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Alternate cover edition for ASIN B00K5HZ4M2. Escaping from the turmoil of her home, fifteen-year-old Posy finds herself at her usual haunt ... the library. When she chooses an unfamiliar book from the shelf, she does not devour its words as she usually does... Its words devour her. Posy is pulled into the pages of a fairy tale in turmoil. Characters whisper of rebellion again Alternate cover edition for ASIN B00K5HZ4M2. Escaping from the turmoil of her home, fifteen-year-old Posy finds herself at her usual haunt ... the library. When she chooses an unfamiliar book from the shelf, she does not devour its words as she usually does... Its words devour her. Posy is pulled into the pages of a fairy tale in turmoil. Characters whisper of rebellion against their Plot. And Posy must find a lost princess whose role in the story is crucial, before her own role in the book comes to a horrible end. With the haughty Prince Kyran as a reluctant companion, Posy ventures past the Borders of the Plot, into the depths of the treacherous Wild Land forest that lie beyond. Secrets are buried there, dangerous and deadly. Yet the darkest secret of all is the one Posy carries within herself. Soon it's clear that finding the lost princess is the least of Posy's concerns. The Author of the book must be found. His Plot must be put to rights again, his characters reminded of who they were first created to be. Only then will the True Story be written, both for Posy, and for the tale she has now become a part of.


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Alternate cover edition for ASIN B00K5HZ4M2. Escaping from the turmoil of her home, fifteen-year-old Posy finds herself at her usual haunt ... the library. When she chooses an unfamiliar book from the shelf, she does not devour its words as she usually does... Its words devour her. Posy is pulled into the pages of a fairy tale in turmoil. Characters whisper of rebellion again Alternate cover edition for ASIN B00K5HZ4M2. Escaping from the turmoil of her home, fifteen-year-old Posy finds herself at her usual haunt ... the library. When she chooses an unfamiliar book from the shelf, she does not devour its words as she usually does... Its words devour her. Posy is pulled into the pages of a fairy tale in turmoil. Characters whisper of rebellion against their Plot. And Posy must find a lost princess whose role in the story is crucial, before her own role in the book comes to a horrible end. With the haughty Prince Kyran as a reluctant companion, Posy ventures past the Borders of the Plot, into the depths of the treacherous Wild Land forest that lie beyond. Secrets are buried there, dangerous and deadly. Yet the darkest secret of all is the one Posy carries within herself. Soon it's clear that finding the lost princess is the least of Posy's concerns. The Author of the book must be found. His Plot must be put to rights again, his characters reminded of who they were first created to be. Only then will the True Story be written, both for Posy, and for the tale she has now become a part of.

30 review for The Word Changers

  1. 4 out of 5

    Gillian Bronte Adams

    It was late at night when I turned the final page of the The Word Changers, slid the book back into place on my shelf, and breathed a mighty contended sigh. Reading this book was like drinking a cup of hot chocolate on a cool evening. It hits just the right spot and leaves you feeling warm and at peace with the world and yourself. The Word Changers has a classic quality to it, with all the timelessness and agelessness of the Chronicles of Narnia - a comparison I don't make lightly. Definitely a It was late at night when I turned the final page of the The Word Changers, slid the book back into place on my shelf, and breathed a mighty contended sigh. Reading this book was like drinking a cup of hot chocolate on a cool evening. It hits just the right spot and leaves you feeling warm and at peace with the world and yourself. The Word Changers has a classic quality to it, with all the timelessness and agelessness of the Chronicles of Narnia - a comparison I don't make lightly. Definitely a keeper.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Abbott

    "But Posy wondered, suspected, even begun to believe, that sometimes reality was too solid and too hard, and that perhaps sometimes the clearest and straightest way to truth was through a fairytale." This quote is a good example of what my opinions about life turned toward when reading this book. The Word Changers is about a girl named Posy who gets placed in a book she was reading because a crucial character in the story (the princess) has run away, and she must be replaced because her presence "But Posy wondered, suspected, even begun to believe, that sometimes reality was too solid and too hard, and that perhaps sometimes the clearest and straightest way to truth was through a fairytale." This quote is a good example of what my opinions about life turned toward when reading this book. The Word Changers is about a girl named Posy who gets placed in a book she was reading because a crucial character in the story (the princess) has run away, and she must be replaced because her presence is imperative to the plot. At least, that is what you are initially led to believe. The truth is, "the plot" in the kingdom is not the same as it once was, and evil is afoot. The princess ran away for a reason, which leads Posy and Kyran (the prince), on a quest to find the princess and right the wrongs that have been done to the kingdom and the inhabitants. My thought process: So, I'm a reader reading about a reader being sucked into a book... what if this actually happens and there is a reader reading about me reading about a reader being sucked into a book? Now I'm kind of waiting to be sucked into a tale (although, knowing my luck, I would be stuck in one where I'm alone in the middle of the ocean on a little lifeboat with nothing but meager rations and a piccolo.) *Ahem* moving on... I think my favorite thing about this book was the creative world and it's inhabitants. I love fantasy, especially when it contains good world building. The different places and creatures were captivating. Definite thumbs up to that. Another thing I enjoyed about this novel is the action in it. The story moved along at a satisfying pace that kept me interested. Also, the characters in the book didn't just go through physical perils, but had to fight inward battles. A lot of this inner reflection was addressed in their experiences in a place called "The Glooming", which held my favorite scenes. Everything that happened in the Glooming was really cool and different. In particular, there was an Underwater Palace that played mind games with Posy and Kyran. I really liked the contrast between the two experiences in the palace, and wish they had spent more time in it. While this part doesn't feel rushed, I would have really liked to see more things that the palace could do to them; This was one of the few times in which Posy and Kyran were separated, making it easier to shed more light on their individual struggles. Nevertheless, their task required haste, so I see why their stay was limited. I feel like it would be a discredit to call the book a romance. While it does contain romance, there is a lot more going on than the typical young adult girl-meets-guy, let's-pretend-this-book-is-a-fantasy-when-it's-really-about-finding-a-counterpart-to-complete-you garbage. The story is actually a Christian allegory, in which the Author is supposed to represent God. The Author actually feels personal, which is a nice change. A lot of times in Young Adult Christian Fiction, the reader feels detached because of the way the book is portraying God, and it can feel cliché. Fortunately, such was not the case in this tale. The Author feels very real. *********************************************************************** Quotes about the author: "The plot here in this land beyond is one that may change and vary; it is one that is dependent on the choices of it's characters themselves. It is not set; it is not the same every time the book is opened or the story told. That is it's danger. And that is it's beauty." "Surely, the characters must believe that an author existed. They were aware they were in a book- where did they think the book had come from?" "Whether the characters answer to the king or not makes no difference in the Author's existence" *********************************************************************** The characters were well rounded and developed. None of the characters were perfect, making them realistic because of their mistakes. Many of the evil ones had an internal war between right and wrong. I really felt for many of the characters in this book. The main theme in this book is forgiveness. In her actual life, Posy's parents have intense fights, and will most likely be getting a divorce. Posy harbors resentment about what they have done to her family, and is bitter about the pain they have caused. There are many other characters in this book seeking or giving forgiveness, which gives a relatable feeling. I really liked this theme, especially for a young adult book. It didn't come off as preachy, and taught a good lesson. "Remember, Prince, there is good and bad in everyone. Dark and shadows depend so wholly on light that it is impossible sometimes to see where one begins and one ends. Not a soul in this world or any other is ever completely lost in darkness- not unless they choose to be." My only quibble is that the beginning of the book felt different than the rest of the story. In the first two chapters, it feels like the target audience is for a more junior level. However, this feeling can be overlooked because the rest of the book fit young adult perfectly, and it was only those first two that gave that impression. I liked the way the book ended. It was a little open ended, but also gave closure. There is room for it to be a series, but it could also work as a stand-alone book. I would definitely recommend this to my fantasy-loving friends! It was an interesting read full of original ideas that left me not knowing what was coming next. A well deserved 4 stars! * In the interest of full disclosure, I received an electronic copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. The opinions stated above are my own.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Shantelle

