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17 Deadly Women Through the Ages: True Crime (Bus Stop Reads)

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BUS STOP READS ARE SHORT QUICK READS 17 DEADLY WOMEN THROUGH THE AGES TRUE CRIME: WOMEN SERIAL KILLERS Our society can barely account for evil in males, let alone imagine it in females. The female nests, creates, and nurtures doesn’t she or is it that we just want to believe in the intrinsic non-threatening nature of women? Yet, history is full of instrumentally viole BUS STOP READS ARE SHORT QUICK READS 17 DEADLY WOMEN THROUGH THE AGES TRUE CRIME: WOMEN SERIAL KILLERS Our society can barely account for evil in males, let alone imagine it in females. The female nests, creates, and nurtures doesn’t she or is it that we just want to believe in the intrinsic non-threatening nature of women? Yet, history is full of instrumentally violent women: women who have fought wars and battles throughout the world, with no less ferociousness than men, women such as Dynamis of Bosphorous, who starved her husband to death and took control of his kingdom, or Artemisia, the queen of Halicarnassus in the 5th century, who conducted a brilliant but brutal military campaign against the Greeks. Mary Tudor, Queen Mary 1 of England, in 1553 became known as “Bloody Mary,” for her extreme cruelty and willingness to execute people. In this short book meet 17 less known but equally murderous cold blooded women. After reading it you may find your perception of the gentler sex changed irrevocably. Enjoy.


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BUS STOP READS ARE SHORT QUICK READS 17 DEADLY WOMEN THROUGH THE AGES TRUE CRIME: WOMEN SERIAL KILLERS Our society can barely account for evil in males, let alone imagine it in females. The female nests, creates, and nurtures doesn’t she or is it that we just want to believe in the intrinsic non-threatening nature of women? Yet, history is full of instrumentally viole BUS STOP READS ARE SHORT QUICK READS 17 DEADLY WOMEN THROUGH THE AGES TRUE CRIME: WOMEN SERIAL KILLERS Our society can barely account for evil in males, let alone imagine it in females. The female nests, creates, and nurtures doesn’t she or is it that we just want to believe in the intrinsic non-threatening nature of women? Yet, history is full of instrumentally violent women: women who have fought wars and battles throughout the world, with no less ferociousness than men, women such as Dynamis of Bosphorous, who starved her husband to death and took control of his kingdom, or Artemisia, the queen of Halicarnassus in the 5th century, who conducted a brilliant but brutal military campaign against the Greeks. Mary Tudor, Queen Mary 1 of England, in 1553 became known as “Bloody Mary,” for her extreme cruelty and willingness to execute people. In this short book meet 17 less known but equally murderous cold blooded women. After reading it you may find your perception of the gentler sex changed irrevocably. Enjoy.

30 review for 17 Deadly Women Through the Ages: True Crime (Bus Stop Reads)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cyndi

    This is just a few little synopsizes (that may or may not be the plural. Blame spell check). It gives a quick overview of female serial killers. Apparently the weapon of choice is poison. There are some horrific true stories in this book, but luckily for me they weren't too graphic. Still... That maybe why its called a bus stop book instead of a lunch hour book. 🤢

  2. 5 out of 5

    Joey Woolfardis

    It is a truth not universally acknowledged that, despite the fact that people seem to be increasingly interested in serial killers and make countless films about them, it's only fun if it's a white man doing it. Bus-Stop Reads are a short series of compilations from other books to give a quick taster of what you can expect. This little surprising delight features extracts from books on female serial killers, most of which were written by Sylvia Perrini, who has a series of books of serial killers It is a truth not universally acknowledged that, despite the fact that people seem to be increasingly interested in serial killers and make countless films about them, it's only fun if it's a white man doing it. Bus-Stop Reads are a short series of compilations from other books to give a quick taster of what you can expect. This little surprising delight features extracts from books on female serial killers, most of which were written by Sylvia Perrini, who has a series of books of serial killers throughout the ages, split in to different themes such as those who poisoned or those of the Victorian Era who were Baby Farmers. They're not really written all that well, but to be honest the subject matter makes up for that. I will say that there is an obvious gentleness when it comes to telling you about these killers: they are laid bare and are set out in a very factual manner with no rhyme or reason given for why it happen, simply that it happened which is how I like my facts on the ugly side of Human Beings to be presented. It's just a really great starting point for learning about female serial killers. It's simply odd how sexist people are toward even female serial killers. How many films have male serial killers, or male killers, WHITE male killers, that are glorified and glamourised, but when it comes to the female of the species nobody cares to make any films. Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Pinterest | Shop | Etsy

