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'We must learn to love, learn to be kind, and this from our earliest youth ... Likewise, hatred must be learned and nurtured, if one wishes to become a proficient hater' This volume contains a selection of Nietzsche's brilliant and challenging aphorisms, examining the pleasures of revenge, the falsity of pity, and the incompatibility of marriage with the philosophical life. 'We must learn to love, learn to be kind, and this from our earliest youth ... Likewise, hatred must be learned and nurtured, if one wishes to become a proficient hater' This volume contains a selection of Nietzsche's brilliant and challenging aphorisms, examining the pleasures of revenge, the falsity of pity, and the incompatibility of marriage with the philosophical life. Introducing Little Black Classics: 80 books for Penguin's 80th birthday. Little Black Classics celebrate the huge range and diversity of Penguin Classics, with books from around the world and across many centuries. They take us from a balloon ride over Victorian London to a garden of blossom in Japan, from Tierra del Fuego to 16th-century California and the Russian steppe. Here are stories lyrical and savage; poems epic and intimate; essays satirical and inspirational; and ideas that have shaped the lives of millions. Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) Nietzsche's works available in Penguin Classics are A Nietzsche Reader, Beyond Good and Evil, Ecce Homo, Human, All Too Human, On the Genealogy of Morals, The Birth of Tragedy, The Portable Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Twilight of Idols and Anti-Christ.


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'We must learn to love, learn to be kind, and this from our earliest youth ... Likewise, hatred must be learned and nurtured, if one wishes to become a proficient hater' This volume contains a selection of Nietzsche's brilliant and challenging aphorisms, examining the pleasures of revenge, the falsity of pity, and the incompatibility of marriage with the philosophical life. 'We must learn to love, learn to be kind, and this from our earliest youth ... Likewise, hatred must be learned and nurtured, if one wishes to become a proficient hater' This volume contains a selection of Nietzsche's brilliant and challenging aphorisms, examining the pleasures of revenge, the falsity of pity, and the incompatibility of marriage with the philosophical life. Introducing Little Black Classics: 80 books for Penguin's 80th birthday. Little Black Classics celebrate the huge range and diversity of Penguin Classics, with books from around the world and across many centuries. They take us from a balloon ride over Victorian London to a garden of blossom in Japan, from Tierra del Fuego to 16th-century California and the Russian steppe. Here are stories lyrical and savage; poems epic and intimate; essays satirical and inspirational; and ideas that have shaped the lives of millions. Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) Nietzsche's works available in Penguin Classics are A Nietzsche Reader, Beyond Good and Evil, Ecce Homo, Human, All Too Human, On the Genealogy of Morals, The Birth of Tragedy, The Portable Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Twilight of Idols and Anti-Christ.

30 review for Aphorisms on Love and Hate

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sean Barrs

    This review is exclusively for the edition and not for the work itself. This is because when reading this shortened version, of his full work, it is very difficult to comprehend what Nietzsche is trying to say. I blame the editors for this, as they have simply pulled out the key facts, or Aphorisms, from the main work. The result is a series of points that do not seem to connect with each other. I’m sure for those that have read much of his work this may be a very concise edition, but for those This review is exclusively for the edition and not for the work itself. This is because when reading this shortened version, of his full work, it is very difficult to comprehend what Nietzsche is trying to say. I blame the editors for this, as they have simply pulled out the key facts, or Aphorisms, from the main work. The result is a series of points that do not seem to connect with each other. I’m sure for those that have read much of his work this may be a very concise edition, but for those that haven’t read anything by Nietzsche this is a poor example of his philosophising. I recommend starting with a full edition of something he has written, like The Birth of Tragedy, rather than this. Penguin Little Black Classic- O5 The Little Black Classic Collection by penguin looks like it contains lots of hidden gems. I couldn’t help it; they looked so good that I went and bought them all. I shall post a short review after reading each one. No doubt it will take me several months to get through all of them! Hopefully I will find some classic authors, from across the ages, that I may not have come across had I not bought this collection.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Darwin8u

    "No life without pleasure; the struggle for pleasure is the struggle for life." - Friedrich Nietzsche, Aphorisms on Love and Hate Vol 5 of my Penguin Little Black Classics Box Set. "Aphorisms of Love and Hate" is a collection of approximately ~100 maxims on love, marriage, pity, gratitude, revenge, etc., taken from Human, All Too Human. The style of this book is modeled a bit on La Rochefoucauld's Maxims aka Sentences et maximes. I haven't read much Nietzsche in 25+ years, so it took a while to ge "No life without pleasure; the struggle for pleasure is the struggle for life." - Friedrich Nietzsche, Aphorisms on Love and Hate Vol 5 of my Penguin Little Black Classics Box Set. "Aphorisms of Love and Hate" is a collection of approximately ~100 maxims on love, marriage, pity, gratitude, revenge, etc., taken from Human, All Too Human. The style of this book is modeled a bit on La Rochefoucauld's Maxims aka Sentences et maximes. I haven't read much Nietzsche in 25+ years, so it took a while to get back into his evocative and hyper-certain groove. The book was interesting, but the aphorisms/maxims were a tad uneven. Some were quite good. I seemed to discover a "truth" about almost every member of my family. I would read one page and identify something that reminded me of me, my wife, my dad, my mom, my brother, etc. But I'd read another page and quickly remember why I don't read Nietzsche that much. Sometimes, like Foucault, and other college philosophy favorites, N-dog gets to be a bit much. It was probably also a mistake tonight to read Nietzsche while listening to Wagner. Oh, well.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Florencia