    The Word Changers was totally unusual... Ashlee Willis’s ideas are superb! From the very first page, I was hooked! And once I switched from Kindle to paperback, I read the book almost straight through. Mysterious and delightful, The Word Changers pulled me into a book inside a book. Posy is a fifteen-year-old girl struggling with the pain of life and the hurt inside her own family. She stumbles into a grand adventure while at the town library... and well... finds a path to love and forgiveness The Word Changers was totally unusual... Ashlee Willis’s ideas are superb! From the very first page, I was hooked! And once I switched from Kindle to paperback, I read the book almost straight through. Mysterious and delightful, The Word Changers pulled me into a book inside a book. Posy is a fifteen-year-old girl struggling with the pain of life and the hurt inside her own family. She stumbles into a grand adventure while at the town library... and well... finds a path to love and forgiveness, among other things. This book was humorous and sweet, and pretty action-packed, with some poignant themes. It kept me guessing... who was on the right side, and who on the wrong? What even was the right side? It was magical... surprising... you just don’t know what’s going to happen. I really want to mention some parts I found delightful, but I think I’ll rather let it be a surprise for you! :) The Word Changers is rather for a more mature audience. –Since there’s definitely a romance going on... and some scenes that could be frightening for some people. So I would say at least 13; this book seems directed toward teens. Posy, at only fifteen, seemed a little young for the depth of the romance she had with a young man in the book. But, I remind myself that I know of some beautiful love stories that started that young, so I’ll say no more on this subject! :) So... I didn't feel that The Word Changers had an overall Christian allegory (comparing it to books from authors like C.S. Lewis, Anne Elisabeth Stengl, or Molly Evangeline/Jaye L. Knight), but it did have some allegorical themes that I found really neat. The Author of the story in The Word Changers didn’t seem to be allegorical other than speaking of authors writing their books, changing plots, letting their characters be real, and so on. Though it did speak of the characters of the book forgetting their author, and the author giving them a free choice, which parallels to things we see in our faith; I don't feel the Author in the book represented God as Aslan represents God in Narnia or anything. I really like a strong Christian-allegory theme, but The Word Changers was still a fun, thought-provoking, and mystical fantasy. The one thing I have to mention that I didn’t like was the end. A sequel please, Ashlee!! :) I want to read more of these lovely characters—I felt a little bit like I was left hanging. And Kyran, what of Kyran and Evanthe?? Are we never to see them again? *sniff* To sum this review up, The Word Changers was a really creative, fun, scary, thought-provoking, and tender story. I don’t think it will be soon forgotten! :) I received a copy of The Word Changers from the author in exchange for my honest review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    H.S.J. Williams

    They say don't judge a book by its front cover. Well...I did...*shamed face* Oh, this cover was sweet and pretty. But it didn't quite look like the sort of fantasy I was interested in, plus modern-day kids dropping into another world isn't my fantasy of choice. But I was wrong on both accounts. This is a fantastic book! Ashlee writes with a clear, confident style both refreshing and engaging to pull you into her story as much as the character is pulled into a book. While I've read some fantasy whe They say don't judge a book by its front cover. Well...I did...*shamed face* Oh, this cover was sweet and pretty. But it didn't quite look like the sort of fantasy I was interested in, plus modern-day kids dropping into another world isn't my fantasy of choice. But I was wrong on both accounts. This is a fantastic book! Ashlee writes with a clear, confident style both refreshing and engaging to pull you into her story as much as the character is pulled into a book. While I've read some fantasy where the plot is lost on the adventure as the characters encounter all kinds of fantastic beings, Ashlee guided the reader along quite skillfully, losing me only once (probably because I was reading too fast in desperation to discover the fate of certain centaurs). While this world and idea may be akin to the Chronicles of Narnia (and that is a beautiful thing), it takes on an entire path of its own as it cleverly builds a world in which characters do not truly die, but are bound to the Plot, sworn to relive the same story over and over whenever a reader picks up the book in which they dwell. But what happens when characters rebel? When they go outside the Plot? What happens when it is discovered that characters might have changed the Plot long ago? That the story is no longer how the Author meant it to be? The cleverness of this book and the profound allegory simply delighted me. I was also impressed with the characters, Posy in particular. She wasn't the can't-do-anything-fainting sort of girl nor the the one who could trample any of her problems. She was real. She was scared, but determined to keep her head. She didn't always make the right choice and was silly at times, but attempted to make up for it. Kyran also was a good character, both immature at points and terribly mature at others. And the villains. I applaud the villains. I actually wasn't quite sure who the real villain was and when I thought I knew, it turned out someone else was influencing that person and so on! It was really quite amusing to see them all try to control each other and think that they were winning! But my favorite part of this book, hands down, was the centaurs. Let me make this clear. I've always thought centaurs were weird. I mean...bare-chested guys rising out the body of a horse? Weeeeeeird! Okay, so the ones in the Narnia movie were kind of impressive, but still. Well. This book changed all that. Think centaurs--elven style. Suddenly, I was a fan. Not only a fan, but I've become a writer of them myself, inspired for a short story exploring the prejudice and exploitation they might face. Probably my biggest complaint with this book was that the centaurs were not on page enough! Violence: There is battle, but description is non-existent. Some characters appear to have been beaten and whipped while captured, but that was off scene. Sexual: Posy develops a crush on Kyran, of course, and eventually romance blooms between them to the point that they share kisses. It felt a little rushed, and she was only 15, but still that felt kind of realistic too. I really couldn't see them going through this without getting crushes on each other! And personally, I feel that this was the author quietly making fun of all the crushes we girls will get on a guy in a book, but...he's in a book. Not going to work. It's vaguely, vaguely hinted that the king might have had an immoral relationship at one point, but who really knows? Not the reader. Language: None. Spiritual: This allegory paralleling our own messed up world who doesn't even acknowledge the Author anymore is unique and stunning! It beautifully explains the perfect love of allowing choice. Really, really well done! I really enjoyed this book and I look forward to whatever else the author has to offer. More centaurs, please! ;)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Deborah O'Carroll

    I love allegorical stories when they're done right, and The Word Changers definitely was. Fantasy and fairytales can present truths in a way that nothing else can. They help me think of things in a new light, and in fact seem to grow my faith more than any other type of fiction. The allegory in this delightful tale was brought about by the main defining fact of the story: that it takes place in a book within a book. The characters know they are in a book, but many of them have stopped believing i I love allegorical stories when they're done right, and The Word Changers definitely was. Fantasy and fairytales can present truths in a way that nothing else can. They help me think of things in a new light, and in fact seem to grow my faith more than any other type of fiction. The allegory in this delightful tale was brought about by the main defining fact of the story: that it takes place in a book within a book. The characters know they are in a book, but many of them have stopped believing in their Author, even though they know they are written characters. Posy, who is not a character at all, but a girl from our own world, is thrown into the midst of this and must try to understand it all for herself. The whole idea and how it was done I found thought-provoking and beautiful. I loved how the story took place within a book! The idea is just so awesome and was incredibly well done. The whole thing was just so unique and intriguing! As a writer myself, and an avid book lover, I loved every single second of it. The characters were varied and interesting, and so well drawn that for a long time I wasn't sure if several of them were good or bad, which created an angle of mystery and suspense. There was awhile there where I wasn't even sure if anybody was good besides Posy -- who was a sweet but relateable main character. The story itself was gripping and very hard to put down. It twisted and turned and kept me guessing. The writing was a perfect fit for the story, with a lovely sort of lilt. It immersed me deeply in the world. One of my favorite things about fantasy is the fantasy world itself, and the individual feel of each. I loved this one, with its castles, forests, wild mysterious places, and the creatures that inhabit it -- from talking owls to centaurs. Also I love the blue mist. Irrationally. A lot. It was just so original and intriguing. I want a blue mist of my own. <3 Whew, all the things I loved about this story, and I haven't even gotten to the main one yet! Which is: Kyran! The story would have been a favorite even without him, but he added so much. Even if this had been a story I disliked, Kyran would have made me love it just by the fact that he was in it. One of my top-favorite characters, Kyran is awesome; enough said. I only had two problems with the story. One was very minor, which was Posy's age. Because of the romantic subplot, which was very sweet and innocent -- and being the hopeless romantic that I am, I really enjoyed that part of the plot itself -- but for some reason I felt like fifteen was a slightly young age for her. The only other thing was the ending, though I'm not going to give it away. It's the only thing that is keeping this book off the very select group of my absolute favorite-favorite-favorite books. I felt it coming by the time it came, but I still hoped against all hope that it would turn out just a little differently . . . But despite my disappointment, at least there are enough hints that I can imagine something more might happen -- someday. One thing I can't help but wonder, is... what about the book itself? I want a sequel! :) If it did tear out a little part of me . . . well, such is the peril of loving a book and its world and characters so much. As Posy herself learns. But we wouldn't have it any other way. Bottom line: I haven't read a book this good in a long time and highly recommend it to everyone! I just enjoyed this story way too much! <3 I'm eagerly looking forward to more books by Ashlee Willis! (I received an ARC ebook from the publisher in return for my honest review. These opinions are my own.)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Allison Ruvidich

