web site hit counter Division: A Collection of Science Fiction Fairytales - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Division: A Collection of Science Fiction Fairytales

Availability: Ready to download

A man awakens as a kamikaze soldier in the new War on Disease. A schoolgirl tries to escape her demons through virtual reality. A spaceship engineer mourns the loss of her daughter. Plunge into the cybernetic woods with DIVISION in seven searing new fairytales for the digital generation, brought to life by Hawke’s trademark haunting style. “If you like sci fi or dystopian w A man awakens as a kamikaze soldier in the new War on Disease. A schoolgirl tries to escape her demons through virtual reality. A spaceship engineer mourns the loss of her daughter. Plunge into the cybernetic woods with DIVISION in seven searing new fairytales for the digital generation, brought to life by Hawke’s trademark haunting style. “If you like sci fi or dystopian work, you will enjoy DIVISION. All the stories have characters that you can sympathize with, and situations that will ring true. Excellent job by Lee S. Hawke on this collection, and I’d love to see more.” ~ Michael Nail at gimmethatbook.com


Compare

A man awakens as a kamikaze soldier in the new War on Disease. A schoolgirl tries to escape her demons through virtual reality. A spaceship engineer mourns the loss of her daughter. Plunge into the cybernetic woods with DIVISION in seven searing new fairytales for the digital generation, brought to life by Hawke’s trademark haunting style. “If you like sci fi or dystopian w A man awakens as a kamikaze soldier in the new War on Disease. A schoolgirl tries to escape her demons through virtual reality. A spaceship engineer mourns the loss of her daughter. Plunge into the cybernetic woods with DIVISION in seven searing new fairytales for the digital generation, brought to life by Hawke’s trademark haunting style. “If you like sci fi or dystopian work, you will enjoy DIVISION. All the stories have characters that you can sympathize with, and situations that will ring true. Excellent job by Lee S. Hawke on this collection, and I’d love to see more.” ~ Michael Nail at gimmethatbook.com

30 review for Division: A Collection of Science Fiction Fairytales

  1. 5 out of 5

    EJ Roberts

    Disclaimers: 1) I was gifted a free copy of this book to provide an honest and non-biased review. 2) I don’t normally read science fiction. 3) I’ve never reviewed a short story collection before. There, those are out of the way, so where do I begin? How about Fantabulous! Lee has an incredible story-telling ability and the words he uses and the images he can make you see as he guides you through each story is just amazing. Each one is different and unique, so you never know what you’re going to r Disclaimers: 1) I was gifted a free copy of this book to provide an honest and non-biased review. 2) I don’t normally read science fiction. 3) I’ve never reviewed a short story collection before. There, those are out of the way, so where do I begin? How about Fantabulous! Lee has an incredible story-telling ability and the words he uses and the images he can make you see as he guides you through each story is just amazing. Each one is different and unique, so you never know what you’re going to read next. You start off as a soldier in a new kind of warfare. One in which you hope humans will win. Next you slide into a world where you plug in, but do you ever unplug? Taking a left at the corner, you go into a world where people no longer connect and talk face-to-face. Until, one day, your DNA profile makes perfect sense with another and next thing you know, you’re asked to “Please Connect.” Go up a level and you’re introduced to a Grey Wall. Does it separate you from the real world to protect you or keep you from contaminating it? Taking an elevator to the roof and you’re shown how easy it is to get beauty. Just a combination of letters and numbers and you can be anything you want. But what happens if the person in control doesn’t agree with your idea of beauty? Ooh! Would a collection be complete without an alien invasion bent on destruction of the world? Of course not. Do you keep hiding? Do you get killed by the aliens? Or do you roll the dice and hope everything turns out okay? And last, but not least, we have the title story, “Division.” A heartbreaking story that transcends time, space, and everything in-between. No matter how far we advance, we’ll never get over the loss of someone closest to us. There were a few stories I’m going to have to go back and read. Not because they confused me, exactly, but because they twisted and turned and I wasn’t expecting it. My mind didn’t finish wrapping around what had happened before I was happily dashing off to read the next story. I’d have to say that my favorite one was “Please Connect.” Just the thought of still having to have the periodic face-to-face in this day and age of technology overload is a great one. Besides, I’d like to think of it as a love story. I’m enough of a romantic at heart to enjoy those types of stories. However, all of them will stick with me for a long time, in a good way. Definitely give Lee’s book a read. It’s fascinating and was a lot of fun. Also, it has a really cool cover. That’s good for something, right? ;-)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Aly