    The ability to wait. Being able to wait is so hard that the greatest poets did not disdain to make the inability to wait the theme of their poetry. Thus Shakespeare in his Othello, Sophocles in his Ajax, who, as the oracle suggests, might not have thought his suicide necessary, if only he had been able to let his feeling cool for one day more. He probably would have outfoxed the terrible promptings of his wounded vanity and said to himself: ‘Who, in my situation, has never once taken a sheep for The ability to wait. Being able to wait is so hard that the greatest poets did not disdain to make the inability to wait the theme of their poetry. Thus Shakespeare in his Othello, Sophocles in his Ajax, who, as the oracle suggests, might not have thought his suicide necessary, if only he had been able to let his feeling cool for one day more. He probably would have outfoxed the terrible promptings of his wounded vanity and said to himself: ‘Who, in my situation, has never once taken a sheep for a warrior? Is that so monstrous? On the contrary, it is something universally human.’ Ajax might have consoled himself thus. * Too close. If we live in too close proximity to a person, it is as if we kept touching a good etching with our bare fingers; one day we have poor, dirty paper in our hands and nothing more. A human being’s soul is likewise worn down by continual touching; at least it finally appears that way to us – we never see its original design and beauty again. One always loses by all-too-intimate association with women and friends; and sometimes one loses the pearl of his life in the process. Two of the most memorable passages for me. Especially the second one, which is dedicated to those who think it's a rather peculiar way to see relationships. See? It's not. Though I'll probably shouldn't mention where I found it. As for the rest - superiority, controversial justifications, the rationalization of evil, obnoxious and yet predictable sexism - nothing to be done but forget. I'm not known for my optimism but I can't take hard-core pessimism that lacks a witty and inventive use of language. Moreover, some passages were simply appalling, probably because they were out of context since this is the shorter version of Human, All Too Human. I'd like to think so. May 9, 19 * Actual rating: 2.5 stars. ** Later on my blog.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

    2.5 stars. Not the greatest Penguin Little Black Classic I've read, but not the worst. This collection contains excerpts from Nietzsche's book Human, All Too Human, published in 1878, and covers a variety of topics including marriage, love, jealousy, friendship, and more. Nietzsche was around 34 years old when writing these aphorisms, but he comes across a lot of time as though he were a cantankerous old man. He doesn't seem to have a very positive view on either marriage or women, and I have to a 2.5 stars. Not the greatest Penguin Little Black Classic I've read, but not the worst. This collection contains excerpts from Nietzsche's book Human, All Too Human, published in 1878, and covers a variety of topics including marriage, love, jealousy, friendship, and more. Nietzsche was around 34 years old when writing these aphorisms, but he comes across a lot of time as though he were a cantankerous old man. He doesn't seem to have a very positive view on either marriage or women, and I have to admit that I didn't agree with him on many of the points that he raised in this collection, but at times he did make me stop and think and reread some sections. I don't know if this is down to his writing itself or to the fairly readable and seamless translation by Marion Faber and Stephen Lehmann, but it's kind of making me want to give one of his full collections a try at some point. Not as difficult to read as I had initially expected, and with some gems throughout, but I'm not sure I can say I'm either a fan or not a fan at this stage. Colour me intrigued though.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

    Great thoughts on abstract ideas, however ultimately a sexist piece of work that is unable to view woman without a context to men.

  6. 5 out of 5

    The Artisan Geek

    29/4/19 A very interesting read!! I spoke about this today on my Instagram and I felt it was very eye opening with regards to the underlying foundations of our society as well as of our emotions and feelings. I am however not well versed when it comes to philosophy so there were times that I struggled. There were also a few statements that in my opinion were rather archaic, but then again this is 19th century writing XD Despite this I am giving this four stars, because I am fascinated by Nietzsch 29/4/19 A very interesting read!! I spoke about this today on my Instagram and I felt it was very eye opening with regards to the underlying foundations of our society as well as of our emotions and feelings. I am however not well versed when it comes to philosophy so there were times that I struggled. There were also a few statements that in my opinion were rather archaic, but then again this is 19th century writing XD Despite this I am giving this four stars, because I am fascinated by Nietzsche's observations and by how a lot of them (I feel) are still very relevant today. I do have to say though that there were parts that were misogynistic. Either way I will be doing a review on my Youtube channel soon! :D You can find me on Youtube | Instagram | Twitter | Tumblr | Website

  7. 5 out of 5

    Libby

    these are 80p so clearly not to be passed up, but Nietzsche is hella dickish in this.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rashima