    (Disclaimer: I received a free copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Also, I stole the idea for the introduction from Hannah Williams. Thanks/sorry, Hannah!) I dislike the saying don’t judge a book by its cover, because, in a strictly literary sense, I do. When I picked up The Word Changers, I saw a pretty cover that lacked polish. And that’s exactly what I read. Posy has a problem. It’s not that her parents are getting divorced. It’s not that she somehow finds herself in a boo (Disclaimer: I received a free copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Also, I stole the idea for the introduction from Hannah Williams. Thanks/sorry, Hannah!) I dislike the saying don’t judge a book by its cover, because, in a strictly literary sense, I do. When I picked up The Word Changers, I saw a pretty cover that lacked polish. And that’s exactly what I read. Posy has a problem. It’s not that her parents are getting divorced. It’s not that she somehow finds herself in a book whose Plot has gone badly awry. It’s not even that a malevolent owl is trying to kill her. Posy’s problem is that she fails to fall in love believably. And that is what kept me from loving this book. Neither Posy nor her love interest has the most dynamic personality—not surprising, since they never do anything that doesn’t advance the plot (note the lowercase p). In this case, I felt the novel suffered from an imbalance of scene and summary. Willis chose to write ‘they rode for several hours’ instead of portraying some of the conversation that might’ve happened along the way. Perhaps he reveals a scene from his childhood, or she confesses to deeply love the color pink, even though she finds it embarrassing. But the characters never raised their heads from the plot (again, note the lowercase p) long enough for me to learn anything about them, or for them to display any signs of chemistry that might warn me of an impending romance. (I also wish I hadn’t known Posy’s age, or maybe that I had known the love interest’s. That was off-putting.) But don’t stop reading yet. I haven’t finished. The Word Changers also had the best Christian allegory I have ever read. To write a strong novel, the Author cannot make things easy for their characters. The Reader must believe they struggle tooth and nail to achieve their heart’s desire before they can believe in the Plot. In the same way, God doesn’t make things easy for us. He doesn’t tell us where we’re going, or we would never get there. Just because He doesn’t smooth things over for us doesn’t mean He’s not there. (Of course, that begs the question of who the Reader represents in the allegory. But I digress.) In conclusion, Ashlee Willis still has a lot to learn, but she has what you can’t teach: vision. I will definitely be reading her next book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Age Appropriate For: 13 and up for romance, mildly scary scenes, and mild violence Best for Ages: 13 - 18 I have to say, I didn’t have high expectations for this book, but I came away very impressed. This wasn’t one of those books that I picked up because of the cool concept, read it, and then wished the author had spent more time developing in. Willis came up with an imaginative concept and developed it to its full potential. To me the whole book had a Narnia feel to it. The story was very differe Age Appropriate For: 13 and up for romance, mildly scary scenes, and mild violence Best for Ages: 13 - 18 I have to say, I didn’t have high expectations for this book, but I came away very impressed. This wasn’t one of those books that I picked up because of the cool concept, read it, and then wished the author had spent more time developing in. Willis came up with an imaginative concept and developed it to its full potential. To me the whole book had a Narnia feel to it. The story was very different than any of the Narnia books, but it had about the same level of fantasy, and some of the same allegorical feel without being overly allegorical. Since I liked Narnia, having a Narnian feel was a good thing. There were a couple of moments that were a bit scary (skeleton people, and the mermaid castle). If you have read all the Narnia books and liked them, you shouldn’t have a problem with anything in this book. Parents might want to read through the book before handing it to their young children or reading it aloud. The characters were pretty awesome. Posy and Kyran were both well developed and interesting. Posy was the perfect mix of sweet and strong, skeptical and believing. Her emotions were all relatable and well shown. While the romance was a bit heavier and shallower than I normally like, the rest of the story more than made up for it. While there was a large cast of supporting characters, I was never confused as to who was who. Willis did a great job of cementing in your mind who the characters were in a matter of a few sentences. It is not often that you find a book with so many characters, but makes it easy for you to remember them all. The ending is bittersweet, but satisfying. While some hope for a sequel to this book, I think the story is completed just as it is. However, if Willis writes a sequel, I will be one of those who pre-orders a copy. I highly recommend this book for those who like romance, YA fiction, and imaginative fantasy stories.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Serethiel Sequoia

    3.5 stars A shining beginning, a darling romance, and a bittersweet ending. I lost a bit of connection with the characters somewhere in the middle, but I still hopelessly adore the worlds Ashlee Willis creates!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Andi

    A note: You don't know true anguish and anger until you have written an entire review for an hour, only to fail to copy and paste it and not have it save correctly. So. Here we go again. "I suppose a cruel thing may be done, and its doer never knows the many wrongs and pains that happen because of it, falling one on the other, toppling like an avalanche on a mountainside." I have a confession: Even after Ashely reassured me that this book was good, I still harbored skepticism. I've been badly sc A note: You don't know true anguish and anger until you have written an entire review for an hour, only to fail to copy and paste it and not have it save correctly. So. Here we go again. "I suppose a cruel thing may be done, and its doer never knows the many wrongs and pains that happen because of it, falling one on the other, toppling like an avalanche on a mountainside." I have a confession: Even after Ashely reassured me that this book was good, I still harbored skepticism. I've been badly scarred twice by the falling in and out of a book plot. Once, when I was a kid, and I read this bizarre novel whose title I have long repressed from memory. It was off the charts creepy. I'm pretty sure that whoever wrote it did so out of malice and hatred for children. Either that, or they had never actually interacted with one before. Then I read part of Between the Lines . You'll notice that I said part. My complaints there belong to a different review entirely. So after both of those failures, I had sort of decided to avoid that genre in general. I had resigned myself to the fact that I would never really enjoy it, and that it was best if I should never pick one up again. Then Ashley had to go and suggest this book to me, and it sounded very intriguing, until I realized that the main character falls into a book. The Anguish. The Grief. But I ordered it from amazon anyway, my fingers crossed. And I'm glad I did. I'm not going to lie. The first five chapters of this book were a bit of a struggle for me. I had trouble connecting with the main character, Posy, and some of the sentences felt awkward. But by the sixth chapter, the writing had changed drastically. The words began to flow together beautifully, the scenes were no longer confusing. A whole world of creativity opened up, and I really enjoyed it. The world building was strong and well thought out, and some of the quotes actually got underlined in my copy (and trust me, I'm very picky when I do that, and it doesn't happen often.) There were also two scenes that especially stood out to me as very clever and kind of scary. That's the kind of thing I like. The characters did hold a large amount of depth. They had flaws and struggles, and they had to work just like anyone else to overcome them. There was also a good amount of character growth, more so than most young adult novels. They learn lessons, sometimes the hard way, just like all of us do. I felt like the romance moved a bit fast. I won't say who it is, although it's easy to figure out, but it just seemed so sudden. I mean, you can totally see it coming, and there is build up to it, but the build up itself is sudden. I should warn you that this next complaint is entirely subjective. I just sort of wished that we could have seen Posy do more things on her own. There's nothing at all wrong with being aided or helped by others, but it just seemed like, with a few exceptions, that the majority of Posy's conclusions were discovered by other people. Many of the things she did were because someone told her to, or in many cases, someone often had to come and save her. There's nothing wrong with this, it's just a preference I have. I wished she had shown more...initiative, I guess. I definitely recommend the book, especially to fans of C.S. Lewis. I'll also be looking for more work from this author. So, is my prejudice against this type of book over?