    This book was quite a surprise for me. I was thinking Disney when I saw the words "Fairy Tale" in this book. But this book is different and well written. I enjoyed it and I don't read too many short stories. I enjoy them mostly when I read one. This book was a breath of fresh air and something different. I think if you are looking for a change from what you normally read you should give this book a try. * I received this book from the author in exchange for an honest review* This book was quite a surprise for me. I was thinking Disney when I saw the words "Fairy Tale" in this book. But this book is different and well written. I enjoyed it and I don't read too many short stories. I enjoy them mostly when I read one. This book was a breath of fresh air and something different. I think if you are looking for a change from what you normally read you should give this book a try. * I received this book from the author in exchange for an honest review*

  3. 5 out of 5

    Clare O'Beara

    I enjoyed the stories which I read - there is one horror tale and I don't read horror, so I just skimmed that one. Most of the tales deal with a high-tech, automated world, where people live in simulated lives of work or populate a generational starship. While these themes are not new, every author imagines a new character and new interactions with the world they describe. My favourite tale showed how unreal the world of human interaction has become, so that two young people have to be educated I enjoyed the stories which I read - there is one horror tale and I don't read horror, so I just skimmed that one. Most of the tales deal with a high-tech, automated world, where people live in simulated lives of work or populate a generational starship. While these themes are not new, every author imagines a new character and new interactions with the world they describe. My favourite tale showed how unreal the world of human interaction has become, so that two young people have to be educated in dating behaviour. They don't expect to meet in real life or establish a relationship. Is it too late to change? The final story deals with loss and anger as a couple go through the grieving process. As they live on a starship, their lives are necessarily different to ours, but no less realistically described. The first story, about a young person who has resisted a fatal disease and is needed to help doctors develop a vaccine, is similar to another I read recently about a 'Patient Zero'. This highlights how different authors notice the approach of disease-spreading factors and wonder how our society will cope. Possibly I read too much SF, so that it's difficult to find something I think is new, but I'm always keen to read new writing and who knows where a writer like this will go next? The book carries bite-size tales which are good for a quick read, on a journey or lunch break. Let your imagination loose and ask if you would like to live in this future world. I was gifted a free copy for an unbiased review.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    I've always been a fan of Fairy Tales, so when I found the opportunity to beta-read a collection of Science Fiction "fairy tales," I couldn't help myself; I dove right in. Lee S. Hawke's Division contains 7 short stories, and I was lucky enough to receive a free copy in exchange for my thoughts and comments. It was a new and fascinating experience for me, being able to see the stories change, witnessing the "before" and "after." Hawke truly takes his reader's opinions to heart. The stories are al I've always been a fan of Fairy Tales, so when I found the opportunity to beta-read a collection of Science Fiction "fairy tales," I couldn't help myself; I dove right in. Lee S. Hawke's Division contains 7 short stories, and I was lucky enough to receive a free copy in exchange for my thoughts and comments. It was a new and fascinating experience for me, being able to see the stories change, witnessing the "before" and "after." Hawke truly takes his reader's opinions to heart. The stories are all vastly different from each other, exploring various elements of Science Fiction, while managing to still bring something new to the table. The ambiguity of his characters lets your imagination take control, and pushes yourself to think beyond the societal norms. I found many metaphors throughout these stories to be refreshing, illustrating many issues facing our society today. Among them, my favourite were the messages of acceptance, and the light that was shed upon the sufferers of chronic illness. While I did receive a free e-book, I intend to someday purchase a tangible copy of this Sci-Fi collection. My only complaint is that they were short stories; I didn't want them to end!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dixie Goode

    I was lucky enough to be able to get a free copy of Division, in exchange for being a beta-reader. Often agreeing to read a book in draft form means that you will be reading rough, unpolished work. In this case it meant that all my expectations were shattered. I wasn't reading the work of a beginning writer, but a collection of short stories that could be taught in a literature class at any English program. Without being too effusive, I still have to say that reading this collection made me very I was lucky enough to be able to get a free copy of Division, in exchange for being a beta-reader. Often agreeing to read a book in draft form means that you will be reading rough, unpolished work. In this case it meant that all my expectations were shattered. I wasn't reading the work of a beginning writer, but a collection of short stories that could be taught in a literature class at any English program. Without being too effusive, I still have to say that reading this collection made me very envious. I wish I could have written these stories. The experience of opening one of these short stories remind me of first discovering some of the stories of Ray Bradbury or Douglass Adams. They are called Fairy Tales, and they have that feel, but only like the old, handed down orally, scary evil wolf, and deadly consequences tales. There is not a Disney ending here. In these stories you meet current villains, like ebola, and you meet fear and the dark side, but you also feel hope and are compelled to think, long after the book is closed. True I got the ebook for free, but I want this book on my shelf and will be ordering it in paperback, come payday.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