    I finally took a stab at reading Friedrich Nietzsche. This book is an abridged version of his maxims from 'Human, all too Human', but, it gives you a great start to reading a genre of anthropology, behavioral economics and metaphysics(somewhat). In this book Nietzsche analyses the conundrum within the human psyche quite ruthlessly and with a dispassionate logic on topics like Love, hate, pity, marriage,revenge, etc. Even though Nietzsche belongs to the 19th century, his insights are still quite I finally took a stab at reading Friedrich Nietzsche. This book is an abridged version of his maxims from 'Human, all too Human', but, it gives you a great start to reading a genre of anthropology, behavioral economics and metaphysics(somewhat). In this book Nietzsche analyses the conundrum within the human psyche quite ruthlessly and with a dispassionate logic on topics like Love, hate, pity, marriage,revenge, etc. Even though Nietzsche belongs to the 19th century, his insights are still quite powerfully resounding in today's world. In fact, the insights & advice could be very well used for marketing firms for branding and understanding consumer behavior. His views on women are something I'd definitely not echo with, but, would give him the benefit of doubt for being the product of his time. Having said above, the book is not an easy-breezy read for sure. It contains around 100 most popular maxims from the philosopher.One might have to re-read and maybe research the interpretation of some of the maxims. I will attempt to elaborate my 3 favorite aphorisms from the book: 1) Psychological Observation: Nietzsche criticizes a man's disability to psychologically dissect and calculate a situation(public events, personalities, etc). By exercising this art, man can entertain himself in any unhappy situation. He advises the man to have an analytical perspective to things by observing ones actions and motives and drawing a maxim out of it. 2)Gratitude and Revenge : Gratitude is a milder form of revenge, and they both are fundamentally the same according to Nietzsche(Sounds cynical, right?!). The powerful man has been weakened by an act of kindness by his benefactor. By offering his gratitude he avenges himself on his benefactor. Therefore, in a society, the good men(powerful men) prioritize practicing gratitude. 3)Judge Not: History is frightful and inhuman. But, Nietzsche advises to not judge the past too quickly, as the instinct of justice was not so widely developed then. Also, the views and the ideas accepted in the past were socially and morally more dominant then and the same would be considered cruel in today's time. Surge ahead, don't linger or draw conclusions from the past. Yes, caustic is his writing! However, some of the maxims still leave you gaping at his wisdom. Definitely a read worthy!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mary Kelly

    A collection of quotes from Nietzsche that make you think and reflect on your own views. Loved it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    A Bookish ✧ Fable

    Some of Mr. Nietzsches points were agreeable and i enjoyed having thoughts that I can now put into words, however, most of his opinions are rubbish. He needs to experience life and stop trying to read women like they were to be newspaper articles.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Laurent

    Limit of human love. Any man who has once declared the other man to be a fool, a bad fellow, is annoyed when that man ends by showing that he is not. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche Limit of human love. Any man who has once declared the other man to be a fool, a bad fellow, is annoyed when that man ends by showing that he is not. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

  12. 4 out of 5

    Eadweard

    3.5/5 " Gratitude and revenge. The powerful man feels gratitude for the following reason: through his good deed, his benefactor has, as it were, violated the powerful man’s sphere and penetrated it. Now through his act of gratitude the powerful man requites himself by violating the sphere of the benefactor. It is a milder form of revenge. Without the satisfaction of gratitude, the powerful man would have shown himself to be unpowerful and henceforth would be considered such. For that reason, ever 3.5/5 " Gratitude and revenge. The powerful man feels gratitude for the following reason: through his good deed, his benefactor has, as it were, violated the powerful man’s sphere and penetrated it. Now through his act of gratitude the powerful man requites himself by violating the sphere of the benefactor. It is a milder form of revenge. Without the satisfaction of gratitude, the powerful man would have shown himself to be unpowerful and henceforth would be considered such. For that reason, every society of good men (that is, originally, of powerful men) places gratitude among its first duties. " ---- " Pity more intense than suffering. There are cases where pity is more intense than actual suffering. When one of our friends is guilty of something ignominious, for example, we feel it more painfully than when we ourselves do it. For we believe in the purity of his character more than he does. Thus our love for him (probably because of this very belief) is more intense than his own love for himself. Even if his egoism suffers more than our egoism, in that he has to feel the bad consequences of his fault more intensely, our selflessness (this word must never be taken literally, but only as a euphemism) is touched more intensely by his guilt than is his selflessness. " ---- " Goodwill. Among the small but endlessly abundant and therefore very effective things that science ought to heed more than the great, rare things, is goodwill. I mean those expressions of a friendly disposition in interactions, that smile of the eye, those handclasps, that ease which usually envelops nearly all human actions. Every teacher, every official brings this ingredient to what he considers his duty. It is the continual manifestation of our humanity, its rays of light, so to speak, in which everything grows. Especially within the narrowest circle, in the family, life sprouts and blossoms only by this goodwill. Good nature, friendliness, and courtesy of the heart are ever-flowing tributaries of the selfless drive and have made much greater contributions to culture than those much more famous expressions of this drive, called pity, charity, and self-sacrifice. But we tend to underestimate them, and in fact there really is not much about them that is selfless. The sum of these small doses is nevertheless mighty; its cumulative force is among the strongest of forces. Similarly, there is much more happiness to be found in the world than dim eyes can see, if one calculates correctly and does not forget all those moments of ease which are so plentiful in every day of every human life, even the most oppressed. " ---- " Pity does not aim at the pleasure of others any more than malice (as we said above) aims at the pain of others, per se. For in pity at least two (maybe many more) elements of personal pleasure are contained, and it is to that extent self-enjoyment: first of all, it is the pleasure of the emotion (the kind of pity we find in tragedy) and second, when it drives us to act, it is the pleasure of our satisfaction in the exercise of power. If, in addition, a suffering person is very close to us, we reduce our own suffering by our acts of pity. " ---- " Means of compensation. If we have injured someone, giving him the opportunity to make a joke about us is often enough to provide him personal satisfaction, or even to win his good will. " ---- " Motive for attack. We attack not only to hurt a person, to conquer him, but also, perhaps, simply to become aware of our own strength. " ---- " To offend and be offended. It is much more agreeable to offend and later ask forgiveness than to be offended and grant forgiveness. The one who does the former demonstrates his power and then his goodness. The other, if he does not want to be thought inhuman, must forgive; because of this coercion, pleasure in the other’s humiliation is slight " ---- " In many people, incidentally, the gift of having good friends is much greater than the gift of being a good friend. " ---- " Different sighs. A few men have sighed because their women were abducted; most, because no one wanted to abduct them. " ---- " Unity of place, and drama. If spouses did not live together, good marriages would be more frequent. " ---- " Marriage as a long conversation. When entering a marriage, one should ask the question: do you think you will be able to have good conversations with this woman right into old age? Everything else in marriage is transitory, but most of the time in interaction is spent in conversation. " ---- " Wanting to be loved. The demand to be loved is the greatest kind of arrogance. " ---- " Learning to love. We must learn to love, learn to be kind, and this from earliest youth; if education or chance give us no opportunity to practice these feelings, our soul becomes dry and unsuited even to understanding the tender inventions of loving people. Likewise, hatred must be learned and nurtured, if one wishes to become a proficient hater: otherwise the germ for that, too, will gradually wither. "