  10. 4 out of 5

    H.S.J. Williams

    Ashlee writes with a clear, confident style both refreshing and engaging to pull you into her story as much as the character is pulled into a book. While I've read some fantasy where the plot is lost on the adventure as the characters encounter all kinds of fantastic beings, Ashlee guided the reader along quite skillfully, losing me only once (probably because I was reading too fast in desperation to discover the fate of certain centaurs). While this world and idea may be akin to the Chronicles o Ashlee writes with a clear, confident style both refreshing and engaging to pull you into her story as much as the character is pulled into a book. While I've read some fantasy where the plot is lost on the adventure as the characters encounter all kinds of fantastic beings, Ashlee guided the reader along quite skillfully, losing me only once (probably because I was reading too fast in desperation to discover the fate of certain centaurs). While this world and idea may be akin to the Chronicles of Narnia (and that is a beautiful thing), it takes on an entire path of its own as it cleverly builds a world in which characters do not truly die, but are bound to the Plot, sworn to relive the same story over and over whenever a reader picks up the book in which they dwell. But what happens when characters rebel? When they go outside the Plot? What happens when it is discovered that characters might have changed the Plot long ago? That the story is no longer how the Author meant it to be? The cleverness of this book and the profound allegory simply delighted me. I was also impressed with the characters, Posy in particular. She wasn't the can't-do-anything-fainting sort of girl nor the the one who could trample any of her problems. She was real. She was scared, but determined to keep her head. She didn't always make the right choice and was silly at times, but attempted to make up for it. Kyran also was a good character, both immature at points and terribly mature at others. And the villains. I applaud the villains. I actually wasn't quite sure who the real villain was and when I thought I knew, it turned out someone else was influencing that person and so on! It was really quite amusing to see them all try to control each other and think that they were winning! But my favorite part of this book, hands down, was the centaurs. Let me make this clear. I've always thought centaurs were weird. I mean...bare-chested guys rising out the body of a horse? Weeeeeeird! Okay, so the ones in the Narnia movie were kind of impressive, but still. Well. This book changed all that. Think centaurs--elven style. Suddenly, I was a fan. Not only a fan, but I've become a writer of them myself, inspired for a short story exploring the prejudice and exploitation they might face. Probably my biggest complaint with this book was that the centaurs were not on page enough! Violence: There is battle, but description is non-existent. Some characters appear to have been beaten and whipped while captured, but that was off scene. Sexual: Posy develops a crush on Kyran, of course, and eventually romance blooms between them to the point that they share kisses. It felt a little rushed, and she was only 15, but still that felt kind of realistic too. I really couldn't see them going through this without getting crushes on each other! And personally, I feel that this was the author quietly making fun of all the crushes we girls will get on a guy in a book, but...he's in a book. Not going to work. It's vaguely, vaguely hinted that the king might have had an immoral relationship at one point, but who really knows? Not the reader. Language: None. Spiritual: This allegory paralleling our own messed up world who doesn't even acknowledge the Author anymore is unique and stunning! It beautifully explains the perfect love of allowing choice. Really, really well done! I really enjoyed this book and I look forward to whatever else the author has to offer. More centaurs, please! ;)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    This book is basically what would happen if Narnia turned into a romance story. I would recommend it to anyone who loves the Narnia world but wishes there was just a bit more romance in it. The best points: 1: An easy to read narrative, flowing and smooth, with brief descriptions of sets that nonetheless create instant mental pictures. 2: A general lack of gore and tacky violence. 3: A surprisingly interesting love story. The romance element served to mirror the romantic fantasies of teenage girl This book is basically what would happen if Narnia turned into a romance story. I would recommend it to anyone who loves the Narnia world but wishes there was just a bit more romance in it. The best points: 1: An easy to read narrative, flowing and smooth, with brief descriptions of sets that nonetheless create instant mental pictures. 2: A general lack of gore and tacky violence. 3: A surprisingly interesting love story. The romance element served to mirror the romantic fantasies of teenage girls--without allowing the hero to become too unbelievable. Kyran was a dashing prince and very handsome, but not faultless--he has a weakness for mermaids, among other things. ;) You get the feeling this Kyran guy is the glorious fantasy version of the guy Posy will actually end up with in real life. The ending scene of the book where she runs into an ordinary guy in the library was a cute touch. 4: An effort on the author's part to show Posy learning to be more mature--for instance, when she figures out maybe she was judging her parents too severely. 5: The story actually had a point. All the fantasy creatures and dramatic adventures were illustrations of real life ideas. This reminded me of C.S. Lewis. The weak points: There are very few. But I will name them here for purposes of honesty. 1: Posy asks the queen early on in the story to help her, only to find out the queen is on the side of her husband, the evil king, and is also an enemy. I thought this oddly stupid on Posy's part. 2: The queen is never shown in much depth and would have been a rather cheap character if the author hadn't tried at the end of the book to give her a more rounded point of view. As it was, I never found her to be real. 3: The centaurs were nice, but not as interesting as they could have been. Maybe I'm just not wildly into centaurs anyway. To wrap it up, the author is talented and the book was like a fun movie. I will definitely read her next book. :)

  12. 5 out of 5

    J.L. Mbewe

    I enjoyed the story, it kept me turning pages, and I loved the creativity of it. But trying to hold the concept of Posy in the book dealing with the Plot, Author, Kingdom, and Characters and all them hoping for a reader to come by and read it was something I had to really work at keeping the suspension of disbelief. That said, if I didn’t try to understand it too much, it worked fine. The concept, I’ve not seen done before, and I’m curious as to the story behind the story, and if the author has I enjoyed the story, it kept me turning pages, and I loved the creativity of it. But trying to hold the concept of Posy in the book dealing with the Plot, Author, Kingdom, and Characters and all them hoping for a reader to come by and read it was something I had to really work at keeping the suspension of disbelief. That said, if I didn’t try to understand it too much, it worked fine. The concept, I’ve not seen done before, and I’m curious as to the story behind the story, and if the author has plans for other works set in this story world. Entering the story, I felt a bit disoriented like Posy, which, I think was intentional. But at the same time I would have liked to have known a bit of Posy’s world, the heartache, the arguing, etc. to make it feel more real. I didn’t really connect with her like I could have if I had experienced what drove Posy to the library. So there is a bit of accepting what we are told, which I think is typical of allegory and in line with what the author was intending to accomplish. While I was reading, I was nervous about how the story would end. We know Posy will have to return to her world, right? So how will the author handle this bit of romance brewing between her and one of the characters? That said, I was pleasantly satisfied with the ending. And this is coming from someone who hates sad endings. Not that it was sad, but you know she couldn’t stay in the book forever. There is allegory here, sometimes obvious, sometimes not. There’s a good message of mercy and forgiveness. A bit of clean romance. A nice read for young adults. Although, the writing at times felt more like middle grade. But this is coming from someone who writes for older teens to adults. My favorite part was when they entered the Glooming and faced the obstacles there. LOVED that part. Don’t want to give too much away! So if you love allegory, definitely check it out! *I received an ARC in exchange for my review.*

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah Gyger

    Word Changers deals with an interesting premise, that characters live in there books and have their own lives, but come to reenact the Plot of there book when a reader appears. Posy is just one such reader, but this time she enters the story as well. I enjoyed Ashlee's premise and the allegory she portrays. It is fascinating that the characters might be living in their books (and makes me afraid to read any of my favorites where the characters dies for fear of hurting the characters ). Yet there Word Changers deals with an interesting premise, that characters live in there books and have their own lives, but come to reenact the Plot of there book when a reader appears. Posy is just one such reader, but this time she enters the story as well. I enjoyed Ashlee's premise and the allegory she portrays. It is fascinating that the characters might be living in their books (and makes me afraid to read any of my favorites where the characters dies for fear of hurting the characters ). Yet there were some things I felt I was supposed to just except, like the fact that no one would say what was going on in the beginning. It frustrates me when characters are evasive. Still, the story was original and a great read for anyone who loves stories with a fairy tail feel and allegory. I was given this book in exchange for an honest review.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lara Mi

    “I suppose I will have to find a way to save your life, then, if such an embrace is to be the reward for it.” With her parents in constant argument, Posy tries to spend most of her time at the library - away from home. At a moment of particular anger and wishing herself away, she finds herself waking in the mysterious book she had just taken from the shelf. As the plot becomes the reality around her, she learns that the story's princess has run away and that Posy is the intended stand-in. It d “I suppose I will have to find a way to save your life, then, if such an embrace is to be the reward for it.” With her parents in constant argument, Posy tries to spend most of her time at the library - away from home. At a moment of particular anger and wishing herself away, she finds herself waking in the mysterious book she had just taken from the shelf. As the plot becomes the reality around her, she learns that the story's princess has run away and that Posy is the intended stand-in. It doesn't take Posy long to realise that things aren't what they ought to be and beckons the question why the real princess ran away in the first place. Together with Prince Kyran, she sets out to find the runaway Princess and save the plot along the way. The Word Changers is, to an extent, your typical portal fantasy in that it sends someone from the real world into a fictional one, with the result that their adventures will also help them come to terms with their real-life problems. In that sense, this book truly follows that formula (no complaints, though, that's what I love about portal fantasy!), but it still finds uniqueness in the way it is told. The story becomes quite unexpectedly dark - even though Posy finds quite early on that she is in a dark fairy tale, it feels pretty upbeat during the early chapters which made it all the more surprising when it took a dark turn. A lot of the conflict is focused on emotional rather than physical pain. Even most of their trials and obstacles along the way require the characters to grow their inner strength instead of combat. This fairy tale world includes a lot of the creatures you'd expect to find in fantasy and fairy tales; talking animals, centaurs, mermaids, princes and princesses and creatures that appear to be made of leaf and earth. Despite these familiar elements, Ashlee Willis delivers something that makes this world very intriguing and lets it stand out from others of its kind. It helps that the characters - both good and evil - are very well written. Posy is a well-rounded character who one can easily relate to and root for. Prince Kyran was perfect, he was essentially a Prince Charming with personality. He'd have his moments of stubbornness and arrogance, but he was a true gentleman in a fairytale fashion. He and Posy had a bit of a rough start and they'd quarrel now and again, but he proved to be incredibly thoughtful, brave and loyal companion. With his helping her on and off the horse, the kiss to the hand... he gave the story a traditional touch while still having a more developed personality than most. While I adored these characters and their world from the first page to the last, I still found this book lacking. There was quite a bit of mystery build up and many hints of characters' wrongdoings and motives. I love a good build up like that and try to guess along the way, yet I felt that most of these things were left unexplored. There were many questions left open; what were the villains' motives? They all seemed to be goading each other, but where did the conflict start? What is the true story of the plot? What were the sacrifices for? Several of these questions were covered but the answers felt a bit too vague. Like, they did it out of jealousy and bitterness - but what was the cause for their jealousy? What made them bitter? There's always talk of the true plot but, while I have a vague idea of what it was meant to be, I don't feel satisfied with the explanation - especially given how much was hinted and that there had been changes to the plot before. So I was really disappointed in all of that but it did not take away from how great the world and characters were.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey Bryant