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jazmine

    This is a quick, easy read of true crime cases of deadly women throughout history and goes as far back as 17th century Italy. There was a few cases I knew, some I didn't. I actually learned quite a bit. However, even though this is the type of book I love reading, there were grammatical errors and missing words. This book also really lacked depth, and it feels more like you're reading high school research papers. This is why I only gave this book a rating of 2 stars.

  4. 5 out of 5

    David Batterson

    This was a troubling read of history's most brutal, serial killing women. Like Dynamis of Bosphorus, who gladly starved her husband to death just so she could take over his kingdom. And of course there was the lovely Queen Mary 1 of England aka "Bloody Mary" and her enthusiasm for executions and torture. And then, Tofania for using arsenic to manufacture facial powders, poisoning her prey. It's amazing how arsenic, a known poison could be so successfully used by so many murderers both men and wo This was a troubling read of history's most brutal, serial killing women. Like Dynamis of Bosphorus, who gladly starved her husband to death just so she could take over his kingdom. And of course there was the lovely Queen Mary 1 of England aka "Bloody Mary" and her enthusiasm for executions and torture. And then, Tofania for using arsenic to manufacture facial powders, poisoning her prey. It's amazing how arsenic, a known poison could be so successfully used by so many murderers both men and women throughout world history. Dagmar Overbye at least used her hands to strangle her victims, a much deeper commitment if you ask me. The punishments received by most of these deadly female serial killers was worse than the murders they'd committed. You'd think that they'd either have been more careful not to get caught, or they just didn't care. Either way, a great short read for anyone who loves world history and reading about true crime. A really great informative read!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Amelia

    Shallow in scope and nothing you couldn't find on Wikipedia; also in need of editing - mainly for run on sentences and dodgy comma usage - but still morbidly fascinating. Oh - and it's FREE.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    I have had 9th grade students who wrote better than this person. Not only is the book poorly written with numerous punctuation errors, it was difficult to follow in places because the antecedents were unclear. If the author is a junior high student, then I can understand how this level of writing would be acceptable. There are so many interesting things that could be said on this subject. It just wasn’t done in this book by this author.

  7. 4 out of 5

    J

    For an advertising book this wasn't actually not really that bad to read and I think I can say that the author understood pushing her books too much would actually turn down readers. Instead she would give several stories from one of her original books and then at the end of the grouping that the reader was reading would it only show up that the stories came from this particular book while here is the link if you are interested. Furthermore the writing was simple and easy to understand while th For an advertising book this wasn't actually not really that bad to read and I think I can say that the author understood pushing her books too much would actually turn down readers. Instead she would give several stories from one of her original books and then at the end of the grouping that the reader was reading would it only show up that the stories came from this particular book while here is the link if you are interested. Furthermore the writing was simple and easy to understand while there was that nice flow that I enjoy in my true crime novels where you get an explanation of the person than their crimes as well as what may have drove them to do what they did. The author also included what may have caused them to be found out, their trials and of course how they were punished. Being mostly of historical crimes it definitely wasn't of a dry read. Although women serial killers almost always seemed to use the same methods to reach their means it is the women themselves who add the variety. How they reach their goals, how they use their wits, their wealth if they had it and also even in some cases their looks is what makes them so dangerously human to our eyes. All in all if you are into true crime or even history involving women this is going to be your book. If I had the funds I would definitely be interested in the series but as for now I will have to sit back and enjoy what I have read here while hoping someone finds my review useful.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    no better that Brain Food: Apple Slices Scandal Level: Red Violence: 6 poisoned cocktails Must be ___ old to read: 16 Read if you liked: The most Evil Women in history Re-readability: Once is enough Thoughts: This is a series of short bios pulled from several books about evil women. Most of them are poisoners but there are a few baby killers in the mix as well. They are each presented in a very dry way, which is nice is some ways because it minimizes the creep out factor, but at the same time it makes no better that Brain Food: Apple Slices Scandal Level: Red Violence: 6 poisoned cocktails Must be ___ old to read: 16 Read if you liked: The most Evil Women in history Re-readability: Once is enough Thoughts: This is a series of short bios pulled from several books about evil women. Most of them are poisoners but there are a few baby killers in the mix as well. They are each presented in a very dry way, which is nice is some ways because it minimizes the creep out factor, but at the same time it makes each of the women seem very one dimensional and they loose their interest. If this was trying to get me to buy the full length books it failed. However it did introduce me to some women I had never heard of and made me want to go look for individual bios about them.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bettye McKee