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    I think it's important to point out that I read this little black book backwards. Don't ask me why, I read a few pages in the front then a few pages in the back. But then I keep reading from the back, I guess I found it was more interesting that way. Either way Nietzsche had some intriguing thoughts in here that stood out to me because they seem relevant in a way to me. I think it's important to point out that I read this little black book backwards. Don't ask me why, I read a few pages in the front then a few pages in the back. But then I keep reading from the back, I guess I found it was more interesting that way. Either way Nietzsche had some intriguing thoughts in here that stood out to me because they seem relevant in a way to me.

  14. 5 out of 5

    ~Madison

    I would recommend this to everyone! Some points are a bit outdated but most are ahead of its time!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    I dipped a toe into Nietzsche and it turns out the water is a bit too cold for me. Or maybe the water is a bit too... shallow. Sips tea. That may be the failing of this bite-size edition rather than the man himself, but it's probably a good thing that me and Nietzsche don't seem to have much in common. This is something I would have loved to have read with a friend and discussed. It's surprisingly readable, which is something I didn't expect. It helps that this collection is only a small sample I dipped a toe into Nietzsche and it turns out the water is a bit too cold for me. Or maybe the water is a bit too... shallow. Sips tea. That may be the failing of this bite-size edition rather than the man himself, but it's probably a good thing that me and Nietzsche don't seem to have much in common. This is something I would have loved to have read with a friend and discussed. It's surprisingly readable, which is something I didn't expect. It helps that this collection is only a small sample of Human, All Too Human, I'm sure it would be a different story had I committed to the whole text. I've read reviews that have said that this edition isn't an easy way to get a feel for Nietzsche and that the format makes everything confusing but I didn't find that at all (and I say this as someone completely new to Nietzsche). This edition breaks the original text down into key quotes which, granted, don't really marry together but for me the disjointed nature makes it easier to get through. Quotes can be read in isolation, chewed over, and set aside. I don't think of it is a text to be read all at once, it's more of a dip-in-dip-out bag. To me it's kind of like reading the collected bath thoughts by someone with a university education. There were some pretty hilarious out-of-touch passages on women too which were so absurd I couldn't even be mad at. Oh the modern woman, you do such a lot! You have so much you have to do and keep a handle on in your day. How could you possibly -- with such a full schedule, with such responsibility and new education -- be expected to keep up with a man's voracious sexual appetites as well? Buy your man a prostitute today! You know, for your own good. Lulz. What a smoothie. TLDR: Moments of brilliance interposed with lot of murk and bitterness. From the tiniest taste of Nietzsche I got with this edition I wouldn't mind another curious bite.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    "We must learn to love, learn to be kind, and this from earliest youth... Likewise, hatred must be learned and nurtured, if one wishes to become a proficient hater." _______________________ Publisher: penguin classics Origin: Germany Genre: philosophy, Non-Fiction Rating: 2/5 __________________________ Aphorisms on Love and Hate contains samples taken from Human, All Too Human by German Philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, showcasing his brilliant and thought-provoking maxims on revenge, false pity and th "We must learn to love, learn to be kind, and this from earliest youth... Likewise, hatred must be learned and nurtured, if one wishes to become a proficient hater." _______________________ Publisher: penguin classics Origin: Germany Genre: philosophy, Non-Fiction Rating: 2/5 __________________________ Aphorisms on Love and Hate contains samples taken from Human, All Too Human by German Philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, showcasing his brilliant and thought-provoking maxims on revenge, false pity and the drawbacks of marriage. _________________________ Perhaps this was a big feat for the editors to condense such a heavy topic, that it presents itself as a shallow and difficult read. The ideas that Nietzsche presents are brilliant and he writes them well. However, there was no key elements to unify and connect each passage, it was hard to comprehend Nietzsche's ideas. I suggest reading a full volume by Nietzsche to really grasp his thoughts, having read his work other, this isn't the best representation of the philosopher. I love the collection that Penguin has chosen but I don't think this one should have been included.