    “Sometimes reality was too solid and too hard, and … perhaps the clearest and straightest way to truth was through a fairytale.” The Word Changers delved into a subject I’ve pondered for all my mature reading years … the Christian allegory of authors and their characters. Ashlee Willis did a thorough job of exploring the way stories reflect life and the relationship between God and ourselves. But it was more than thorough—it was engaging and enjoyable! I really liked the writing—it had a lyrical “Sometimes reality was too solid and too hard, and … perhaps the clearest and straightest way to truth was through a fairytale.” The Word Changers delved into a subject I’ve pondered for all my mature reading years … the Christian allegory of authors and their characters. Ashlee Willis did a thorough job of exploring the way stories reflect life and the relationship between God and ourselves. But it was more than thorough—it was engaging and enjoyable! I really liked the writing—it had a lyrical, fairytale quality to it, yet with enough of a modern touch to make it fast-paced. At the beginning, I found the confusion over what exactly “the plot” was and the other mysteries—such as what happened to the princess, who could be trusted, and so forth—to be necessary but a little slow (which is odd, because I usually like thought in fiction; maybe because there wasn’t enough action to precede it? Maybe because I could never quite understand it myself?). However, the mystery of the owl Falak did engage me; he was a most fascinating character, because you could never guess what he would do next. I wish the castle where the MC Posy spent her time at the beginning had been described more. The relationship between Prince Kyran and Posy took me a little while to get used to and appreciate. But once the two of them entered the Wild Lands and then the Glooming, and all sorts of unpredictable and unprecedented things happened, my interest in everything picked up. I think overall this book had a great blend of thought and action, depth and novelty. Posy was relatable, especially as a character with questions about life—and a great love of books! The ending seemed perfect to me, if a little sad; it wrapped up the story satisfactorily but at the same time promised more, leaving the future to play out in your mind. A well-written adventure, indeed! My other favorite quotes: “I would not love my characters,” whispered the Author, “if I did not let them live. They must live, though it means making many mistakes.” “I long to see my own characters come to life and make decisions and words of their own. Tell me, what Author doesn’t wish that?” “She had to act on what she knew, on where and whom she was. The Author knew the end, and the characters would get there, but not until they began to do things now to make the pages turn.”

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lisa (Bookworm Lisa)

    I found the idea of the book fascinating. A young girl who has turmoil in her life is suddenly in the book she is reading. Now, I will admit that has always been a fantasy of mine in one level or another. I have been pulled into a story and wished I could be a part of the fictitious world. For Posy, her book world is more of a nightmare. She is to replace a Princess who has run away from the story. The plot rules most of the characters. Every time a reader opens the pages of the book, they act ou I found the idea of the book fascinating. A young girl who has turmoil in her life is suddenly in the book she is reading. Now, I will admit that has always been a fantasy of mine in one level or another. I have been pulled into a story and wished I could be a part of the fictitious world. For Posy, her book world is more of a nightmare. She is to replace a Princess who has run away from the story. The plot rules most of the characters. Every time a reader opens the pages of the book, they act out the sequence of events. Depending on how well they do in their parts, the reader will stay or become disinterested with the plot. Posy quickly finds that the plot and kingdom are in tatters. The Princess has left because she wants to rid her people of the evil that has invaded the story. Posy and the Prince, Kyran, leave on a quest to find the missing Princess and alter the story they are living. I enjoyed the enlightening process that Posy underwent. She grew as a person because of her experiences in the Kingdom. She learned life lessons that altered how she viewed life and her expectations of her family and herself. I loved the message about forging your own destiny and not feeling that life has to be endured. The book has a feeling of hope. There is a little romance, but it's not the all encompassing love that are typical of Young Adult books. The love is more about caring about someone else enough to let them grow. It's a great message for youth.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Brent King

    Where better to learn the great themes of life and soul than in a story? We try to learn them through the story we write in the book of our life. Yet often they become clearer to us as we experience them vicariously through a book on our shelf. But what if our participation in this book went beyond our imagination? What if we could enter its pages, breath its air, and change its Plot? With strong metaphors, Ashlee Willis takes us into such an adventure. Life is a story, and Ashlee’s—no, Posy’s—st Where better to learn the great themes of life and soul than in a story? We try to learn them through the story we write in the book of our life. Yet often they become clearer to us as we experience them vicariously through a book on our shelf. But what if our participation in this book went beyond our imagination? What if we could enter its pages, breath its air, and change its Plot? With strong metaphors, Ashlee Willis takes us into such an adventure. Life is a story, and Ashlee’s—no, Posy’s—story is about life. I fell into her story and found within its magic a land like mine, where joy, sadness, and sacrifice shape its pages. Truthfully, there were times when I forgot that I wasn’t there with Posy, experiencing the Mist, the Myths, and Melanthius. The Word Changers reminded me of the second book in The Chronicles of Narnia. Prince Caspian deals with themes of faith, obedience, the cost of discipleship, and God’s silence. The Word Changers speaks to these themes and more in a tale that is fresh and unique. Where better to learn the great themes of life and soul than in a story? And I think Ashlee’s story is a great place to begin.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Laura Grace

    This was such an amazing fantasy novel! It was so good I just have to say that again...this was such an amazing fantasy novel! I instantly bonded with Posy in the beginning and could very easily relate to the many pains in her heart! It was so easy for me to get caught up in her story and boy did I get caught up in it! There was so much action, drama, romance, and of course magic! I really enjoyed the adventures and how the story played out (even if I had tears rolling down my face by the end)! It This was such an amazing fantasy novel! It was so good I just have to say that again...this was such an amazing fantasy novel! I instantly bonded with Posy in the beginning and could very easily relate to the many pains in her heart! It was so easy for me to get caught up in her story and boy did I get caught up in it! There was so much action, drama, romance, and of course magic! I really enjoyed the adventures and how the story played out (even if I had tears rolling down my face by the end)! It was unlike any fantasy novel I have read to say the least and had an amazing message! The mercy and forgiveness that was shown to those who didn't deserve it really made me reflect on my own life choices! I also loved how Ashlee weaved in the Gospel because that in itself was super powerful! "The Word Changers" is definitely going to be a must read every year for me! I was blown away by the message and the overall adventure this story held! Definitely don't miss this one if you love fantasy novels! *(I received this novel from the author in exchange for my honest review! All thoughts expressed are my own and I was not required to write a positive review!)*

  19. 4 out of 5

    JoJo Sutis

    What an amazing, awesome, fun story!!! I absolutely love what the author has done with this book- I feel like it takes the reading experience to a whole new level! What would happen if you could step inside your favorite book? What if you were mistaken for one of the characters? How awesome would that be?!? Well, that’s exactly what happens to main character Posey. I could not stop reading, I had to find out what would happen to these amazing characters. Any fan of fantasy fiction will love The Word Ch What an amazing, awesome, fun story!!! I absolutely love what the author has done with this book- I feel like it takes the reading experience to a whole new level! What would happen if you could step inside your favorite book? What if you were mistaken for one of the characters? How awesome would that be?!? Well, that’s exactly what happens to main character Posey. I could not stop reading, I had to find out what would happen to these amazing characters. Any fan of fantasy fiction will love The Word Changers!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Johnson