    Disclaimer: The fact that the author was kind enough to provide a free copy of the book in exchange for a review in no way affects the candor of the opinions expressed herein. From the very first sentence, Lee Hawke's style reminded me of my favorite sci-fi author, Isaac Asimov. When I heard the word "fairytale" I mistakenly assumed they would be retellings of the tales originally by the Brothers Grimm or Hans Christian Andersen and the like. Thank you, Lee, for helping me understand the true natu Disclaimer: The fact that the author was kind enough to provide a free copy of the book in exchange for a review in no way affects the candor of the opinions expressed herein. From the very first sentence, Lee Hawke's style reminded me of my favorite sci-fi author, Isaac Asimov. When I heard the word "fairytale" I mistakenly assumed they would be retellings of the tales originally by the Brothers Grimm or Hans Christian Andersen and the like. Thank you, Lee, for helping me understand the true nature of a fairytale as it was originally intended. These are no talking animals and princesses yearning for love—these are solemn stories and poignant messages designed to draw the reader in and strike at the very core of their psyche. "Division" will thrill your imagination and blow your mind at the same time. And if the last and titular story doesn't leave you wiping away tears or (as I was) breathless... You're probably a robot. Five stars! *****

  7. 4 out of 5

    Marjolein

    Read all my reviews on http://urlphantomhive.booklikes.com 2.5 Stars I hesitate to call the stories in this collection Fairy tales because they never gave off the fairy tale vibe for me. It was a collection of short stories set in different dystopian/high tech futures. And while they are dealing with diverse aspects of possible dystopian futures, I was left wanting something more. Some of the stories had interesting topics, which I think would have worked better in a longer story where the story Read all my reviews on http://urlphantomhive.booklikes.com 2.5 Stars I hesitate to call the stories in this collection Fairy tales because they never gave off the fairy tale vibe for me. It was a collection of short stories set in different dystopian/high tech futures. And while they are dealing with diverse aspects of possible dystopian futures, I was left wanting something more. Some of the stories had interesting topics, which I think would have worked better in a longer story where the story/world could have been fleshed out a bit more. I quite liked the writing however, so I might pick up more a longer story by Lee S. Hawke.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Stanley

    Good new take I thought this was a good new take on fairy tales, not all tales of light not all tales of dark but tales that will grab you and make you listen

  9. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Lee S. Hawke’s short story anthology Division is subtitled “a collection of science fiction fairytales”, and I’ll admit I wonder about that. To me, fairy tales epitomise oral storytelling tradition, trading in archetypical characters and grand, good versus evil dramas. This is not so much a failing as a characteristic of the medium: simple, powerful imagery is memorable, and thus it is this that survives generations of retelling. Division, on the other hand, exemplifies written word storytelling Lee S. Hawke’s short story anthology Division is subtitled “a collection of science fiction fairytales”, and I’ll admit I wonder about that. To me, fairy tales epitomise oral storytelling tradition, trading in archetypical characters and grand, good versus evil dramas. This is not so much a failing as a characteristic of the medium: simple, powerful imagery is memorable, and thus it is this that survives generations of retelling. Division, on the other hand, exemplifies written word storytelling. Its characters are deep and recognisably human, its thematic explorations nuanced enough to defy Aesopian one-liners. As Hawke puts it, it’s “not Cinderella in Space”, it’s fiction which only resembles fairy tales insofar as it compels the reader to experience childlike wonder, insofar as the themes are timeless, which could be said of many a great work of fiction. It’s firmly a creature of its own medium, and it’s all the better for it. 'The Soldier' sets the tone for the the anthology, grim but hopeful, speculative in its setting but timeless in its themes. The enemies of this way are pestilence, disease; the eponymous soldiers, people blessed with supercharged immune systems that might hold the key to developing cures. Hawke takes this clinical presence and grounds it in the personal, the protagonist's torture as his body is razed as a battlefield bringing home the direness of this war far better than any bombastic, globe-spanning treatment of the same could. 'Please Connect' asks us what first love means, absent the social narratives that colour our perceptions of what romance and attraction “are” or “should be”. The protagonist, conditioned by a society that has obsoleted face-to-face interaction, sees even his sanitised courtship with an anthropological eye that Hawke impossibly transmutes into a warmer parlance. There is a raw eroticism in the language here, drawn from where it has always lain: in the quickening of a pulse, in the wetness of a breath. 'Dissimilation' and 'The Grey Wall' both hark upon the themes of unreality and altered perception (the former with its Inception-like layerings of non-worlds; the latter with an expressly unreliable narrator whose doublethink allows Hawke a novel angle on magical realism). Both these stories ask something about when and how it is better to live within fantasy than reality, the question left deliberately ambiguous despite the characters’ own certainty. Meanwhile, 'Lemuria' is set in the midst of an apocalyptic alien invasion where anyone who sees the monsters, dies, an incursion into psychological horror that is overshadowed by a late-game twist which all too briefly asks us what rated we would rather endure than death. 'Beauty' is perhaps the most explicitly political of the lot, a disillusioned neo-“plastic surgeon” ruminating on the homogeneity of his work: >He’d been a young girl then, and he still remembered the first advertisements. Transcend age. Transcend race. Transcend gender. But since he’d stepped out of medical school, all he’d ever done was fulfil the same three basic templates, again and again and again. The possibility of infinite variation had led only to convergence. It’s a powerful meditation on the moral dangers of fashions, and on the beauty of the different and of individual expression. The final story, 'Division', is about two women's grief following the death of their daughter. It's told through the eyes of one mother, Diyani, a passionate mechanic whose affinity is for her work, not people. Her heartbreak is raw on the page, her anger twisting her away from the world and, especially, her partner, the physical space of their shared bed reifying the deterioration of their relationship. When the healing finally begins, it's faltering and unsure, the stuff of human beings, not fairy tales. Yet it feels like a burden being lifted, all the same. There Division closes, metaphor, story, and anthology: peering into what it is that makes us human, and in spite (because?) of all our faults, still finding magic. (Disclaimer: this review was written based on a review copy provided by the author.)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ravencrantz