  17. 4 out of 5

    reem

    "Letting oneself be loved. Because one of the two loving people is usually the lover, the other the beloved, the belief has arisen that in every love affair the amount of love is constant: the more of it one of the two grabs to himself, the less remains for the other person. Sometimes, exceptionally, it happens that vanity convinces each of the two people that he is the one who has to be loved, so that both want to let themselves be loved: in marriage, especially, this results in some half-droll "Letting oneself be loved. Because one of the two loving people is usually the lover, the other the beloved, the belief has arisen that in every love affair the amount of love is constant: the more of it one of the two grabs to himself, the less remains for the other person. Sometimes, exceptionally, it happens that vanity convinces each of the two people that he is the one who has to be loved, so that both want to let themselves be loved: in marriage, especially, this results in some half-droll, half-absurd scenes."

  18. 5 out of 5

    Francielli Camargo

    It was hard to rate this. Though I really enjoyed some parts of the book and made me really think about it, there were some parts that felt err... too Nietzsche. We all know Nietzsche is not the nicest or biggest feminist in history and that obviously shows in his writings. Overall I think I'd just say 3.5 stars It was hard to rate this. Though I really enjoyed some parts of the book and made me really think about it, there were some parts that felt err... too Nietzsche. We all know Nietzsche is not the nicest or biggest feminist in history and that obviously shows in his writings. Overall I think I'd just say 3.5 stars

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    Great writing style, a real treat. I know these books are very short but i felt a bit more context would have been helpful.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I don't know what it is about non-fiction books, but I have no qualms about writing little notes in them about my thoughts and feelings. I wrote a lot in this one. Mostly comments which can be summed up with this particular set of emojis: 🤨, 🤔, 🙄, and 😂 ( <--- me, laughing at the sheer absurdity or obviousness of a particular statement). Anyway, onto the review... All in all, a bit of an iffy read. The definition of an aphorism is "a pithy observation which contains a general truth." I feel so ch I don't know what it is about non-fiction books, but I have no qualms about writing little notes in them about my thoughts and feelings. I wrote a lot in this one. Mostly comments which can be summed up with this particular set of emojis: 🤨, 🤔, 🙄, and 😂 ( <--- me, laughing at the sheer absurdity or obviousness of a particular statement). Anyway, onto the review... All in all, a bit of an iffy read. The definition of an aphorism is "a pithy observation which contains a general truth." I feel so cheated with this book! There were some pithy observations all right, but barely any truth except the authors absolute belief in his own views. It almost felt like I was reading sattire. I'm still not sure if I wasn't... To the best of my knowledge, the selection of 'aphorisms' in this sampler of Friedrich Nietzsche's philosophical writings is from his book Human All Too Human, and maybe you have to read the actual book for a proper scope on his "blazing maxims", but I'm pretty sure all you'd find is eye-rolling, brow raising pages rife with classism, sexist quips, and the occasional dash of humour here and there. In this particular Little Black Classic, I did manage to find some of the 'gems' Nietzsche is dubbed "iconoclastic" for. There was a really interesting concept under the Love and Promises chapter that made me pause for thought. But mostly there were a lot of base statements such as "pity is a poor peoples emotion, don't infect yourself with it." Ok... so he didn't quite use THOSE particular words, but that's 100% what his paragraph on pity tells the reader. Classism (or elitism, maybe?) is a heavily occurring theme. Which, I mean, I shouldn't let myself be offended by since this was published in 1878. Sidenote: This book has some of the longest sentences I have ever read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    JK

    Trying to read the first few pages of this was like a slap in the face. I've never felt so utterly idiotic, so unworldly, and so stupid. I had to slow my reading down to a snail's pace, and chew each word slowly to really ensure I was picking out the correct meaning. I even read some paragraphs out loud to truly cement my understanding. Although I continued this cautionary tread for all fifty-five pages, my initial panic subsided, and I began to really connect with Nietzsche's maxims. The volume Trying to read the first few pages of this was like a slap in the face. I've never felt so utterly idiotic, so unworldly, and so stupid. I had to slow my reading down to a snail's pace, and chew each word slowly to really ensure I was picking out the correct meaning. I even read some paragraphs out loud to truly cement my understanding. Although I continued this cautionary tread for all fifty-five pages, my initial panic subsided, and I began to really connect with Nietzsche's maxims. The volume seems a bit haphazardly put together, almost like a book of quotes: Nietzsche on love, Nietzsche on marriage, Nietzsche on tragedy of childhood. This meant a real lack of message, and made me wish I'd started my philosophy journey elsewhere. My favourite of these aphorisms was the one on twofold kind of equality: "The craving for equality can be expressed either by the wish to draw all others down to one's level (by belittling, excluding, tripping them up) or by the wish to draw oneself up with everyone else (by appreciating, helping, taking pleasure in others' success)." An important one for me. I enjoyed the first half (power, jealousy, revenge) more than the second half (love, marriage, husbands, wives) as this is where the sexist views began to rear their ugly heads. Despite this, Nietzsche had already mentioned that we're an evolving species of opinion, and customs of the past may seem odd to the people of the present, purely because we're used to better things, and struggle to understand. I'll let him off. His thoughts are powerful ones to consider, and I'm glad I picked this up. I only wish I had ventured into a real Nietzsche volume before doing so. This is more of a whistle-stop tour of his views on love and hate.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Joey Woolfardis

