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Justice in America

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As reactions to the O. J. Simpson verdict, the Rodney King beating, and the Amadou Diallo killing make clear, whites and African Americans in the United States inhabit two different perceptual worlds, with the former seeing the justice system as largely fair and color blind and the latter believing it to be replete with bias and discrimination. The authors tackle two impor As reactions to the O. J. Simpson verdict, the Rodney King beating, and the Amadou Diallo killing make clear, whites and African Americans in the United States inhabit two different perceptual worlds, with the former seeing the justice system as largely fair and color blind and the latter believing it to be replete with bias and discrimination. The authors tackle two important questions in this book: what explains the widely differing perceptions, and why do such differences matter? They attribute much of the racial chasm to the relatively common personal confrontations that many blacks have with law enforcement - confrontations seldom experienced by whites. More importantly, the authors demonstrate that this racial chasm is consequential: it leads African Americans to react much more cynically to incidents of police brutality and racial profiling, and also to be far more skeptical of punitive anti-crime policies ranging from the death penalty to three-strikes laws.


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As reactions to the O. J. Simpson verdict, the Rodney King beating, and the Amadou Diallo killing make clear, whites and African Americans in the United States inhabit two different perceptual worlds, with the former seeing the justice system as largely fair and color blind and the latter believing it to be replete with bias and discrimination. The authors tackle two impor As reactions to the O. J. Simpson verdict, the Rodney King beating, and the Amadou Diallo killing make clear, whites and African Americans in the United States inhabit two different perceptual worlds, with the former seeing the justice system as largely fair and color blind and the latter believing it to be replete with bias and discrimination. The authors tackle two important questions in this book: what explains the widely differing perceptions, and why do such differences matter? They attribute much of the racial chasm to the relatively common personal confrontations that many blacks have with law enforcement - confrontations seldom experienced by whites. More importantly, the authors demonstrate that this racial chasm is consequential: it leads African Americans to react much more cynically to incidents of police brutality and racial profiling, and also to be far more skeptical of punitive anti-crime policies ranging from the death penalty to three-strikes laws.

31 review for Justice in America

  1. 4 out of 5

    Brooke L

    Justice in America is a thorough analysis of the racial inequalities in the American justice system to African Americans. Through this book, which uses lots of statistics and graphs, one learns that the justice system is actually much more unjust than people may believe. The author is trying to convey the message that although America has come far through its history, it still has far to go as African Americans are not treated or have the same opinions on justice at all as Whites. This book was o Justice in America is a thorough analysis of the racial inequalities in the American justice system to African Americans. Through this book, which uses lots of statistics and graphs, one learns that the justice system is actually much more unjust than people may believe. The author is trying to convey the message that although America has come far through its history, it still has far to go as African Americans are not treated or have the same opinions on justice at all as Whites. This book was of a very appropriate length. There was no "frou-frou" (like there was in Unbroken). Everything that was stated in the book was useful and no words were wasted. This book covers a very serious problem and, as so, has lots of analysis, and it is still just over 200 pages. The analysis was very thorough as well and is usually accompanied with a chart or graph, such as on pages 132 and 133. These graphs are very easy to read and are accompanied with text which can help to clarify anything, "A predicted probability plot in Figure 4.3... demonstrates a familiar pattern: Black respondents are not indiscriminately biased toward black targets. Rather, those who think the system is very unfair are much more critical of the search when it is directed against the African-American men" (132-133) Although I, personally, do not read many books such as this one, everything is explained very clearly and even I can understand. This book is very powerful, as it not only uses a very analytic writing style, it leaves no questions unanswered. Also, it uses recent examples in America of the injustice faced by African Americans, such as this, "District Attorney Reed Walters explaining his decision to charge six African-American students with attempted murder after they beat a white student but declining to charge White students, who hung nooses from a school yard tree, with hate crimes" (1) This is what one opens the book to, and it shows just how ridiculously biased society is.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Charles

  3. 4 out of 5

    John

  4. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa Baird

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ella

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

  7. 5 out of 5

    Andd Becker

  8. 5 out of 5

    Gina Chen

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

  10. 5 out of 5

    Raphael Nelson

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mariam

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mariam Hassan

  13. 4 out of 5

    Amber

  14. 4 out of 5

    Quint

  15. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Wickham

  16. 4 out of 5

    Robertha

  17. 4 out of 5

    Logan

  18. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Burns

  19. 4 out of 5

    JD

  20. 5 out of 5

    David Kaib

  21. 4 out of 5

    Susan

  22. 5 out of 5

    Aimee

  23. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ankur Singh

  25. 4 out of 5

    J

  26. 4 out of 5

    Maggie Reid

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amar Baines

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mindi Beal

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kim Hollstein

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany Koewler

  31. 4 out of 5

    Aurra Fellows

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