    1.5/5 I don't think I like short stories. Even novellas from books I adore, I'm always left unsatisfied and like I read something that was never finished. So many of these stories ended so abruptly, I was waiting for another chapter to come next. I'm incredibly disappointed with this collection, there was only one story I really enjoyed at all, and even that didn't seem fleshed out enough. Not to mention these aren't fairytales. They're just mildly creepy snippets of worlds we'll probably never s 1.5/5 I don't think I like short stories. Even novellas from books I adore, I'm always left unsatisfied and like I read something that was never finished. So many of these stories ended so abruptly, I was waiting for another chapter to come next. I'm incredibly disappointed with this collection, there was only one story I really enjoyed at all, and even that didn't seem fleshed out enough. Not to mention these aren't fairytales. They're just mildly creepy snippets of worlds we'll probably never see again. They felt more like those promo pamphlets publishers send out for new books instead of ARCs. The ones that have the first chapter or two to draw you in as you wait for the book to be released. All these stories leave you with a sense of incompletion, save for maybe one or two but even those could have given more information. It's not even normal loose ends you would get in a full length novel. I expect some things to go unanswered so everything isn't neatly packaged at the end. I don't mind a few loose ends or a few questions, but to answer nothing? To accomplish nothing? What's the point then? What's the point of this collection? Other than to be a huge disappointment, I mean. The alien story and the spaceship story were decent, thus bumping this to 1.5 (or 2 by goodreads standards) stars, but it wasn't enough to save the collection. I've no interest in reading more by this author.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Disa Marnesdottr

    I've read this before. I will undoubtedly read it again. I got it for free, Amazon tells me, in February of 2015. I'd never read anything by the author before, and had no idea what I was in for. It's a collection of seven short stories, each one dark and sparkling, so short that any summary would be a spoiler, but that's okay. It won't take you long to read it. I just checked--the ebook is only ninety-nine cents. Go get it. I've read this before. I will undoubtedly read it again. I got it for free, Amazon tells me, in February of 2015. I'd never read anything by the author before, and had no idea what I was in for. It's a collection of seven short stories, each one dark and sparkling, so short that any summary would be a spoiler, but that's okay. It won't take you long to read it. I just checked--the ebook is only ninety-nine cents. Go get it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Archie

    This collection of short stories was enjoyable to read. I opened the book now and then over the past year, finishing the last story a couple of days ago. As I read the stories I liked them and found them well written. Now that I sit her to write the review, I can't recall any of the individual stories, maybe it is my poor memory or the stories were not memorable. This collection of short stories was enjoyable to read. I opened the book now and then over the past year, finishing the last story a couple of days ago. As I read the stories I liked them and found them well written. Now that I sit her to write the review, I can't recall any of the individual stories, maybe it is my poor memory or the stories were not memorable.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Annjeannette

    Bland...like food without seasoning or variation. Sigh...there is no fairytale aspect to these stories. If you are looking for some generic scifi to get you through your commute, this might do it. For the more demanding reader, these stories are a bit bland and predictable.