    Interesting cases This book consists of several brief writings about female murderers in history. While the writing is unprofessional, the information is quite interesting. Most of the cases involve poisoners and baby-killers, and many received the death penalty. Writers, please, refrain from telling your readers that a criminal was hung. The word "hanged" was created for this one purpose; please use it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Wowee, there are some sadistic people out there. I've personally found that divorce is so much simpler. No guilt. No prison. No death sentence. This was a quick read, and I enjoyed that. Yep, I'd recommend this book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Adrielle

    This is a short version involving excerpts from other novels. For the most part it is information you could find by doing a few google searches. Regardless, it is still interesting and I learned some things.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sandra Burns

    Quick read Interesting stories, especially the ones in the early 1900 period, and ones not in the USA. These women, almost got away with it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lunara Alder

    Good Excerpts These are excerpts from several of the author's books, but there was enough substance to each woman's story to make a satisfying short read. I was excited to discover that I hadn't heard of a majority of them, which means this author isn't just writing about the same women everyone else writes about (Nannie Doss, Elizabeth Bathory, etc.). I do think just one more edit would have been good to fix a couple minor mistakes, but it wasn't enough to detract from the reading experience. I al Good Excerpts These are excerpts from several of the author's books, but there was enough substance to each woman's story to make a satisfying short read. I was excited to discover that I hadn't heard of a majority of them, which means this author isn't just writing about the same women everyone else writes about (Nannie Doss, Elizabeth Bathory, etc.). I do think just one more edit would have been good to fix a couple minor mistakes, but it wasn't enough to detract from the reading experience. I also think the cover could be changed - Medusa doesn't quite fit, and not just because she's a mythological being. Overall, I'd recommend this to those curious about female murderers. It's a good introduction with less known cases, and if readers are interested in more, they just need to read the books these pieces were excerpted from.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Donna M Thomas

    Great read, buuuut... The cases were interesting, and I liked that they were in chronological order. I thought they were informative but not boringly so. However, all but one; maybe two, had to do with poisonings. I would have rather seen a variety of methods, so to speak. Also, I liked that there were photos, when possible to procure. I think though it would have been acceptable to have sketches for the cases dated early, even if they didn't accurately depict the person. I feel photos and illust Great read, buuuut... The cases were interesting, and I liked that they were in chronological order. I thought they were informative but not boringly so. However, all but one; maybe two, had to do with poisonings. I would have rather seen a variety of methods, so to speak. Also, I liked that there were photos, when possible to procure. I think though it would have been acceptable to have sketches for the cases dated early, even if they didn't accurately depict the person. I feel photos and illustrations help the reader get lost in the book. With all my prattling finished, I really enjoyed the book and wouldn't mind reading more of the author's works :)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Quinesia Johnson