    A world she had only ever dreamed about would open her eyes to a world she never knew. What an amazing book! Ashlee does a great job of writing and pulling you into the story with Posy. I didn't get lost once (not that I usually do, but I will admit to getting myself turned around occasionally). The idea of how characters never really die, but are bound to the Plot and come back every time someone opens the book was intriguing. This interaction between Posy and Caris got me thinking: "In my A world she had only ever dreamed about would open her eyes to a world she never knew. What an amazing book! Ashlee does a great job of writing and pulling you into the story with Posy. I didn't get lost once (not that I usually do, but I will admit to getting myself turned around occasionally). The idea of how characters never really die, but are bound to the Plot and come back every time someone opens the book was intriguing. This interaction between Posy and Caris got me thinking: "In my world," said Posy, "authors write stories, and the characters do whatever the author tells them. It's not like this--the characters don't have minds and lives of their own." "How do you know this?" was Caris' surprising reply. The corner of her mouth turned up in a playful smile. "You do not see the characters when the pages of the book are shut. Is there never a time when you read a book for the second time and you notice something that you didn't remember from the first time? Or hear a story told, and every time it is told it grows and changes in the telling? Change is the nature of everything." Caris has a point: how do we truly know that characters we read about don't have minds of their own and the ability to change the story every time it's read? (Just a little fanciful pondering, but I mean, come on, how do we really know?) Character-wise, I was very impressed. Posy was determined to figure out what was going on and do her best to solve it with as little death/injury as possible. Yes, she did get scared and once or twice gave into despair and tears but she got over those (with a little help) and pushed forward. There were a couple times were she made the wrong choice given the situation, but hey, we all do that every so often. Kyran was great too, at points immature and a total boy and at other points, wise beyond his years. Ashlee did a good job essentially masking the true villain. Every time I thought I'd finally figured out who the bad guy was, something would happen and it would turn out that someone else was pulling the strings. I guess I shouldn't say it that way...there were several "bad" guys through the story, but I think there were only a couple actual villains. The so-called bad guys seemed like they were doing what they were doing because they were comparatively weak-willed and were led to believe the path the were on was the only way to change things. I did like how the villains all thought they were exerting influence and control on someone while it was really the other way around or even not at all. Overall this book does a good job of toning down the violence that's become so prevalent today. Don't get me wrong, once in awhile I enjoy a good knock-down, drag-out fight (with & without excess...descriptions) as much as the next person but sometimes it's nice to read about it without actually reading about it. Let me explain. Yes, there were a couple battles, but for the most part it was described with things like "searching to make sure Kyran was safe" and "she leaned out of her tree to be sick", etc, etc. There was a point where you got a little more gritty/dirty and Posy took a sword from a dead man to help Kyran, but that was really the extent of the gore. There was also evidence of what looked like beatings/torture, but the events physically took place "backstage" so to speak. In the romance department, there was some but not really that much. I will admit that I felt that Kyran and Posy rushed into the whole "I love you, you know that right?" thing, but the flip side of that is they both knew that they only had a small amount of time together. They were very sweet together (once they actually admitted their love). This book portrayed the characters as being fed up with being stuck in the same rut of the Plot and wanting to change it because they believed the Author to be a myth. I think that's a very accurate portrayal of people today and their faith with God. I've said this many times before, I have a relationship with God but it's nowhere near what it could be. However I know people who are just like the characters in the book; they think he doesn't exist because they never see him. "I wrote you, you are mine," it continued, its voice as hard as its diamond eyes. "But I do not write everything you do and think. I do not write every decision you make. Not because I cannot--but because I will not. Perhaps someday, when you are a father, Prince, you will understand how empty is your heart if your child is a hollow toy that you can move where you will him to be. This is exactly how God is for us but I think so many people have lost sight of that fact. God (the Author) wrote us and we belong to him, but he also gave us the ability to choose our path. That means that he occasionally has to watch as we take the path that turns us from him. But he allows us to make that choice because without it, we would just be hollow husks. Congratulations to Ashlee Willis on a wonderfully amazing debut novel! Many thanks to Ashlee and Conquest Publishing for providing me with a free copy in exchange for my review!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    Recommended for: Teens The Word Changers was an interesting fantasy story with an intriguing premise: People in books are real. Posy, a girl from the real world, replaces the missing princess Evanthe in the Plot of a book, but she finds that much more than a missing princess is afoot. Posy and Evanthe's brother Kyran go on a quest to find Evanthe, and discover what has really happened to the Plot along the way. I did enjoy this book, but unfortunately it did not jump onto my extensive favorites l Recommended for: Teens The Word Changers was an interesting fantasy story with an intriguing premise: People in books are real. Posy, a girl from the real world, replaces the missing princess Evanthe in the Plot of a book, but she finds that much more than a missing princess is afoot. Posy and Evanthe's brother Kyran go on a quest to find Evanthe, and discover what has really happened to the Plot along the way. I did enjoy this book, but unfortunately it did not jump onto my extensive favorites list. Writing: 4/5 The Word Changers is fairly well written. While it didn't ever become a page turner for me, I was never jerked out of the story by poor writing. Descriptions were pretty good and emotions were described well. The writing wasn't anything extraordinary, but it was pretty good. Setting: 4/5 It's a fantasy world within a book. It has mythical creatures like centaurs, talking animals and a magical mist that tells Posy what to do, which was kind of cool. It was a little difficult to get used to talking owls outside of Narnia. It seemed a little out of place in a young adult book, but the owls were crucial to the plot. I wasn't terribly intrigued by the setting within the kingdom, but I did really like the Glooming. It was an interesting place, and full of different tests Posy and Kyran had to get through to make it to Evanthe. I don't want to give the Glooming away, but I thought it the best part of the book. Plot: 3/5 I'm divided on this. Part of the plot I liked and part of it I didn't. I'll start with the part I liked: the adventure. There was quite a bit of it, as Posy and Kyran set out to find Evanthe, and got involved in starting a fight for the True Plot against the king. And again, I liked the stuff within the Glooming. It kept reminding me of things from many of my favorite books, but in a new way. I also did like when they met the Author and learned about him writing their story. I usually appreciate writing based allegory. Now, what I didn't like: the romance. I'm not against a romance subplot, I rather like them, but this one never worked for me. What I love about the romance in Molly Evangeline's books is how the relationship is built on God and friendship. In The Word Changers, it seems to be built on that she's a teenage girl, and he's a handsome guy, and doesn't all YA need a little romance? When Posy first met Kyran, she hated him, but then, next time, when they were setting out on their journey to find Evanthe, she seemed to be falling for him simply because he was a guy. Not that Kyran was bad, he is a pretty good character, it's just that's not why she falls for him. The feeling is returned, but still, it seems to be for no other reason than because the book "needed" a romance. There are a couple of kisses between them, which I didn't feel were necessary. I think the book would have been better if the author hadn't tried to force in a romance. Character Development: 3/5 Posy and Kyran were fairly well developed, but I never really connected with either of them. I did like how it was difficult to figure out whose side Falak the owl was really on. Also, the side the king and queen were on was difficult to discern, which was a good thing. The lesser characters were a little difficult to keep track of, and not very distinct. They did behave like typical book characters, but again, I didn't connect to them. All in all, The Word Changers was a pretty good book built around an intriguing concept. Though I don't count it as a favorite, I did enjoy it. I received a free ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. The opinions expressed are my own.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Faye

    Posey’s world is falling apart, her parents are separating, and there is nothing she can do about it. So she escapes into the pages of a book finding herself lost in the plot in a way that she never could have ever imagined! Pulled into the story’s plot by Falak, an owl who is not all that he seems, Posey is forced to take on the role of the princess, dutifully playing her role. But all is far from right in the kingdom, and some have seen fit to take its plot into their own hands, can Posey and Posey’s world is falling apart, her parents are separating, and there is nothing she can do about it. So she escapes into the pages of a book finding herself lost in the plot in a way that she never could have ever imagined! Pulled into the story’s plot by Falak, an owl who is not all that he seems, Posey is forced to take on the role of the princess, dutifully playing her role. But all is far from right in the kingdom, and some have seen fit to take its plot into their own hands, can Posey and her new friend Kyran rescue the kingdom from a plot that has strayed from its Author? What a delightful twist on the classic fairy tales! I loved the premise behind this story; that a girl actually get swept away into the book that she is reading. Isn’t that just every reader’s dream? Posey is a bright and inquisitive girl, unafraid to ask the questions that others fear. She is also discerning, as well as adventurous. Kyran was a straightforward, yet at times mysterious hero, who coped remarkably well with the revelations that were thrown his way. Overall, this was a fun read full of adventure, and I believe it would be especially great for ages 9-14. There was adventure, mystery, tough choices to make, and mystical animals such as centaurs, mermaids, talking owls, and more. Ms. Willis did and absolutely wonderful job with this allegory of God’s ever-present, never ending love, as well as His sovereignty and our free will. A terrific book for middle grade readers, as well as families, who share a love of reading, and dream of joining their heroes within the pages of a book. Thanks to the author for sharing a review copy with me in return for an honest review!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Grace Mullins