  14. 4 out of 5

    AugurPool

    Full Disclosure: I do not personally know this author, but I received a free copy of this book in exchange for a candid review. When I saw review copies offered, I jumped at the chance to read this book. Besides being a huge sci-fi fan, I write science fiction 'fairytales' myself. While I don't mind the concept of retold classics, I was pleased to see that these were all original tales. For the most part, the stories are extremely well-done, with themes that explore the same human experiences in Full Disclosure: I do not personally know this author, but I received a free copy of this book in exchange for a candid review. When I saw review copies offered, I jumped at the chance to read this book. Besides being a huge sci-fi fan, I write science fiction 'fairytales' myself. While I don't mind the concept of retold classics, I was pleased to see that these were all original tales. For the most part, the stories are extremely well-done, with themes that explore the same human experiences in new, futuristic, but still authentic ways. Lee S. Hawke is undoubtedly a fine author with compelling ideas and a definite skill for storytelling. Though many endings are left 'open ended', as some reviewers have mentioned, I found them all to have very clear and complete story arcs with very satisfying conclusions. The ideas and themes behind the stories are brilliant and fun. I was moved many times. Hawke has definite wordsmithing skill, and I found myself impressed with certain turns of phrases or the sudden realization that a new story had swapped to present tense, and I hadn't even noticed until mid-way through (I'm usually not overly fond of present tense). The characters themselves were all unique, although I did find that the author's voice/pet habits rang through heavily enough to dilute that in places: starting so many sentences with 'but' or 'and' (a habit I share and am maybe over conscious about), fragments, over-saturation of similes & metaphors, etc. I very much loved the tales and will be watching this author in the future! However, I hope she avails herself of a quality editor for future books. My issues are more with the editing than with the stories, because the stories are great! However, for grammar enthusiasts like myself, there are enough issues that it was consistently pulling me out of the stories. There are a lot of mis-used/missing commas, which kept me stumbling even though the stories themselves were propelling me forward. As mentioned, the writer ticks above also started really glaring for me. Especially the simile/metaphor issue! A well-done simile or metaphor is so subtle as to not even be noticed, unless it stands out due to extreme awesome. The first time or two that they jumped out, it was because of just that. “Wow, what an interesting way to put it!” But the more (and more, and more) that they started cropping up, they really went from shining to glaring to annoying. Similes (and metaphors) are like salt – used judiciously, they make nearly everything better, but use far too much and the effect is overbearingly obvious and leaves a bad taste. I would have happily rated it much higher had the editing been better. I'd added the author to my 'spec fic writers to watch' list and undoubtedly look forward to reading more. However, it was a heavy enough issue that I actually went looking for info on the editors and publisher (who has NO info on their website as to who they are). If this is self-published, it's extremely well-done storytelling, and I don't want to diminish that at all, but a professional editor could have easily bumped it from 3 to 5 stars.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Wendy Skultety (gimmethatbook.com)

    This review originally appeared on my blog at www.gimmethatbook.com. Short stories are always good to read in between longer books, because they serve as a palate cleanser and give you things to think about in a small package. DIVISION was awesome to read because the sci-fi wasn’t overly technical; the stories were all basically dystopian and mostly believable; and there was just enough of an odd twist to make you take a breath and consider the possibilities of what you just read. The twist is not This review originally appeared on my blog at www.gimmethatbook.com. Short stories are always good to read in between longer books, because they serve as a palate cleanser and give you things to think about in a small package. DIVISION was awesome to read because the sci-fi wasn’t overly technical; the stories were all basically dystopian and mostly believable; and there was just enough of an odd twist to make you take a breath and consider the possibilities of what you just read. The twist is not always glaringly obvious–you need to read the story (or parts of it) over again to grasp what Hawke is saying. In the story about the boy trying to get beyond the giant gray Wall that surrounds his town, the descriptions of the road become more and more detailed, until you realize what, exactly, the road is made of. That’s when you get that chill in your heart and know you are dealing with a writer with talent. Short stories are hard to create–you have to have a hook, interesting characters, and a plot that wraps up just as things get going. Hawke has constructed some fine work here, for sure. Perhaps my favorite one was the story about the forced interaction between the data analyst and the software coder. Appropriately dystopian and government controlled, I thought it would be a lot darker than it turned out to be–but still satisfying nonetheless. Maybe I liked it because it was the most benign one of them all. Remember what I said: odd twists and hints of darker things that sometimes lurk in the basement, or in the far reaches of our mind, where we don’t want to go. If you like sci fi or dystopian work, you will enjoy DIVISION. All the stories have characters that you can sympathize with, and situations that will ring true. Excellent job by Lee S. Hawke on this collection, and I’d love to see more.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Anna Tan

