web site hit counter Ilongot Headhunting, 1883-1974: A Study in Society and History - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Ilongot Headhunting, 1883-1974: A Study in Society and History

Availability: Ready to download

This study, a history of the kind of people who are supposed to have one, challenges the fashionable view that so-called primitives live in a timeless present. The conventional wisdom, that such societies are static, is shown by the author to be an artifact of anthropological method. By piecing together extended oral histories and written history records, the author found This study, a history of the kind of people who are supposed to have one, challenges the fashionable view that so-called primitives live in a timeless present. The conventional wisdom, that such societies are static, is shown by the author to be an artifact of anthropological method. By piecing together extended oral histories and written history records, the author found that headhunting among the Ilongots of Northern Luzon, Philippines, was not an unchanging ancient custom, but a cultural practice that has shifted dramatically over the course of the past century. Headhunting stopped, resumed, and stopped again; its victims at various periods were fellow Ilongots, Japanese soldiers, and lowland Christian Filipinos; it took place as surprise attack, planned vendetta, or distant raid against strangers. Placing headhunting in its social, cultural, and historical contexts requires a novel sense of how to use biography, recorded history, and narrative in the analysis of small-scale, non-literate local communities. This study combines historical and ethnographic method and documents the inherent orchestration of structure, events, time, and consciousness. The book is illustrated with 34 photographs.


Compare

This study, a history of the kind of people who are supposed to have one, challenges the fashionable view that so-called primitives live in a timeless present. The conventional wisdom, that such societies are static, is shown by the author to be an artifact of anthropological method. By piecing together extended oral histories and written history records, the author found This study, a history of the kind of people who are supposed to have one, challenges the fashionable view that so-called primitives live in a timeless present. The conventional wisdom, that such societies are static, is shown by the author to be an artifact of anthropological method. By piecing together extended oral histories and written history records, the author found that headhunting among the Ilongots of Northern Luzon, Philippines, was not an unchanging ancient custom, but a cultural practice that has shifted dramatically over the course of the past century. Headhunting stopped, resumed, and stopped again; its victims at various periods were fellow Ilongots, Japanese soldiers, and lowland Christian Filipinos; it took place as surprise attack, planned vendetta, or distant raid against strangers. Placing headhunting in its social, cultural, and historical contexts requires a novel sense of how to use biography, recorded history, and narrative in the analysis of small-scale, non-literate local communities. This study combines historical and ethnographic method and documents the inherent orchestration of structure, events, time, and consciousness. The book is illustrated with 34 photographs.

30 review for Ilongot Headhunting, 1883-1974: A Study in Society and History

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bob Newman

    Losing your head over history The Ilongots, never a numerous people, traditionally lived in the forested mountains of central Luzon, in the Philippines. Though they may number as many as 50,000 today, most of them do not live in their traditional lands. The reasons are cultural, historical, economic, or all three. Up to the early 1970s, most Ilongots still followed what might be called a "traditional" life, though a main point of Rosaldo's work is to question that very word. The question for rea Losing your head over history The Ilongots, never a numerous people, traditionally lived in the forested mountains of central Luzon, in the Philippines. Though they may number as many as 50,000 today, most of them do not live in their traditional lands. The reasons are cultural, historical, economic, or all three. Up to the early 1970s, most Ilongots still followed what might be called a "traditional" life, though a main point of Rosaldo's work is to question that very word. The question for readers of this book is "do you really need to know very much about an obscure Philippine people ?" The answer for those who are not Southeast Asia specialists is probably "no". However, ILONGOT HEADHUNTING is not a straight-out ethnography, nor is it an exciting (titillating?) book about gruesome, exotic practices in the jungle. It is a very interesting and serious attempt to reverse the old anthropological habit of presenting small, isolated societies as if they existed in a vacuum, without history, without any influences from outside. Rosaldo wants to do away with the notion of the "timeless primitive". All peoples have history and their lives and actions definitely reflect it. Just because anthropologists did not find neat books and historical records in such places as the Ilongot mountains does not mean life never changed there. The life cycle of the individual, long a favorite focus for anthropologists, was never an "immutable structure". People's lives constantly changed from generation to generation. Rosaldo painstakingly weaves a story of clans, feuds, marriages, relationships with outsiders, and new influences to show that Ilongot history---though not remembered for much more than a century by the people---played a definite role in many aspects of their lives. In fact, they were obsessed by history.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    As reader is carried through the Ilongot feuding, raiding, and peacemaking, the Ilongot’s spring to life as a unique and exciting people. By vividly demonstrating how age mates take heads to avenge a perceived wrong, we began to understand the motivation for this type of behavior. Rosaldo does an excellent job with the strategic placement of photographs of the Ilongot as they plant, dress in their finest, fish, duel, and holding babies. I would love to see a whole book of just photographs on th As reader is carried through the Ilongot feuding, raiding, and peacemaking, the Ilongot’s spring to life as a unique and exciting people. By vividly demonstrating how age mates take heads to avenge a perceived wrong, we began to understand the motivation for this type of behavior. Rosaldo does an excellent job with the strategic placement of photographs of the Ilongot as they plant, dress in their finest, fish, duel, and holding babies. I would love to see a whole book of just photographs on the Ilongot people. My favorite picture is of the Ilongot father holding his baby. I don’t know exactly why this one affects me as it does. Rosaldo has had a unique opportunity to live with the Ilongots and to record for future generations what the Ilongots were and have become. He declares that the children of the Ilongots will walk a different path than their Ilongot parents. “Ilongot society has followed not a straight-line progression, but an uneven motion, now starting, now stopping, then shifting direction” (289). The Ilongots are not without a history!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Fredrick Danysh

    Looks at the Ilongots of the Philippines who were headhunters until after World War II.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Iskandar Muhammad

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kalli Small

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alix

  7. 4 out of 5

    Orlan Baliton

  8. 4 out of 5

    Suepattra

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michell8

  10. 5 out of 5

    Angeline Kasia

  11. 4 out of 5

    John

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Ashton

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kert Tandog

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kshetrimayum Narendra

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ellyce

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Weber

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rajendra Dhiman

  18. 5 out of 5

    Joyce

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

  20. 5 out of 5

    Fredrick

  21. 5 out of 5

    Blaž Potokar

  22. 4 out of 5

    esra

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ferdinand

  24. 4 out of 5

    Glenne Tietzer

  25. 5 out of 5

    Firas Shennib

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lanny

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sophie

  28. 4 out of 5

    Guy Paikowsky

  29. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  30. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.