    A collection of the German Philosopher Nietzche's thoughts on love, the human condition, feelings and marriage, set in short, devourable segments. This was a marvellous collection. I swept through this as if my life dependended upon it: and perhaps it does. There are segments which are truer than others, and some which are obviously products of the time Nietzche was writing in. It seemed a confusing batch at times, too, for I'm not sure Nietzche really, truly believed all he was writing, as hypo A collection of the German Philosopher Nietzche's thoughts on love, the human condition, feelings and marriage, set in short, devourable segments. This was a marvellous collection. I swept through this as if my life dependended upon it: and perhaps it does. There are segments which are truer than others, and some which are obviously products of the time Nietzche was writing in. It seemed a confusing batch at times, too, for I'm not sure Nietzche really, truly believed all he was writing, as hypocrisy was often rife within. It is quotable and will provide conversions aplenty, though perhaps we should forgive a man from a different time his views on women, paradoxical as they were. Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Pinterest | Shop | Etsy

  23. 4 out of 5

    Meg

    The first Nietzsche I've ever picked up. I'm not enthused about it, I was bored throughout. It could be a case of the work been out of its original context, but it didn't read cohesively at all and felt disjointed. Also, the way he spoke of women and our intelligence made me cringe hard. I know it is of an era past, but it is still so gross. Yuck. The first Nietzsche I've ever picked up. I'm not enthused about it, I was bored throughout. It could be a case of the work been out of its original context, but it didn't read cohesively at all and felt disjointed. Also, the way he spoke of women and our intelligence made me cringe hard. I know it is of an era past, but it is still so gross. Yuck.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Pink

    This was okay, but not a complete book, so somewhat disjointed.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dane Cobain

    I’ve always been told that I’d love Nietzsche, partly because my MBTI personality type is INTJ, and the cliché is that INTJs love Nietzsche. I really enjoyed his work, so maybe they’re right.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mustapha