    Science Fiction Fairytales. Read that again. Science Fiction Fairytales. Figured it out yet? I haven't. But I like it. From the first story, The Soldier, up to the final title story, Division Hawke draws you into a strange yet familiar future world of technology, pushing the limits of what we'd expect to be normal. The Soldier tells the tale of being used as a soldier in the war against disease. Dissimilation brings you into a virtual reality within a virtual reality within - which is the real w Science Fiction Fairytales. Read that again. Science Fiction Fairytales. Figured it out yet? I haven't. But I like it. From the first story, The Soldier, up to the final title story, Division Hawke draws you into a strange yet familiar future world of technology, pushing the limits of what we'd expect to be normal. The Soldier tells the tale of being used as a soldier in the war against disease. Dissimilation brings you into a virtual reality within a virtual reality within - which is the real world again? Please Connect makes you ponder a world where human connection has disappeared and sex is an unnatural ritual obligated by the government. In The Grey Wall you discover a strange world of living furniture, and wonder - what if? - even as Beauty brings you deeper into a different world where you wonder what choices you would make if you could change everything about yourself. Lemuria is a semi-horror story of an alien-like invasion and escape. Undoubtedly, the crown jewel of this anthology is Division itself, a story of raw grief, of coping mechanisms, of pain, of division and loss. It's a short work, one you can finish reading in maybe an hour or less. But it's one that leaves you with a satisfied feeling in your chest. I received a gift copy of this e-book from the author in exchange for an honest review.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Carey Rulo

    Refreshing and original fairytales for the digital generation Lee S. Hawke simultaneously treads the literary paths of The Brothers Grimm and Bradbury to create seven new fairytales for the digital generation. Among these spellbinding stories, readers will meet: A reluctant soldier who finds hope in the devastation of humanity's final war. A young girl who decides an unknown reality is preferable to a virtual world. Two strangers who discover the power of human contact in an increasingly technologic Refreshing and original fairytales for the digital generation Lee S. Hawke simultaneously treads the literary paths of The Brothers Grimm and Bradbury to create seven new fairytales for the digital generation. Among these spellbinding stories, readers will meet: A reluctant soldier who finds hope in the devastation of humanity's final war. A young girl who decides an unknown reality is preferable to a virtual world. Two strangers who discover the power of human contact in an increasingly technological world. A young boy who figures out that sometimes living the lie is better than knowing the truth. A man who re-discovers his appreciation for beauty in a world of mind-numbing similarity. A young lady who learns that sometimes assimilation is the only path to safety and survival. And, finally, a couple suffering from a catastrophic loss who have to learn to reconnect to their humanity and one another. In the tradition of both fine folklore and science fiction, Hawke reveals both the positive and negative aspects of human nature paired with settings and scenarios that hit just close enough home to leave readers feeling a little uncomfortable. I highly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys science fiction, fairytales, or just reading in general. These short stories will keep you entertained and engaged.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Lucky me, because these stories are terrific! One reason I don't read more sci-fi books is that too many of them disappoint me with their flat characterizations, lack of subtlety, and tendency to depend on flashy technological gimmicks to stimulate excitement in the reader. All flash and not enough substance for my taste. These stories, however, have all the substance I could ask for. There is still plenty of advanced technology and I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Lucky me, because these stories are terrific! One reason I don't read more sci-fi books is that too many of them disappoint me with their flat characterizations, lack of subtlety, and tendency to depend on flashy technological gimmicks to stimulate excitement in the reader. All flash and not enough substance for my taste. These stories, however, have all the substance I could ask for. There is still plenty of advanced technology and peril, but at their hearts, these stories are about people, not gimmicks. Each story was lusciously subtle and nuanced in the building of its emotional impact. Rather than racing onward to get to the next scene, I found myself slowing down to savor the humanity of the moments. The characters are written with compassion and sensitivity. Even as they are confronted with all the strange and terrible suffering their dystopian worlds can throw at them, they still feel like real people, with real human needs and desires, struggling as best they can against the stark inhumanity of their situations. Thought provoking and thoroughly enjoyable. I look forward to future books by this author. A full-length novel of this same caliber of writing will definitely be a must-read for me!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Anchit