    This story follows the adventure of Posy, an inwardly hurting girl who finds herself in a fairy tale book. I've thought of how cool a story where someone is transported into a book world would be (especially to us bookworms), so what fun to find that a book was releasing with this idea. My over all opinion of "The Word Changers" is that it is a sweet fantasy read with some good underlying messages of forgiveness and not blaming others for everything wrong in your life. I loved how it had quite a This story follows the adventure of Posy, an inwardly hurting girl who finds herself in a fairy tale book. I've thought of how cool a story where someone is transported into a book world would be (especially to us bookworms), so what fun to find that a book was releasing with this idea. My over all opinion of "The Word Changers" is that it is a sweet fantasy read with some good underlying messages of forgiveness and not blaming others for everything wrong in your life. I loved how it had quite a few fantastical creatures (talking owls, centaurs, and even mermaids). I did not always see things coming in it, so it wasn't every predictable ( unexpected plot twists can be such fun!). My biggest problem with the story is that I found it seemed somewhat rushed at times. But that's not an issue worth putting down this book, because this book does deserve praise. If you'll forgive the pun- the plot of this story is well done. I found it original and could tell there was a lot thought put into it. And, to me, it had the closest essence of being Narnia-like than any other book that I've read in awhile. If you enjoy a fascinating, clean read, then I think "The Word Changers" is a book you just might want to pick up this summer. I give it a rating of four, and I recommend it. *With thanks to the publisher and author for a free e-ARC of the book in exchange for my honest review. I was not required to write a positive review.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Grace Mullins

    This story follows the adventure of Posy, an inwardly hurting girl who finds herself in a fairy tale book. I've thought of how cool a story where someone is transported into a book world would be (especially to us bookworms), so what fun to find that a book was releasing with this idea. My over all opinion of "The Word Changers" is that it is a sweet fantasy read with some good underlying messages of forgiveness and not blaming others for everything wrong in your life. I loved how it had quite a This story follows the adventure of Posy, an inwardly hurting girl who finds herself in a fairy tale book. I've thought of how cool a story where someone is transported into a book world would be (especially to us bookworms), so what fun to find that a book was releasing with this idea. My over all opinion of "The Word Changers" is that it is a sweet fantasy read with some good underlying messages of forgiveness and not blaming others for everything wrong in your life. I loved how it had quite a few fantastical creatures (talking owls, centaurs, and even mermaids!). I did not always see things coming in it, so it wasn't very predictable (unexpected plot twists can be such fun!). My biggest problem with the story is that I found it seemed somewhat rushed at times. But that's not an issue worth putting down this book, because this book does deserve praise. If you'll forgive the pun- the plot of this story is well done. I found it original and could tell there was a lot thought put into it. And, to me, it had the closest essence of being Narnia-like than any other book that I've read in awhile. If you enjoy a fascinating, clean read, then I think "The Word Changers" is a book you just might want to pick up and give a try. I give it a rating of three and a half, and I recommend it. You may want to know- There is violence, kissing, and magic.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Hayden

    The plot was original and fascinating. I don’t think I’ve ever read a book quite like it, and I really enjoyed it. This book had many intriguing characters- ones whose goals and ambitions were often a mystery. Who was trustworthy, and who wasn’t? I’ve read other books like this where that plot device was annoying, but it was handled well here and I really liked it. The only thing I didn’t care for was the romance, since it involved a few kisses and seemed almost out of place in regards to everyth The plot was original and fascinating. I don’t think I’ve ever read a book quite like it, and I really enjoyed it. This book had many intriguing characters- ones whose goals and ambitions were often a mystery. Who was trustworthy, and who wasn’t? I’ve read other books like this where that plot device was annoying, but it was handled well here and I really liked it. The only thing I didn’t care for was the romance, since it involved a few kisses and seemed almost out of place in regards to everything in the rest of the book. Still, overall, this was one I enjoyed much more than I was expecting to! It had a lot of different types of characters -owls, mermaids, centaurs- and normally that type of fantasy can confuse me, but this book was easy for me to read, and that’s something I definitely appreciated! Recommended to anyone who’s looking for a clean fantasy book with allegorical meanings. I received this book for free from the author in exchange for my honest review.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Savannah Kundo

    I received a copy of "The Word Changers" from GoodReads First Reads. Have you ever wanted to enter into the world of your favorite book? That's exactly what happens to Posy in "The Word Changers," though she quickly discovers that she's entered into more of a nightmare world that her greatest fantasy. When she arrives in The Plot, she finds that she is to replace the runaway princess - who does not have the ideal role in The Plot. Soon, Posy is taken on a dangerous, yet exciting, journey through I received a copy of "The Word Changers" from GoodReads First Reads. Have you ever wanted to enter into the world of your favorite book? That's exactly what happens to Posy in "The Word Changers," though she quickly discovers that she's entered into more of a nightmare world that her greatest fantasy. When she arrives in The Plot, she finds that she is to replace the runaway princess - who does not have the ideal role in The Plot. Soon, Posy is taken on a dangerous, yet exciting, journey through the outer lands of the kingdom, where she encounters centaurs and mermaids, to rescue the princess, all with Prince Kyran by her side. I was pleasantly surprised by how wonderful this novel is! This is the type of book that will keep you up much later than you should because you HAVE to find out what happens. The world Ashlee has created in The Word Changers is incredibly intriguing. I love the idea of transporting a reader into a story, too. Great novel!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten

    http://kiribeth.blogspot.com/2014/06/... This book is right up there with some of the top fantasy, and it's a must-read for anyone who has ever called himself a fan of Narnia. Posy hates her life, with her parents always bickering, always fighting. One night when her own temper gets the better of her, she flees to a nearby library, intending to get lost in a book to hide from her problems for a while. And boy, does she get lost IN a book. When she wakes up, she's surrounded by a whole bunch of peo http://kiribeth.blogspot.com/2014/06/... This book is right up there with some of the top fantasy, and it's a must-read for anyone who has ever called himself a fan of Narnia. Posy hates her life, with her parents always bickering, always fighting. One night when her own temper gets the better of her, she flees to a nearby library, intending to get lost in a book to hide from her problems for a while. And boy, does she get lost IN a book. When she wakes up, she's surrounded by a whole bunch of people she doesn't know -- people who tell her that she is the Princess Evanthe. Even the owl in the corner treats her like the princess. Yet, she knows, just as they know, that she is not Evanthe. No, she is only Evanthe's replacement -- a girl called into a story so that the Plot would not be messed up. And what happened to Evanthe? Why, she ran away! It's going to take Posy's teaming up with the young Prince Kyran (a boy with whom she did not have a satisfactory first meeting) to go out beyond the Borders of the story to find the missing princess and bring her back. Of course, that's just the beginning of the story. If I were to give you more, I'd be sunk in spoilers. Personally, I really enjoyed this book. I love the idea of characters being alive, doing things, living between the times readers pull their story off a shelf. Have you ever wondered why bits of a story seem different the second time you read a book? That's because the characters might not have acted it out exactly the same way as the first time you read it. And the whole theme of being word changers, someone who had the power to change the words within a story... from within the story. Amazing! The characters themselves I found very unique for a fantasy. With these types of books, authors tend to stick cliche characters into their works, yet Ashlee Willis didn't. The prince was dashing, yet not perfect. The heroine struggled with emotions that linked her both to the story-world and her own. The owls were not typical of owls anywhere that I've read. Beginning the book, I got a deep sense of deja vu -- someone from our world called into a fantasy where they team up with an individual from that world to find missing royalty at the request of owls. "It's The Silver Chair all over again," I thought, but I was wrong. While this has elements that reminded me of Narnia, there's so much... more, for a lack of a better word. It was just a smashing read. And yes, I was glued to the pages and I finished it all in one day. Advisory: Just some of your usual fantasy violence. As certain characters let loose their evil intentions, others stray from the Plot, fights and battles ensue. Centaurs, ipotanes (centaurs with only two legs), mermaids, owls, and men fight and are killed/injured. Nothing is overly graphic, though, so I'd recommend this book for readers twelve and up. At one point, Posy looks into a mirror and notices her curves. While remaining clean, I found those paragraphs to be a bit awkward and would have preferred them left out. The author also later describes a mermaid -- again, clean, but just something to take note of. Also, since it is a big part of the story, I need to mention it here: the romance angle. While I thought on the whole it was a sweet romance, I got a little annoyed with the physical aspect of it. The couple shared (if my count was correct) five kisses, and the description of his muscles or their holding hands (or other physical contact) I didn't like. *Please note: I received a copy of this book from the author/publisher in exchange for my honest review.*