    This book was a very personable read, having respect for clarity and brevity. The 17 deadly women chosen to be discussed were basically all shockers. However, I rated this at 3 stars because there was a mid- way redundant lull, due to the same cases being all similar poisonings. Maybe not a bus stop read, this is more of a city-to-city bus read, as was it is a little long for me. Pretty shocking cases, if you're not completely aware of what 1700- 1800 women serial killings were like. I loved it, This book was a very personable read, having respect for clarity and brevity. The 17 deadly women chosen to be discussed were basically all shockers. However, I rated this at 3 stars because there was a mid- way redundant lull, due to the same cases being all similar poisonings. Maybe not a bus stop read, this is more of a city-to-city bus read, as was it is a little long for me. Pretty shocking cases, if you're not completely aware of what 1700- 1800 women serial killings were like. I loved it, I wish Glover would do more true crime bus stop reads.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kirsty Noah-whitlock

    A short and quick read about 17 women who murdered several people including their own families. I had not heard of any of the women in this book so ili found it quite interesting to learn something new and it also shows that the typical white male murderer may be the most spoke about but is certainly not the only "type" to kill. Sometimes the "shock factor" comes from some of the worst female killers who you wouldn't expect to kill their own and other people's children. An easy read and well wri A short and quick read about 17 women who murdered several people including their own families. I had not heard of any of the women in this book so ili found it quite interesting to learn something new and it also shows that the typical white male murderer may be the most spoke about but is certainly not the only "type" to kill. Sometimes the "shock factor" comes from some of the worst female killers who you wouldn't expect to kill their own and other people's children. An easy read and well written book

  17. 5 out of 5

    ruby2shoes

    Some might assume that women serial killers are rare, that is not the case. This book reveals that women have been involved for centuries. These cases maybe a samplers of Stephanie Glover's other books yet each individual case opens the door of what women are capable of doing. Intriguing, leaving one wanting more. Very fascinating.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Savina

    A quick read as stated in the title. All the women mentioned used the same main method of killing: poison. It would've been nice to have a little more variety in the women chosen. Some I had heard of before while most I never knew about which was nice to learn but the killing method became a bit stale after a few women.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tammy

    Interesting read Now and then I like to read true stories without all the fluff (long backstory, dialog, drawn out court room scenes, etc). I like it when an author gives the facts. Book like this are a good reminder that life has always been what it is and that there a boogeymen (and women) out there. And it’s good to know that sometimes they get caught and held accountable.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Wordaholic

    It is not a pleasant book to read. After a few case histories it became hard to finish it. Some were pitiful and some miserable but some downright cruel. Mostly, women suffered from childhood trauma and personality disorder and OCD. But what they did was gruesome.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joan Dabrowski

    27 Deadly women Very interesting and it shows the other side of mental illness and depression. Hopefully family and doctors can determine when s person needs help before it is too late.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Baines

    3.5 stars This is a short but fascinating read about female serial killers - most of which I'd never heard of, which I was quite pleased about. They are condensed from other books but it handily says what books they are from. I'll definitely be looking out for them.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cassandra

    Must read..... The book was intriguing to say the least. From the very early years there have been some very devious women. They would kill for all the wrong reasons. I give this book five stars. It is a must read book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Micheal

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I like the stories in it but it plateaued for me. The stories were interesting and it’s always good to read about something that’s never been talked about, but after awhile they al read the same. It was either baby killing or poisoning. Not a very diverse set of killings.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jo R

    These cases were too quickly skimmed over. Not enough depth A more in depth look at the women would have been appreciated. Some were skipped over so quickly that it was hard to determine their crimes, on the whole I found this book one dimensional

  26. 5 out of 5

    Priscilla Verian

    Pleasant Detailed Read Always fascinated by that which I do not know. Loves that the author offered the full story as well as referenced the book she used to compose her book. Highly recommend for a good and captivating read. Happy readings.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Pellar

    Eh Copy and paste hack job. Fine if you want something short, but not really worth your time. Nothing new here.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    It is a small book. Very easy to read and it doesn't take up a lot of time. My only criticism is that the book was not over a longer period of time.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kim Arnold

    I was intrigued by this book, but it was nothing more than a teaser to get you to buy other books.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Wyndi Harrington

    Mean Women V A No ladies named here hell is to nice of a place for these women, glad they got what they did.

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