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Back Home (Special Illustrated Edition with the Original Artwork): The narrative of Judge Priest and his people

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BACK HOME - BEING THE NARRATIVE OF JUDGE PRIEST AND HIS PEOPLE is one of Irvin S. Cobb's wonderful stories about Judge Priest, a fictional shrewd and kindly Kentucky judge.. Irving S. Cobb was once among America's top celebrities. Author of 60 books, a writer compared to Mark Twain, Irvin S. Cobb was the country's highest paid journalist, a radio, motion pictures and lect BACK HOME - BEING THE NARRATIVE OF JUDGE PRIEST AND HIS PEOPLE is one of Irvin S. Cobb's wonderful stories about Judge Priest, a fictional shrewd and kindly Kentucky judge.. Irving S. Cobb was once among America's top celebrities. Author of 60 books, a writer compared to Mark Twain, Irvin S. Cobb was the country's highest paid journalist, a radio, motion pictures and lecture circuit star. More celebrated in his time than Johnny Carson or Jay Leno in ours, Irvin S. Cobb hosted the Academy Awards in 1935. He also received the French Legion of Honor and two honorary doctorates. A bridge over the Ohio River, parks, a major hotel, and a brand of cigars were all named after him.


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BACK HOME - BEING THE NARRATIVE OF JUDGE PRIEST AND HIS PEOPLE is one of Irvin S. Cobb's wonderful stories about Judge Priest, a fictional shrewd and kindly Kentucky judge.. Irving S. Cobb was once among America's top celebrities. Author of 60 books, a writer compared to Mark Twain, Irvin S. Cobb was the country's highest paid journalist, a radio, motion pictures and lect BACK HOME - BEING THE NARRATIVE OF JUDGE PRIEST AND HIS PEOPLE is one of Irvin S. Cobb's wonderful stories about Judge Priest, a fictional shrewd and kindly Kentucky judge.. Irving S. Cobb was once among America's top celebrities. Author of 60 books, a writer compared to Mark Twain, Irvin S. Cobb was the country's highest paid journalist, a radio, motion pictures and lecture circuit star. More celebrated in his time than Johnny Carson or Jay Leno in ours, Irvin S. Cobb hosted the Academy Awards in 1935. He also received the French Legion of Honor and two honorary doctorates. A bridge over the Ohio River, parks, a major hotel, and a brand of cigars were all named after him.

20 review for Back Home (Special Illustrated Edition with the Original Artwork): The narrative of Judge Priest and his people

  1. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Zapata

    Nope. I just can't do this. I have not had much chance to really get moving with this book until today, and I have just begun the second of ten stories, but I am calling it a DNF. I should have been prepared. Cobb was a Southern man, after all. A Southern author writing about a Southern town, with a definitely Southern approach to life and people. But no matter how talented the author (and Cobb is quite talented: he created such a realistic scene of the County Fair that I could almost smell the foo Nope. I just can't do this. I have not had much chance to really get moving with this book until today, and I have just begun the second of ten stories, but I am calling it a DNF. I should have been prepared. Cobb was a Southern man, after all. A Southern author writing about a Southern town, with a definitely Southern approach to life and people. But no matter how talented the author (and Cobb is quite talented: he created such a realistic scene of the County Fair that I could almost smell the food) talent does not ease the jolt a modern reader feels when faced with words that are no longer acceptable. The first story had a few terms here and there which annoyed but I thought I could deal with. However, in the second story the attitude intensifies and like I said I simply cannot continue. I was attempting this book because his Judge Priest stories were what first brought Cobb fame and after reading part of his autobiography I was curious to see what these stories were like. And I have seen. This book belongs in the past with the ghosts of those old Southern gentlemen Cobb was trying to glorify.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Hans Halberstadt

    As mentioned elsewhere, I have been on a long Irvin Cobb jag that started in July of 2014 and has just about run its course. I'd keep going indefinitely except that I seem to have read them all...but maybe I will start over. They are that good. Cobb wrote many books about Judge Priest, a mythical judge in a mythical little Kentucky town. The stories start well after the end of the Civil War and end with the final story in BACK HOME, "Black and White." The characters are mostly former Confederate As mentioned elsewhere, I have been on a long Irvin Cobb jag that started in July of 2014 and has just about run its course. I'd keep going indefinitely except that I seem to have read them all...but maybe I will start over. They are that good. Cobb wrote many books about Judge Priest, a mythical judge in a mythical little Kentucky town. The stories start well after the end of the Civil War and end with the final story in BACK HOME, "Black and White." The characters are mostly former Confederate soldiers whose lives were forged in that conflict, and the issues of being on the losing side and being an old man in changing times. The essence of the Judge Priest stories is the process of reconciliation and what happens to men as their brotherhood shrinks as friends and comrades age and die. I like to think of these as "bible stories" although there's nothing much about them on the surface to suggest any religious context. Judge Priest himself does not attend church and does not belong to any congregation. But these stories deal with moral challenges, conflicts, and frictions in a way that seem biblical in intent. The last story in the book concerns two white Confederate veterans, the last survivors of their local breed, and an elderly black former slave whom they nominate for membership in the group and whom they appoint to a position of honor, the color-bearer. It is a very sweet story and, like Cobb's other fiction, based on real people and real events.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Lynn

    This is a great example of Irvin S. Cobb as an author of local color. I also highly suggest this for individuals interested in Paducah and Jackson Purchase history, especially "Up Clay Street." As in most great Cobb books, the diligent Judge Priest makes a number of appearances. This is a great example of Irvin S. Cobb as an author of local color. I also highly suggest this for individuals interested in Paducah and Jackson Purchase history, especially "Up Clay Street." As in most great Cobb books, the diligent Judge Priest makes a number of appearances.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Eugenia Parker

  5. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Lelekis

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bob Griffith

  7. 5 out of 5

    Keef

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jake Keeling

  9. 4 out of 5

    Peter Pierson

  10. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tim Hart

  12. 4 out of 5

    John A

  13. 4 out of 5

    BookDB

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

  15. 4 out of 5

    Edward Waverley

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rex Vardeman

  17. 5 out of 5

    overthehill

  18. 4 out of 5

    Toby Sanders

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jane

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly B Brantley

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