anastasia Tuckness

    Sophie loves painting, and she loves trees, so she is excited to paint her favorite tree in art class. As she starts, though, she thinks a grey trunk makes her tree look sad. Her solution is innovative and completely valid, but several of her classmates don't appreciate it. (This is the hurt feelings part.) As with the previous Sophie book about her anger, Molly Bang does an amazing job of expressing feelings with the words and the pictures in the story. Sophie loves painting, and she loves trees, so she is excited to paint her favorite tree in art class. As she starts, though, she thinks a grey trunk makes her tree look sad. Her solution is innovative and completely valid, but several of her classmates don't appreciate it. (This is the hurt feelings part.) As with the previous Sophie book about her anger, Molly Bang does an amazing job of expressing feelings with the words and the pictures in the story.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I enjoyed this more than the original Sophie book about anger. I just love the tone of this book as well as the dialog between teacher and students. Sophie paints her tree to express herself and when she is questioned because she didn't "color it right" her teacher shows everyone the power of creative expression. I can't wait to get a copy for my school AND use this with students. I will work with the Art teacher and or ELA teachers, too. I am excited to use this book!! I enjoyed this more than the original Sophie book about anger. I just love the tone of this book as well as the dialog between teacher and students. Sophie paints her tree to express herself and when she is questioned because she didn't "color it right" her teacher shows everyone the power of creative expression. I can't wait to get a copy for my school AND use this with students. I will work with the Art teacher and or ELA teachers, too. I am excited to use this book!!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    Listed in CCBC Choices 2016 under Picture Books for School-Age Children. Just as in "...Really, Really Angry", Molly Bangs captures the essence of hurt feelings quite perfectly. When a classmate criticizes Sophie's painting, her feelings are hurt. Back pages suggest to readers that there are many things one can do to feel better. Would be a great classroom read aloud with discussion. Sweet Spot: Grades K-3 Listed in CCBC Choices 2016 under Picture Books for School-Age Children. Just as in "...Really, Really Angry", Molly Bangs captures the essence of hurt feelings quite perfectly. When a classmate criticizes Sophie's painting, her feelings are hurt. Back pages suggest to readers that there are many things one can do to feel better. Would be a great classroom read aloud with discussion. Sweet Spot: Grades K-3

  24. 4 out of 5

    Patrice Sartor

    Both this title and the one where Sophie gets really, really angry are good at providing ways for children to deal with difficult emotions. For this one, Sophie draws a picture of her favorite tree, and it's not what her classmates expect. They make fun of her for this, and as a result, as you can expect, her feelings get really, really hurt. I'm not particularly a fan of this style of heavily lined, simply drawn, brightly colored art, though I'm guessing kids will like it just fine. Both this title and the one where Sophie gets really, really angry are good at providing ways for children to deal with difficult emotions. For this one, Sophie draws a picture of her favorite tree, and it's not what her classmates expect. They make fun of her for this, and as a result, as you can expect, her feelings get really, really hurt. I'm not particularly a fan of this style of heavily lined, simply drawn, brightly colored art, though I'm guessing kids will like it just fine.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Davidson

    Molly's teacher says for everyone in the class to find a tree they like a lot, study it and then the next day in class they are each going to draw their tree from memory. Molly has a favourite tree where she goes to feel happier. The next day when she paints her tree, she paints it the way it makes her feel. The other children make fun of her picture but the teacher has a way to show the children how special it is. Molly's teacher says for everyone in the class to find a tree they like a lot, study it and then the next day in class they are each going to draw their tree from memory. Molly has a favourite tree where she goes to feel happier. The next day when she paints her tree, she paints it the way it makes her feel. The other children make fun of her picture but the teacher has a way to show the children how special it is.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sheri

    This story is about painting what you feel about your favorite tree. Sophie sees things differently when it is time to paint her favorite beech tree. Good thought process in her choice of colors and the teacher is very helpful showing others that she isn't wrong but sees things different than they do. A book about feelings and that your feelings are important and seeing what others are feeling is different. Good read aloud and discussion in elementary grades. This story is about painting what you feel about your favorite tree. Sophie sees things differently when it is time to paint her favorite beech tree. Good thought process in her choice of colors and the teacher is very helpful showing others that she isn't wrong but sees things different than they do. A book about feelings and that your feelings are important and seeing what others are feeling is different. Good read aloud and discussion in elementary grades.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jody Lewandowski

    Sophie uses paint to show how she views her favorite tree - the tree she visits to calm herself after being angry or sad. I love Bang's use of color and lighting in Sophie's painting - and the narrator's explanations, in simple terms, of why those choices make such a difference. Of course, this is also a good example of how to work through those hurt feelings without lashing out. Sophie uses paint to show how she views her favorite tree - the tree she visits to calm herself after being angry or sad. I love Bang's use of color and lighting in Sophie's painting - and the narrator's explanations, in simple terms, of why those choices make such a difference. Of course, this is also a good example of how to work through those hurt feelings without lashing out.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    For older children, this story has several themes, such as how we all view the world differently, showing our creative sides, art, and hurt feelings. The illustrations are great, and the different topics are dealt with in a very realist example. A little text heavy for younger readers, I would recommend this as a one on one book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kenson and kirra

    my mom got me this book from the library after i had to read when sophie's is really really angry for homework for school. this book had more words in it, but i liked it a lot because it had her special calm tree in it too. I think it was cool how the teacher made everybody feel good about themselves and their project. my mom got me this book from the library after i had to read when sophie's is really really angry for homework for school. this book had more words in it, but i liked it a lot because it had her special calm tree in it too. I think it was cool how the teacher made everybody feel good about themselves and their project.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Leake

    I think this is a great book for teaching children about emotions. What I also think is that the pictures throughout this book can be overwhelming for children at such a young age. Some kids might not fully understand the concept of emotions yet, and then this book would not really serve its purpose to the children.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.