    I read the first 3 stories. The first story was really good. I liked the gentle writing style. The second story (the one on virtual reality) was okay. I felt that when concepts are introduced the could have been explained a bit more - what is what. I was left to figure out what the author means over the next couple of paragraphs. The 3rd story was also okay. It was of a romance genre, which I really detest. I skimmed through it and then dropped the book. Overall these stories have an interesting S I read the first 3 stories. The first story was really good. I liked the gentle writing style. The second story (the one on virtual reality) was okay. I felt that when concepts are introduced the could have been explained a bit more - what is what. I was left to figure out what the author means over the next couple of paragraphs. The 3rd story was also okay. It was of a romance genre, which I really detest. I skimmed through it and then dropped the book. Overall these stories have an interesting Sci-Fi background theme and the cultural effects of that technology. It felt like each story was 2-3 chapters from a novel, meaning that it didn't feel complete. You were just starting to get into the world while the story ended. I guess that's how short stories are like. Another thing that I noticed was that the author changes his writing style from story to story. That's something I didn't know before. I guess this means that if we read a novel and don't like it it doesn't necessarily mean that we don't connect with that author. We should try 2-3 books for each author until we can decide whether we have a taste for his writing or not. To each his own.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Division was a very good series of short stories. I was hung up on the first couple of stories trying to fit them into fairytales but then decided to forget that and focus on the science fiction which made it much more enjoyable. The stories showcase some of the best concepts of science fiction. I think my favorites were 'The Grey Wall' and 'Please Connect'. The first because it makes you think, about the direction science is taking us and what our mind is willing to believe - and isn't that what Division was a very good series of short stories. I was hung up on the first couple of stories trying to fit them into fairytales but then decided to forget that and focus on the science fiction which made it much more enjoyable. The stories showcase some of the best concepts of science fiction. I think my favorites were 'The Grey Wall' and 'Please Connect'. The first because it makes you think, about the direction science is taking us and what our mind is willing to believe - and isn't that what science fiction is all about? I liked 'Please Connect' because it reminded me of a book of short stories called 'First Love' that included my first science fiction love story, I had always thought of science fiction in this boxed definition then I read that love story and went on to Asimov's mysteries and so much more. Perhaps that's why I was frustrated with the title word "fairytales", I know science fiction could be written within the scope of fairytales.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    First of all, I wouldn't recommend it for anyone who can't stand stories left unfinished. However, every story was a wonderful glimpse into a different world, set of circumstances, and universe. But more importantly, you saw different characters interact with their new worlds, in tough situations: some sad, some happy, and others exciting. Lee S. Hawke is able to create a whole world without needing countless chapters. You're instantly immersed, and it leaves you wanting more from each and every First of all, I wouldn't recommend it for anyone who can't stand stories left unfinished. However, every story was a wonderful glimpse into a different world, set of circumstances, and universe. But more importantly, you saw different characters interact with their new worlds, in tough situations: some sad, some happy, and others exciting. Lee S. Hawke is able to create a whole world without needing countless chapters. You're instantly immersed, and it leaves you wanting more from each and every story. As he says in his introduction, he wants you to decide what happens, where the story goes. I love science fiction and these short stories were perfect to pull out when I got a few minutes and wanted something to read. Disclaimer: Received book free in order to review it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Deb Wilson

    Wow. Where do I begin? Okay, with the facts. The publisher contacted me to offer a free copy in exchange for a review. I love science fiction, adore short stories, and have always liked the dark side of fairy tales. This collection of stories is all of those things. I can't say much without spoiling them, but they all make you consider things a little bit, and like real life, nothing is straight black and white. The stories are well written, and I can see myself reading these again in the future Wow. Where do I begin? Okay, with the facts. The publisher contacted me to offer a free copy in exchange for a review. I love science fiction, adore short stories, and have always liked the dark side of fairy tales. This collection of stories is all of those things. I can't say much without spoiling them, but they all make you consider things a little bit, and like real life, nothing is straight black and white. The stories are well written, and I can see myself reading these again in the future. Fantastic stories from first to last. You can read the whole thing in an hour or two as well. Highly recommended!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Danica