    - Throughout these excerpts Nietzsche seems to support and endorse the idea that morality is relative, both temporally and culturally, he writes; “the hierarchy of the good, is not fixed and identical at all times”. He explains how morality and what is deemed right is set by the culture and time period, therefore morality is not objective, but subjective to these factors. Nietzsche then uses this argument to posit that “cruel men” should be thought of as immoral only in the sense that their acti - Throughout these excerpts Nietzsche seems to support and endorse the idea that morality is relative, both temporally and culturally, he writes; “the hierarchy of the good, is not fixed and identical at all times”. He explains how morality and what is deemed right is set by the culture and time period, therefore morality is not objective, but subjective to these factors. Nietzsche then uses this argument to posit that “cruel men” should be thought of as immoral only in the sense that their actions seem to have no place in our current culture and state of affairs. He writes; cruel men have been “left over” from earlier cultures. He moves further to use this logic to conclude that such “immoral” men actually lack responsibility for their perceived immorality by our standards. For if morality is simply determined by the culture, time period and other factors which prescribe it, then morality is not a constant. He finishes with the statement that “[cruel men] are as little responsible as a piece of granite for being granite”. - These ideas are further refined when Nietzsche writes that “our present morality has grown up on the ground of the ruling class and castes”. This seems to suggest that Nietzsche believes morality is prescribed by those in power, or the “ruling class” or elite (to echo Marx). This leads me to posit that, perhaps, Nietzsche was musing about the idea that the state should not interfere in moral or social issues; and that the state should not prescribe morality, as it is simply the version of events or opinion of those in power at the time. These beliefs could lead to intense cynicism regarding morality and its very existence. - He touches on morality further in the text, positing that “to be moral, correct, ethical means to obey an age-old law or tradition”. - Nietzsche returns to this theme, and argues that, when considering earlier periods of history, one must not be too judgemental, as the morality of the past cannot be judged according to the standards of the morality of the present, as the time, culture, context and period are different, and therefore the prescribed morality of the time was also different. - Later in the text, Nietzsche muses on the subject of the “economy of kindness”. He likens kindness to “precious finds” which should be used as “economically as possible”. He seems to be arguing that kindness is rare, and should be used not often. - Nietzsche is critical of the need to have pity for others. He references La Rochefoucauld, who advised that reasonable men should leave pity to the common people, who need such passions. He agrees with La Rochefoucauld and Plato that pity “weakens the soul”. He then goes on to posit that it a truism that it is pleasurable to cause other people pain. He argues that people are dishonest in claiming to think causing anyone harm is not pleasurable. He goes on to quote Prosper Merimee, “know that nothing is more common than to do harm for the pleasure of doing it.” - When comparing justice and love, Nietzsche asks, “isn’t love obviously more foolish?”. He argues that love is clearly more pleasant for people than justice, and so it is overestimating to the disadvantage of justice. - Nietzsche claims that all so-called “evil” actions (and the word “evil” is in apostrophes due to Nietzsche’s rejection of an absolute morality, and therefore the word “evil” becomes circumspect somewhat) are only evil insofar as they are motivated by the drive for self-preservation; to gain pleasure and avoid unpleasure. Again, he seems to be calling into question the traditional view of morality and concepts of good and evil. He seems to be musing that people only commit evil deeds, to preserve themselves. He then begins to explore the concept of free will, writing that “those evil actions which outrage us most today are based on the error that that man who harms us has free will, that is, that he had the choice not to do this bad thing to us. This belief in his choice arouses hatred, thirst for revenge, spite, the whole deterioration of our imagination; whereas we get much less angry at an animal because we consider it irresponsible.” Nietzsche is negating the idea that free will exists. - Nietzsche muses about the life of “free-spirited people” or philosophers whose goal in life is to gain knowledge about the nature of things. He explores how such people expend “as little energy as possible” in mundane affairs such as economic conditions, money etc. so that “they can plunge with all their assembled energy” into the element of knowledge. - Nietzsche distinguishes between the two kinds of equality; that is to say; the equality of drawing “all others down to one’s level” and the equality of drawing “oneself up with everyone else”. - He plays with the idea that one should be polemically outspoken when he writes that “the most disagreeable way of responding to a polemic is to be angry and keep silent”. - He also toys with the idea that people in general are treacherous and untrustworthy when he writes “there will be but a few people […] who will not reveal the more secret affairs of their friends.” - When betraying someone, one should express your suspicion to them that they are betraying you, to arouse self-awareness on the other person’s part, and to force him to behave openly for a time, granting you, the true traitor, the upper hand. - “It is much more agreeable to offend and later ask for forgiveness than to be offended and grant forgiveness. The one who does the former demonstrates his power then his goodness.” - “Mothers are easily jealous of their sons’ friends if they are exceptionally successful. Usually a mother loves herself in her son more than she loves the son himself.” - Throughout the text, Nietzsche is highly critical of both women and marriage. He coins various phrases frequently such as “if spouses did not live together, good marriages would be more frequent.” He suggests that people are false and they “try to be in love”. People are false and try to please their partners, as “women wholly become what they are in the imagination of the men who love them.” Women who love an important man, “want to have him to themselves” and are very jealous. - Nietzsche touches upon the topic of fake, empty people who only live to please others. He writes that there are “women who have no inner life wherever one looks for it, being nothing but masks.” He also offers advice to the reader about marriage, positing that one should ask, when faced with a suitor, whether one will be able to maintain good conversation with the possible betrothed right into old age. He then seems to suggest that if not, one should avoid the person and that most suitors will be disappointing in this way. - He writes how living in close proximity to another person, such as a wife, for such a long time, is extremely detrimental. He likens it to one who keeps “touching an etching” with his bare hands, causing the etching to gradually become a dirty piece of paper. Thus, he argues that marriage erodes one’s image of the other; you see their faults in all their abhorrence, and never see their “original design and beauty” again. - Nietzsche goes on to argue that a philosopher who has “chosen as his task the acquisition of knowledge”, should not weight himself down with “considerations of a family” etc. - “Life consists of rare, isolated moments of the greatest significance, and of innumerably many intervals, during which at best the silhouettes of those moments hover about us. Love, springtime, every beautiful melody, mountains, the moon, the sea – all these speak completely to the heart but once, if in fact they ever do get a chance to speak completely. For many men do not have those moments at all, and are themselves intervals and intermissions in the symphony of real life.” - He argues that, just as one must learn to love others, equally one must learn to hate.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ecem Yücel

    -Legolas! What do your elf eyes see? - Misogynism! This was the fifth book of my Penguin Little Black Classics 80-book-box-set challenge. And my first Nietzsche book. Now, he started with very interesting ideas on morality, the falsity of pity, the importance of goodwill, selfishness and selflessness, how gratitude is actually a milder form of revenge etc., which were thought-provoking assertions, and I liked seeing things from a different point of view. Then he started to talk about marriage and -Legolas! What do your elf eyes see? - Misogynism! This was the fifth book of my Penguin Little Black Classics 80-book-box-set challenge. And my first Nietzsche book. Now, he started with very interesting ideas on morality, the falsity of pity, the importance of goodwill, selfishness and selflessness, how gratitude is actually a milder form of revenge etc., which were thought-provoking assertions, and I liked seeing things from a different point of view. Then he started to talk about marriage and women. From what I gathered from Nietzsche's aphorisms, he sees marriages as entrapments for men, as well as women as creatures whose only purposes on earth are to serve and comfort men. There are remarks asserting that a marriage is like a spider's web where the spider (the man) is entrapped in the middle of it and feeding itself with its own blood, or defending men's cheating of their wives, along with the suggestion that a wife should support her husband's cheating. Because the wives are already busy with providing a comfortable life for their husbands, household chores, kids, keeping the house proper etc., so, the husbands cannot also expect sex from their wives, it's too much to ask. That's where the younger girls come in, so the husbands wouldn't burden their old wives, it's a necessity. How thoughtful, isn't it? I don't know much about Nietzsche, but his words felt like a scorned man's words. It felt like he got married, then when his wife got older, he wanted to go frolicking with younger girls but got caught and scolded badly by his wife, so he wrote down his resentment "as a milder form of revenge". I'm sorry if I'm angering Nietzsche lovers here, but I didn't catch a single good word about women out of his pen. He demeaned them at every chance, described the woman as a heartless creature who only acts out using her brain and the man as a very innocent, entrapped, poor thing in a marriage. Here are a few examples of Nietzsche's misogynism: a mother doesn't really love her son, but loves to see herself in his son. A friendship between a woman and a man is possible if the woman is ugly. When a wife and a husband fight, the husband is the one who feels regret for the pain he inflicted, and the wife is the one who feels regret for the pain she didn't inflict enough, so she keeps inflicting pain using her tears, etc. If more married couples lived separately, fewer marriages would break down. A man should marry an older woman when he's young, so this older wife can guide him through his young, inexperienced years, restrain his youthful crazy decisions, then when her younger husband matures, she should support him in finding younger girls whom he can "educate". Should I go on? For years, I had this idea of Nietzsche being a great thinker, philosopher. So, I don't need to tell you how that image in my mind shattered the first time I read a work of his because of his misogynistic remarks. I really tried to see beyond his misogynism, but some of his remarks were really deliberate to demean women, they felt like I was hearing over the speech of a misogynist man in a cafe full of other men, trying to make his friends laugh with his talking about "the woman trouble". I'm aware that Nietzsche lived in the late 19th century and nearly all men were misogynists back then, etc. That maybe I should look past his misogynism and read his assertions on other subjects. I may do so, but thanks to this book, I got to read a good selection of his ideas which I believe reflects his personality and wit accurately, so I don't think I will ever have a higher opinion of him than I do now.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Oliver