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jansina

    The description of the story had me intrigued; the first chapter had me hooked. Posy finds herself drawn into a book - literally. For a book lover like myself, this is the perfect plot. Following that, throughout the book there are references to words, pages, margins, and other book-related terms. The word play around these is delightful. The author has a writing style that is creative and flows naturally. It never felt either too simple or too complex. There were very a few grammar mistakes in t The description of the story had me intrigued; the first chapter had me hooked. Posy finds herself drawn into a book - literally. For a book lover like myself, this is the perfect plot. Following that, throughout the book there are references to words, pages, margins, and other book-related terms. The word play around these is delightful. The author has a writing style that is creative and flows naturally. It never felt either too simple or too complex. There were very a few grammar mistakes in the book, but they were minimal (i.e., "Oh." The king said. It should be "Oh," the king said.) As an editor, I'm nit-picky, but they didn't trip me up as I was reading and there were only a few instances. (I actually debated mentioning them here - especially since, as I was given a pre-release copy, they may have been caught and fixed already.) For the most part, the characters are unique and believable. Posy has a mixture of faults and positive traits, and felt easiest to relate to. Our situations may not be the same, but the feelings behind them are. The other characters are a mixture of believable and slightly flat (meaning, mainly good traits or mainly bad traits). There weren't any that stuck out to me as a problem, but some that could have been fleshed out much more. The way the story is written, though - mainly from Posy's perspective - there wasn't much chance of that and the author did a good job with the characters that were shown more. I did feel the change in Kyran was a little too abrupt, however it worked within the plot. The romance was sweet, but I'm honestly not sure how I feel about it. I'm a hopeful romantic, so it definitely didn't bother me - aside from their ages. (Okay, as older teens, romance is natural, but I prefer it when characters are older. Old fashioned? Perhaps.) Near the end it started to bother me for a different reason, but I won't say more to avoid spoilers. The overall plot is imaginative and kept my interest. The story begins almost immediately, and it brings the reader right into it, in the same way Posy is brought into the book. There is adventure and pain, goodness and mercy, evil and joy. Other reviewers have called this an allegory, and it is one. The similarities to Christianity came through clearly even at the beginning of the book, but especially as it nears the end. From the perspective of a Christian, it wasn't preachy or overdone, and it was great to see the Truths throughout the book. More than once, I had to stop and reread a sentence to truly take it in and commit it to memory. The wording is that beautiful. There is magic throughout the book. Magic brought Posy to the story, and magic guides many things within it. Although I am sometimes against magic in books, it didn't bother me in this one. I think the reason it didn't is because it wasn't shown as a positive thing. It wasn't necessarily shown as a negative one, either; it was just there. Ashlee Willis is a talented author and I look forward to her next books. Although this book wraps up naturally and works well as a standalone, I would love a sequel! --- I was given a copy of the book in exchange for this unbiased review.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elisabeth

    I was expecting a enchanted, slightly dark fairy tale, but oh was I wrong. So, the story is about fifteen year old Posy who escapes to the library to get a break from her fighting parents. She finds a strange book that she's never seen before and when she opens it she gets sucked into the story. Everything becomes black, and she gets a feeling like she's falling. When she wakes up she is lying in a bed, surrounded by unfamiliar people calling her princess . Posy soon learns that she has been br I was expecting a enchanted, slightly dark fairy tale, but oh was I wrong. So, the story is about fifteen year old Posy who escapes to the library to get a break from her fighting parents. She finds a strange book that she's never seen before and when she opens it she gets sucked into the story. Everything becomes black, and she gets a feeling like she's falling. When she wakes up she is lying in a bed, surrounded by unfamiliar people calling her princess . Posy soon learns that she has been brought to the story to replace the real princess, Evanthe, who has gone missing, so that the Plot, that every character has to follow, can go on without any distubances. Because if the Plot is changed imbalance will occur in the Kingdom. After a while Posy gets to know the real reason why the princess ran away. Apparently the princess story ends with her being sacrificed every time a reader reads the book and because you can't truly die when your in the Plot the princess has to die over and over again. Posy now realises the horrible fate that awaits her and with some help she escapes the castle and together with the prince, Kyran, she goes on a quest beyond the Borders of the Plot to find the princess and maybe even the Author of the book, who everyone thinks had abandoned them. The concept of the book was really original and unique but other than that this is one of the most frustrating books I've ever read, and I had to take breaks while reading it so I wouldn't throw it in the wall. My main reasons for not liking it was: 1. The characters. I didn't connect at all with Posey. I found her really annoying. She always needed help and was never able to do anything by herself. She always needed someone ( Kyran) to save her/reassure her that she was going to be safe. She started crying so often that I lost count of how many times it happened. On top of all of this I got really angry at her because she was very fast to call others cowards while she herself wasn't any better. And where was Posey's 'dark' secret that was promised on the back cover??? 2. The romance between Posey and Kyran. In the beginning Kyran dislikes Posey but only a few chapters later she is mistaken for his wife! HIS WIFE! Because apparently the way he looks at Posey isn't the way a "brother" would look at his "sister". LIKE WHAT?! The romance was just way to fast to my taste and overall made me cringe. 3. The way the book portrayed women. Trough out the book there were lots of things that somehow suggested that men were stronger than women, that men were supposed to go out fighting while women should stay safe and hidden. There was especially this one line that made me really mad: But the man only shook his head and said. his voice disapproving, " I'd never have thought the prince was so desperate as to employ women in his army. A shame is what it is." And what made me even angrier was that Posey didn't even seem to notice. I'm really dissapointed, because thanks to the original concept it could have been quite an amazing book, but it wasn't.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Camilla Cruz

    Whenever I read a book, I first have to consider if it is striking me as true to the category in which it is in. Word Changers certainly is a Young Adult Christian Fantasy, and it is an asset to the genre. It's an allegory of faith, hope, redemption, forgiveness, and love, amongst other things. Certain parts felt like parables. While it is a Christian Fantasy, there was no "preachiness" (I say that for the benefit of those who feel that is important.). There is a Narnia-like element to it, but i Whenever I read a book, I first have to consider if it is striking me as true to the category in which it is in. Word Changers certainly is a Young Adult Christian Fantasy, and it is an asset to the genre. It's an allegory of faith, hope, redemption, forgiveness, and love, amongst other things. Certain parts felt like parables. While it is a Christian Fantasy, there was no "preachiness" (I say that for the benefit of those who feel that is important.). There is a Narnia-like element to it, but is a completely different story. I am quite pleased with how unique it is, and how it was pulled off. I felt like the author was learning as she wrote, like Posy poured from her fingers by deeper inspiration than herself. It caught me off guard, actually, because I got sucked in with Posy and the other characters. I could "see" what Posy was seeing. I could "feel" the insecurities, the fear, the inner stretching of the characters as they battled their weaknesses and their enemies, as they discovered their strengths, as they were forced to truly "see" themselves and grow. It was hard for me to "witness" so many negative role models in Posy's life; and it became even more challenging when it became apparent that Prince Kyran also had few positive mentors or support. But, I LOVE the elements of redemptive love, the clear explanation of grace and mercy. I love the definite message of hope even in the midst of seemingly unending trials and danger. I was blessed by the subtle and firm messages of encouragement and promptings to be brave. There were some really neat situations, too! Word Changers was well written, flowed well, and is a unique adventure. Some parts that seemed to be more "vague" in there explanations were not a problem for me, as I naturally filled in the blanks in my imagination. It was easy to do since I became thoroughly involved. It was not always easy to determine what would happen next, lots of surprises to keep things going. I did have a hard time with Posy being able to get around as she did with a leg injury. (that is the only spoiler you'll get from me.) I look forward to sharing this with my older kids soon. I think that for any negative aspects, such as negative role models, the book has innumerable valuable lessons to share. I think it could really speak to a kid dealing with tough family issues. Or a kid who is just dealing with the crazy emotions and changes of growing up. It could encourage that wounded heart to open up to some very important points to consider. It is worth reading. Loved this allegorical adventure fantasy. Thank you.

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