    As a busy college student, I rarely can find the time to read my textbooks, much less books for fun. I downloaded "Division" before I had to leave for class and started reading it on my way. Next thing I knew, I was sitting in class and the lecturer was wrapping up their 90 minute lecture, but I had been reading the entire time. If you enjoy science fiction, this is definitely a book to check out. Sci Fi is not my favorite genre, and it's one I rarely read, but I really liked reading this book. I As a busy college student, I rarely can find the time to read my textbooks, much less books for fun. I downloaded "Division" before I had to leave for class and started reading it on my way. Next thing I knew, I was sitting in class and the lecturer was wrapping up their 90 minute lecture, but I had been reading the entire time. If you enjoy science fiction, this is definitely a book to check out. Sci Fi is not my favorite genre, and it's one I rarely read, but I really liked reading this book. I definitely have my favorite fairytale in this novel, and I'm sure you will have one too.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    I enjoyed Division quite a lot I've read science fiction going back as far as Jules Verne, and it is one of my favorite genres. I hope to read more of Hawke's work in the future. The only thing which confused me was why he called the collection "fairytales". I suppose all science fiction is akin to fairytales, but I kept trying to link each story to a specific tale. If such links existed I failed to find them, which I found a bit frustrating, but not so much to spoil a good read. I enjoyed Division quite a lot I've read science fiction going back as far as Jules Verne, and it is one of my favorite genres. I hope to read more of Hawke's work in the future. The only thing which confused me was why he called the collection "fairytales". I suppose all science fiction is akin to fairytales, but I kept trying to link each story to a specific tale. If such links existed I failed to find them, which I found a bit frustrating, but not so much to spoil a good read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Con

    I'm not usually a sci-fi reader yet these stories with their diverse characters made it easy for my mind to accept the challenge to open up and ~connect with this other world immediately. New and inventive while keeping the heart and truths of the world I know. As a sucker for angst I welcome the emphasis on the tragic aspects, but also the offering of hope. Each part observant and thought-provoking with S. Hawke's trademark poetic style that I love so very, very much. I'm not usually a sci-fi reader yet these stories with their diverse characters made it easy for my mind to accept the challenge to open up and ~connect with this other world immediately. New and inventive while keeping the heart and truths of the world I know. As a sucker for angst I welcome the emphasis on the tragic aspects, but also the offering of hope. Each part observant and thought-provoking with S. Hawke's trademark poetic style that I love so very, very much.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Joanne

    I liked these stories...I'm still not quite sure how they are "fairytales" but they are an interesting look at personal relationships and technology. My favorite story was "Please Connect" which illustrated how the human touch, the human connection is central to us all, regardless of how much technology we have in our world. as a side note, I appreciated the nod to Gary Gygax in the "Division" talking about Gygax-20 (if that isn't a D&D reference I'll eat my kindle.) I liked these stories...I'm still not quite sure how they are "fairytales" but they are an interesting look at personal relationships and technology. My favorite story was "Please Connect" which illustrated how the human touch, the human connection is central to us all, regardless of how much technology we have in our world. as a side note, I appreciated the nod to Gary Gygax in the "Division" talking about Gygax-20 (if that isn't a D&D reference I'll eat my kindle.)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    This collection of sci-fi fairytales contains seven short stories that made me shiver. They're excellent -- each and everyone one of them. I had a few favourites, but I can't say that I found one I didn't like, or one that I liked least. I definitely recommend this to anyone who would like to try a new genre! :) It's short and sweet, and super worth it! This collection of sci-fi fairytales contains seven short stories that made me shiver. They're excellent -- each and everyone one of them. I had a few favourites, but I can't say that I found one I didn't like, or one that I liked least. I definitely recommend this to anyone who would like to try a new genre! :) It's short and sweet, and super worth it!

  28. 5 out of 5

    V.R.

    I was excited to read this collection of short stories and it did not disappoint. First, I have to say, I love the cover and the stories inside were just as great. All of them were unique but tied together theme-wise brilliantly. The last one brought me to tears!! Would definitely recommend.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alecia

    New worlds I wouldn't consider these your standard definition of fairy tales, but I enjoyed them all the same. Short sci-fi stories told in apocalyptic lands, about death mostly, but also about hope and love. A short read, but worth it for sure. New worlds I wouldn't consider these your standard definition of fairy tales, but I enjoyed them all the same. Short sci-fi stories told in apocalyptic lands, about death mostly, but also about hope and love. A short read, but worth it for sure.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ruth Caves

    Not a normal fairy tale Once upon a time starts so many stories. I love that these short tales make you think of possible "what if's", creating even more possibilities. Not everything ends up living happily ever after, but just one step at a time, day after day. Very imaginative. Not a normal fairy tale Once upon a time starts so many stories. I love that these short tales make you think of possible "what if's", creating even more possibilities. Not everything ends up living happily ever after, but just one step at a time, day after day. Very imaginative.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.