    So, Nietzsche says that pity is a tiny revenge. If you make somebody feel bad for you, you enjoy the pleasure that it gives you. Because when you do that, you feel more powerful than them since you inflicted pain, even if it were the tiniest bit. For that reason, many moral philosophers place pity pretty low in the hierarchy of moral feelings. What I think is that when you feel pity for someone, although you do feel their pain, it is also a reflection on how you have lived your life. So, it is t So, Nietzsche says that pity is a tiny revenge. If you make somebody feel bad for you, you enjoy the pleasure that it gives you. Because when you do that, you feel more powerful than them since you inflicted pain, even if it were the tiniest bit. For that reason, many moral philosophers place pity pretty low in the hierarchy of moral feelings. What I think is that when you feel pity for someone, although you do feel their pain, it is also a reflection on how you have lived your life. So, it is the sense of power that you feel over them that extracts the pain inside you. You feel slightly more privileged. The privilege makes you feel guilty and hence, the pity. Nietzsche also talks about the morality of a crime. If self defense is considered to be moral or ethical, why are crimes that occur out of self-preservation not moral? Pure malice is one thing where the human inflicts pain on others just to feel pleasure out of the pain they inflict. However, malice that comes out of a sense of security is not really malice. I guess that sums up the intent of the act. But then, he also goes on to talk about how one does not know the pain he inflicts unless he has the same pain inflicted on him. So, a child that hurts an animal intentionally doesn't exactly know what it is doing, so it is not malicious. And I don't agree with that. I don't think you need to go through something to understand what is okay and what is not. But again, Nietzsche doesn't really believe in pure good or pure evil, neither does he believe in absolute morality.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nusaiba

    Through these bite sized philosophical texts on the duality of morality, Nietzsche pulls out a bunch of ideas— on how revenge is often disguised as gratitude, how pity serves the self more than its intention of serving the other, and very brief musings on forgiveness, goodwill, marriage, women, love and hate. Even though I strongly agree with some of his ideologies and disagree with others, I wish the passages which my disagreements stemmed from were more elaborate. "Aphorisms on Love and Hate" Through these bite sized philosophical texts on the duality of morality, Nietzsche pulls out a bunch of ideas— on how revenge is often disguised as gratitude, how pity serves the self more than its intention of serving the other, and very brief musings on forgiveness, goodwill, marriage, women, love and hate. Even though I strongly agree with some of his ideologies and disagree with others, I wish the passages which my disagreements stemmed from were more elaborate. "Aphorisms on Love and Hate" is basically a shortened version, or say, a compilation of excerpts of his other work, "Human, All Too Human". This made some of the ideas that had the potential to give more interesting conclusions, seem very dull. But in the end, this was kind of fun to read. Hope to enjoy its longer, original version in a new light.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Maud van Lier

    I think that Nietzsche is a very gifted writer but also a dangerous one. In his description on hate and revenge, he has the clear insight that often the anger lies with ourselves and not the other and that we should therefore avoid displaying our fears and anger on someone else. However, at the same time and in the same kind of poetic language, he writes about how some people are better than others and have therefore more rights. When identifying with those people, one can start to believe what I think that Nietzsche is a very gifted writer but also a dangerous one. In his description on hate and revenge, he has the clear insight that often the anger lies with ourselves and not the other and that we should therefore avoid displaying our fears and anger on someone else. However, at the same time and in the same kind of poetic language, he writes about how some people are better than others and have therefore more rights. When identifying with those people, one can start to believe what Nietzsche writes. So be careful. This is just one rather arrogant man writing down his viewpoint of the world in a gifted and gripping way. We are all equal and we are each born with different advantages and disadvantages. No one stands above someone else. Read Nietzsche as wanting every human to pursue their best qualities not as reasoning that some are better than others and therefore have more rights.

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